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Old March 11th, 2011, 01:42 PM   #2261
quashlo
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Tōkyō area commuters stranded as railway service suspended
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...103110519.html

JR Shinjuku Station, East Exit (15:34):



With the entire rail network paralyzed, people were forced to walk (15:55, Hibiya).
Given the distance of many commutes, walking home is out of the question for many, but workers have been encouraged to head back to their office and wait things out.



Passengers evacuate a Yamanote Line train (16:45, Minato Ward):



Commuters stranded at Shibuya Station (18:00):



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Old March 11th, 2011, 10:04 PM   #2262
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Status of Tōkyō area railways as of March 12 1:26 am:
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...103110804.html

Quote:
Some railway companies are running all-night service through to the morning of March 12 to serve passengers stranded on their way home. The status of each company is as follows.

Tōkyō Metro (schedule for last trains pushed back)
Already fully re-opened: Ginza Line, Marunouchi Line, Hanzōmon Line, Namboku Line
Portions re-opened: Hibiya Line (Minami-Senju – Naka-Meguro), Tōzai Line (Takadanobaba – Myōden), Chiyoda Line (Kasumigaseki – Yoyogi Uehara), Yūrakuchō Line (Ikebukuro – Shin-Kiba), Fukutoshin Line (Shibuya – Ikebukuro)

Toei Subway (schedule for last trains and Toei buses pushed back)
Already fully re-opened: Ōedo Line, Shinjuku Line
Portions re-opened: Asakusa Line (Nishi-Magome – Asakusabashi), Mita Line (Mita – Nishi-Takashimadaira)

Seibu Railway
Running all-night service to morning of March 12

Keiō Line (schedule for last trains pushed back)
All lines re-opened, but service is all-stop only

Odakyū Electric Railway (schedule for last trains pushed back)
All lines re-opened, trains operating at slower speeds

JR East, Tōbu Railway, Keisei Electric Railway
No re-opening on March 11. Due to facilities damage, service on the Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation’s Nippori–Toneri Liner will be suspended to later than March 12
The tsunami also apparently caused derailment of at least one train on the JR Senseki Line (this is in the hardest hit area, in Sendai), but there has been no confirmation on how many people, if any, were on board.
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...103110809.html
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Old March 11th, 2011, 10:04 PM   #2263
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News on March 12 service on the JR East network in the Greater Tōkyō (National Capital Region):
http://www.jreast.co.jp/

30 to 50 percent of services will be restored on the following lines starting 0700 hours:
  • Chūō Rapid Line (full length)
  • Ōme / Itsukaichi Line (full length)
  • Chūō–Sōbu Local Line (full length)
  • Saikyō Line (Ōsaki – Ōmiya)
  • Keihin-Tōhoku / Negishi Line (Ōmiya – Sakuragichō)
  • Jōban Rapid Line (Ueno – Abiko)
  • Jōban Local Line (Ayase – Toride)
  • Tōkaidō Line (Tōkyō – Atami)
  • Yokosuka Line (Ōfuna – Zushi)
  • Sōbu Rapid Line (Tōkyō – Chiba)
  • Yokohama Line (full length)
  • Takasaki Line (full length)

Yamanote Line is expected to re-open around 8:00 am, with about 30 to 50 percent of the normally scheduled services. Many limited express services are expected to be suspended.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 10:30 PM   #2264
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Just where did that tsunami hit, that Tokyo is so severely affected?
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Old March 11th, 2011, 10:49 PM   #2265
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKorean View Post
Just where did that tsunami hit, that Tokyo is so severely affected?
Tokyo is protected from tsunami - the short period waves are strongly damped over long passage along shallow waters of Tokyo Bay (How high were the waves on Tokyo waterfront?). As far as tsunamis go, Tokyo is effectively inland. What disrupted Tokyo was shaking itself - strong enough to break houses and set on fire oil refineries something like 400 km from hypocentre.

How far did the shaking affect the other directions of Japan? What about the Sea of Japan side of Tohoku, or Hokkaido which is after all just as far north of Sendai as Tokyo is south?

There have been typical news reports of "bullet train" missing. More specific reports state that one train is missing on Senseki line - which is zairaisen - but they explicitly mention 2 trains missing. Can anyone specify the lines and approximate locations of both/all missing trains?
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Old March 11th, 2011, 11:01 PM   #2266
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Even if there ends up being no physical damage to the infrastructure, inspecting all of the facilities to make sure they are undamaged takes time. And then there is the issue of mobilizing station staff and train crews who may or may not be able to actually get to offices, stations, and train yards.

JR East has not received word from 4 train crews, but these are all on conventional lines (Senseki Line and Ōfunato Line) in Miyagi and Iwate Prefectures, closest to the quake epicenter. At least one Senseki Line train was derailed as a result of the tsunami.
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...103120157.html
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Old March 11th, 2011, 11:03 PM   #2267
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Tokyo is protected from tsunami - the short period waves are strongly damped over long passage along shallow waters of Tokyo Bay (How high were the waves on Tokyo waterfront?). As far as tsunamis go, Tokyo is effectively inland. What disrupted Tokyo was shaking itself - strong enough to break houses and set on fire oil refineries something like 400 km from hypocentre.

How far did the shaking affect the other directions of Japan? What about the Sea of Japan side of Tohoku, or Hokkaido which is after all just as far north of Sendai as Tokyo is south?

There have been typical news reports of "bullet train" missing. More specific reports state that one train is missing on Senseki line - which is zairaisen - but they explicitly mention 2 trains missing. Can anyone specify the lines and approximate locations of both/all missing trains?
Were they in service with passengers or were they just parked at the train yard?
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Old March 12th, 2011, 02:56 AM   #2268
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Some news clips:

Earthquake footage at JR Kannai Station on the Keihin-Tōhoku / Negishi Line in Yokohama:


Source: Kanagawa Shimbun

The scene at Yokohama Station and around the station’s West Exit on the afternoon of 2011.03.11… Some commuters are glued to the TV screens inside stations, while others crouch along the walls and stairways of the station waiting for news about the resumption of train service.


Source: Kanagawa Shimbun

Stranded passengers spend the night in Shinjuku Station.


Source: rocketnews24 on YouTube

TBS news report around 7:00 am today (2011.03.12), as people flood the South Exit at JR Shinjuku Station to hopefully catch the first trains of the morning. Less than half of the normal services are in operation, and only on certain lines.

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Old March 12th, 2011, 03:04 AM   #2269
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Helicopter teams rescue 9 passengers from the 4-car JR Senseki Line train near Nobiru Station (Higashi-Matsuyama City, Miyagi Prefecture) that was derailed after being struck by the tsunami.
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...htm?from=main2

According to the article, the other three trains for which JR East has yet to receive contact from assigned train crews were operating on the Ōfunato Line, Kesennuma Line, and Yamada Line—all relatively minor lines, but with sections right up along the Tōhoku coastline and easily susceptible to the tsunami.
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Old March 12th, 2011, 07:20 AM   #2270
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I don't mean to sound insensitive but at this point, what would be the fate of the Shinkansen lines in the Northeast and the Tozai Line construction in Sendai?
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Old March 12th, 2011, 09:43 AM   #2271
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
I don't mean to sound insensitive but at this point, what would be the fate of the Shinkansen lines in the Northeast and the Tozai Line construction in Sendai?
Don't want to get too much into Shinkansen since it's probably better left in the other thread, but I just found this picture of part of the aerial structure through Fukushima:
http://www.asahi.com/national/galler...1103120218.jpg

Suffice it to say they've got their work cut out for them, although at least this part is only the catenary masts... I haven't heard any news of structural damage to the aerials. Jōetsu and Nagano Shinkansen are back in service as of 16:04 March 12.

As for the Tōzai Line, this is Wakabayashi Ward, the hardest hit part of Sendai City due to its location right next to the coast, and where there is news of at least 200-300 dead from the tsunami. In contrast, central Sendai City is OK.
http://www.asahi.com/photonews/galle...sunami122.html

Compare with this quickie map I made… Please note alignment for the Tōzai Line is approximate only.
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?sourc...3a9fe946edd747

The red dot and line show the approximate photo location and area captured. The Tōzai Line is actually further north, but if you look at the terrain layer in Google, you can see that there isn’t much difference in elevation between the eastern sections of the Tōzai Line and the areas captured in the picture. It seems entirely possible that the construction sites for the Tōzai Line, which will be entirely underground in this part of the city, could have been inundated.

Few other pics...

JR Senseki Line flooded
http://www.asahi.com/national/galler...1103120277.jpg

Senseki Line train derailed by the tsunami
http://www.asahi.com/photonews/galle...sunami128.html
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Old March 13th, 2011, 06:14 AM   #2272
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Hey everyone-- Just want to tell people in the forum my story...

As you may or may not know, I moved to Yokohama 2 weeks ago for my new job in Tokyo. So I was at my desk in the office in Gotanda, which is about 4km south of Tokyo station on the Yamanote line. I live in Hiyoshi, which is in the north end of Yokohama. I take the Tokyu Meguro line to Fudomae station from Hiyoshi Station. It's about 20 minutes end to end.

When the quake hit I ran outside along with my co-workers; it's a small 4 story building and there were maybe 15 of us at the job that day. There's a parking lot in front of our building where we gathered. All the buildings were shaking violently, and we expected the glass to break out any second--but it held.

We had no idea how big the quake was at that moment. There was no damage on the 1st or 2nd floors where I work, but on the 3rd and 4th floors, cabinets were overturned. There were 2 big aftershocks in the first hour after the quakes. We then found our sales people and CEO had to walk from Odaiba due to all trains being halted, and taxis being overbooked.

Tokyu started running trains out of Tokyo at 12am... So I eventually got home, but most people didn't get back till the morning.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 07:59 AM   #2273
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Here is an interesting vid on Youtube, it's a broadcast when the actual 9.0 hit Japan. You'll see an automated early warning message coming on, then after a minute or so the actual shaking starts.



That is the lead time trains have to make an emergency stop, and all trains equipped with ATC hooked up to UrEDAS detecting the P waves within the earthquake hits the breaks automatically.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 08:21 AM   #2274
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You might think that that's it, but I was glued to the live NHK feed in the late evening on March 11 and there were constant earthquake warnings every 15-20 minutes from all the aftershocks.

Coming from earthquake country myself, I actually find Japan's warning system almost surreal... Honestly, it almost feels like magic. It's an amazing technology that will hopefully be replicated and introduced in other areas subject to frequent seismic activity.

Last edited by quashlo; March 13th, 2011 at 08:28 AM.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 08:27 AM   #2275
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Some more clips:

Scary footage at JR Sendai Station as the earthquake happened.


Source: quikku1 on YouTube

Mikawashima Station on the JR Jōban Rapid Line at the time of the earthquake.
Shaking was violent and persisted for some time.


Source: miyasako555 on YouTube

The situation in the Yokohama area on 2011.03.12.
Limited JR service, leading to some crowding as stranded passengers try to make it home.
Overcrowding on platforms forced station staff to use some access control at JR Yokohama Station.



Clips on the Shin-Keisei Electric Railway and JR Jōban Line on 2011.03.12.
Because of reduced service, radial lines like the Jōban Line saw crowding that was almost at weekday rush-hour levels.



Currently, most train service is restored in Greater Tōkyō.
However, service on the JR Jōban Line between Toride and Iwaki and JR Narita Line between Narita and Abiko is still suspended. Also, further out, the Mito Line and Kashima Line are still closed. Nippori–Toneri Liner is still down (earlier reports said “facilities damage”) and I think the Yurikamome and some of Tōbu’s lines further north in Gunma and Tochigi may also still be out of commission. It’s likely these have suffered some sort of damage that will take a little bit longer to repair.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #2276
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Pictures:
Source: Yomiuri Shimbun

A JR Senseki Line train derailed and carried away by the tsunami. (March 12 8:43 am, Higashi-Matsuyama City, Miyagi Prefecture)


Passengers spend the night in an underground passage at Ueno Station. (March 12 12:38 am, Taitō Ward, Tōkyō)


Stranded commuters queue up to take buses. (March 11 9:34 pm, Shibuya, Tōkyō)


Flooded areas around JR Hakodate Station. (March 11 7:32 pm, Hakodate City, Hokkaidō)


Passengers waiting at entrance to Sendai Municipal Subway Sendai Station. (5:29 pm)


People wait inside the concourse at Keiō Shinjuku Station for the resumption of train service. (March 11 5:06 pm)


With the faregates closed, passengers stare at the news reports on TV screens inside JR Kawasaki Station. (March 11 2:59 pm)


With train service halted, commuters walk home on foot (March 11 7:02 pm, Shibuya Ward, Tōkyō)


Passengers stuck at JR Shinjuku Station. (March 11 3:10 pm, Shinjuku Ward, Tōkyō)


Odakyū Shinjuku Station. (March 11 3:21 pm, Shinjuku Ward, Tōkyō)
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Old March 13th, 2011, 08:29 AM   #2277
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Four-car JR Jōban Line train at JR Shinchi Station in Fukushima Prefecture. There were no injured or dead inside the train, so presumably passengers had already left when the tsunami came.
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news...2390069-n1.htm













JR East announced that 70 passengers and crew on the four passenger trains feared lost had been accounted for:
  • About 50 passengers plus conductor from a train on the JR Senseki Line between Nobiru and Tōna. The train’s operator made it back to Sendai on his / her own.
  • About 15 passengers and one operator from a train on the JR Ōfunato Line between Ōfunato and Shimo-Funato.
  • Several passengers from a JR Kesennuma Line train between Matsuiwa and Saichi. The operator returned to the train yard.
  • Passengers from a JR Ōfunato Line train at Sakari Station who had already exited the train before the earthquake occurred.
http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20...00003-jij-soci

However, there is apparently another train on the Sanriku Railway Minami-Rias Line (a small, third-sector private railway in Iwate) that is still lost.
http://www.sanspo.com/shakai/news/11...0507014-n1.htm
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Old March 13th, 2011, 08:31 AM   #2278
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Some people think that that's it, but I was glued to the live NHK feed in the late evening on March 11 and there were constant earthquake warnings every 15-20 minutes from all the aftershocks.

Coming from earthquake country myself, I actually find Japan's warning system almost surreal... Honestly, it almost feels like magic. It's an amazing technology that will hopefully be replicated and introduced in other areas subject to frequent seismic activity.
You are absolutely right. I turned on the TV this morning and suddenly an earthquake warning similar to the one in the video you posted popped up. 5 secs later, my room was shaking.

On Friday and Saturday the aftershocks were constant, almost every 5 minutes at some points. 2 big ones woke me up in my sleep. Today I can still feel aftershocks from time to time, but their intensity and frequency is much lower than Friday and Saturday.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 08:36 AM   #2279
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Thanks for the updates...
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Old March 14th, 2011, 12:20 AM   #2280
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An update on the situation in the Tōkyō area...

Due to damage to multiple power plants, TEPCO and the Japanese government have announced rolling blackouts to begin this morning (2011.03.14 0600) in the Kantō region. This will of course greatly affect the ability of railway operators to provide service.

JR East has already announced that it will suspend service across most of its network for the whole day. Only the following JR lines will be running, at much reduced levels:
  • Yamanote Line (full length)
  • Chūō Rapid Line (Tōkyō – Tachikawa)
  • Keihin-Tōhoku Line (Kamata – Akabane)
  • Jōban Rapid Line (Ueno – Matsudo)
  • Jōban Local Line (Ayase – Matsudo)
They probably strategically selected these as the most critical lines… The Sōbu Main Line and Tōkaidō Main Line are paralleled by private railways. However, service from Saitama seems like it might be severely affected, as there is no JR service planned north of Akabane and no parallel private railways. There will be no service on peripheral lines (Nambu Line, Yokohama Line, Musashino Line) and less-critical radial lines (Keiyō Line).

Private railways are suspending service on their smaller feeder rail lines and service on sections of their networks further out from central Tōkyō… There will be no or only limited through-servicing with the subways. Given that it may have difficulty deploying enough staff since train crews may not be able to get to work, Tōkyō Metro will also run at substantially reduced frequency. To save power, it will also cut AC in all trains.

People have been encouraged to avoid commuting or otherwise leaving their homes, but this will be another test for both passengers and the railway staff. Commuters who do choose to go to work will have to find a means to access the nearest in-service station or line, whether it’s bus, taxi, on foot, or on bike, and try and get on a train from there. The details of the blackouts were only announced just a few hours ago, and so far many early-bird commuters are showing up at stations unaware of the changes.
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