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Old December 19th, 2010, 06:14 AM   #2021
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Completely revamped signage at Odakyū Shinjuku Station

Recently, Odakyū completely redesigned all of their signage at Shinjuku Station. Almost everything, including mintue details, is now in Japanese and foreign languages.

Some pics:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Departure board for Platforms 4 and 5 (for rapid express, express, and semi-express trains) is an LED + lamp unit. It's rare to see five rows on display, although this is for two platforms at an extremely busy station. The lamp display is new and shows all the way up to Hakone Yumoto, a major tourist destination.

16:11 10-car express for Katase Enoshima on the Odakyū Enoshima Line
16:18 10-car rapid express for Odawara on the Odakyū Odawara Line
16:29 10-car rapid express for Fujisawa on the Odakyū Enoshima Line
16:31 10-car express for Odawara
16:41 10-car express for Odawara



Departure board for underground platforms 8 and 9 (for section semi-express and local trains). Since this is mostly for local services, there is no need for the lamp display to show stops.
16:21 8-car section semi-express for Karakida on the Odakyū Tama Line
16:23 8-car local for Hon-Atsugi on the Odakyū Odawara Line
16:33 8-car local for Hon-Atsugi



Platform information board. Odakyū appears to have one-upped the other railway operators and now has signs like these in five languages (Japanese, English, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, and Korean). Even the note at the upper left directing passengesr to Platforms 8 and 9 for section semi-express and local trains is translated into all five languages. The services are all color-coded as well.





Vertical route map on the ground-level platforms



Vertical route map on the underground platforms



Even small details like this are in all five languages. I think this is probably too much for smaller stations, but for a major terminal like Odakyū Shinjuku Station, which is a gateway to Hakone for foreign tourists, this seems appropriate.

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Old December 19th, 2010, 06:15 AM   #2022
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More pics of the Tōkyō Metro 16000 series: Part 1

A small series shot at the open house at Ayase Car Yard in Adachi Ward, Tōkyō Prefecture on 2010.11.28:
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

Lined up next to a 06 series (really, "the" 06 series as there is only one of this train in existence). The beltline on the 06 series features blue, but this has been replaced with a lime green on the 16000 series.









16013 on display



For some reason, a 60000 series MSE model was placed at the bottom (?)



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Old December 19th, 2010, 06:16 AM   #2023
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More pics of the Tōkyō Metro 16000 series: Part 2

Bolsterless bogies



Brake controls are manufactured by Mitsubishi.



VVVF drive is manufactured by Tōshiba.



One-handle throttle on the left side, the standard design



Interior is quite different from the 10000 series and actually looks somewhat similar to the "egg train" Seibu 30000 series



The trains are already in service, so ads have already been placed all up and down the interior.



Seat comfort is improved... If I remember correctly, this was one of the complaints about the 10000 series.



Seat partitions

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Old December 19th, 2010, 06:16 AM   #2024
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Miscellaneous news items from the Tōkyō area

Just a few videos of some smaller news items in the Tōkyō area.
Source: karibajct on YouTube

With the schedule changes on 2010.12.04, Keiyō Line rapid trains during the midday period began through-service onto the Sotobō Line between Soga and Kazusa Ichinomiya. Previously, these through-servicing rapid trains only operated during the morning and evening commutes. Some clips of E233 and 209 series trains on these through-services:



Tōkyō Metro 16000 series for the Chiyoda Line debuted in revenue service on 2010.11.04, but since then also began through-service onto the Odakyū Odawara Line / Odakyū Tama Line and JR Jōban Line (local). Here, a 16000 series through-service run arrives at and departs Odakyū Nagayama Station on the Tama Line, bound for Abiko on the Jōban Line on a Tama Express run.



A special open house event was held on 2010.11.14 at Maruyama Depot on the New Shuttle (Saitama New Urban Transit), a rubber-tired guideway line built along parts of the Shinkansen viaduct in Saitama Prefecture. A comprehensive tour of the depot and the trains:



In a bit of holiday spirit, Odakyū, JR East, and Takashimaya teamed up for the annual Shinjuku Terrace City Illumination project, decorating the Southern Terrace area near Shinjuku Station with holiday lights. This is pretty much a tradition now and one of the more popular holiday illumination schemes in Tōkyō.

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Old December 20th, 2010, 06:53 AM   #2025
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Investigative committee to be established to consider nationwide IC farecard interoperability
http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20...82-yom-bus_all

Quote:
JR companies including JR East and JR West and the main private railways in the Greater Tōkyō, Nagoya, Kansai, and Kyūshū regions have finalized a policy directive to launch interoperability of the ten types of IC farecards circulated across all the involved companies.

An investigative committee will be established before the end of the year, aiming for the start of interoperability in the spring of 2013. As long as passengers have at least one of the 10 different IC farecards, they will be able to use it for transit modes when traveling on business or leisure, drastically improving convenience.

The basic technological specifications of the IC farecard systems are the same, and if the circulating companies or groups make agreements, the cards can be used across systems. However, as system improvement costs are required for every participating railroad or bus operator, a portion of small-scale bus operators have been less than enthusiastic about interoperability. However, with the spread of IC farecards, the various companies have determined that it is no longer possible to avoid the issue if they want to further improve passenger convenience.

Interoperability is currently being carried out among a portion of JR companies, centering around JR East. In addition, interoperability within metropolitan areas has also been implemented. In the Greater Tōkyō area, the PASMO card (issued by private railways and bus companies) and JR East's Suica card are interoperable, while in the Kansai area, JR West's ICOCA card and the PiTaPa card used on private railways and other operators are also interoperable.

If interoperability can be achieved among the 10 IC farecards, the PASMO card, for example—currently not accepted outside of private railways and buses in the Greater Tōkyō area and on JR East—would be valid for use with each of the JR companies (JR Hokkaidō, JR Central, JR West, JR Kyūshū) as well as Kansai private railways and other operators. However, JR Shikoku has not introduced an IC farecard system, and there are no railway companies from Shikoku planning to participate in the investigative committee.
More movementon the IC farecard front... It's probably taken a bit longer than might have been desired because the process has been an entirely private-sector undertaking (no support from the government) and the complexity / scope of the systems involved, but it seems it may only be a few years before we could see a system that allows nationwide interoperability of IC cards. Based on the information in the article, the subject card systems would appear to be the following:
  • Kitaca (JR Hokkaidō)
  • Suica (JR East)
  • PASMO (Greater Tōkyō area private railways, Tōkyō Metro, Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation)
  • TOICA (JR Central)
  • manaca (Nagoya area private railways, Nagoya Municipal Transportation Bureau)
  • ICOCA (JR West)
  • PiTaPa (Kansai area private railways, Ōsaka Municipal Transportation Bureau)
  • SUGOCA (JR Kyūshū)
  • nimoca (Nishitetsu)
  • Hayakaken (Fukuoka City Transportation Bureau)
This article also hints at international interoperability with farecard systems in other countries, as well, although I think we're still a far way from that. If this happens, perhaps the next big thing is trying to somehow integrate the EX-IC service for the Tōkaidō / San'yō Shinkansen and implementing similar systems to the other Shinkansen (?).

Newest Suica CMs (2010.12):
Source: potsugoro on YouTube

"Salaryman" (15s), with actor Matsushige Yutaka



"OL" (15s), with actress Mimura



A small soundbite from Mimura on the convenience of Suica. I have to agree, I want some special goods with the Suica penguin on them...


Source: dainfantry00 on YouTube

Sony's 2010 promo video for the FeliCa platform, the technology behind virtually all of Japan's IC card systems (transit-related and not):


Source: sd4kfelica on YouTube
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Old December 20th, 2010, 12:34 PM   #2026
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
manaca to offer rewards points system
http://www.asahi.com/travel/rail/new...011190016.html
This is to replace the current discounting of fares that's currently in place with the YURIKA prepaid magnetic card system now. YURIKA cards are sold at the following denomonations:
Code:
Price Paid    Actual Stored Value
----------    -------------------
1000            1000
2000            2200
3000            3300
5000            5600
 *values are in JPY
They had to figure out a way to keep those discounts in place in order to appease the masses; My company makes me buy a separate YURIKA card for travel on company time to track my reimbursements. I have 2 separate sites so I can't get a commuter pass; and this way they save some ¥ because some of my commutes end up being a free ride, since they only reimburse me the amount I paid, not the actual value of the card.

I have no idea how this will work out with the points system though; YURIKA cards print the stations entered and exited on the backs of the cards, and this is what I turn in with my expenses every month. TOICA card TVMs have an option to print this same thing out at will, so I suspect they'll have me do that, but the days of them getting the discount is over; I'm only taking one Manaca card, and highlighting my commutes to turn in to them... My points are my points

There's also some discounted YURIKAs as well, like the off-peak YURIKA that is valid M~F from 10am ~ 4pm and all day Sat and Sun... Again, I have no clue how that's gonna work out yet either, but as soon as I know, you'll know!
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Old December 20th, 2010, 03:42 PM   #2027
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo
...Shin Kaisoku services can get quite crowded...
--that's an understatement! I tend to take JR-west's Biwako/Kyoto line from Maibara into Osaka station whenever visiting that area from Nagoya-- I've said for years that they should bump the cars up from the 8 they have on that service now. JR-Tokai's connecting service from Maibara (if you're lucky) or Ogaki (if you're unlucky) to Toyohashi sees some 10 car formations already now, but we all have to crowd onto that smaller consist at Maibara station...

Making matters worse, there used to be a cross-platform transfer; now we're made to walk up the stairs from track 8 and cross all the way over to track 2... I suspect they did this to make passengers slow the pace and become more orderly...

Wonder if those new consists will be working January 2-3rd-- I'm going to Kyoto for the first temple visit of the year at Kiyomizudera, so I guess we'll see then!
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Old December 21st, 2010, 04:38 PM   #2028
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I just read on the Japan building projects page that the Shin Hankyu bldg and the Hanshin Dept store will be razed and redone as one big project...

That Hankyu Hanshin plan intrigues me... Part of me is wondering if it'll mean the unification somehow of the Hankyu-Hanshin rail network... One can dream, right?
http://goo.gl/maps/5l8T
After all-- Hankyu and Hanshin ARE the same company...
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Old December 21st, 2010, 07:23 PM   #2029
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Interesting idea... Are you thinking actual through-service or just some sort of cross-platform transfer?

Without through-servicing, if you wanted to bring all three Hankyū lines underground, I think the station would need to be pretty large, no?... The current Hankyū Umeda Station, with 9 bay tracks, is already the largest terminal (by # of tracks) in Japan for a single private railway. Of course, if you want to do through-servicing, then you'd be limited at the Hanshin end, as typical platform length there is only 6 cars, while the Hankyū trains are typically 8-10 cars.

I suppose they only need to bury the Kyōto Line, though, as that would be the most sensible choice out of the three in terms of value. Passengers on the Kōbe or Takarazuka Lines who wanted to get to the Hanshin Line could still transfer at Jūsō or Umeda. Taking it even further into the future, to allow through-servicing perhaps they could redesign the Hanshin Line to 10-car platforms to better serve full-length trains from both Kintetsu and Hankyū.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 07:38 AM   #2030
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MLIT to study maglev linking Ōsaka and Kansai International Airport
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/trend/...0031001-n1.htm

Quote:
In an interview December 18 with officials from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), it was revealed that the government's proposed budget for FY2011 is expected to include the cost of studies regarding high-speed rail access connecting central Ōsaka City and Kansai International Airport (KIX) (approx. 40 km distant), including a possible maglev line.

Ōsaka Prefecture and others have been pushing for access improvements to KIX as a critical step toward increasing ridership, and it appears that the MLIT has also recognized the need for study. It's expected that the study will also evaluate the possibility of constructing the line as a joint project between the public and private sectors.

It currently takes about one hour to travel from Ōsaka's Kita business district and central Ōsaka City to KIX. According to studies by the MLIT's Ōsaka Regional Civil Aviation Bureau, however, while there are approx. 15 million people in the Keihanshin region within one-hour travel time by public transit to Ōsaka (Itami) Airport, the equivalent number for KIX is only approx. 4 million people. As a result, improving access to KIX is seen as a necessity in order to strengthen the airport's international competitiveness.

In regards to new access routes to KIX, there have been several proposals made including construction of the Naniwasuji Line linking the two railway terminals in Ōsaka's Minami and Kita districts, and the KIX maglev beginning at the Umeda North Yard on the north side of JR Ōsaka Station—a project advocated by Ōsaka Prefecture governor Hashimoto Tōru in the fall of last year. It's believed that the travel time between the Kita district and KIX would be reduced to 30-40 minutes with the Naniwasuji Line and 7 minutes with the KIX maglev, and in a memorandum submitted to the MLIT on December 8, Ōsaka Prefecture requested the advancement of high-speed rail access studies.

With the study funding, the MLIT will perform an evaluation of the possibility of specific options including maglev and Shinkansen trains. The MLIT also plans to study the introduction of methods of private-sector participation in the project from the planning stage on, including contracting out infrastructure investment and operations to private-sector firms while the infrastructure itself will be under the ownership of the public sector.

Meanwhile, regarding the consolidation of management of KIX and Itami, it was revealed that the MLIT will establish a new committee together with KIX's "investors' group" composed of Ōsaka Prefecture, Hyōgo Prefecture, Wakayama Prefecture, and others. The committee would be a separate body from the Senshū City / Town Kansai International Airport Committee (composed of nine local cities and four local towns near KIX) and the Strategic Committee for Cities Surrounding Ōsaka International Airport (composed of eleven cities surrounding Itami Airport), creating a third channel. The effort is an attempt to incorporate local public opinion into the operation of both airports following the consolidation.

It's expected that the MLIT will present the policy directive together with the study of new access routes to KIX at a forum with local jurisdictions and members of the financial sphere scheduled for December 21.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 08:13 PM   #2031
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Interesting idea... Are you thinking actual through-service or just some sort of cross-platform transfer?
I was thinking of bringing it all underground somehow. The 9 track bay is needed now in order to have locals, rapids, and expresses on all lines layover at once on Hankyu. The choreography they do in that section is beautiful by the way-- when going between Juso to Umeda, you can see the other 2 trains racing along sides, and then in the middle, the same trains have left from Umeda towards Juso at the same time.

My thinking was to thorough-service the Hankyu Kyoto line with the Hanshin Main Line...
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Old December 24th, 2010, 03:58 AM   #2032
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MLIT releases FY2009 peak hour average congestion data

On 2010.12.22, MLIT released data on average congestion of trains during the peak one-hour period for FY2009. Private railway congestion data (for FY2009 actual and FY2010 projected) was already released and posted here, but we now also have FY2009 actual data on municipal subways and JR lines. MLIT report is here.

Greater Tōkyō

Code:
Railway	     Line	      From		  To                   FY2009  FY2010
Tōbu	     Isesaki	      Kosuge	          Kita-Senju            140%    137%
 ""          Tōjō	      Kita-Ikebukuro      Ikebukuro             138%    135%
Seibu        Ikebukuro	      Shiinamachi         Ikebukuro             172%    172%
 ""          Shinjuku	      Shimo-Ochiai        Takadanobaba          159%    159%
Keisei       Oshiage	      Keisei Hikifune     Oshiage               160%    160%
 ""          Main	      Daijingūshita       Keisei Funabashi      149%    146%
Keiō         Keiō	      Shimo-Takaido       Meidaimae             167%    166%
 ""          Inokashira	      Shinsen             Shibuya               139%    139%
Odakyū       Odawara	      Setagaya Daita      Shimo-Kitazawa        187%    187%
Tōkyū        Tōyoko	      Yūtenji             Naka-Meguro           174%    171%
 ""          Den'en Toshi     Ikejiri Ōhashi      Shibuya               187%    185%
Keikyū       Main	      Tobe                Yokohama              152%    152%
Toei         Asakusa          Honjo - Azumabashi  Asakusa               122%     --
 ""          Mita             Nishi-Sugamo        Sugamo                139%     --
 ""          Shinjuku         Nishi-Ōjima         Sumiyoshi             154%     --
Tōkyō Metro  Ginza	      Akasaka-Mitsuke     Tameike - Sannō       161%    162%
 ""          Marunouchi	      Shin-Ōtsuka         Myōgadani             157%    158%
 ""          Hibiya	      Minowa              Iriya                 156%    156%
 ""          Tōzai	      Kiba                Monzen-Nakachō        197%    198%
 ""          Chiyoda	      Machiya             Nishi-Nippori         178%    179%
 ""          Yūrakuchō	      Higashi-Ikebukuro   Gokokuji              167%    168%
 ""          Hanzōmon	      Shibuya             Omotesandō            170%    171%
 ""          Namboku	      Komagome            Hon-Komagome          146%    146%
Sōtetsu      Main	      Nishi-Yokohama      Yokohama              141%    143%
JR East      Tōkaidō          Kawasaki            Shinagawa             190%     --
 ""          Yokosuka         Shin-Kawasaki       Shinagawa             181%     --
 ""          Chūō (Rapid)     Nakano              Shinjuku              194%     --
 ""          Chūō (Local)     Yoyogi              Sendagaya              91%     --
 ""          Keihin-Tōhoku    Ueno                Okachimachi           198%     --
 ""          Jōban (Rapid)    Matsudo             Kita-Senju            173%     --
 ""          Jōban (Local)    Kameari             Ayase                 171%     --
 ""          Sōbu (Rapid)     Shin-Koiwa          Kinshichō             180%     --
 ""          Sōbu (Local)     Kinshichō           Ryōgoku               203%     --
Keihanshin

Code:
Railway	     Line	      From		  To                   FY2009  FY2010
Kintetsu     Nara	      Kawachi Eiwa        Fuse                  138%    138%
 ""          Ōsaka	      Shuntokumichi       Fuse                  137%    137%
 ""          Minami-Ōsaka     Koboreguchi         Ōsaka Abenobashi	136%    136%
 ""          Kyōto	      Momoyama Goryōmae   Kintetsu Tanbabashi	140%    140%
Nankai       Kōya	      Mozu Hachiman       Mikunigaoka           124%    124%
 ""          Main	      Minato              Sakai                 122%    122%
Keihan       Keihan Main      Noe                 Kyōbashi              116%    116%
Hankyū       Takarazuka	      Mikuni              Jūsō                  143%    143%
 ""          Kōbe	      Kanzakigawa         Jūsō	                141%    142%
 ""          Kyōto	      Kami-Shinjō         Awaji                 128%    129%
Hanshin      Main	      Deyashiki           Amagasaki             113%    113%
Ōsaka Subway Midōsuji         Umeda               Yodoyabashi           144%     --
 ""          Tanimachi        Tanimachi Kyūchōme  Tanimachi Rokuchōme   114%     --
 ""          Yotsubashi       Namba               Yotsubashi             98%     --
 ""          Sakaisuji        Nipponbashi         Nagahoribashi         117%     --
JR West      Tōkaidō (Rapid)  Ibaraki             Shin-Ōsaka            111%     --
 ""          Tōkaidō (Local)  Shin-Ōsaka          Ōsaka                 114%     --
 ""          Ōsaka Loop       Tsuruhashi          Tamatsukuri           128%     --
 ""          Katamachi        Shigino             Kyōbashi              135%     --
 ""          Hanwa (Rapid)    Sakai-shi           Tennōji               123%     --
Greater Nagoya

Code:
Railway	     Line	      From		  To                   FY2009  FY2010
Meitetsu     Main (East)      Jingūmae            Kanayama              135%    135%
 ""          Main (West)      Sakō                Meitetsu Nagoya       136%    136%
Kintetsu     Nagoya	      Komeno              Kintetsu Nagoya       138%    138%
Nagoya       Higashiyama      Nagoya              Fushimi               148%     --
 Subway      Meijō / Meikō    Kanayama            Higashi-Betsuin       142%     --
 ""          Tsurumai         Kawana              Gokiso                131%     --
JR Central   Tōkaidō          Biwajima            Nagoya                126%     --
 ""          Chūō             Shin-Moriyama       Ōzone                 135%     --
Fukuoka

Code:
Railway	     Line	      From		  To                   FY2009  FY2010
Nishitetsu   Tenjin - Ōmuta   Hirao               Yakuin                153%    153%
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Old December 24th, 2010, 06:36 AM   #2033
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Quote:
JR-Tokai's connecting service from Maibara (if you're lucky) or Ogaki (if you're unlucky) to Toyohashi sees some 10 car formations already now, but we all have to crowd onto that smaller consist at Maibara station...

Making matters worse, there used to be a cross-platform transfer; now we're made to walk up the stairs from track 8 and cross all the way over to track 2... I suspect they did this to make passengers slow the pace and become more orderly...
I suspect the main reason they make travel inconvenient for Nagoya-Osaka local passengers is that they want intercity trips to be taken by shinkansen. The Maibara-Ogaki "neck" is cited as a challenge for seishun 18ticket users angling for a comfy seat during holiday periods. There is even a website on riding strategies for local trains of the Tokaido Line.
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Old December 24th, 2010, 08:53 PM   #2034
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Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
I suspect the main reason they make travel inconvenient for Nagoya-Osaka local passengers is that they want intercity trips to be taken by shinkansen. The Maibara-Ogaki "neck" is cited as a challenge for seishun 18ticket users angling for a comfy seat during holiday periods. There is even a website on riding strategies for local trains of the Tokaido Line.
Oh yeah--I'm well aware of that line of thought... But really it's a non-starter for those of us living here in Nagoya... We all take Kintetsu to get to Osaka! It's only ¥2000 yen and 2 express trains away to Osaka-Nanba... same amount of time taken--sure, but I always get a seat, only have to change at Ise-Nagakawa in Mie prefecture, and its about ¥1000 yen cheaper...

Also Kintetsu has a 3 day all-you-can-ride ticket for ¥4000 yen if you buy 2 days or more in advance... And remember the Urban Liner surcharge is only ¥1650 end-to-end above the regular fare...

Kintetsu won that race years ago-- JR already has the regular business commuters on the shinkansen... Also many discount ticket places here sell unreserved tickets to Osaka on the shink for only ¥4500... again, if you know where to go, and your Japanese is good, you'll find out how to get around Japan for cheap... But as far as getting to Kyoto, JR is it. And with the Shinkansen to Kyoto its double the cost but half the time (45 minutes) I think lots of people in this economy end up on the Tokaido Shinkaisoku though-- last time I was headed there that train was packed from Nagoya to Kyoto; most of us were tourists visiting Kyoto for the fall colors...

Last edited by starrwulfe; December 24th, 2010 at 09:07 PM.
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Old December 24th, 2010, 09:54 PM   #2035
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Cab view: JR West 221 series rapid (Maibara to Aboshi)

Since there's some discussion about the JR connection at Maibara, here's a cab view from the operator's cab on a JR West 221 series rapid train from Maibara to Aboshi. This is train 769T, departing from Maibara (Maibara City, Shiga Prefecture) at 11:30 and arriving at Aboshi (Himeji City, Hyōgo Prefecture) at 15:07. This journey stretches 200 km along the east-west spine of JR West's "urban network" in the Keihanshin area, from Maibara to Hikone, Yasu, Kusatsu, Ōtsu, Kyōto, Takatsuki, Ibaraki, Ōsaka, Amagasaki, Nishinomiya, Ashiya, Kōbe, Akashi, Kakogawa, and Himeji.

This is the second fastest of three services on the line, faster than local services but slower than the special rapid (shin-kaisoku) services, and runs from the Biwako Line (Tōkaidō Main Line) through to the JR Kyōto Line (Tōkaidō Main Line), the JR Kōbe Line (Tōkaidō Main Line, San'yō Main Line), and finally the San'yō Main Line. The dense urbanization picks up around Kusatsu and continues all the way till Kakogawa. The approach into Ōsaka Station is especially nice, as you get a view of the new canopy and station building under construction.
Source: SuperExpress1 on YouTube

Part 01: Maibara to Notogawa http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiXbGm-gk3M
Part 02: Notogawa to Yasu http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jF1sA2a2_tg
Part 03: Yasu to Kusatsu http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCDLKMH3Ra8
Part 04: Kusatsu to Ōtsu http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DYwvtWK3Zk
Part 05: Ōtsu to Kyōto http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eN9j2DxEU4
Part 06: Kyōto to Takatsuki http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EM48itslo0
Part 07: Takatsuki to Ōsaka http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riEBTDAl_zE
Part 08: Ōsaka to Ashiya http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alL7zhCs9og
Part 09: Ashiya to Sannomiya http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seSe8WZXawg
Part 10: Sannomiya to Kōbe http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wbx98fZb-OQ
Part 11: Kōbe to Tarumi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1jwgDj1_8E
Part 12: Tarumi to Nishi-Akashi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMbfjSW0w94
Part 13: Nishi-Akashi to Kakogawa http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVFzVtNrPew
Part 14: Kakogawa to Himeji http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMUFVYsrPGU
Part 15: Himeji to Aboshi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqL7kWeUwU0
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Old December 25th, 2010, 10:33 AM   #2036
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Is that Shinkansen train far in the right background in part 2 @ 12:25
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Old December 25th, 2010, 01:57 PM   #2037
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coth View Post
Is that Shinkansen train far in the right background in part 2 @ 12:25
Yes, it is. The shinkansen line parallels this stretch of line at a distance of 500~600m. A ride in the front of a kaisoku/shin-kaisoku service on the Tokaido/Sanyo Lines is highly recommended, as these types (unlike trains of JR East) have nice views for passengers out of the front.
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Old December 29th, 2010, 08:14 AM   #2038
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Railway digest, first half of 2010

A railway digest of some of the major news items relating to railways in Japan for the first half of FY2010. Most of the clips are urban systems, although there are a few non-urban items.
Source: ayokoi on YouTube

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Old December 29th, 2010, 08:15 AM   #2039
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Nankai hopes to extend rapi:t trains to Umeda and Shin-Ōsaka via Naniwasuji Line
http://www.nikkei.com/news/local/art...F2F2F2F2F2F2F2

Quote:
On December 21, Nankai Electric Railway president Watari Shinji accepted an interview with reporters from the Nihon Keizai Shimbun and indicated his intention to "operate limited express trains to the Umeda area" after the opening of the Naniwasuji Line, a new rail line currently under planning by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). In order to enhance connections between the Shinkansen and Kansai International Airport (KIX), Watari also expressed his desire to extend the service to as far as JR Shin-Ōsaka Station.

The national government and Ōsaka City are planning to underground a branch line of the JR Tōkaidō Line and construct an underground Kita-Umeda Station (provisional name) in the Umeda North Yard area outside JR Ōsaka Station, where development is currently underway. The MLIT is also expecting to use the new station for the Naniwasuji Line as well, and when the new line opens, Nankai Electric Railway will be able to run directly to Umeda.

Watari points out, "If we can run trains directly to Umeda, people in the office districts surrounding Umeda will be able to live along the Nankai network." Watari also expressed his hopes for increasing ridership on existing lines through realization of direct service.

In addition, Watari also says that "convenience will increase further if direct service to Shin-Ōsaka Station can be offered," and that the railway wants to increase the number of railway line options connecting the Shinkansen and KIX. However, the section from around Nakatsu Station (planned station), after the Tōkaidō Line branch line rises to the surface, to Shin-Ōsaka Station is under the ownership of West Japan Railway Company (JR West), and coordination is required with JR West.
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Old December 29th, 2010, 08:15 AM   #2040
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New Yumemino Station to open March 3
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/ib...102000061.html

Quote:
On December 20, Toride City and the Urban Renaissance Agency (UR), an independent administrative corporation, announced that they will open the new Yumemino Station on the Kantō Railway Jōsō Line in Nonoi, Toride City on March 13 of next year. This is the first new station on the Jōsō Line since March 1982. Simultaneously, the Yumemino new town development will make its debut, and the station plaza and portions of nearby roadways such as the Shimo-Takai / Nonoi Route will also open to the public.

Yumemino Station is currently under construction between Shin-Toride and Inatoi Stations on the Jōsō Line. The platforms are approx. 90 m long and 6 m wide. The platforms and station building are connected by underground passages, and elevators will also be constructed.

The travel time from Yumemino Station to the JR Jōban Line's Toride Station is 8 minutes, and the fare is ¥210. The travel time to Moriya Station on the Tsukuba Express (TX) is 10 minutes, and the fare is ¥240. Station staff will be deployed at the station during the morning and evening commute periods, but the station will be unstaffed from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm.

UR broke ground on the new town development in March 1996, aiming for a planned population of 6,100 residents. The planned development area is approx. 80 ha. Of this area, approx. 34 ha is for residential uses, and lots will be on sale starting in May of next year. Itō Ham (HQ: Hyōgo Prefecture) is also scheduled to construct a factory in the development.
Rendering:


Source: Kantō Railway
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