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Old March 14th, 2011, 05:11 PM   #2281
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the eastern end of the Tozai Line being built in Sendai (Arai Station) appears to be just a couple miles from the Pacific Coast and is at the edge of an agricultural area next to a freeway interchange. I hope this does not lead to a permanent cancellation for Sendai's crosstown subway.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 06:54 PM   #2282
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
An update on the situation in the Tōkyō area...

Due to damage to multiple power plants, TEPCO and the Japanese government have announced rolling blackouts to begin this morning (2011.03.14 0600) in the Kantō region. This will of course greatly affect the ability of railway operators to provide service.

JR East has already announced that it will suspend service across most of its network for the whole day. Only the following JR lines will be running, at much reduced levels:
  • Yamanote Line (full length)
  • Chūō Rapid Line (Tōkyō – Tachikawa)
  • Keihin-Tōhoku Line (Kamata – Akabane)
  • Jōban Rapid Line (Ueno – Matsudo)
  • Jōban Local Line (Ayase – Matsudo)
They probably strategically selected these as the most critical lines… The Sōbu Main Line and Tōkaidō Main Line are paralleled by private railways. However, service from Saitama seems like it might be severely affected, as there is no JR service planned north of Akabane and no parallel private railways. There will be no service on peripheral lines (Nambu Line, Yokohama Line, Musashino Line) and less-critical radial lines (Keiyō Line).

Private railways are suspending service on their smaller feeder rail lines and service on sections of their networks further out from central Tōkyō… There will be no or only limited through-servicing with the subways. Given that it may have difficulty deploying enough staff since train crews may not be able to get to work, Tōkyō Metro will also run at substantially reduced frequency. To save power, it will also cut AC in all trains.
As a new resident of Yokohama with a daily commute into Tokyo via the Tokyu Meguro line, here's the details:

Meguro line was running every 15 minutes, local trains only and only to Meguro station from it's usual Hiyoshi Station terminus on the Tokyoko line (also my home neighborhood now)

Usually we have this line running thru service with the Toei Mita line subway, and Metro Nanboku line subway/Saitama rapid railway. Alternate trains run as expresses, usually the trains that are running onto the Mita line. Frequency is usually 10 minutes off-peak and 5 minutes peak times.

Also the reason why most trains didn't run was simple-- the crossing gates use local power lines in most areas. With the rolling blackouts in place, the crossing arms wouldn't come down when a train passes.

Today we only had Group V see blackouts-- outlying Ibaraki and Shizuoka prefecture exurbs of the metropolis. Tomorrow is another day...
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Old March 14th, 2011, 07:32 PM   #2283
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I'm guessing your neighbourhood is in Kohoku ward, close to Kawasaki?

How long is the commute to Tokyo?
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Old March 15th, 2011, 08:38 AM   #2284
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
Also the reason why most trains didn't run was simple-- the crossing gates use local power lines in most areas. With the rolling blackouts in place, the crossing arms wouldn't come down when a train passes.
It's interesting you say this because my experience contradicts this statement. I work in Totsuka, Yokohama and last Friday after the quake power was out in the entire ward, but Totsuka Station had power, presumably because it is powered by the Tokaido Line, not the local power grid. Anyway, there is an at-grade crossing right next to the station; despite the the power outage, the gate arms were down, the lights were blinking and the warning sounds buzzing. Totsuka is scheduled for another black out today, but I believe the JR lines will continue to run. There are quite a few at-grade crossings on the Tokaido Line; I doubt they'd pull power and keep the line running if it was powered by the local grid. But who knows, perhaps the line you use is different because it's not JR or a major line like Tokaido line, idk.
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Old March 15th, 2011, 09:59 AM   #2285
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
It's interesting you say this because my experience contradicts this statement. I work in Totsuka, Yokohama and last Friday after the quake power was out in the entire ward, but Totsuka Station had power, presumably because it is powered by the Tokaido Line, not the local power grid. Anyway, there is an at-grade crossing right next to the station; despite the the power outage, the gate arms were down, the lights were blinking and the warning sounds buzzing. Totsuka is scheduled for another black out today, but I believe the JR lines will continue to run. There are quite a few at-grade crossings on the Tokaido Line; I doubt they'd pull power and keep the line running if it was powered by the local grid. But who knows, perhaps the line you use is different because it's not JR or a major line like Tokaido line, idk.
This is the case in some areas of course. But even the Tokaido line has sections where the gates are powered locally. That's why the section between Odawara and Fuji has no service today.

Here is a link that I picked up while working on my newsfeeds today. A realtime crowd sourced twitter matrix of JR Tokyo lines using the GPS coordinates in the tweets to append them to their respective lines. Awesome use of tech!
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/15393707/JR1.html
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Old March 15th, 2011, 10:04 AM   #2286
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post

I'm guessing your neighbourhood is in Kohoku ward, close to Kawasaki?

How long is the commute to Tokyo?
Only 20 minutes to work. Meguro Line starts here and ends at my job.
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Old March 15th, 2011, 10:35 AM   #2287
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JR East does have its own power plants, so that may also be part of the reason. Private railways likely don't have access to their own sources of electricity and need to purchase it (e.g., from TEPCO). I think this is why they were more susceptible to the rolling blackouts and you saw them trying to pull some crazy schedules where trains would only be running during fixed blocks of hours.... Must have been pretty tough for the schedulers.
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Old March 15th, 2011, 10:37 AM   #2288
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Rolling blackouts: Part 1

First some videos of the events on 2011.03.14 as a result of the rolling blackouts, which led to substantial cuts in train service all across Greater Tōkyō.

The morning commute was particularly chaotic, despite the fact that the rolling blackouts weren’t actually implemented because TEPCO said the total load on the grid was lower than expected. Although not on the initial list of lines, JR East did resume service on the Saikyō Line at 8:00 in the morning, giving Saitama-area commuters an option other than hoofing it to Akabane Station.

Morning crowding was also severe on Keikyū, which was hit with all the demand from Yokohama-area commuters who normally take JR or other lines. Keikyū ended up suspending service temporarily between 15:30 and 20:00, citing potential safety hazards.

After the chaos in the morning, JR East decided to resume service for the evening commute on additional lines:
  • Tōkaidō Line (Tōkyō – Fujisawa)
  • Yokosuka Line (Tōkyō – Zushi)
  • Chūō‒Sōbu Line (Nishi-Funabashi – Mitaka)
They also restored the full-length of the JR Keihin-Tōhoku Line (west of Kamata and north of Akabane). As a compromise of sorts, however, it reduced the number of services across all lines to only 20 percent of the normal schedule.

Odakyū, which had suspended service on most of its network in the morning, resumed service on all of its lines at around 20:00.

Some bus companies are having difficulties deploying drivers and securing fuel, and were forced to operate on weekend schedules or with heavily-reduced service.

Yomiuri Shimbun clips at Nishi-Kokubunji Station and Tachikawa Station on the JR Chūō Line.



asahi.com aerial shots of train stations and roadways:



ANN news report 1.



ANN news report 2.
Shinjuku Station, at 17:00.
Apparently, the rush started a little earlier than usual, as some companies let workers off early. Apparently, many workers didn’t show up to their offices at all.



This morning (2011.03.15) was a little less hectic, as railway operators increased service. TEPCO agreed to provide power as needed by railway operators to the necessary transformer stations at the request of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). Railway operators would help conserve some electricity by limiting the number of trains and total coverage area, while TEPCO agreed to provide enough electricity during the peak demand periods. This also made things easier for railway operators, who now no longer need to constantly devise complicated schedules on the fly to avoid blackout periods.

ANN news report 3.

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Old March 15th, 2011, 10:40 AM   #2289
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Rolling blackouts: Part 2

Pics of the rolling blockout:
Source: Yomiuri Shimbun

A congested Toda Bridge (National Route 17) as a result of rolling blackouts that also meant chaos for railways. This is one of the major routes into central Tōkyō from Saitama. (March 14, 9:47 am, Itabashi Ward, Tōkyō)


Passengers listen to information on the status of train services from station staff. (March 14, 9:16 am, Azamino Station on the Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line in Aoba Ward, Yokohama City)


Faregates at JR Musashi Kosugi Station are shuttered after service on the JR Nambu Line was suspended in response to rolling blockouts. (March 14, 1:27 pm, Nakahara Ward, Kawasaki City)


Crowding outside Yokohama Station as a result of the suspension of JR service. (March 14, 9:07 am, Yokohama City)


People crossing the Shin-Arakawa Bridge from Saitama Prefecture on bikes and motorcycles, bound for JR Akabane Station. (March 14, 8:45 am, Kita Ward, Tōkyō)


With a reduced schedule, trains were crowded. (March 14, 8:07 am, Aoba Ward, Yokohama City)


With the train schedules announced, passengers wait on the platform for the train. As the train is already full, only a handful of people were able to get on. (March 14, 6:51 am, Ōizumi Gakuen Station in Nerima Ward, Tōkyō)


People read special edition papers reporting on the chaos in Greater Tōkyō. (March 14, 9:56 am, Tenjin, Fukuoka City).
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Old March 15th, 2011, 10:41 AM   #2290
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Rolling blackouts: Part 3

A long queue of passengers outside Kichijōji Station on the JR Chūō Line as a result of the reduced train service. (March 14, 8:30 am, Musashino City, Tōkyō).


People crossing a bridge on foot bound for central Tōkyō. (March 14, 8:29 am, Kita Ward, Tōkyō)


A crowded Keikyū Yokohama Station as a result of cancelled service on JR and other lines. (March 14, 7:58 am, Yokohama City)




Queues to board trains stretch outside the station. (March 14, 7:46 am, Shakujii Kōen in Nerima Ward, Tōkyō)
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Old March 15th, 2011, 07:06 PM   #2291
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post

ANN news report 2.
Shinjuku Station, at 17:00.
Apparently, the rush started a little earlier than usual, as some companies let workers off early. Apparently, many workers didn’t show up to their offices at all.


Er, What's that 'Burping' noise at 1:49? It's not one of the electronic gates being opened is it?
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Old March 16th, 2011, 09:09 AM   #2292
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Newscaster in the studio.
He's just saying "Oh" or "I see..."
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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:17 AM   #2293
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New station building at JR Himeji Station

After a comprehensive planning process, JR Himeji Station will be getting a new station tenant building. This will become the new face of Himeji City, as the train station is the gateway to accessing Himeji Castle, a huge tourist draw. The new station tenant building is the final chapter of the station improvements, which included the elevation of all zairaisen tracks at the station (JR Kōbe Line and San’yō Main Line on 2006.03.26 and Bantan Line and Kishin Line on 2008.12.22).

Some pics of the station area and artist sketches of what the improvements will look like:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Current JR Himeji Station station tenant building, Himeji Festa. Himeji Festa closed on 2011.01.31.



When they elevated the zairaisen tracks, they freed up space between the tracks and the current station building that will now be used for the new station building.



Now, some shots of artist sketches and illustrations posted at the station…
The improvements are quite wide in scope, including transforming the main roadway outside the station into a transit mall, substantially expanding the station plaza area and creating a “sunken garden”, constructing a new pedestrian deck to connect to an improved bus station, and streamlining traffic circulation around the station.



Apparently, this will become the largest station plaza in Japan, with a total surface area of approx. 30,000 sq m.



The “sunken garden” will be built on the site of the current station tenant building.



Ōtemae-dōri, the main road leading to the station, will be converted to a transit mall between the station and the next signalized intersection.



The Festa Building South Annex opened on 2011.03.03 on the site of a former bus station. The stores that used to be in Himeji Festa were relocated here to allow for demolition of the current station tenant building.

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:18 AM   #2294
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JR Nada Station improvements construction update

Small update on the work being conducted here (2011.02).

This was the oldest station on the JR Kōbe Line, but with the tracks at ground level, the areas north and south of the station remained separated. After petitions by local residents, JR West is constructing a new station building with an elevated concourse and public passage. The work is already complete.

Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

North Exit.



The design is supposed to replicate features of the old station building.



North-south public passage. The eastern section (left side) is now open, and features several retail shops. Looks a little quiet right now, but on average the station has 22,000 daily entries.



I’m liking the insides much better than the outside.



On the Sannomiya-bound platforms, looking at the east side of the public passage. Unfortunately, this side of the public passage has all the retail, so there’s not really much to see.



Construction notice for passengers. The work is already complete, and they now just have to clear out the staging areas.

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:20 AM   #2295
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Nankai to replace Nankai Kaikan Building
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/new...0390047-n1.htm

Quote:
On February 24, Nankai Electric Railway announced that it will replace the Nankai Kaikan Building (Chūō Ward, Ōsaka City) near Nankai Namba Station that is home the railway’s headquarters with a skyscraper featuring a performance hall and other facilities. Nankai will construct a separate office building in the vicinity of the site, relocating its headquarters after completion in spring 2013. The new skyscraper will also house facilities for Ōsaka Prefecture University.

The railway is still in final negotiations with Ōsaka City regarding the replacement of the existing building, so the height and number of floors of the new building is currently undecided. At a press conference on February 24, Nankai chairman Yamanaka Makoto said groundbreaking would take place in 2016, with completion in 2018, and remarked, “We want to take full advantage of the geographical qualities of the Minami district, which is rich with Naniwa (Ōsaka) culture.” The railway identified the building as the final page of its redevelopment of the Namba area, and included the project in its mid-term business plan for FY2011-14.

The railway named its mid-term business plan the Rinshin (Noble Progress) 130 Plan, in the hope the company stands resolute as it faces its 130th anniversary in 2014. Through appealing to foreigners visiting to Japan, expanding its real estate and distribution businesses, and developing new businesses such as daycare and parenting support, the railway hopes to increase its consolidated revenues from ¥195.5 billion in FY2010 (forecasted) to a target of over ¥230.0 billion. The total investment into the new building will reach ¥130.0 billion.
Images from Nankai’s press release:
Source: Nankai

The new building is the one shown faintly on the right side of the picture. The tower at center is the Swissôtel Nankai Ōsaka, while the low-rise at bottom is the Nankai Building, holding the Takashimaya department store and Nankai Namba Station.



The left half of the area outlined in orange is already developed by Nankai. The orange-fill box in the left half is the Nankai Kaikan Building and the site of this new proposed skyscraper. The other orange-fill box in the right half is a separate tower proposed by Nankai. The railway is hoping to create a new north-south “axis” from the train station to the other tower.



Pictures:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/

Bird’s-eye view of the area around Nankai Namba Station. Namba Parks is at bottom left.



Swissôtel Nankai Ōsaka, from Namba Parks. The building to the left of the hotel is the Nankai Kaikan Building. Currently, it’s an inefficient use of terminal-area land and ripe for redevelopment.







Nankai’s original redevelopment plan for the area around Nankai Namba Station from March 1989, during the heyday of the bubble. Obviously, the plan has been downsized as it’s been implemented over the years.

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:21 AM   #2296
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New 2000 series debuts on Yokohama New Transit Seaside Line

The new 2000 series for Yokohama New Transit’s Seaside Line debuted in regular service on 2011.02.07. The units are being built locally at Tōkyū Car Company’s Yokohama plant. A total of 16 five-car units will be introduced to replace the aging 1000 series trains.
Source: karibajct on YouTube

First day of service. The line is located along waterfront areas of southern Yokohama, so unfortunately, it can get pretty windy.



Tour inside a running train:

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:22 AM   #2297
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Seibu Ikebukuro Line construction update: Part 1

First, some pictures near Shakujii Kōen, where the Seibu Ikebukuro Line is being quadruple-tracked and elevated (2011.02.18).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Cab view from an outbound train between Nerima Takanodai and Shakujii Kōen.
Right now there’s only two tracks, plus one track in the middle to turn back trains.



Approaching the touchdown point, it looks like the elevated inside outbound track is laid and ready to be connected to the existing outbound track. The switchout is supposed to occur in April. They still have to build the outside inbound track, but this will occur after they’ve made the switch and can start dismantling all the ground-level track.



Moving closer, we can see the inside outbound track is mostly ready, although it looks like the inside inbound track isn’t quite connected all the way to the station.



Not much to see at ground level…



New elevated outbound tracks and platform are right on top of ground-level tracks and platform.

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:23 AM   #2298
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Seibu Ikebukuro Line construction update: Part 2

Next set:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Definitely lots of progress since the last update, with the remaining beam sections for the elevated outbound track now in place. Notice the temporary sound wall as well which will eventually disappear once they add the fourth elevated track.



You can see the bolt holes to connect to the future girders on this side of the aerial structure, but given space constraints, they can’t do much more until they make the switch to the elevated track.



Lots of rebar sticking out…



Approaching the other touchdown point, the elevated outbound track ends here for now. At this location, the elevated outbound track jogs to the right along the elevated inbound track, leaving some open space here to work with. As a result, they may not need to demolish this particular section of the ground-level tracks immediately after the switchout.



The west touchdown point closer to Ōizumi Gakuen. Can see the new outbound track in place to the right waiting for the April switchout.

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:24 AM   #2299
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Seibu Ikebukuro Line construction update: Part 3

Next is Hōya Station (2011.02.18):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

On an outbound train, approaching the station from the east.
Was difficult to imagine how they would get 3 tracks to work with such limited space, but it actually looks fine now. This end of the island platform is especially narrow now, but I suppose that can’t be avoided.



The center track is designed as ladder track like the new inbound track. The new platform looks mostly complete… Canopy is already in place, but they just have to do the surfacing.



Central section of the new platform.



West end of the new platform.



From up above in the station’s public passage, looking east towards Ikebukuro.



Next is Tokorozawa Station, where work began in March 2010 on giving the station a major facelift, including an elevated station concourse with public passage, retail, and other facilities. The new station building is scheduled to open in fall 2012, with the new public passage opening in 2013 after renovation of existing facilities near the current ticketing area.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Poster in the station about the improvements. Most of the work for the new elevated concourse and vertical circulation is being conducted in the central parts of the existing platforms, minimizing the need to do any complicated trackwork. It’s likely they will build and open the new facilities and then simply remove the existing facilities.



Floor of the new concourse is taking shape. It took them a year to get this far due to limited time slots in the late evening and early morning to erect all the structural elements. Once the floor plates are in place, construction should accelerate as they can safely do work while the trains run.



Unlike some other construction sites, they’ve got a fair amount of staging area to work with, and much of the heavy machinery including the crane is contained on the other side of the tracks.

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:25 AM   #2300
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Seibu Haijima Line construction update: Part 1

Next is an update on the grade separation of the Seibu Haijima Line near Fuchū Kaidō in Kodaira City, Tōkyō (2011.02.18). At the time of these photos, preparations were being made to elevate the outbound track on 2011.02.27.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

On an outbound train between Hagiyama and Ogawa, near the switchout point. The switchout point is located on a curve, but since the new elevated outbound track is being constructed on the outside, the curve will now be a little smoother. In the distance, we can see they’ve set up some temporary masts to support the overhead.



Past the switchout point, we pass alongside the future ramp up to the elevated track. There’s sound barriers on the outside of the track as this is permanent structure, but the inside only has some protective fencing in preparation for when they begin construction of the elevated inbound track.



Approaching the grade crossing at Fuchū Kaidō (Fuchū Road), a major north-south road in western Tōkyō Prefecture. As there are no comparable parallel facilities for some distance and the roadway is in the process of being widened, they went ahead and decided to grade-sep this crossing. The track bows out a bit here to make room for some temporary columns holding up the new overpass above Fuchū Kaidō. The idea is to basically “slide” the new overpass into position.



At Ogawa Station, looking north at the ramp down from the elevated outbound track. Immediately to our left is the current outbound track.



Moving to the left a bit to see just how sharp the curve and steep the grade are. The track on the far left is for the Seibu Kokubunji Line.



Traveling on an inbound train, looking at the ramp down. They had some generous ROW clearance here, allowing them to shift the original tracks two positions over. As a result, they have already begun building parts of the elevated inbound track before the outbound track has been elevated.

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