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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:34 AM   #2341
quashlo
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 1

Next, some updates on the Tōhoku Through Line project to connect the Utsunomiya Line (Tōhoku Main Line), Takasaki Line, and Jōban Line from Ueno Station with the Tōkaidō Line at Tōkyō Station. This is a tricky project as it involves building a new aerial structure above the existing Tōhoku Shinkansen aerial structure, but will allow for greater flexibility in operations and reduced crowding on the Ueno – Tōkyō section of the Yamanote Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line.

First, some pictures (2011.02.20) of the related work at Shinagawa Station, where they are doing some complicated track and platform realignment to allow through-servicing Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and Jōban Line trains to switch back at Shinagawa. Currently, the track and platform layout does not allow for this. The Tōkaidō Main Line has four tracks and two island platforms at the station, but in between the inbound and outbound direction are four more tracks and two more island platforms used mainly for trains coming to and from Tamachi Yard.
Source: http://homepage.mac.com/otanuki/Tohoku_Tokaido/

Platforms 9 through 12 are the ones being modified in this project. Red lines are existing track. The green parts are the new sections of platforms being constructed and the peach lines are the new tracks being constructed.



From the north end of Platform 11, looking northwest. Between Platform 10 and Platform 11, they are constructing some new building. The new outbound track (Track 10) will go on the other side of the building.



New double crossover. The building in the previous picture is between these new tracks and Track 11 at bottom right.



South of the crossover, looking at the new Platform 10. I believe they will also eventually be replacing the current Track 11 with the new one in the middle here, so they will extend the platform outward at the northern end.



Looking north again. The new crossover is in the distance.



Moving to the south side of Platform 11, looking north. They are building a new stairwell connecting to the north-side platform bridge.



Moving to the north end of Platform 9, looking at the north extensions of Platform 9 and 10. This new section of platform will be wider than any of the existing platforms.



The new Track 11 and Platform 11 gradually converge with the existing track and platform the further south we go. The northern parts look more complete… Here, they are still setting up the support structures underneath and have yet to lay down the concrete slab sections.



Peeking at the new platform sections from the south stairwell on Platform 9.



From the south end of Platform 11, looking at Platform 10.



Looking south, much of the new Track 11 is already laid. New canopy is already in place too, but the platform extension has yet to be constructed.



They are also extending the south end of Platform 11 to make up for the loss at the north end of the platform due to the track curvature.



South end of Platform 9, looking south. The new Platform 10 track is at bottom left. Yokosuka Line tracks are at far left.

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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:35 AM   #2342
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Dbl post

Last edited by quashlo; March 24th, 2011 at 12:29 PM.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:36 AM   #2343
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 2

Next, an older photo set from autumn 2010 of the main construction site, where they are building 3.8 km of new track to connect the Tōhoku Main Line and Tōkaidō Main Line at the cost of approx. ¥40 billion. This project is being financed entirely out of JR East’s pocket. For 1.6 km from Ueno Station to Akihabara Station and 0.9 km north of Tōkyō Station, there is already track in place, and they only need to do minor improvements. The problem section is about 1.3 km of track where they must bring the track above the existing elevated Shinkansen track and then back down again due to lack of right-of-way to build them side-by-side.

First, the south section of the bi-level aerial structure between Sotobori-dōri and Kanda Station.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Map for this particular segment



Since they are only doing minor track improvements here, there’s not much to see. A Shinkansen train passes above, while above that is the Inner Circular Route of the Shuto Expressway.



This is approximately location R0 in the map, at Sotobori-dōri looking south. This is the southern end of the ramp up to the second level above the Shinkansen tracks.



Looking north. At this location, we can see the track will already be substantially higher than either the Shinkansen track on right or the existing zairaisen tracks on left.



Location R4 on the map, looking south.



Looking north. Some beautiful steel design here with the cross-bracing—a nice contrast with the bulky reinforced concrete on the opposite side of the overpass. Not sure if this is the final design or just some temporary frame to support the overpass, as it appears the area beneath is being used as a construction entrance (?).



Location R5-7 on the map, looking south.



Looking north



Location 1TP, looking south. They’ve got the big crane here to lift and slide in the concrete sections one bit at a time.



Looking north



East side of location SP1, at the south end of Kanda Station. From here on, the tracks slide in above the Shinkansen tracks. At first glance, the vertical clearance for the Shinkansen tracks looks fairly small due to the height of the sound walls.



West side of location SP1

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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:37 AM   #2344
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 3

Next, the section near Kanda Station.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Map



Looking south from Platform 3 (Yamanote Line counterclockwise loop for Ueno, Ikebukuro) at Kanda Station. This thing is massive!



Looking at the grades approaching Kanda Station. The rise is steep enough that some of JR East’s older trains will not be able to make the climb. We can also see that one section using steel only.



A little further north, where there’s more elaborate steel work.





From Platform 1 (Keihin-Tōhoku Line for Shinagawa, Yokohama). Scaffolding looks barely enough for one person.



From the central part of the platform, looking south.



Looking north



From the north end of the platform, looking south.



Looking north. They have yet to do any visible column work here.



From location SA2



Location SP2, outside the South Exit of JR Kanda Station. There was some concern from locals in the Kanda area about the shadows and noise of the new second-level aerial, which ended up causing some delays in the construction schedule. In some sense, however, this is almost what they should have done decades ago when they converted the original Tōhoku Main Line ROW for Tōhoku Shinkansen use and cut off the Tōhoku Main Line at Ueno. The original schedule was completion in 2012, but I believe this has been pushed back to 2013 now.



Location SP4, where stores stay open directly underneath the new aerial structure being constructed above.



Location SP5, at Chūō-dōri. Some pretty tall box girders on the Shinkansen overpass.

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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:38 AM   #2345
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 4

Next, a look at the technology and equipment behind this project. Since work can only be done when trains are not scheduled, when you factor in closing off the tracks and various safety checks, there’s only about a three-hour block of time each evening to get work done. And since the work is being performed directly above the Shinkansen tracks, in the case of an emergency situation such as severed overhead, there are 30 operations staff waiting around whenever there is overnight work to allow for Shinkansen trains to turn back at Ueno.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Materials and equipment are delivered to the appropriate sites along the construction zone via the Tōhoku Shinkansen tracks. As a result, the south end of the Tōhoku Shinkansen platforms at Tōkyō Station serves as the “South Yard” for the construction work. After the last train, workers slide over the Shinkansen buffer stops to allow construction vehicles to access the right-of-way. When they need to lift steel members into place, they lay down special temporary track to allow a 100-ton crane to get to the lift site. They need to do this every night there is a lift.



Each column group is composed of up to 30 steel members. There are 16 column groups in this particular construction section, for a total of 260 steel members that must be lifted into place. Given the time constraints, they can only lift about one steel member a night, and only about half of the days each month due to Shinkansen maintenance. This is the reason why the project appears to be moving so slow.



This big green machine weighing 1,700 tons lifts the precast concrete sections into place and was specially designed for this work by Ishikawajima – Harima Heavy Industries (IHI).





Lead tower





As the crane is mobile, it’s not permanently fastened to the columns supporting the aerial structure.





Behind the crane are the already erected precast concrete sections.

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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:39 AM   #2346
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 5

Next, the section between Kanda and Akihabara Stations.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Map



Just north of Kanda Station, looking south.



A little further north.



Further north, the Shinkansen and zairaisen tracks break off from each other, creating a space for the two new tracks to ramp down and connect to the existing sidings at Akihabara Station.



Location SA7



Location 1AA, looking south from Yasukuni-dōri.



Location R8, looking north from Yasukuni-dōri.



Location R12, looking south from Yanagihara-dōri just south of the Kanda River.



Looking north, the slurry tank is visible.



Location R13-15, looking south from Sakuma-dōri (the road just south of JR Akihabara Station).



Location R16-18, looking north from Sakuma-dōri. Straight ahead is the elevated structure out of JR Akihabara Station, which they switching out with newly-built columns.

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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:41 AM   #2347
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 6

Next, the section near Akihabara Station.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Looking south from Akihabara Station. The parts sticking out are the sections just north of Sakuma-dōri.





Looking south from the platforms at Akihabara Station at the approach to the bi-level aerial structure.



Just above the Kanda River. The existing elevated sections are still in good enough shape and strong enough to be reused, but must be jacked up to the proper height for the ramp up.



Further north





These older sections are all-steel.



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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:41 AM   #2348
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 7

Continuing further north…



They’ve removed all the ballast and track here. It appears they may be using this particular section as a staging area or access route for construction equipment to get to the parts where they are jacking up the old viaduct sections.





Directly beneath the Sōbu Local Line viaduct.



Further north



From the north end of the platforms at Akihabara Station, looking south.



Looking north. From Ueno Station to Akihabara Station, there’s more room to work with due to storage tracks and sidings for trains turning back at Ueno.

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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:42 AM   #2349
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Tōhoku Through Line construction updates: Part 8

Next, the section near Akihabara Station.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

While not directly-related to the Tōhoku Through Line construction, JR West is also implementing barrier-free improvements at JR Okachimachi Station.





Looking south from the south end of the platforms at Okachimachi Station. Including one siding, there will be three tracks heading south up until Akihabara Station.





Looking north



Moving further north…







From the north end of the platforms, looking south.



Looking north



Again, nothing major on these sections since there’s room to work with and they are doing some simple track replacement.

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Old March 22nd, 2011, 08:28 AM   #2350
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Just a small update on the JR situation in the Tōkyō area and surrounds as of 2011.03.22:

Many lines are back on 100% schedule, but there are still a few that are not running the normal number of trains. There’s also the following lines / sections which aren’t running at all:
  • Shōnan-Shinjuku Line
  • Tōhoku Main Line: North of Kuroiso (Note: Kuroiso is the limit of the commuter range anyways)
  • Jōban (Rapid) Line: North of Tsuchiura
  • Sagami Line: North of Samukawa
  • Karasuyama Line
  • Hachikō Line: North of Komagawa
  • Ryōmō Line: East of Isesaki
  • Agatsuma Line
  • Shin’etsu Main Line: West of Annaka
  • Mito Line: Oyama to Tomobe
  • Suigun Line
  • Kashima Line: Nobukata to Kashima Jingū
Basically most of the lines that still remain closed have suffered damage and require extensive work to repair. This is the Jōban Line in Hitachi Naka City, Ibaraki Prefecture:


Source: Yomiuri Shimbun

JR is working day and night to get all the damage repaired, but there’s a lot of it and it’s spread over a wide area. They don’t have enough staff to repair everything at once, and they are short on fuel. At the above section on the Jōban Line between Mito and Katsuta, the earthquake caused about 100 m of embankment to subsdide by as much as one meter. They have about 40 people at this one location alone to repair the embankment and replace the tracks. The section between Tsuchiura and Katsuta has about 500 locations where damage has been identified.

Mito Station is also out of commission for an indefinite period of time due to track damage:
http://www.ibaraki-np.co.jp/news/new...13004509866733
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 09:11 AM   #2351
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Thanks for the constant updates! How's the progress on the reinstatement of the Tohoku Shinkansen... seems a lil' unfortunate that the Hayabusa service was short-lived before it was disrupted.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 08:24 PM   #2352
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I posted a small update here:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=584

JR has yet to commit to a timeline, but the main section between Nasu – Shiobara and Morioka will probably take at least 2-3 months to get back into pre-earthquake shape. For reference, the San'yō Shinkansen took about two months after the Great Hanshin Earthquake (a.k.a. Kōbe Earthquake).
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 08:46 PM   #2353
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As another "side-effect" of the ongoing disaster, there is the all-around jishuku (i.e., "self-restraint"). This can take the form of cancellation of celebratory events (for railways, this can mean ceremonies for new stations or new lines) or a temporary halt on actions that are seen as solely profit-driven, sometimes replaced in favor of actions for the general public good.

People who've been to Japan often comment that the trains and stations are plastered with advertisements inside and out, but with the quake, tsunami, and nuclear plant situation, some ad spaces are now bare, or replaced entirely with public service ads from AC (Advertising Council Japan). Here, aside from one Tōkyō Metro "Tōkyō Heart" ad, many others (with the blue logo at bottom) are AC public service ads:


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/wakowada/

Walk inside a Keihin-Tōhoku Line train where ad space that is generally always filled sits empty:


Source: ikryaiboj on YouTube
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Old March 23rd, 2011, 07:49 PM   #2354
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And as an aside, this is also the case on TV here too. I spent the last week in Nagoya as the quake totally derailed (no pun intended) my moving schedule up to Tokyo/Yokohama. Since I couldn't work for a week, I watched a ton of TV, and 90% of the spots were AC PSAs, and the other 10% were the mobile companies explaining how to use the Jisai Keihou (Disaster Alert) system on their mobiles. When registered, the phone will receive a message that pretains to an earthquake early-warning (not fiction; I got a warning about 30 seconds before the main quake hit, and before some BIG aftershocks) and tsunamis...
Didn't know the trains were also devoid of ads. I'll look for that tomorrow...
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Old March 24th, 2011, 12:20 AM   #2355
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For J-pop fans, Tackey and Tsubasa recently released a new song and PV on 2011.03.16 about the Yamanote Line, Yamanote-sen Soto-mawari (Yamanote Line Clockwise Loop). Corny, and the Ōsaka / Midōsuji Line reference is a bit forced, but anyways...

I didn’t know Gussan did railway monomane… I thought that was strictly the domain of Nakagawa Reiji.


Source: 283backborn on YouTube

On the topic of CMs / PVs, might as well post this older collabo between Lotte and the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line with Satō Takeru and Beyonce impersonator Watanabe Naomi:

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Old March 24th, 2011, 05:53 AM   #2356
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I'm a J-pop fan and I loved those videos. Thanks for sharing! The Yamanote Line model train that appeared in the first video is really something special. Wish I had train set like that as a kid.
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Old March 24th, 2011, 11:54 AM   #2357
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Texmaco Rail and Japanese consortium in talks to form JV
http://www.telegraphindia.com/111032...y_13757810.jsp

Quote:
New Delhi, March 23: Calcutta-based Texmaco is in talks with a Japanese railway consortium to make suburban and metro rail coaches.

Texmaco chairman Saroj Kumar Poddar, who today announced that 21 firms controlled by him would come under a new brand name Adventz, hopes to finalise the deal with the Japanese consortium in three months. Group officials also announced plans to invest $2 billion (about Rs 9,000 crore) over the next four years for expansion.

Railway sources said Texmaco had been in talks with Kawasaki and Itochu to make metro coaches. It had earlier bid for the Rae Bareilly coach factory in collaboration with Kawasaki and Mitsubishi.

“We are looking for a joint venture partner for both EMU (electric multiple unit) and metro coaches,” Poddar said.

Texmaco Rail makes about 7,000-9,000 wagons annually and plans to invest Rs 75-100 crore in two years to ramp up capacity, Poddar said.

The new unit to make suburban coaches will be located at the existing factories and not require huge investments, he said.

On the new brand identity of his group companies, including Texmaco, Zuari and Paradeep Phosphates, Poddar said, “The birth of Adventz is based on four fundamental principles: collaboration, sustainability, inclusiveness and being global.”

As part of the group’s move towards globalisation, it will continue to form joint ventures with global leaders.
Seems like this is what was being referenced in the other article about Kawasaki looking for a JV partner in India.
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Old March 24th, 2011, 11:55 AM   #2358
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Small update on the situation in Sendai:
http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2011...840361000.html

Sendai-area JR lines (Tōhoku Main Line, Senseki Line, and Senzan Line) are expected to be operational by early April (in other words, 2-3 weeks).

Sendai Muncipal Subway is still only running between Tomizawa and Dainohara. The section between Dainohara and Izumi Chūō is being covered by buses instead, but some passengers wait an hour or longer to get on a bus. With the reduced train schedules, there’s also a painfully long hour wait at Dainohara. So currently, not so great. With the JR lines down, everybody is turning to the bus system, which clearly is completely overwhelmed at the moment.

I’m curious if they have thought about bringing in buses and drivers from other parts of Japan, as they did this quite successfully after the Kōbe Earthquake. I know some Ōsaka Municipal Buses recently drove all the way up to the disaster area to transport relief goods… Not sure what happened to them after that.

However, it seems like this situation may not persist too long … According to JR East, portions of its Sendai-area lines will reopen soon:
  • Tōhoku Main Line
    • Iwanuma – Sendai: Early April
    • Sendai – Iwakiri: By end of month
    • Iwakiri – Rifu: Early April
  • Senseki Line (Aoba-dōri – Kozuru Shinden): March 28
  • Senzan Line (Sendai – Ayashi): Early April
Sendai Airport Transit will take some time, though. The tunnels beneath the runways at Sendai Airport are completely flooded and the first-floor train control room at Sendai Airport Station was damaged by the tsunami.

Meanwhile, in the Tōkyō – Mito corridor, the Jōban Line between Tsuchiura and Katsuta is set to reopen in early April as well. Not great quality, but some video of the work on this section (this is shot in Hitachi Naka City):


Source: coza49 on YouTube
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Old March 24th, 2011, 11:56 AM   #2359
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Apparently, the other major concern now among some railways is with securing DC motor carbon brushes. Several railway operators, including JR West and private railways such as Kinki Nippon Railway (Kintetsu) relied on manufacturer Hitachi Chemical to provide them with these components, but Hitachi Chemical’s headquarters in Hitachi City, Ibaraki Prefecture was damaged by the tsunami, and their plant in Namie Town, Fukushima Prefecture, which does the final assembly, etc. of this particular component, is within the 20 km no-entry zone around the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant. This particular component needs to be replaced once every three months.

JR East and JR West say they have some spares in stock to last another one to two months, but JR West has said that unless alternative sources are found, it will begin reducing midday service on some lines in its network starting April 2 (April 11 in the Keihanshin area) to attempt to extend the supply as long as possible. To give an idea of the scope, about 50% of JR West’s non-Shinkansen rolling stock (approx. 2,300 railcars) requires the brushes. However, at least one operator—Keihin Electric Express Railway (Keikyū)—says it has no plans to reduce service because it relies on multiple suppliers for the component.
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Old March 25th, 2011, 09:50 AM   #2360
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I went down to Fukuoka and Nagasaki this week. I was impressed with what I saw in Fukuoka, especially the new Hakata Station.

I snapped some pics of the Nagasaki trams and posted them here: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...9#post74889709

Preview:
Source: Me https://picasaweb.google.com/nouveau...L7ry8Ow_MvUXw#









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