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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:26 AM   #2301
quashlo
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Seibu Haijima Line construction update: Part 2

Now some shots at the grade crossing:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

At the west end of the crossing closer to Ogawa is the construction access. They weren’t able to secure space on the other side, so heavy machinery and other construction traffic trying to access the site has to cross the temporary tracks here. After they elevate the outbound track, they may remove the temporary outbound track and relocate the staging area there before constructing the elevated inbound track.



On the opposite side of the tracks, on the east side of the crossing closer to Hagiyama. Here, one part of the overpass is being supported by a temporary frame. Basically, the overpass is constructed in one shot, for both tracks. This is the position for now, when they elevate the outbound track. When they finish constructing the other half of the elevated structure for the inbound track, they can then just slide the overpass into the final position.



On the north side of the tracks. You can see the overpass actually juts out a bit from the protective fencing on the completed part of the elevated structure. This is likely to save time in sliding the overpass into the ultimate position.



Sound walls on the completed outbound track. The double blue line on the outside is the same used on the exterior of the Seibu 6000 series trains. It actually ends up looking a lot like the new aerial structures on the Keikyū Main Line and Airport Line near Keikyū Kamata.



Before the switchout, Seibu held a small “railwalk” event (2011.02.19):


Source: fujik101 on YouTube
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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:27 AM   #2302
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Solar panel installation on Tōkaidō Line platforms at Tōkyō Station complete
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20110221.pdf

Quote:
As part of our Group Business Vision 2020: Challenge, JR East Group is undertaking efforts to prevent global warming. As one element in this program, the solar panel system for the Tōkaidō Line platforms (Tracks 9 and 10) at Tōkyō Station which we have been installing since January 2010 has recently been completed, and was turned on for use for the first time on February 25, 2011.

As far as JR East stations, we have already introduced solar panel systems to the Shinkansen platforms at Tōkyō Station and Takasaki Station, but this latest installation is our largest yet, expected to generate 453 kW of electrical power and 340 MWh of electricity annually, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by approx. 101 tons. This is equivalent to approx. 0.3 percent of the electricity used by Tōkyō Station.

The generated electricity will be used to power Tōkyō Station’s lighting systems, air conditioning equipment, and other facilities. JR East will continue to take steps towards energy conservation and further reduction of carbon dioxide emissions.

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #2303
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JR East designs new seat for commuter EMUs; prototype to be tested on Yamanote Line
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20110304.pdf

Quote:
At JR East, in order to realize improvements in customer satisfaction as stated in our Group Business Vision 2020 plan, we have been conducting research and development towards improving passenger comfort inside trains.

In regards to seats for commuter trains, we have now developed a design that not only provides individual comfort but also ensures that other passengers in the surrounding area can also comfortably use our trains.

Now, through tests on the Yamanote Line, we will examine the seat design’s comfort, as well as evaluate and test the seat’s durability and costs, with the aim of developing the seat to a mass production design.

This R&D effort was undertaken as a joint research effort with Keiō University professor Yamazaki Nobutoshi.

Development objectives
In regards to seats for commuter trains, JR East has thus far implemented various improvements such as expanding the width of seats to ensure as many passengers as possible can sit comfortably, as well as clearly partitioning seats. However, due to some passengers who spread out their knees, lean on other passengers, or stick their legs out, there have been many instances where passengers in the surrounding area have experienced displeasure. In addition, some passengers may feel concerned that they may be invading other passengers’ space or otherwise making things difficult for passengers around them. As a result, in order to ensure that all passengers inside the train are able to ride comfortably, we have aimed to develop a seat that both ensures seating comfort and encourages passengers to give space to others.

R&D details
Through a joint research effort by Yamazaki Nobutoshi, a professor of mechanical engineering at Keiō University’s Department of Science and Technology, together with the Cutting-Edge Railway Systems Development Center at JR East’s Research and Development Center, we have developed and produced a prototype seat that is comfortable both for the sitting passenger and the passenger around him or her, designed to both ensure seating comfort and encourage passengers to give each other space. In regards to the prototype design, we have thus far conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the seat’s comfort and other qualities, largely receiving positive results. Now, in preparation for mass production of the design, we will conduct a test on one car of one train on the Yamanote Line starting in June 2011, evaluating the design’s comfort, durability, and costs.

Prototype seat



Comparison of current and prototype seats
Left: Current seat (blue), used on the E233 series for the Keihin-Tōhoku Line.
Right: Prototype seat (brown).



Seat back that promotes torso stability and “deep” (proper) sitting
Seat back is designed like a cup to support the upper body. The protrusion of the central part of the seat back has been reduced.



Seat cushion that prevents knees from bowing out and promotes deep sitting

The deepest part of the seat cushion has been shifted further back. The central part of the edge of the cushion is designed lower and slants forward. The left and right sides of the seat protrude up and out to provide support to the thigh area.

Seats on standard commuter sets in Japan are already pretty comfortable since they are full cushions—not metal or plastic seats, and not hard fabric-covered seats. However, the stereotypical scene of a passenger falling asleep on the train and using the shoulder of the person next to them as a pillow is a fairly common occurrence. Will be interesting to see how effective this is in preventing that. The protruding edges on the sides of the cushion should also be a welcome addition, since it normally takes some effort to keep your knees from bowing out and touching the people next to you or taking over their seat space.

ANN news report (2011.03.08):



The test of the prototype design on the Yamanote Line will take place all of next fiscal year.
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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #2304
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7-11 stores nationwide to accept IC farecard electronic money, allow recharging starting March 8
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2010/20110306.pdf

Quote:
Starting Friday, March 8, 2011, Seven & i Holdings Co., Ltd. group company Seven-Eleven Japan Co., Ltd., Hokkaidō Railway Company (JR Hokkaidō), East Japan Railway Company (JR East), Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central), West Japan Railway Company (JR West), Kyūshū Railway Company (JR Kyūshū), and Keihin Electric Express Railway Corporation (Keikyū) will rollout a service at all 13,232 7-11 stores across Japan (as of February 2011) that allows customers to make payments with electronic money using the IC farecards issued in each region by the respective railway companies. Customers will also be able to load value onto their IC farecards at 7-11 stores.



7-11 not only has developed its own electronic money system known as nanaco but also accepts multiple other electronic money systems. Now, by introducing transport-based electronic money systems that have expanded all throughout Japan, can be used on railways, and have become an integral part of life in each region, we are anticipating that use of electronic money at 7-11 shops will increase dramatically.

With the help of 7-11’s store network and customer base, the various railway companies involved believe this latest service will further improve convenience for customers using transport-based electronic money.

Code:
Provider      7-11 Service Area           Store Count     Accepted electronic money
                                       (as of Feb 2011)      (payment, charging)
=======       =================        ================   =========================
JR Hokkaidō   Hokkaidō                        800         Kitaca, Suica
JR East       Iwate, Yamagata, Miyagi       7,000         Suica, Kitaca, PASMO,
                Fukushima, Tochigi,                         TOICA, ICOCA, SUGOCA,
                Ibaraki, Chiba,                             nimoca, Hayakaken
                Saitama, Tōkyō,
                Kanagawa, Gunma,
                Niigata, Nagano,
                Yamanashi
                (except a portion of
                Tōkyō and Kanagawa
                stores)
Keikyū        A portion of stores in          300         PASMO, Suica
                Tōkyō and Kanagawa
JR Central    Shizuoka, Aichi, Gifu,        1,200         TOICA, Suica, ICOCA, SUGOCA
                Mie
JR West       Toyama, Ishikawa,             2,400         ICOCA, Suica, TOICA, SUGOCA
                Fukui, Shiga, Kyōto,
                Ōsaka, Hyōgo, Nara,
                Wakayama, Shimane,
                Okayama, Hiroshima,
                Yamaguchi
JR Kyūshū     Fukuoka, Saga,                1,300         SUGOCA, Suica, TOICA,
                Nagasaki, Kumamoto,                         ICOCA, nimoca, Hayakaken
                Ōita, Miyazaki
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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:29 AM   #2305
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A bit late on this, but a portion of the Sendai Municipal Subway Namboku Line, between Tomizawa and Dainohara on 2011.03.14. TBS news report:

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Old March 18th, 2011, 08:29 AM   #2306
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Another video from one of the regular YouTube posters, showing the “chaos” (actually, it’s comparatively calm given the situation) on Monday 2011.03.14 around Yokohama area. Starts at Hodogaya Station (Yokosuka Line), then Tennōchō Station (Sōtetsu Line), then the mess at Yokohama Station, where only Keikyū was running. After that is Higashi-Kanagawa Station (Keihin-Tōhoku Line) and Yokohama Station (Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, JR, and Keikyū).


Source: karibajct on YouTube
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Old March 18th, 2011, 03:46 PM   #2307
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Some pics of the Yokohama train situation after the earthquake.
Source: Me https://picasaweb.google.com/nouveau...CEs4HQuMq56AE#

I walked from work to Totsuka station. Power was out in the ward, except in the station. However, trains (JR and subway) were not running. Taken at around 6:00 PM, a few hours after the quake.


JR Totsuka Station: closed.


People watching TV at JR Totsuka Station. This is how I got most information about the situation. It was the first time I saw images of the Tsunami. It was unbelievable to see at the time.


I had to walk home 5 hours. I followed the Yokohama Blue Line most of the way; from time to time, I'd duck into a station to check and see if trains were running. No such luck.


Monday morning. My usual station, JR Ishikawacho, is closed.


JR Kannai station is a short walk down the street. Also closed.


Yokohama Blue Line Kannai station was open however. Trains were severely packed, the worst I've seen on this line. But they probably compare to crowding on a normal weekday in Tokyo.


I got off at Totsuka. The platform was jammed, so people were roped off and queued up on the upper level.


People lined up yet another level up. I honestly could not believe how many people were waiting to board Blue Line trains; I've never seen anything like it, even when I lived in Tokyo.


Upstairs, JR Totsuka station is closed.


This is my experience at Yokohama station on Tuesday:

I board at Ishikawacho Station. Trains were delayed. The train was packed, as was expected.


JR Yokohama station. The Keihin-Tohoku/Negishi Line platforms were severely overcrowded, so station officials had roped off the stairwells and had people queue up in the level under the platforms.




Wednesday on out was fairly normal, except for some irregular train schedules. The Yokohama Blue Line is the worst; due to power outages, it keeps going in and out of service. I boarded a train yesterday, only for their to be an announcement that it would not depart for another 30 minutes!
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Old March 18th, 2011, 09:20 PM   #2308
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Thanks for the pictures...

Looks like Yokohama was a circus. Just shows how critical each operator is on the Yokohama – Tōkyō corridor, even after all the redundancies of having five direct main lines connecting central Yokohama and central Tōkyō (3 JR + Keiykū + Tōkyū).
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Old March 19th, 2011, 05:52 AM   #2309
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The most amazing thing about it all was how many people were determined to go to work this week, starting on Monday. Friday after the earthquake also showed how vital trains are to Japan. Although I have no pictures, you would not believe the mass exodus of people migrating along Yokohama's streets that night.
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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:45 AM   #2310
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JR Sannomiya Station station building proposals

One of my favorite Kōbe bloggers created some interesting station building proposals for JR Sannomiya Station using existing buildings as models. These are all unofficial, faked pictures, but still look quite real and offer some ideas for developing JR Sannomiya into a true gateway for Kōbe.
Source: http://blog.livedoor.jp/jzs160_vertex/

Station building under construction



A design based on the Kōbe International House. The tower portion of the building has been removed and replaced with some roof-top decorative elements.



A design based on the Kōbe Kyū-Kyoryūchi 25-ban-kan (Building 25 of Kōbe’s Foreign Settlement). Again the tower portion has been removed.



A design based on the new Ōsaka Fukoku Seimei Building (Ōsaka Fukoku Mutual Life Insurance Building).



A tower design.

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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:48 AM   #2311
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Hanshin Namba Line shows strong ridership growth in second year
http://www.kobe-np.co.jp/news/keizai/0003877754.shtml

Quote:
In regards to the Hanshin Namba Line, which will celebrate its second anniversary on March 20, on March 18 Hanshin Electric Railway revealed that railway revenues and ridership increased since the line’s first year of operation. Director and vice-chief of the railway’s urban transport business Shimai Keiji (55) said, “In addition to the events surrounding the 1300th anniversary of Heijō-kyō Capital in Nara, people have become aware of the convenience and services on the line.”

As for the line’s performance in its second year of operation, revenues were up 8.6% over the first year to Ą3.75 billion. Ridership was up 12% over last year, to approx. 65,000 passengers daily. Non-commuter pass ridership was up 5% to 35,000 passengers, while commuter pass ridership was up 22% to 30,000, bringing commuter pass shares up from 42% to 46% and closer towards the ultimate goal of 50%.

Regarding the ridership growth, Shimai explained, “People have become aware of the convenience of not having to transfer for trips between the Hanshin (Ōsaka – Kōbe) area and Namba or Nara, so there has been growth in our commuter pass ridership.” Shimai also says that a special program that allows holders of Namba Line commuter passes to board at either Namba or Umeda has also proven a success.

In regards to train operations, Shimai says that they have stabilized, and the railway will now look at improving the schedule to meet passengers’ needs. As part of a new effort, the railway is also considering discounting tickets targeting tourists and operating seasonal or charter trains. Shimai said that through-servicing of Kintetsu limited expresses is currently “under consideration.” However, he also indicated that the railway will be keeping an eye out on the future situation, saying there is some “anxiety over the effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake.”
Short tour of the Hanshin Namba Line:
Source: panacealand on YouTube

Part 1: Kujō Station
Buying a ticket and waiting on the platform



Part 2: Inside a train, from Kujō to Ōsaka Namba



Ceremony for the very first Namba Line train (2009.03.20, 4:50 am, at Amagasaki Station):


Source: JUMBOSOHAN503 on YouTube
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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:48 AM   #2312
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Keihan announces schedule changes to take effect May 28
http://www.asahi.com/kansai/travel/n...103020026.html

Quote:
On March 1, Keihan Electric Railway announced that it will substantially increase the number of direct-service limited express trains running on ten-minute headways between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi as part of schedule changes on May 28. The two limited express trains per hour running between Yodoyabashi and Hirakata-shi will be extended to Demachayanagi, bringing the total to six limited express trains per hour.

With the completion of grade separation work near Yodo Station (Fushimi Ward, Kyōto City) and the elevation of the inbound (Kyōto-bound) track, the railway will also make big changes to its schedule. Meanwhile, the midday rapid expresses and semi-expresses on the Nakanoshima Line will be changed to sub-expresses and locals. While the number of trains departing from and arriving at Nakanoshima will decrease, the railway says connections to limited expresses departing from and arriving at Kyōbashi will become more convenient.

The railway says that ridership on stations on the Nakanoshima Line has increased compared to when the line opened in October 2008. Keihan president Ueda Seinosuke said, “When ridership on the Nakanoshima Line increases, we’d love to modify the schedule again in response.”
Changes:


Source: Keihan Electric Railway

This is an overall decrease in midday service on the western end of the line (closer to Ōsaka) from 24 tph to 18 tph. The Nakanoshima Line will also be converted to serve mostly slower trains and drop from 8 tph to 6 tph during the midday, while all the fast trains will depart from the Main Line.

Current midday schedule
Yodoyabashi
2 tph: Limited express between Yodoyabashi and Hirakata-shi
4 tph: Limited express between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi
4 tph: Sub-express between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi
4 tph: Local between Yodoyabashi and Kayashima
2 tph: Local between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi
Nakanoshima
2 tph: Rapid express between Nakanoshima and Demachiyanagi
2 tph: Semi-express between Nakanoshima and Kuzuha
4 tph: Semi-express between Nakanoshima and Kayashima

Future midday schedule
Yodoyabashi
6 tph: Limited express between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi
4 tph: Express between Yodoyabashi and Kuzuha
2 tph: Local between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi
Nakanoshima
2 tph: Sub-express between Nakanoshima and Demachiyanagi
2 tph: Local between Nakanoshima and Kayashima
2 tph: Local between Nakanoshima and Demachiyanagi

Unfortunately, the Nakanoshima Line opened probably a little too early, as development on Nakanoshima is lagging a bit. The line is in an unusual position as well, as many of it’s stations are within five-minutes walking distance of the Keihan Main Line and it’s potential catchment area is a narrow strip of land (Nakanoshima Island) in central Ōsaka sandwiched by the Dōjima and Tosabori Rivers. Doesn’t help that it’s a newer line, either, which means higher fares than the Main Line. Keihan is also at a bit of a disadvantage when it comes to the Ōsaka – Kyōto corridor, as both JR and Hankyū have straighter track and are able to offer much shorter journey times. Extending the two limited expresses an hour currently terminating at Hirakata-shi to Demachiyanagi instead may be an attempt to capture a larger share of Kyōto-bound visitors.

2011.05.28 will also mark completion of Phase II of the Yodo Station continuous grade separation project, with both directions of the Main Line elevated. In addition, the elevated pedestrian bridge connecting Yodo Station with the Kyōto Racecourse will also open. However, there is still Phase III of the project, which involves station works and elevation of the tracks leading to / from the car yard just west of the station.

Some Nakanoshima Line videos:

One-station journey from Ōebashi to Watanabebashi on one of my favorites, the Keihan 3000 series. We may start to see these out of Yodoyabashi with the May 28 schedule changes.


Source: AhiruZuki on YouTube

The ceremony for the first train departing Nakanoshima Station (2008.10.19, 5:12 am):


Source: JUMBOSOHAN503 on YouTube

Bonus of two Keihan 3000 series trains at Neyagawa-shi Station:


Source: yositoify on YouTube
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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:49 AM   #2313
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JR Ōsaka Station construction updates: Part 1

Some recent updates on the new station building at JR Ōsaka Station which I’ve been lagging behind on. Enjoy!

First a video walk-through (2011.02.26). The newest parts of the station are actually in the beginning. The other parts have actually been opened for a while now.


Source: panacealand on YouTube

Now, some picture sets.
The new station tenant building features eight public spaces. First, the new Atrium Square (2011.02.04):
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Zoom-in of the Atrium Square, the new eight-story tall atrium space serving as the North Exit of the new station.



Moving towards the central concourse of the station.



Looks like these columns won’t be getting the large “digital signage” advertising.


Inside the atrium…



I believe the escalator to the roof of the Atrium Square leads to the Sun Plaza.



The new clock above the entrance to the main part of the station is still being adjusted.



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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:50 AM   #2314
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JR Ōsaka Station construction updates: Part 2

Elevator shaft… Should get some nice views of the atrium space in the elevators.



This would be a pretty awesome place to have an office, since you are right next to the train station and you’ve got everything you need in close walking distance, if not in the station building itself. When you’re bored, you can walk out onto these balconies and do train- (or people-) watching.



Still working on this part of the ground level of the North Exit…





East entrance to Building 1 of the new JR Ōsaka Mitsukoshi–Isetan department store. Once this opens, the competition between department stores in and around the station will become more fierce. Both Hankyū and Hanshin have terminal department stores, and there is also a Daimaru in the South Gate Building on the other side of the station.



The area at the right with a different pavement treatment is supposed to be the transit plaza. These new gates are bus stops for JR highway express buses and Hankyū Bus.



They almost resemble Shinkansen platform fences.



The new carillons in the Carillon Square.

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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:51 AM   #2315
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JR Ōsaka Station construction updates: Part 3

Next, more shots of the transit plaza and the new Carillon Square (2011.02.08):
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Looking at the under-construction transit plaza, occupying the first floor of the North Gate Building, from the east side.



From the west. This used to be a road outside the station.



More of the new gates. The JR Express Bus Ticketing Center is supposed to relocate here from the station’s Sakurabashi Exit in late May, opening together with the new transit plaza and just a little bit after the May 4 grand opening of the North Gate Building.



A Hankyū bus entering view from the left… The Hankyū Bus terminal on the north side of the North Gate Building will also relocate to the new transit plaza in late May.



Some on-going road work.



The escalator and stairway at the Midōsuji North Exit of the station opened on February 5.



Looking down from the top of the stairway at the station exit.

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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:51 AM   #2316
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JR Ōsaka Station construction updates: Part 4

The pedestrian bridge to the Hankyū side of the terminal area also opened on February 5.



The different pavement treatments are a small reminder that passengers are “crossing borders” between JR West and Hankyū Corporation.



The Carillon Square was still closed at the time.



This stairway will probably be one of the better vantage points as you can climb up and probably get a good view of the tracks and platforms beneath you, as well as the new canopy above.



New directional signage and perhaps advertisement space at the Carillon Square.



Main passage on the north side of the station.



New ad for JR Ōsaka Mitsukoshi–Isetan department store.

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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:52 AM   #2317
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JR Ōsaka Station construction updates: Part 5

Next is the new Central South Exit at the station (2011.02.28):
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

The new Central South Exit is the main gateway on the south side of the station and is part of the new South Gate Building, which opened on March 16.



At the time of these photos, they had already opened parts of the exit to the public. Passengers could already easily see the entire area on their way in and out of the station even before the official opening. This area is officially called the “South Gate Square”.



West side of the South Gate Square. Not as open a space as the Atrium Square on the north side, but still not bad.



Looking west



Looks like most of the signage in JR Ōsaka Station, once complete, will use black as the main color.



Looking east



Entry to Daimaru department store



Escalator pair on the west side



Escalator pair on the east side, from the underground level to the second level. It seems like they plan to (or are at least leaving the possibility open to) put in another set of escalators on the left, from the underground level to ground level.

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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:53 AM   #2318
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JR Ōsaka Station construction updates: Part 6

View when exiting the station through the new Central South Exit, looking south. Hanshin Department store and terminal is at left.



Some “token” solar panel installations on the rain canopy.



West side of the South Gate Square



Stairwell to underground passages on the west side. Ōsaka / Umeda Station has one of the larger inter-connected network of underground passages in Japan. JR Ōsaka Station, Ōsaka Municipal Subway Umeda Station, Hankyū Umeda Station, Hanshin Umeda Station, JR Kita-Shinchi Station, Ōsaka Municipal Subway Nishi-Umeda Station, and Ōsaka Municipal Subway Higashi-Umeda Station are all connected by underground passage.



East side of the South Gate Square



Looking from the east.



The new exit looks good in daylight, but I like it better at dusk.

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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:54 AM   #2319
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JR Ōsaka Station construction updates: Part 7

Next, new digital signage in the main underground passage in Basement Level 1 of the station (2011.02.28):
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/



Typical four-screens-per-column style



Currently, they are only showing still images in a “slideshow” format. Video content is a little more time- and budget-intensive, making it a more difficult medium. Given the high volume of traffic on this passage, there was also some concern that video might cause people to stop to watch, disrupting pedestrian flow.



This section of the passage is open-air, and you can see straight up to the new South Gate Square.

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Old March 20th, 2011, 09:55 AM   #2320
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Yumemino Station opens on Kantō Railway Jōsō Line

The new Yumemino Station opened on the Kantō Railway Jōsō Line in Toride City, Ibaraki Prefecture on 2011.03.12. After the earthquake and tsunami a day earlier, the ceremonies to celebrate the new station were cancelled.

This small station will serve an 80 ha Urban Renaissance Agency development with a forecasted future population of 6,100 residents. This is the first new station on the Kantō Railway since the opening of Shin-Moriya in 1982.

Some pics:
Source: http://ameblo.jp/suganuma-tenko/

Main entrance



Special ceremonies were cancelled because of the earthquake and tsunami. Service on the JR Jōban Line east of Toride was also cancelled, making it difficult to make it to the station by train anyways. However, the railway still offered commemorative tickets for the station opening.



IC card charge machine is still in operation, but with service cancelled, the TVMs were offline.





While the disasters up north perhaps meant an inauspicious start for the station, Hokusō Railway, a sister company under the Keisei Group, offered these orchids to celebrate the opening.



LED departure boards are on continuous scroll with messages about cancelled service and events.



However, they were still testing the displays to see if they were functioning properly.



Single island platform. There was supposed to be a special train to celebrate the opening departing the station at 5:00 am, but that was cancelled. The only hint of the planned events is this banner.

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