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Old March 3rd, 2011, 07:28 PM   #2241
quashlo
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Maybe in the next batch order for the Marunouchi Line... I think right now they are refurbishing the existing 02 series:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1055
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Old March 3rd, 2011, 09:54 PM   #2242
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Hitachi wins order for B-CHOP energy storage system for Seoul Metro Line 9
http://www.hitachi.com/New/cnews/110303a.html

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TOKYO, Japan, and SEOUL, Korea, March 3, 2011 – Hitachi, Ltd. (NYSE: HIT / TSE: 6501), in collaboration with Hitachi Korea Ltd., has received an order for two 1000kW Energy Storage for Traction Power Supply ("B-CHOP") Systems from POSCO-ICT, a major engineering company in Korea. The B-CHOP systems, which will be used in the Seoul Metro Line 9 subway, are scheduled to begin commercial operations in August 2011.

Seoul Metro Line 9 is the first urban train line in Korea to be operated as a social infrastructure development project using private sector capital. Seoul Metro Line9 Corporation owns the trains, along with all electrical and mechanical equipment and facilities, and Seoul Line 9 Operation Co., Ltd. is responsible for operation and maintenance. Line 9 will run through the heart of Seoul, from the area around Gimpo International Airport, which is located in the westernmost part of the city and acts as the gateway to the nation's capital, to the Gangnam district, a new urban area in Seoul. As such, it is expected to serve as a new core transportation line. Phase 1, which measures 27.0 km, began operations in July 2009, and Phases 2 and 3, measuring 14.1 km in total, are currently under construction. The Korean government and regional municipalities have positioned railway transport as an effective means of preventing global warming, for example through reductions in CO2 emissions, and are continuing to promote energy conservation measures. They have expressed great interest in introducing new technologies related to the effective use of the regenerative power produced when the trains are stopped or slowing down.

Hitachi's B-CHOP system temporarily stores this regenerative power in rechargeable batteries, and reuses this power when it is needed to run other trains. In this way, the system reduces the total power volumes required to operate the line. The rechargeable batteries are lithium-ion batteries developed for automotive applications by Hitachi Vehicle Energy, Ltd. (President: Masafumi Yuhara). The direct current switching gear used in the B-CHOP system is a High Speed Vacuum Circuit Breaker (HSVCB)*1, the first of its kind to be implemented in Korea.

In October 2006, Hitachi completed a business collaboration contract with POSCO-ICT regarding the sale and maintenance of the B-CHOP system. Since then, the two companies have worked together in sales activities targeting railway operators in Korea. In 2007, Hitachi delivered a B-CHOP system to the Kobe Municipal Transportation Bureau in Japan for the Itayado traction substation on the Seishin Yamate Line. Seoul Metro Line9 Corporation and Seoul Line 9 Operation Co., Ltd. placed the new order based on a recognition of the outstanding energy conservation effects and operating performance of the system installed in Kobe. When Seoul Line 9 first began operations in 2009, Hitachi also delivered regeneration inverter equipment through POSCO-ICT, and the newly ordered B-CHOP system will enable even further reductions in power consumption. POSCO-ICT will install Hitachi's B-CHOP system in two traction substation on Seoul Line 9, and will receive fee-based income in accordance with the level of energy conservation effects achieved as a result of the system's installation.

Hitachi is currently rolling out its railway system business on a global scale as a key field in the Social Innovation Business. The company will continue to contribute to the growth and development of Korean railways based on new technologies such as the B-CHOP system, an energy conservation product for railway traction substation, as well as the Cubicle type Vacuum Insulated Switchgear (C-VIS)*2, a 22 kV switchgear system that conforms with CO2 reduction measures, and the HSVCB mentioned above, which demonstrates outstanding safety performance. As a comprehensive railway system integrator, Hitachi offers a wide range of solutions, including the "A-Train," a next-generation aluminum train car system, and signal systems whose performance has been proven in Japan's highly precise and reliable railway transport. Based on these advanced solutions, Hitachi will contribute to the development of environment-friendly urban railways, and to the creation of a "Green Growth" society, which has been put forward as a goal of the Korean government.

High Speed Vacuum Circuit Breaker (HSVCB)
A high-speed direct current circuit breaker that uses a vacuum interloper. The world's first HSVCB was developed by Hitachi in 1987. Conventional DC circuit breakers operate in air, but electrical arcs are generated in the air when circuits are broken, presenting issues related to both noise and safety. The HSVCB breaks the circuits using a vacuum interloper, so no electrical arcs are generated. This means that the circuit breaker operates more quietly, and offers outstanding safety in terms of fire prevention. These circuit breakers are currently in install in Japan, Taiwan, and the UAE.

Cubicle type Vacuum Insulated Switchgear (C-VIS)
A 22 kV switchgear that uses no SF6 (sulfur hexafluoride) gas, which has been identified as a greenhouse gas. The C-VIS is a compact switchgear that houses a circuit breaker, an isolation function, and a earthing switch inside of a vacuum insulated casing. The operating device uses a hybrid electromagnetic operation mechanism that dramatically reduces the frequency of maintenance. These switchgears are currently in install in Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan.
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Old March 5th, 2011, 11:47 AM   #2243
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Has there ever at any point been talk about increasing capacity on the Ginza Line e.g. increasing the number of cars from 6 to 8, etc. or is it simply just impossible? I ask because it seems to be a fairly busy line and 6 cars seem too few. But for this same reason and because of it's age, I suppose it would be too costly, difficult and time consuming to increase the number of cars per train. I guess I could ask the same question about the Marunouchi Line. And judging by the looks of the newer Namboku line stations, they built the stations with enough platform space for 8 cars, although only 6 car trains serve the line at the moment. It doesn't seem very busy though compared to the Ginza and Marunouchi lines, so I guess they won't be taking advantage of the extra room any time soon...
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Old March 5th, 2011, 09:10 PM   #2244
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The Ginza Line was already so busy by the 1970s that the Hanzōmon Line was built to relieve it. I would imagine that extending the platforms at the Ginza Line's stations would already have been done if it offered enough extra capacity to justify the cost.
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Old March 6th, 2011, 06:00 AM   #2245
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I think it seems really bad because the trains on both the Ginza Line and Marunouchi Line are so small. Overall ridership on the Ginza Line is actually lower than previous years, and crowding levels are on the lower end compared to the rest of Tōkyō Metro's lines... The Hanzōmon Line is actually worse in terms of passenger demand vs. capacity.

I wouldn't hold my breath that they will do anything about the Ginza Line, though... But if we were to dream, Braillard's proposal for a new line (Shibuya – Roppongi – Kasumigaseki) would probably be a good relief for the Ginza Line, as the most crowded section of the line is between Akasaka Mitsuke and Tameike – Sannō.
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Old March 6th, 2011, 02:17 PM   #2246
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Here's a map I've made of Tokyo subway network, with geographically accurate path of all 13 lines (Tokyo Metro + Toei Subway). Hope that helps those unfamiliar with the most ridden system in the world.



Closer view of central area:


Last edited by juanico; March 6th, 2011 at 02:24 PM. Reason: Resized pictures
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Old March 6th, 2011, 07:34 PM   #2247
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Nice.
Next, you should add in the JR and private railway lines to make it complete.
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Old March 6th, 2011, 10:55 PM   #2248
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I've done it. Will post it soon

For now, here's the same map with the additional lines that complete the metro network : Rinkai (dark blue on the map), Saitama (turquoise), Tōyō (bright green), all up to full metro standards ; Yurikamome (indigo), Nippori-Toneri (pink), both are light automatic metro ; the green racket-shaped line in the East being Yūkarigaoka, a people mover serving some residencial area.



With monorails, streetcar lines, and Yokohama Subway:



Monorails: Tokyo (in sky blue), Chiba (cyan), Tama Toshi (orange)
Streetcars: Setagaya (yellow), Toden Arakawa (green)
Yokohama Subway: Blue and Green lines (partially shown)

Last edited by juanico; March 6th, 2011 at 11:09 PM.
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Old March 7th, 2011, 07:23 PM   #2249
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In the quoted article about the new Ginza line cars, one item caught my attention and I thought it might be of interest to share the history behind that bit of information that I uncovered while researching my book "Tokyo Subways", pub. 1992, under the pen name Dennis Shaw.

"About the former 1000 series
The former 1000 series, which serves as the design theme for this new series, was introduced by Tōkyō Metro predecessor Tōkyō Underground Railway as Japan’s first subway train.

Because the series was designed for subways, the cars were designed as all-steel units—a departure from the wood frequently used at the time—and featured inflammable materials."


While planning the construction of the Ginza line, they studied various subways. Around that time, there was a fire in a New York subway involving wooden cars. I understand that was the primary reason for making all-steel cars.
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Old March 7th, 2011, 07:46 PM   #2250
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Interesting...

I guess history repeats itself, as the MLIT upgraded its fire resistance standards for subway cars after the Daegu Subway fire in 2003. Materials used in the ceiling of subway cars must not only be fire-resistant but also resistant to melting and liquidization, and doors must be provided between cars to contain any fire. This applies to all subway-type cars, including through-servicing private railway trains (e.g., Tōkyū 5000 series, JR East E233-2000) and private railway subway trains (e.g., Keihan 3000 series, Hanshin 1000 series).
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:44 PM   #2251
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
IC farecard manaca debuts in Nagoya area
http://www.chunichi.co.jp/article/na...202000017.html



Short news feature on manaca (2011.02.10).
Unfortunately, there’s not much up on YouTube yet, and I don’t feel like scrounging around personal blogs, so maybe starrwulfe can post some pictures of opening day.


Source: celockable on YouTube
Sorry I didn't come thru as promised-- I took lots of pix but then my job suddenly transferred me to Tokyo...
So the good news-- I live in Tokyo now!
Bad news... I can't cover Tokai stuff like I once did...

Anyway, Manaca came off without a hitch... I got my pre-ordered card and promptly went around using it everywhere I could. Works as expected on the subway and bus and Meitetsu lines... But there were various snafus I didn't expect...
  • I found out quickly that there are some lines that aren't participating in the Manaca roll-out... The Linimo fo example.
  • On the subway, they've left some old gates in the plazas, so unless you're paying attention, you may walk up to them and there's no place to tap. I'm guessing they couldn't roll 'em out fast enough and all the gates will be manaca/ticket or manaca only by the summer.
  • The list of stores that accept manaca as payment is inconsistent due to the chain stores upgrading of the POS systems. For example, I could use my manaca at all Aeon markets and Circle K stores... But as for Mr. Donuts, I could only use the one by Ikeshita Station. Again, this may change. Incidently, I found manaca had been installed on almost every Coca-Cola vending machine I came across within 2 kms of a station, including the one near my old place. Wow.

Anyway, I have pix to tell the tale as soon as I unpack my stuff... Stay Tuned!
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Old March 9th, 2011, 10:37 AM   #2252
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I'll take Tōkyō area pics anytime.

There's lots going on, and unfortunately, one of my favorite blogs no longer updates while another has cut down on his posts... I'm also getting super busy at work, so anything you got is good.
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Old March 9th, 2011, 10:37 AM   #2253
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Marubeni chasing Jakarta MRT job
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/busin...mrt-job/427555

Quote:
Japanese trading giant Marubeni Corporation has made its third offer in as many years to help build Jakarta’s Mass Rapid Transit rail line, Governor Fauzi Bowo said on Tuesday.

After meeting with Teruo Asada, Marubeni’s president and chairman of the Japan-Indonesia Economic Committee, Fauzi said the company would have the opportunity to participate in the project once it got under way in 2012, but would have to go through a public tender process.

“I welcome their offer to take part in the project,” he said. “Once the tender is open, they will have the chance to register, but they must meet the requirements.”

Marubeni was previously involved in the construction of MRT networks in Caracas, Manila and Taipei, among other cities.

Fauzi said he had received similar offers from other major companies, adding that he hoped the crowded field would result in the lowest cost for the project once the tender process was complete.

Sutanto Suhodho, the governor’s deputy for transportation, trade and industry, said that while Marubeni had allocated substantial funding for projects in Indonesia and Southeast Asia, it would have to take part in the public tender along with all other companies seeking to participate in the MRT project.

“It’s not just Marubeni that has expressed interest,” he said. “We’ve also heard from Mitsubishi and from companies from Germany. They’ve all got to go through the same tender process.”

In the meeting, Marubeni also offered to invest in power generation and water management projects in the capital.

“They’ve got a lot of experience in desalination plants,” Fauzi said. “There’s a desalination pilot project being run now by Ancol [in North Jakarta], and if the results are positive, we could build on it as an alternative source of clean drinking water for the city.”

He added that in the field of power generation, Marubeni had offered to invest in a new plant with state-owned utility Perusahaan Listrik Negara to meet the city’s capacity shortfall of 150 megawatts.

However, he said his administration was looking for a longer-term solution by building its own power plant, independent of PLN, in the special economic zone planned for Marunda in North Jakarta.

In a separate development, the Jakarta Transportation Office announced it would try to utilize abandoned monorail pillars in the building of elevated roads for new TransJakarta busway corridors. Corridors XIII, XIV and XV are all expected to have elevated sections running over busy junctions and stretches of road.

Udar Pristono, head of the office, said using the existing pillars would help to save costs.

“All three routes will need elevated sections, so we’ve proposed that they make use of the monorail pillars in South and Central Jakarta as well as existing elevated road sections that aren’t being used,” he said on Tuesday.

Sutanto added that building elevated busway routes was the only viable way to ensure the routes were completed quickly with minimal disruption to regular traffic.

“The only options are to acquire more land for the new routes or elevate them, but freeing up land is always complicated and could turn out to be the more expensive option,” he said.

Construction of the three routes is not expected to begin until after 2012.
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Old March 9th, 2011, 10:38 AM   #2254
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Kinki Sharyō’s ameriTRAM on demonstration for DART
http://www.dallasnews.com/news/trans...allas-line.ece

Quote:

The ameriTram 300, an energy-efficient streetcar made by Japan-based Kinkisharyo, was demonstrated Tuesday on DART's light-rail tracks in downtown Dallas.

By JOSH PHERIGO
Staff Writer
Published 08 March 2011 03:18 PM

Dallas Area Rapid Transit demonstrated a new energy-efficient streetcar Tuesday afternoon for city officials and the media.

The ameriTRAM prototype, manufactured by Kinkisharyo, shuttled DART and city leaders back and forth from the Akard and Victory stations while a Kinkisharyo executive explained the benefits of the new streetcar.

DART is developing a plan to create downtown streetcar routes that would complement its larger light-rail system. The city secured a $23 million grant last year to help finance the project.

Kinkisharyo vice president and general manager Rainer Hombach told a group of passengers, including Dallas City Council member Linda Koop, that the vehicle would save on installation costs because it can operate without overhead cables.

The streetcar runs on rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and can travel about five miles before recharging for six to eight minutes, Hombach said. The ameriTRAM also recycles energy by channeling braking energy back into the battery.
DART footage (2011.03.08).
Feels strange seeing no pantograph up…


Source: DARTDallas on YouTube
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Old March 9th, 2011, 04:48 PM   #2255
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I'm guessing it wasn't configured for overhead operation that time around.
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Old March 9th, 2011, 11:00 PM   #2256
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Kawasaki snags order for Taichung MRT with Alstom, CTCI Corporation
http://e.nikkei.com/e/fr/tnks/Nni20110309D09JFN05.htm

Quote:
TOKYO (Nikkei)--Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. (7012) said Wednesday that it has won a joint order with Alstom Transport SA of France and CTCI Corp. of Taiwan to supply a train system to the Taiwanese city of Taichung.

This roughly 29.5 billion yen order will be delivered to the Taipei city government's Department of Rapid Transit Systems by October 2017.

The 18-station system will span 16.71km in Taichung, serving this area with driverless two-car trains. Kawasaki Heavy will oversee construction of the entire system and supply 36 cars, along with maintenance service.

Alstom will handle the signal system, while CTCI will supply the electrical system.

Kawasaki Heavy's previous orders in the segment have consisted largely of supplying train cars. By taking on the larger role of coordinating the delivery of a complete system, the company may see a pickup in such orders down the road.

It will seek more opportunities abroad by joining forces with overseas firms.

This order is for the new Wuri-Wenxin-Beitun Line (Green Line) between Beitun Station and Wuri Station (THSR Taichung Station) in Taichung City. More specifically, Kawasaki, as the consortium leader in this effort, will be responsible for project management and systems integration, and will also manufacture the 36 cars and provide the train depot equipment. Communications systems and AFC will be handled jointly by Alstom and CTCI.

Kawasaki already has some pretty extensive experience in Taipei at least, supplying 132 cars for Taipei MRT’s first fleet in 1992 and 1993, as well as 321 cars (fourth fleet) between 2005 and 2010. In March 2007, Kawasaki also teamed with CTCI and others to win the train system for the Xinyi–Songshan Line, with Kawasaki providing the rolling stock and signaling systems. Work on the 138 cars for that order already began in 2010. Kawasaki has also supplied 700T high-speed trainsets for THSR and is currently manufacturing trains for the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport MRT.

These will be some unusual sets, with only two-car consists but metro-style standard of five doors per car.

Last edited by quashlo; March 9th, 2011 at 11:38 PM.
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Old March 10th, 2011, 01:36 PM   #2257
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Kinki Sharyō’s ameriTRAM on demonstration for DART
Was the name 'ameriTRAM' picked to make the tram seem more American and patriotic and to hide the fact that it's actually Japanese?
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Old March 11th, 2011, 01:28 AM   #2258
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I'm not sure there's really a need to hide the fact that it's Japanese, as KS already has a good share of the LRV market in the U.S., whether the average passenger recognizes it or not. After all, the big "Kinki Sharyō" plastered on the sides of the prototype is clearly not an American company.

I think it's more about appealing to the notion of trains assembled and/or manufactured locally, providing jobs to American people—"Buy American" is always a key issue in winning orders in the U.S.

KS put up some pictures of the new unit on their Flickr account:

In Charlotte:

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


In Dallas:

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Photo op for the bigwigs…

image hosted on flickr


Next to one of DART’s older Kinki Sharyō LRVs:

image hosted on flickr
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Old March 11th, 2011, 01:47 AM   #2259
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The AmeriTram seems like a good compromise for future DC streetcar lines (due to the city's anti-overhead wires law).
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Old March 11th, 2011, 04:01 AM   #2260
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
The AmeriTram seems like a good compromise for future DC streetcar lines (due to the city's anti-overhead wires law).
They got rid of part of the law , except near the mall...
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