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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:29 AM   #2181
quashlo
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Increased through-service between Hankyū Kyōto Line and Ōsaka Municipal Subway Sakaisuji Line planned
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/new...1580114-n1.htm

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On January 25, it was revealed that Hankyū Electric Railway (Hankyū Corporation) and the Ōsaka Municipal Transportation Bureau will operate direct-service trains connecting Tengachaya Station (Ōsaka City) and Kawaramachi Station (Kyōto City) starting in May. The effort is targeted at improving convenient access to Kyōto for Chinese and other foreign tourists visiting Ōsaka.

Hankyū Electric Railway and the Ōsaka Municipal Transportation Bureau began mutual through-service of the Hankyū Kyōto Line and Municipal Subway Sakaisuji Line in 1969. Currently, direct-service trains connect Tengachaya Station and Takatsuki-shi Station (Takatsuki City, Ōsaka Prefecture), but passengers bound for Kawaramachi Station must transfer at Takatsuki-shi Station or other stations.

According to officials, the two railway operators are coordinating on a plan to operate 30 to 40 daily direct-service trains during the midday period on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays. The trains would operate as local trains on the Sakaisuji Line section and as semi-expresses on the Hankyū Kyōto Line section. The Sakaisuji Line passes through the Nipponbashi district, home to many electronics shops, and Hankyū Electric Railway says, “Visiting Kyōto will become easier for foreign tourists visiting the Minami area of Ōsaka.”

Cab view from a Hankyū 6300 series limited express on the Hankyū Kyōto Line, from Kawaramachi in Kyōto to Ōsaka Umeda.
Source: SuperExpress1 on YouTube

Part 1: Kawaramachi to Katsura http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p70FT4C08EU&hd=1
Part 2: Katsura to Nagaoka Tenjin http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jL8iSG5RqQ&hd=1
Part 3: Nagaoka Tenjin to Takatsuki-shi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYbeJ5-7sk8&hd=1
Part 4: Takatsuki-shi to Ibaraki-shi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PiZTwt9Eeww&hd=1
Part 5: Ibaraki-shi to Awaji http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLMUCXu7U_A&hd=1
Part 6: Awaji to Jūsō http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgumRKIJxhM&hd=1
Part 7: Jūsō to Umeda http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8qeIfEzHYw&hd=1

These through-service trains would follow most of the same route, but switch over to the Hankyū Senri Line at Awaji to through-service with the Ōsaka Municipal Subway Sakaisuji Line all the way to Tengachaya.
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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:30 AM   #2182
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Names announced for new stations on Fukui Railway Fukubu Line
http://www.fukuishimbun.co.jp/module...6&storytopic=1

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On February 3, Fukui Railway announced the names for two stations in southern Fukui City, Fukui Prefecture to open on March 20 on the Fukubu Line. Based on the results from a survey of residents, the new station between Sanjūhassha and Asōzu in Asōzuchō will be named Taichō no Sato Station after Taichōji Temple (Sanjūhasshachō, Fukui City), believed to be the birthplace of Taichō. The new station between Harmony Hall and Ebata in Imaichichō will be named Seimei Station after a local placename.

In an effort to incorporate the opinion of local residents, Fukui Railway conducted a multiple-choice questionnaire in November and December of last year. For the new station in Asōzuchō, 438 respondents voted for Taichō no Sato, beating out Maki (91 votes) and Fukui Heights (224 votes). For the new station in Imaichichō, 238 respondents voted for Seimei, beating out Shimo-Arai (95 votes) and Imaichi (117 votes).

Both stations will be unstaffed, with waiting spaces constructed in the center of the platforms. Bicycle parking will be provided for 14 bikes at Taichō no Sato Station and 18 bikes at Seimei Station.

The new stations on the Fukubu Line have been constructed as part of a Local Public Transport Coordinated Plan, with funding from the national and prefectural governments. Of the four stations in the plan, Sports Kōen Station (Iehisachō, Echizen City) opened in March of last year. The last remaining station is scheduled to open in late FY2016 between Iehisa and Sun Dome Nishi.
Assortment of scenes on the Fukubu Line.
I think I may have posted this a long time ago, but this is the re-edited, HD version.


Source: masanaga on YouTube
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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:30 AM   #2183
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Meitetsu proposes network-wide changes to limited express service; several lines to convert to one-man operations
http://chubu.yomiuri.co.jp/news_k/ckei110125_1.htm

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On January 24, Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu) announced that it will implement schedule changes across its entire network on March 26. In regards to trains arriving and departing Meitetsu Nagoya Station during the 7:00 am and 8:00 am hours, the railway says it will re-evaluate limited express operations on its main lines to better meet the needs of limited express users during the commute periods. These are the first network-wide schedule changes since the December 2008 revisions about two years and three months ago.

On the Airport Line, limited express service during the morning periods will be consolidated into the special μSky reserved-seat limited expresses bound for Chūbu International Airport; other limited express trains currently operating will be replaced with rapid expresses. In exchange, limited express services on the Nagoya Main Line and Inuyama Line will be increased, expanding overall limited express operations.

Meanwhile, midday μSky services between Meitetsu Gifu and Chūbu International Airport will be shortened to start and terminate at Meitetsu Nagoya due to low ridership on the section between Meitetsu Gifu and Meitetsu Nagoya. As ridership is low on the Toyokawa Line, Chikkō Line, and portions of the Nishio Line, these sections will be converted to "one-man operations" with only the train operator on board.
Window view from a Meitetsu 2000 series μSky limited express from Chūbu International Airport to Meitetsu Gifu.
Source: kouiso on YouTube

Part 1: Chūbu International Airport to Jingū-mae


Part 2: Jingū-mae to Meitetsu Nagoya


Part 3: Meitetsu Nagoya to Meitetsu Ichinomiya


Part 4: Meitetsu Ichinomiya to Meitetsu Gifu
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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:31 AM   #2184
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Meitetsu’s struggle to survive, Part 1: Strategies to increase ridership
http://chubu.yomiuri.co.jp/news_k/ke...yu110125_1.htm

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With the advent of a decreasing child population, growing older population, and an appreciating yen, the Chūbu region is being forced to revolutionize its industrial structure. With their survival on the line, just what business strategies are corporations devising? As the first in the “Corporate Research” series, we will trace the issues and outlook of Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu).

Station-by-station ridership analysis
Nagoya Railroad began this year with good omens. Blessed with good weather, ridership during the three-day New Year’s period saw many passengers heading to Atsuta Jingū (Atsuta Ward, Nagoya City) and Toyokawa Inari (Toyokawa City, Aichi Prefecture) along the Meitetsu network for their first shrine visits of the new year. As a result, ridership during this period reached 3.82 million—a 4.0 percent year-over-year increase and the first positive growth in four years.

However, Meitetsu president Yamamoto Ado, who held a press conference in Nagoya City on January 24, was less enthusiastic: “This year is do or die.”

Since autumn 2008, ridership has been struggling as a result of the prolonged recession and the swine influenza scare, with FY2009 ridership across the network posting a 2.6 year-over-year decrease, the first ridership decline in seven years for the railway. While ridership this fiscal year appears to point towards a two-percent increase, the future is still uncertain, and it’s unclear whether the railway will be able to get back on the track to recovery.

In the midst of all this, Meitetsu is pouring its efforts into improving the efficiency of its business and increasing convenience for commuters heading to and from work and school. In the schedule revisions announced on January 24, the railway said it would use the data records from magnetic pass farecards to analyze ridership station-by-station, re-evaluating operations of limited expresses during the morning period, as well as operations of the special μSky limited express trains bound for Chūbu International Airport. Meitetsu executive director Shibata Yūki said, “We’ve crafted a schedule that is easy-to-use for our passengers and operates the trains that our users want.”

Meanwhile, the railway will increase “options and concentration” of its business resources by expanding sections with “one-man operations,” where only the train operator is present on board, focusing on routes where ridership levels are low. The cost savings generated through these schedule revisions will reach ¥620 million.

Uphill battle against the private auto
Of the 16 major private railways across Japan, Meitetsu comes in third in terms of total length of operating lines behind Kintetsu and Tōbu, with 444.2 km. But in terms of revenue from railway operations, Meitetsu slips to eighth place, with ¥82.3 billion as of FY2009 (fiscal year ending March 2010).

Its home base of Aichi and Gifu Prefectures has lower population density than the Greater Tōkyō area or Kansai region, and private automobile use is high. Competition with JR Central on the Nagoya – Gifu and Nagoya – Toyohashi corridors is also becoming more and more fierce.

Since 2001, Meitetsu has closed multiple unprofitable lines, including the trams that used to operate within Gifu City. Currently, the Nishio / Kamagōri Line and portions of the Hiromi Line are the subject of debate over possible abandonment, even as they receive funding from local governments to cover up operating deficits.

With a precedent in Hankyū Hanshin Holdings, in which two private railways merged in 2006 after a fund bought out the majority of shares, one Meitetsu executive-level employee says, “I keep telling the younger staff, ‘There’s no guarantee that things will continue like this forever,’” indicating his opinion that reorganization in the private railway industry is entirely possible.

Road to survival in manaca
Together with the schedule revisions, Meitetsu is placing its hopes for recovery behind the manaca IC farecard set to rollout starting February 11.

With the introduction of manaca, which will also be accepted on the Nagoya Municipal Subway and other operators, revenues in Meitetsu’s railway business won’t show immediate growth, but Meitetsu president Yamamoto emphasizes the card’s benefits: “We can get passengers to use the card as part of their lifestyle for a variety of purposes, not just when using the trains.”

At Meitetsu, manaca will not only have electronic money functionality—the railway will also offer its own rewards points service that awards points to users based on how much money they spend at manaca-affiliated shops using the card’s electronic money functionality. The railway aims to become an integral part of railway users’ lifestyles.

The railway is also making multiple efforts to increase ridership outside of commuters to work and school, including sponsoring special campaigns to boost tourism together with local governments. Is there a way to put a halt to the decline in railway ridership in smaller cities? Meitetsu continues its search for an answer.

μSky limited express (at Tokonama City, Aichi Prefecture).




Final confirmation tests of the IC farecard to be introduced in February continue at stations.
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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:31 AM   #2185
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Meitetsu’s struggle to survive, Part 2: Redevelopment of Nagoya Station is key
http://chubu.yomiuri.co.jp/news_k/ke...yu110126_1.htm

Quote:
Closing the Children’s Annex
Meitetsu Department Stores, which houses its flagship branch directly above Meitetsu Nagoya Station, will close its Children’s Annex on March 31, concentrating its facilities into a two-building structure with the Main Store and Men’s Annex. The store’s sales floor area will shrink by approx. 18 percent.

Meitetsu Department Stores, which became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Meitetsu in 2004, aimed to increase sales through a large-scale renovation across all three buildings of its flagship store in March 2007.

But partially due to bad luck after being struck by the “Lehman shock” of 2008, Meitetsu Department Stores president Kamino Shigeyuki is forced into resignation: “Things didn’t proceed as we had hoped.”

Meitetsu Group’s distribution business, centered on its department stores, posted sales of ¥140.1 billion in FY2009 (fiscal year ending March 2010)—a little over 20 percent of the group’s consolidated revenues, ¥620.0 billion. While the distribution business is generating 1.7 times the revenue of the group’s railway operations, it later fell into an operating deficit (¥1.5 billion in the red) for the first time in two years.

But the reasons behind the crisis in the group’s distribution business aren’t limited only to structural recessions in its department stores. Some have pointed out the flagship store’s lack of appeal compared to rival department store JR Nagoya Takashimaya outside Nagoya Station, and it hasn’t taken full advantage of its business tie-up with Isetan enacted in 2005.

Eliminating unprofitability
Meitetsu is accelerating management reform and the reorganization of its group. As of March of last year, the consolidated group currently encompasses 141 companies—actually over 100 less than the 248 companies in 2000.

Part of the reason lies with declining revenues in its previously-stable railway business as a result of sluggish ridership growth, resulting in a lack of capacity to permit unprofitable businesses.

While Meitetsu continues with the closure of unprofitable facilities and sales of facilities and subsidiaries located away from its railway network, it has spun off the bus and leisure businesses that were previously part of the group, helping to strengthen its profitability.

Starting in April, the group will gradually consolidate lodging reservations and other systems at the Gifu Grand Hotel and its four hotels in Aichi Prefecture, including the Meitetsu Grand Hotel and Meitetsu Inuyama Hotel. The group hopes to reduce costs while at the same time responding to an increase in Internet reservations, increasing business efficiency by creating a “groupwide scheme that keeps customers coming back,” says Meitetsu Grand Hotel president Yamazaki Ryūji.

Replacement of company headquarters
Replacing the Children’s Annex will be a branch of big-name home appliances retailer Yamada Denki. Meitetsu hopes to rise from the slump by taking advantage of Yamada’s ability to attract customers to increase visitors at its department store.

In addition, Meitetsu president Yamamoto Ado has his eyes set on redevelopment in the area surrounding Nagoya Station, including the replacement of the Meitetsu Group's building, which houses Meitetsu headquarters, a Meitetsu Department Store, and the Meitetsu Grand Hotel.

The blueprints for the plan call for replacing the headquarters building—less then stellar compared to neighboring skyscrapers—and enhancing its terminal functions and ability to attract customers, but the surrounding area is a complex web of underground retail arcades and subway lines, making an early groundbreaking difficult.

Meitetsu will soon begin coordination with government officials and enter into discussions with Kinki Nippon Railroad, JR Central, and other stakeholders who own adjacent buildings.

At the January 24 press conference, Meitetsu president Yamamoto hopes to include some direction concerning the redevelopment in the railway’s next midterm business plan to begin in FY2012: “We are hoping to assemble at least a partial vision for the redevelopment sometime during the next fiscal year.”

Yamamoto says that the actual start of the redevelopment is “many years ahead.” While the probability is high that it will come after completion of JR Central’s Nagoya Station New Building (provisional name) slated for FY2016, the redevelopment is likely to become a major project that could drastically affect the future of Meitetsu Group once it gets off the ground.

A joint redevelopment with Kintetsu, which abuts the Meitetsu Department Store, is likely to surface as a major topic of debate in the future.


Meitetsu Group revenues by business
Consolidated revenues: ¥620 billion
Transport: 45% (railways only: 12%)
Real estate: 15%
Leisure and services: 9%
Distribution (department store business, etc.): 21%
Other businesses (information management, etc.): 10%

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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:32 AM   #2186
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Meitetsu’s struggle to survive, Part 3: Interview with Meitetsu president
http://chubu.yomiuri.co.jp/news_k/ke...yu110127_1.htm

Quote:
If conditions are right, a tie-up with Kintetsu to increase station convenience
Nagoya Railroad president Yamamoto Ado (62) accepted a one-on-one interview with Yomiuri Shimbun on January 26, answering questions about the railway group’s business strategy and progress on the current midterm business plan, which ends in FY2011.

Railway business
What are your projections and countermeasures for railway demand?
As long as the local population continues to decline and the high mode share of private automobiles continues, railway demand will decrease. By increasing the convenience of our urban transport lines like the Nagoya Main Line and carrying out cost reductions on smaller local lines, we will enhance our entire railway network.

What are the merits of introducing the manaca IC farecard?
Ease of use for passengers will see dramatic improvements, with passengers only having to place their card near the automatic faregates to board trains. We are also hopeful about the card’s ability to realize latent demand—users of the card’s electronic money functionality who then begin to use our trains. For a railway company, the card will lead to increased business efficiencies.

Redevelopment
What is the redevelopment for the Nagoya Station district?
Meitetsu’s assets in the Nagoya Station district are valuable properties that hold the keys to our group’s future. We will exchange opinions with the government administration and high-potential corporations in the surrounding area, while looking 20, 30 years into the future and considering what the needs are for a facility immediately next to the train station. A one-off development on our own is unthinkable.

What are the possibilities of teaming with neighboring Kintetsu on the Nagoya Station redevelopment?
If the conditions are right, we can carry out the redevelopment together. While mutual through-servicing of trains is difficult because of different track gauges, the concept of making a unified station structure is possible. It’s only natural to think that by making the station more convenient, passengers (on both railways) will increase.

Group business
What is your strategy for consolidated subsidiaries outside of the Chūbu region?
We won’t be changing our policy of aiming for efficient business by concentrating our capital along the Meitetsu network. Our group companies are continuing the work of reorganizing their subsidiaries, and the total number of consolidated subsidiaries will likely decrease a little more in the future. However, many of our subsidiaries in other areas are bus companies that are a critical means of transport in those regions, and there are conditions that prevent us from immediately backing out.

Will you be able to meet your target figures in your current midterm business plan?
As a result of the recession following the 2008 “Lehman shock,” the gap between the original projections in the current plan and the current situation has grown. Since overcoming the effects of the shock required substantial effort, it will be difficult to meet our goals for consolidated profits after taxes. However, as interest rates are low, we are actively pursuing reduction of our interest-bearing debt, and it’s likely we will meet our targets.

Future vision
What is your vision for the group?
Railway companies must be in step with the region. We believe the revitalization of this region will lead to our own revitalization, and we will continue contributing to local areas.

What specifically do you have in mind?
While manufacturing is the foundation that continues to support Aichi and Nagoya, we are now in need of another pillar to support the region. We have been advocating for tourism promotion, developing special campaigns together with local governments. In order to create regional vitality, we must increase residents and visitors to the area. Elections will continue this year, but we hope that new government leaders will think about new regional development.

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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:33 AM   #2187
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Station redevelopment projects build taller, larger
http://www.asahi.com/business/topics...102020498.html

Quote:
Station-side redevelopment projects focusing around department stores are surfacing one after another at major stations in large cities. What sets these projects apart is a push to build tall and big. While department stores are closing in succession in smaller cities, more and more are concentrating in large metropolises.

Tōkyū: Large facility at Nikotama
Tōkyō Express Electric Railway (Tōkyū Corporation) Futako – Tamagawa Station (Setagaya Ward, Tōkyō)—commonly known as “Nikotama” and always ranking as one of Tōkyō's most desirable neighborhoods to live.

The Futako – Tamagawa RISE Shopping Center, a large retail facility directly connected to the station, will open March 17. Centered on an expansive 6,000 sq m food floor, the facility will feature a total of 157 stores including general merchandise stores. The primary target demographic is women in their 20s and 30s living along the Tōkyū Line.

In order to transform this area into an even more attractive neighborhood, Tōkyū Electric Railway Group is also constructing office towers and high-rise condominiums on approx. 11 ha of land surrounding the train station. It’s expected the cost of the redevelopment project will reach ¥150 billion.

At Tōkyū’s “home base” of Shibuya Station (Shibuya Ward, Tōkyō), large-scale redevelopment is also underway in preparation for the undergrounding of the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line in FY2012 and the start of through-service with the Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line. In addition to the opening of a new Tōkyū Department Store on the site of the former Tōkyū Bunka Kaikan (Tōkyū Cultural Hall), Tōkyū is coordinating with local jurisdictions, JR East, and Tōkyō Metro on a plan to construct a large station tenant building and expand Hachikō Plaza by FY2014.

On January 27, Tōkyū announced personnel changes to take effect April 1, including the promotion of Executive Director Nomoto Hirofumi, who has a long history in the field of land development, to president of the railway, revealing its intention to position urban redevelopment as a pillar of its business, alongside railway operations.

And then there’s Tōbu Railway, which is devising a strategy focused on the popular Tōkyō Sky Tree (Sumida Ward) broadcast tower. In coordination with the spring 2012 opening, construction of the Tōkyō Sky Tree Town mixed-use facility is also underway. In addition to a 300-store specialty retail mall, planetarium, and aquarium, the railway will also rename Narihirabashi Station, the gateway to the project, as Tōkyō Sky Tree Station.

Abeno, Ōsaka: 300 m, Japan’s tallest building
At Ōsaka Abenobashi Station (Abeno Ward, Ōsaka City), Kinki Nippon Railway (Kintetsu Corporation) is constructing the Abenobashi Terminal Building Tower, a 300 m tall tower with five underground floors and 60 stories aboveground. The building will surpass Yokohama’s Landmark Tower and be Japan’s tallest skyscraper.

The anchor tenant, Kintetsu Department Store’s Abeno flagship store, is scheduled to become the largest department store in Japan, with a total of 100,000 sq m of sales floor area. The plan also calls for offices, foreign-brand hotels, and an outdoor observation deck that allows a 360-degree view.

JR Hakata City (three underground floors and 10 stories aboveground), a new station tenant building at JR Hakata Station to open on March 3 of this year, will become Kyūshū’s largest retail facility, with over 230 stores including a Hankyū Department Store and Tōkyū Hands. With the opening of the full length of the Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route on March 12, a total of 100,000 people are expected to use the station tenant building daily, including visitors from the Kansai region and Kyūshū, as well as from other parts of Asia.

In FY2016, the 46-story Nagoya Station New Building (provisional name) is scheduled to open at JR Nagoya Station, bringing another skyscraper next to the two JR Central Towers already in place.

JR’s success a catalyst
Looking at smaller cities across the country, department stores outside train stations and in central districts are closing one after another as a result of stagnating population growth and sluggish consumer spending. But why all these redevelopments outside key terminal stations in major cities?

For one, ridership at train stations in major cities is high. Because the stations are large, it’s easy to secure space for replacing facilities and building skyscrapers. Success by JR companies in station building redevelopments at Kyōto, Nagoya, and Sapporo has been a catalyst in the trend towards building taller.

In addition, recently, there has been demand for “mega-stores” that keep customers interested, featuring an unbeatable array of items and jointly-connected movie theaters or other facilities. Even last year, major cities saw the closure of the Matsuzakaya Nagoya Station department store and Tōkyō’s Seibu Yūrakuchō department store, but some pointed to their limited sales floor areas. Expansion is critical to survival.

Fukuda Akio, head of the Real Estate Economic Institute’s Planning and Studies Department, says, “Developments outside train stations in major cities have substantial benefits in the creation of new value. This trend should continue, primarily focusing on big-name corporations.”



Render of the Futako – Tamagawa Station redevelopment. (Tōkyū Corporation)


Render of the Futako – Tamagawa RISE Shopping Center to open in March. (Tōkyū Corporation)
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Old February 5th, 2011, 10:48 AM   #2188
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Originally Posted by manrush View Post
I kind of wonder what rail gauge this LRT system would use. If it would be the same gauge as the two legacy tramway lines (1372mm), then those two lines could eventually be connected to the new LRT network.
I see no reason for them to go out of their way and order narrow-gauge (1,067 mm) or standard-gauge (1,435 mm) trams, but I wouldn't hold my breath that this route will ever be connected to the Arakawa Line or Setagaya Line. For one, they're too far away from each other. Other thing is that since this is supposed to be LRT, I suspect they will go with low-floor designs, making these trains incompatible with the other two lines, which use platform-style boarding.
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Old February 5th, 2011, 11:57 AM   #2189
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This argument doesn't hold much water since Tokyo-to under Ishihara is planning to move Tsukiji by 2020 anyways.
There are gubernatorial elections coming up this year, and populist Ishihara won't run again (finally). The candidates of the big parties haven't been selected yet, afair. I wonder if this will change the stance on moving the Tsukiji market.
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Old February 5th, 2011, 01:06 PM   #2190
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Vitalize Chuo-ku by linking Tsukiji with other parts of the ward? This is unconceivable, simply because to build the LRT, they would have to destroy the Tsukiji fish market. The LRT would be on the loop line 2, a road that is planned to be built partly on the site of the Tsukiji market. Nobody knows what would be built instead, but for sure not something as popular as the fish market.
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Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
This argument doesn't hold much water since Tokyo-to under Ishihara is planning to move Tsukiji by 2020 anyways.
Samuraiblue, the argument holds absolutely: if you read well, they plan to build the LRT "between 2020 and 2025.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asakaze View Post
There are gubernatorial elections coming up this year, and populist Ishihara won't run again (finally). The candidates of the big parties haven't been selected yet, afair. I wonder if this will change the stance on moving the Tsukiji market.
Asakaze, indeed, many people expect that he will not run again. But it still not 100% sure, he hasn't made any clear statement yet, saying he will tell his choice later. Actually everybody is waiting the last moment. Nobody is pushing for the relocation as much as Ishihara, so I expect it will change the stance on it if he doesn't run/is not re-elected.

Quashlo, marvelous graphics! With what did you make it?
The data you give are helpful, but they talk about the present situation. How will be this areas in 2025, when they'll open the LRT? Probably 10 times denser!
I have to quote myself:
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Originally Posted by Braillard View Post
In conclusion, remember that in Japan, railways CREATES city. It triggers urbanization. That's why it's normal that lines line Rinkai take a few years to be profitable. And that's why it's normal to design lines where you may not always see the need of it (for instance Shin-Toyosu). It's often a proof of a long-term vision, and what else does a megacity need the most?
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Old February 5th, 2011, 09:30 PM   #2191
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I think we simply have different approaches. Before we even consider building a new line (a major investment that takes decades to pay off, if it even does so), we should ask ourselves whether we have exhausted other options that could generate substantial cost savings without substantially sacrificing the quality of transit service.

Capitalizing on existing infrastructure can be much more cost-effective than building an all-new subway line. This can take the form of feeder services to existing stations (whether it be through LRT, Yurikamome, or bus), upgrades of existing stations (new faregates, new platforms, etc.), or even simple things like increasing train frequency.

In fact, they are already doing this: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=723

This is for the Toei Ōedo Line only:
  • Conversion from 8-car trains to 10-car trains (FY2011): This doesn't seem like much, but this is an automatic 25% increase in line haul capacity.
  • Increased frequencies during the morning rush hour (already partially implemented FY2010)
  • Construction of new platform at Kachidoki Station to separate inbound and outbound platform traffic (FY2013)
Toyosu Station on the Yūrakuchō Line is also getting a new entrance location (March 2012).

Please note that there is still excess capacity on the Ōedo Line, not just in terms of train length but also in terms of service frequency. The schedule at Kachidoki during the morning peak is only 17 tph in the inbound direction (to Shiodome, Roppongi, and Shinjuku) and 19 tph in the outbound direction (to Ryōgoku, Iidabashi, Shinjuku Nishiguchi). Converting all these to 10-car trains would increase capacity by at least 4,000 to 5,000 pphpd or more. Imagine if you then increased frequency to 24 tph—basically a train every 2.5 minutes and more in line with the more frequent lines in Tōkyō—this would be at least another 6,000 to 8,000 pphpd. This means the line has extra capacity for at least 10,000 to 13,000 pphpd—by no means a small sum.

Same story holds for Yūrakuchō Line, although to a lesser extent: only 18 tph inbound (to Yūrakuchō, Iidabashi, Ikebukuro) and 22 tph outbound (to Shin-Kiba).

In summary, there is a lot that can be done by simply improving access to existing rail stations through the proposed LRT, Yurikamome, or buses, while implementing the capacity improvements on the existing lines.
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Old February 10th, 2011, 08:00 PM   #2192
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Increased through-service between Hankyū Kyōto Line and Ōsaka Municipal Subway Sakaisuji Line planned
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/new...1580114-n1.htm
This would've REALLY come in handy for me 8 years ago when I had to travel out to Kyoto for classes and work from Higashi-Osaka... ARGH! I often wondered why they didn't run a few rapid expresses from Tengachaya... Awaji gets really crowded because of the transfers that happen there by itself!
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Old February 10th, 2011, 08:37 PM   #2193
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Meitetsu’s struggle to survive, Part 3: Interview with Meitetsu president
http://chubu.yomiuri.co.jp/news_k/ke...yu110127_1.htm
I've been saying ever since I got to Nagoya that Meitetsu should be doing 2 things to realign itself...

1> more thru-routing with the Nagoya Subway. The Tsurumai line is the only line that does it, other than the Kami-Iida line--and it's run just as an extension to the meitetsu Komaki line; the train crews are all meitetsu even on the subway section. They should work with the city to extend that line somehow-- make it completely bisect the Meijo line and connect it to the main line in Minami Ward is a good idea. Also figure out a way to route the Meitetsu Seto Line into the Tsurumai Line... It's currently an isolated line that just ends at Sakae-machi station... Are track gauges different? And of course make the plan for the Sakura-dori line to connect to the meitetsu Ozai line to Shippo happen.

2> Tie up with Kintetsu. I really hoped Kintetsu and Meitetsu were the same track gauge-- Their stations sit on the same level as each other and actually have 2 platform level transfer gates where you can see the trains just on the other side of the wall... Even the tracks line up together in a invisible 'Y' formation. It'd be great to take an Urban Liner from Mie-- or even Osaka and wind up at Centrair... But since that's impossible; make it easy to change at Nagoya Station by adding more platform transfer gates, and more importantly, working with Kintetsu to get Manaca accepted on the their routes. People from Mie and western Aichi have to carry Pitapa and most of the time, they're transferring to meitetsu or subway at Nagoya and will now have to carry Manaca too.

Just some thoughts here... Well gotta get some sleep-- tomorrow, I'll shoot pictures of Manaca working for the first day!
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Old February 11th, 2011, 06:13 AM   #2194
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the introduction of Manaca
the biggest event in Nagoya transport history since NGO's opening six years ago
can't wait for the pix...
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Old February 11th, 2011, 07:47 PM   #2195
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ITŌCHŪ signs MOU with Kyiv City on subway modernization
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=139225

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Kyiv City State Administration has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Japanese corporation ITOCHU.

As the city authorities reported, this Memorandum has witnessed the intention of both parties to cooperate in obtaining by municipal enterprise Kyivsky Metropoliten a loan for 30 years at 1.5% per annum. Chairman of the Administration, Oleksandr Popov noted that the issue of attracting foreign investment in the capital is relevant for local authorities. In particular, the priorities of the Ukrainian side in collaboration with Japan are the construction of a subway line to one of the districts in the capital and purchase of related equipment. A deputy chief executive officer of the department of industrial projects at the head office of the ITOCHU corporation witnessed the company's interest in direct participation in projects for modernization of the Kyiv underground and building a new subway line. He noted that in the future the company is also ready to discuss its participation in the clean water city programs. It is envisaged that in February, ITOCHU management will report on this matter to the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan.
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Old February 11th, 2011, 07:47 PM   #2196
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JICA offers to finance Karachi mass transit system
http://www.brecorder.com/news/busine...3973:news.html

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KARACHI (February 11, 2011) : Japan Interna-tional Co-operation Agency (JICA) plans to introduce Mass Transit System (MTS) in Karachi. This was stated by Director General (Karachi Mass Transit Cell) Malik Zaheer ul Islam, at a seminar on Karachi Transportation Improvement Project held here on Wednesday.

"JICA in collaboration with City District Government Karachi (CDGK) has planned construction of MTS in the city, under the Karachi Urban Transport Plan for 2030". He said that the project, which kicked off last year, is currently in planning stage. Planning is divided in two phases and the work on Phase-I would be completed by the end of June this year. The second phase, which would then start would further take two years to complete, he said.

Later a feasibility report would be prepared which is pivotal for the materialisation of the project, he said adding that a Bus Transit System (BTS) or a Rail Transit System (RTS) or a combination of both is being planned for the city. A detailed study concerning the site of the project is being carried out by a consultancy team from Japan and Pakistan at different corridors of the metropolis namely, Guru Mandir to Surjani, Nagan Chowrangi to Korangi, Guru Mandir to Safura Goth, Korangi to Cantt Station, Nagan Chowrangi to SITE and Tower to Sohrab Goth, he said.

He stressed the need of reduction of private cars and urged the public to increase the use of public transport. People are looking forward for a better public transport system and admitted that the city faced a shortage of 7,800 public buses. Malik Zaheer ul Islam said the MTS is one of the practical solutions to the transport problem in the city, terming it "a need of time." He said that by 2030 the number of registered cars and motorcycles would increase to 2.6 million and 3.6 million, respectively." This drastic rise in private ownership of cars and motorbikes has caused the transport system to deteriorate and had also increased traffic accidents and pollution in the city.

Concerning the financial aspects of the project, he said that the project would be constructed through build, operate and transfer (BOT) with concessions. It would be funded by JICA, public-private partnerships and the city government, he said. Co-ordination of local authorities is required and appealed the masses for their support so that the project is implemented without any fear or favour.
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Old February 11th, 2011, 07:48 PM   #2197
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Sumitomo targets orders for 1,000 railcars in Taiwan
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-0...d-upgrade.html

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Sumitomo Corp., part of groups that have won $890 million of rail-car orders in Taiwan since December, is aiming to win deals for another 1,000 cars as the island upgrades transport systems.

Taiwan is likely to buy the equipment over the next few years, Takeshi Murata, a general manager in Sumitomo’s transportation project & equipment department, said in an interview yesterday in Tokyo. He didn’t elaborate further.

Tokyo-based Sumitomo has also begun talks to sell partner Nippon Sharyo Ltd.’s carriages in Toronto and is targeting U.S. cities as governments boost rail spending to pare road congestion and emissions. Global rail investments will rise 2.4 percent annually to 161 billion euros ($219 billion) by 2015, according to Brussels-based trade group, the Association of the European Rail Industry.

Sumitomo and Nippon Sharyo won a $360 million contract for 136 rail cars from the Taiwan Railways Administration in December. A Taiwanese venture backed by the two companies also got a $530 million order for 296 train cars last month.

“There’s demand to replace trains in Taiwan,” said Murata. “We will try our best to win the orders.”

Taiwan plans to buy a large number of rail cars as it replaces equipment, Deputy Minister for Transportation and Communications Yeh Kuang-shih said by phone today. He didn’t give a precise figure.

Sumitomo fell 0.6 percent to 1,259 yen as of the 3 p.m. close of trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Nagoya, Japan- based Nippon Sharyo, a unit of Central Japan Railway Co., was unchanged.

North America
In North America, Sumitomo is in talks with the Toronto Transit Commission on a possible order, Murata said. The company is also in negotiations with “several” other authorities in the region after winning a $57 million deal to supply 18 diesel rail cars with Nippon Sharyo to California’s Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit, he said.

The companies won the Sonoma-Marin order after making a proposal that was about 20 percent cheaper than Siemens AG’s, the second-lowest bidder, according to the rail authority’s website.
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Old February 11th, 2011, 07:54 PM   #2198
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ITŌCHŪ signs MOU with Kyiv City on subway modernization
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=139225
Japan seems to be making its presence known in Eastern Europe.

First, Bucharest and Sofia and now Kiev.
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Old February 12th, 2011, 04:46 AM   #2199
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Japan seems to be making its presence known in Eastern Europe.

First, Bucharest and Sofia and now Kiev.
I believe one of Hitachi's reasons for building a rolling stock plant in the UK (if indeed that occurs) is to provide a facility to supply potential orders in continental Europe, especially in the Central and Eastern portions, on top of fulfilling the British IEP order.
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Old February 12th, 2011, 05:28 AM   #2200
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I believe one of Hitachi's reasons for building a rolling stock plant in the UK (if indeed that occurs) is to provide a facility to supply potential orders in continental Europe, especially in the Central and Eastern portions, on top of fulfilling the British IEP order.
It would be nice to see Hitachi trains as future rolling stock for the Sofia Metro and the future Belgrade Metro.
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