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Old July 3rd, 2009, 07:59 PM   #221
quashlo
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JR West research achievements garner attention
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/affairs/dis...2155005-n1.htm

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“People make mistakes,” admits JR West’s Safety Laboratory, and yet, the research successes of the laboratory have garnered the attention of outsiders. After the horrible Amagasaki rail crash in 2005, the Safety Laboratory was established three years ago. Is there really a need to call out the train signals? Is there a benefit for superiors to praise lower-ranking staff? The fruits of the laboratory’s research have altered the predisposition in the railway business that “accidents can be prevented if you try hard enough,” and are being adopted in employee training in fields completely outside of railways, including the Japan Self-Defense Forces, hospitals, and airline companies.

After the tragedy of the Amagasaki rail crash, JR West admitted it had not done enough to deal with human error. The establishment of the Safety Laboratory was part of an attempt to improve the company structure and response to the issue.

The group selected 25 employees from each of the various departments, such as train operations, track maintenance, and administration, and asked them what they thought JR West lacked as a company. In half a year, the group published Learning about the Human Factor through Examples.

“What happens when you’re tired?” “Why is there a manual?” “Are you cutting corners because you expect everyone else to cover for you?” The pamphlet outlines 32 themes, and provides real-life examples, as well as an analysis and countermeasures.

The pamphlet was intended for the training of JR West employees, but gained attention through word of mouth, with everyone from construction contractors, banks, and medical institutions asking for copies. JR West began selling the pamphlets for ¥300 each, and has sold as many as 46,000 copies to entities outside of the company.

“Human error isn’t just a problem for railways… It happens in all fields. I suppose the pamphlet is popular because there hasn’t really been any written material that analyzes it in an easy-to-understand fashion,” says Shiratori Kenji, head of the Safety Laboratory.

The results of the group’s research have been adopted as part of JR West’s restructuring.

The direct cause of the Amagasaki rail crash was excessive speed on the part of the train operator, but the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism’s (MLIT) Accident Investigation Committee (now the Transport Safety Committee) pointed out that “punishment-style” retraining sessions for train operators with accident records also played a part. As a result, the Safety Laboratory looked at the relationship between superiors and subordinates.

Two groups were formed—a functional group where the superior actively engaged in communication with staff, and a dysfunctional group where the superior ignored what his subordinates had to say. The two groups were asked to perform simple tasks, and when the superiors each congratulated the groups on their work, the functional group became more efficient, while the dysfunctional group became less efficient.

“After the accident, there was a tendency in the company to think that rewarding workers was the best strategy to prevent incidents. But the research showed that it only worked if there were good working relationships already formed,” explained Chief Shiratori.

Research efforts also looked at regulations requiring operators to constantly check trackside signals. Up until now, train operators were required to point at the signals with their fingers and call each one out. In urban areas, however, these checks can occur once every 20 seconds, and some drivers claimed it was exhausting.

The research concluded that there was little difference in error rates between using both fingers and voice as opposed to just voice when checking signals. Last November , the regulations were revised to permit voice-only checks except at key locations.

“There’s no end to improving safety,” says Chief Shiratori. Currently, the laboratory is researching operator sleepiness and plans to release a set of guidelines to counteract sleepiness this fall.
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Old July 3rd, 2009, 08:02 PM   #222
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Hyōgo Prefecture finally embraces wrap ads
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/lifest...1453005-n1.htm

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Hyōgo Prefecture, currently the only jurisdiction in the Kinki region to prohibit wrap ads on its trains, is accepting public comment on a plan to revise those regulations at the September prefectural assembly meeting. In response to the increasing regional connectivity of the railway network—including the March opening of the Hanshin Namba Line—a bill to amend the regulation was introduced into the September assembly, with passage set by the end of the year. The various railway operators in Hyōgo Prefecture welcomed the move, saying it will make it easier for them to deploy trains.

Wrap ads made their debut approximately ten years ago on the JR Yamanote Line in Tōkyō. The ads aren’t actually painted on the train, but printed onto a film that is then wrapped around the train. Using the latest technological advancements, the installation costs have been reduced substantially and the ads have become more and more common throughout the country. In the Kansai region, JR West first installed them in October 2004 on the Ōsaka Loop Line. Kintetsu trains saw their first ads approximately five years ago.

According to the Hyōgo Prefectural Land Management Department, officials never imagined the possibility that trains would be used as outdoor advertising. In 1992, the prefectural government banned all wrap ads on trains, with the exception of public advertisements and announcements related to neighborhoods and cities along the train line. The regulations have since stayed. The prefectural government is now considering allowing the ads, but will only approve them with some provisions on the size and color.

Hanshin Electric Railway, which mostly runs inside Hyōgo Prefecture, has not run wrap-ad trains outside of a PR “Kōshien” train to advertise for the Kōshien national high school baseball championships in the spring and summer. With the March 20 opening of the Hanshin Namba Line, however, Kintetsu trains now run thru-service onto the Hanshin network. Kintetsu runs advertisement trains on the Nara Line for private universities and beauty salons, but because the trains were effectively banned from the Hanshin Namba Line as a result of the regulation, Hanshin has asked the prefectural government to relax the rules.

Among the Kintetsu trains that enter Hyōgo Prefecture, a tourism PR train wrapped in an ad for Nara has been permitted, but a PR train for the Spain Village resort on the Kintetsu network was not approved because it was deemed a private interest. Kintetsu runs vivid, rainbow-colored wrap-ad trains in Mie Prefecture, but says it tries to breach the topic with local jurisdictions first, and has refrained from using the ads on some occasions.

With falling ridership on Kansai railways due to a declining birth rate, advertisement is becoming an ever-more-important source of revenue for railway operators, and Kintetsu says it would welcome a relaxation of regulations. JR West says that if Hyōgo Prefecture approves the changes, it may consider modifying some of its train services.

The prefectural government will accept public comment on the plan until July 13, and consider the bill at its September assembly meeting. After getting through all the loops, the law would likely take effect starting some time next year. “After obtaining public support and understanding for the proposal, we’ll do our best to get all the paperwork done as quickly as possible,” said representatives.
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Old July 3rd, 2009, 08:31 PM   #223
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Tōkyō: Part 1

At Shin-Yokohama Station on my Nozomi train. Besides being Yokohama’s Shinkansen station, Shin-Yokohama is also served by the Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line and the JR Yokohama Line. At bottom, the JR Yokohama Line tracks pass below the elevated Shinkansen tracks.

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Nearing central Tōkyō, we pass above the Tōkyū Ōimachi Line. The Ōimachi Line extension to Mizonokuchi on the Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line is set to open on June 11.

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At Ōsaki, we are about to join the Yamanote Line loop, at center. Ōsaki Station, served by the JR Yamanote Line, Saikyō Line, and Shōnan-Shinjuku Line, as well as the Tōkyō Waterfront Area Rapid Transit (TWR) Rinkai Line, is just a little further to the left out of the frame. We are actually passing directly above the tracks for the Shōnan-Shinjuku Line and Rinkai Line, which veer off from the Yamanote Line at Ōsaki Station.

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We’ve entered the Yamanote Line loop and are passing by Tamachi Car Center, which primarily houses trains for the Tōkaidō Line. This section of the loop between Shinagawa and Tōkyō Stations is fairly busy…The Yamanote Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and Tōkaidō Line run parallel above ground, while below ground is the Yokosuka Line. Immediately west of the tracks, the Toei Subway Asakusa Line runs underground beneath National Route 15, paralleling the loop a couple blocks over.

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Passing a Yamanote Line train. Although the Yamanote Line has its own set of tracks, portions of the loop are officially classified as part of other lines. The section from Tabata to Tōkyō is officially part of the Tōhoku Main Line, while the section between Tōkyō and Shinagawa is part of the Tōkaidō Main Line. Only the west and north segments of the loop between Shinagawa and Tabata are officially classified as “Yamanote Line” tracks.

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I needed to get to Ikebukuro, so after getting off I opted for JR. You can transfer for free onto regular JR lines after getting off the Shinkansen at Tōkyō as long as your destination station is within the 23 wards of Tōkyō. This is a 209 series Keihin-Tōhoku Line train on a rapid run to Isogo on the Negishi Line. Although a few trains on the Negishi Line run through-service with the JR Yokohama Line, the Negishi Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line are essentially a single line, as most trains run across both lines. The complete run between Ōfuna on the Negishi Line and Ōmiya on the Keihin-Tōhoku Line is a good 60 km, passing through Kamakura, Yokohama, Kawasaki, and central Tōkyō before arriving in Saitama.

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During the midday, Keihin-Tōhoku Line trains run a special “rapid” service on the section parallel to the Yamanote Line between Tabata and Shinagawa Stations. While Yamanote Line trains make 14 stops on this section, Keihin-Tōhoku Line rapid services make only seven stops, at Tabata, Ueno, Akihabara, Tōkyō, Hamamatsuchō, Tamachi, and Shinagawa. Outside of the midday period, the Keihin-Tōhoku Line runs regular all-stop trains. Coincidentally, Hamamatsuchō was only recently added as a rapid stop after JR East acquired the Tōkyō Monorail. Adding a stop at Hamamatsuchō was intended to improve access to Haneda Airport.

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These JR East 209 series trains are gradually being replaced with new E233 series trains, and will eventually disappear completely in 2010. They first debuted in 1993 and are still fairly young, but were designed to be half as heavy, last half as long, and cost half as much.

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On the parallel section, the Keihin-Tōhoku Line and Yamanote Line share the same island platform (in the same direction), so it’s possible to transfer to and from rapid trains very easily. Here, the nearside of the island platform is for the Yamanote Line.

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Ikebukuro Station, North Exit. Ikebukuro is one of the larger subcenters in Tōkyō, and the station is served by trains from seven major lines run by four companies (JR East, Tōbu Railway, Seibu Railway, and Tōkyō Metro). The station is a little unusual in that it is the terminal for the Tōbu Tōjō Line and Seibu Ikebukuro Line, but because of through-service, trains on these lines could stop at any of several different locations aboveground or below-ground. If I want to get a Tōjō Line train, for example, I could wait at the Tōjō Line terminal aboveground, or take a through-service train from either of the Tōkyō Metro Yūrakuchō Line or Fukutoshin Line, which each have separate underground stations at Ikebukuro.

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A look at the tracks from the northwest corner of the station area. The nearest tracks are for the Tōjō Line, while the tracks in the background are for JR. The Seibu Ikebukuro Line tracks aren’t visible, but they’re behind the JR tracks inside the Seibu Department Store building. Both Tōbu and Seibu have large department stores at this station.

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A TJ Liner departs the station, bound for Shinrin Kōen, 50 km away in Saitama Prefecture.

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I hop on a Yamanote Line train to get me to Shibuya. This is at Shibuya, facing north.

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The Yamanote Line platforms at Shibuya are segregated by direction. On the other side of the wall to the right are the clockwise loop tracks for Shinjuku and Ikebukuro.

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A train for Shinagawa and Tōkyō arrives.

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The conductor in the end car steps out.

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All trains on the Yamanote Line are these E231-500 series trains first introduced in 2002.

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The conductor has her hand on a button that will start the announcement that the train is about to depart. She waits until the crowds thin slightly before pushing the button, but at busy stations, this is usually not enough time given the headways. The announcements will often start before most people have gotten on board, so there is a bit of a push towards the end as everybody tries to get on before the doors close.

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A few shots of Hachikō Entrance at JR Shibuya Station, which opens onto the busy west side of the station. Shinjuku, Ikebukuro, and Shibuya are the busiest stations in Tōkyō by ridership.

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JR East commuter lines map for Tōkyō. The green circle represents the Yamanote Line, with most services branching off of the loop. The only JR lines to pass inside the loop are the Chūō Rapid and the Chūō-Sōbu Local, shown in orange and yellow east-west .

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In the corner are special machines for Shinkansen and special express trains. The closest Shinkansen station is still Tōkyō, but you can purchase your tickets here and use the free transfer within the 23 wards to get there.

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English version of the map.

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Each of the major private railways in Tōkyō has one or two terminal stations on Yamanote Line. For Tōkyū, the terminal station is Shibuya, and like the other private railways, it has its own department store at the terminal. Before the advent of the subway, the private railways weren’t permitted to enter inside the Yamanote Line loop, which was instead serviced by streetcars. As the streetcar lines were gradually replaced by subways after World War II, the idea of subway through-service surfaced as a way to reduce transfers and get passengers through the loop easier.

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Shibuya is served by eight major lines and four operators (JR East, Tōkyū Corporation, Tōkyō Metro, and Keiō Electric Railway). This is the one of the entrances to the Tōkyō Metro underground station.

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A Tōkyō Metro Ginza Line train departs from the third floor of the Tōkyū Department Store. This was the first subway line constructed in Tōkyō and Asia, opening in 1927. Because it uses third-rail electrification, it is one of the few subway lines in Tōkyō that don’t run through-service.

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Bus plaza on the east side of the station.

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Heading to the Tōkyū part of the station.

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Down on the Tōkyō Metro Hanzōmon Line / Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line platforms. Aside from fare considerations, the two lines are basically one and all trains run through-service. Here, a Tōkyū 5000 series train waits at the platform, on an express run bound for Kuki Station on the Tōbu Isesaki Line. The pink stickers indicate this end car is a women-only car during certain hours of the day.

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The 5000 series trains were introduced in 2002 and are based partly on JR East’s E231 series.

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On Platform 1, for the Den’en Toshi Line. Although it’s at the junction point between the two operators, the station is managed by Tōkyū. The current Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line station is also managed by Tōkyū, in preparation for the through-services between the Fukutoshin Line and the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line to start in 2012.

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Last edited by quashlo; July 3rd, 2009 at 08:37 PM.
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Old July 4th, 2009, 01:13 AM   #224
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A Tōkyō Metro Ginza Line train departs from the third floor of the Tōkyū Department Store.

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That kind of says it all about rail transport in Tokyo.
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Old July 4th, 2009, 03:18 PM   #225
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I guess these department stores are what make Tokyo rail lines profitable... wish I could visit Tokyo!
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Old July 5th, 2009, 05:18 AM   #226
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yeah its awesome how these department stores are part of the Railway companies.

wow how romantic Rail Travel is, its pretty awesome to travel to these places by Rail and buying tickets to board the trains and traveling and seeing the industrial, bustling cities, to Rural forests and mountains its really beautiful thanks Qualiso for the pictures man really i wish i can do that travel by Rail really how beautiful and romantic.

sorry its me daydreaming but yeah wow alot of stuffs is happening in tokyo and also like the idea of different companies running the railways in japan it seems much better like that then nationalized though.
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Old July 5th, 2009, 08:38 AM   #227
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Hasn't anyone thought of emulating the Japanese model of private rails?
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Old July 5th, 2009, 06:21 PM   #228
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Yeah that's the question, do we have any examples of rail systems around the world that emulate the Japanese model?
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Old July 5th, 2009, 06:22 PM   #229
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I guess these department stores are what make Tokyo rail lines profitable... wish I could visit Tokyo!
Perhaps in the past, but now I think it's the real estate they own, and the captive markets they engender (suburbs to city center)

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Hasn't anyone thought of emulating the Japanese model of private rails?
I think the original Pacific Electric Interurban Railway in Southern California developed in a similar way to some Japanese private railways. In fact, the spread out nature of the Los Angeles area is owing to the network of interurbans that once carried people from the outer suburbs to downtown LA, not the freeways, which came later.

However, most interurbans went under due to the depression and the rising popularity of the motor car. OTOH, motorization happened much later in Japan, and perhaps, looser anti-trust laws helped private railways to diversify. Most railways run bus services, for example.
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Old July 6th, 2009, 02:49 AM   #230
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But not most bus lines run rail services.

I will do some research into the history of private rail companies. It really interests me how successful they've been and if the government refuses to support rail, then so be it. Wish me luck!! xDDDD
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Old July 6th, 2009, 05:13 AM   #231
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But not most bus lines run rail services.

I will do some research into the history of private rail companies. It really interests me how successful they've been and if the government refuses to support rail, then so be it. Wish me luck!! xDDDD
davsot, here is an interesting article about the history of the private railway operator Hankyu, in Osaka. However, the author makes an incorrect assertion that Hankyu's services compete with the Shinkansen. Rather, they compete (fiercely) with JR West's narrow gauge system that link the same city centers.

http://www.calrailnews.com/crn/0802/0802_45.pdf
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Old July 6th, 2009, 07:41 AM   #232
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thanks k.k. jetcar.

Appreciate it.
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Old July 6th, 2009, 08:26 AM   #233
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Nankai adopts water conservation efforts
http://www.asahi.com/business/update...906250090.html

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After switching out some urinals at men’s restrooms with new “waterless urinals,” Nankai Electric Railway announced that they were able to save 33,256 tons of water over the course of 2008. The amount of water saved amounted to ten percent of the water consumed by the company’s railway operations, and was enough water for seventy four-person households for a full year.

The waterless urinals use special deodorants in place of water. Nankai first introduced the urinals in March 2007, installing about 76 across 19 of its stations, including Namba Station. The company said it plans on introducing 31 additional installations at four of its stations in 2009.
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Old July 6th, 2009, 08:30 AM   #234
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Negotiations to reduce Hokusō Line fares by five percent
http://mytown.asahi.com/chiba/news.p...00000907030001

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Chiba Prefecture has entered into discussions with a railway operator and local jurisdictions on a proposal to reduce fares for the Hokusō Line by five percent. Since the operator, Hokusō Railway (HQ: Kamagaya City), is currently in a state of accumulated deficit, the reduction in fares would be offset by financial assistance from six cities and two towns along the line, as well as usage fees from Keisei Electric Railway trains on the Narita New Rapid Railway using Hokusō Line tracks. There is strong resistance from local officials over the costs of the subsidy, but the prefectural government says it will come to an agreement with all parties by the mid-July deadline for submitting fare restructuring requests to the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT).

The current fare on the Hokusō Line from Keisei Ueno Station to Inba Nihon Idai is ¥1,070. With the opening of the Narita New Rapid Railway, the line will be extended east to Narita Airport. Residents along the Hokusō Line note that the Keisei Main Line charges ¥1,000 for a trip between Keisei Ueno and Narita Airport, and argue that if the origin and destination are the same even if the route is different, then the fare should be identical as well.

Chiba Prefecture, on the other hand, has also been working to get fares lowered as a means to entice development in Chiba New Town. The prefectural government is considering three proposals for a five-percent, ten-percent, and 15-percent cut in fares, leading to a loss in fare revenue of approximately ¥700 million to ¥1.9 billion. The prefectural government has met with local jurisdictions and various high-level city officials to discuss the issue of sharing the costs of subsidizing reduced fares.

The prefecture and the Urban Renaissance Agency (UR), the two lead entities in the development of Chiba New Town, asked Hokusō Railway to reduce the fares by 15 percent, in exchange for offering to convert each of their ¥5.3 billion in interest-free loans to shares in the company. For Hokusō Railway, which has an accumulated deficit of ¥33.6 billion as of 2007, the proposal is an enticing offer, reducing their debt and giving them some more financial flexibility.

But Keisei Group, who would see its ownership in the company (currently 51 percent) drop as a result of the proposal, expressed dissatisfaction with the plan and has so far focused on less reduction in fares and lower conversion to shares.

Towards the end of April, the prefectural government then proposed an average fare reduction of five percent or more, with an increase in the discount rate for commuter passes along the entire line. In addition to Keisei’s usage fees for the Hokusō Line, the lost revenue would also be covered by the prefecture and UR converting ¥1.5 billion each from loans to company shares, with six cities and two villages along the line (Ichikawa, Matsudo, Kamagaya, Funabashi, Shiroi, Inzai, Motono, and Inba) contributing ¥300 million for five years. The contributions by each jurisdiction would be reevaluated after the five-year period.

However, there are some jurisdictions that oppose the current proposal. Representatives from Funabashi City, which also must support the Tōyō Rapid Railway (another high-fare line), claim, “It’s unfair to financially support only one railway operator. In addition, the contributions of Keisei and the prefectural government aren’t explicitly stated anywhere.”

Hokusō Railway adds, “As an insolvent company, we can’t direct the usage fees from Keisei trains to fare reductions.”

In response, the prefectural government plans to emphasize during negotiations that nearly half of the construction costs for the Narita New Rapid Railway are being borne by the national, prefectural, and local governments, with the benefits being reaped by both Hokusō and Keisei.

The MLIT has also expressed concern over the fate of the talks and appears to be considering ways it can resolve the issue, including mediation.
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Old July 6th, 2009, 08:33 AM   #235
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JR West expects increased operating profit from development projects
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/s/article/...301000730.html

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On July 3, JR West announced that development surrounding Ōsaka Station—including a new station building for which JR West Group’s “JR Ōsaka Mitsukoshi – Isetan” department store will be a tenant—would likely boost the group’s operating profit by ¥10-11 billion five to six years after the spring 2011 completion date.

JR West’s earnings forecast for the March 2010 consolidated accounts is expected to show operating profits of ¥80 billion, with as much as 10 percent coming as a result of development projects. With population declining, the group says it can’t count on increases in revenue from the group’s main business in rail transport, and is instead looking at distribution and real estate business to maintain profit.

The critical JR Ōsaka Mitsukoshi – Isetan store is expected to make more than ¥55 billion in sales annually. In response to the consumer trend towards low-cost goods, the group is considering offering a wide variety of merchandise at both high and low price-points.

In addition, the group is considering expanding its department store business beyond the Kansai region and into Okayama and Hiroshima Prefectures, and also hopes to see increased ridership on the San’yō Shinkansen and its non-Shinkansen lines. Annual revenue from railway operations is expected to increase by approximately ¥5 billion.

The Ōsaka Station Area Development is one of the group’s larger projects, together with the Kyūshū Shinkansen through-service to open in spring 2011. In addition to constructing a 210,000 sq. m. building north of the station, an addition to the existing Acty Ōsaka building on the south side of the station will house an expanded space for major department store retailer Daimaru. The total project cost is approximately ¥210 billion.
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Old July 6th, 2009, 08:48 AM   #236
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Hasn't anyone thought of emulating the Japanese model of private rails?
This is how it was done in the past, even in the US. Private investors purchased land in the periphery of the urban area and built rail lines to serve the new development. The basic principle is the same, although Japan has probably taken advantage of it the most. These railway conglomerates have extensive assets in real estate, tourism and hospitality, retail, railway stock manufacturing, etc. Tōkyū Group is the most famous, but the other private railways follow the same pattern.

One thing the Japanese railways do very well is structuring lifestyles around the railway. At some of the larger stations outside the immediate city center, the station will be a complex of retail and services, making it very easy to do shopping or run errands on the way home from work. Some stations have nursery schools and day care facilities inside, so that parents can drop their child off at the station in the morning and pick them up in the evening. The railway operators also do extensive image branding, outreach, and special events with local jurisdictions and recreational / commercial facilities to generate passenger demand.

All these efforts contribute to making the railway attractive outside of simply being a way to get to and from work, and more a means for all types of travel, including recreation, entertainment, shopping, etc. It also maximizes the use of the infrastructure… Compare this to some of the newer systems, where the general effect is to simply capture commute traffic, but outside of those hours, your system runs empty and you are losing money.

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Originally Posted by davsot View Post
I will do some research into the history of private rail companies. It really interests me how successful they've been and if the government refuses to support rail, then so be it. Wish me luck!! xDDDD
In the past, the private railways were able to shoulder all the costs of operating the existing infrastructure as well as constructing new lines. But nowadays, the costs are higher and the expected revenue less, especially as the rail networks get more and more built out and the "new" ridership generated by building an entirely new line gets smaller. So nowadays for new lines, the railways usually get some form of subsidy on a portion of the construction / debt costs from the government.

Here's some more reading material on privatization of urban railways if you're interested:

Transit Transformations: Private Financing and Sustainable Urbanism in Hong Kong and Tokyo
(working paper, Robert Cervero, 2008)
http://www.pbrc.soka.edu/Resources/D...ormationsC.doc

Lessons from Japanese Experiences of Roles of Public and Private Sectors in Urban Transport
(JRTR #29, Kenichi Shoji, 2001)
http://www.jrtr.net/jrtr29/pdf/f12_sho.pdf
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Old July 6th, 2009, 08:58 AM   #237
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Tōkyō: Part 2

We arrive at Futako Tamagawa on the Den’en Toshi Line. A Tōkyō Metro 08 series train, manufactured by Nippon Sharyō in 2003, departs for Chūō Rinkan Station, as a Tōkyū 9000 series train on the Ōimachi Line enters the station, bound for Ōimachi Station.

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Looking west across the Tama River at the quadruple-tracked section of the Den’en Toshi Line.

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A new 6000 series temporarily leaves the station to stop on the layover tracks. These sets were introduced in March and are exclusively for express runs on the Ōimachi Line.

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Tōkyū 8500 series train bound for Chūō Rinkan.

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Platform 1 (for Chūō Rinkan), looking northeast.

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An 8000 series train on the Ōimachi Line has discharged its passengers and is about to head for the layover tracks west of the station.

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The 6000 series unit reenters the station on a return trip to Ōimachi.

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A Tōbu 50050 series enters the station, bound for Chūō Rinkan. On the other end of the Hanzōmon Line, the Tōbu Isesaki Line also runs through-service, so its possible to see trains from three different companies along the whole length of the line. A complete through-service run from Chūō Rinkan on the Den’en Toshi Line, through the Hanzōmon Line, to Minami-Kurihashi on the Tōbu Nikkō Line is nearly 100 km, and is the longest through-service operation for Tōkyō Metro.

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We arrive at Mizonokuchi Station in Kawasaki City. To the left, construction work is proceeding on the Ōimachi Line extension.

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Work continues on the quadruple-track section west of Mizonokuchi.

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Another 5000 series unit, showing Car No. 8, which is one of the six-door cars. There are usually two of these in each 5000 series train, and the seats are folded up during the morning rush hour to give passengers more space and improve dwell times. A third six-door car was recently added to several trains.

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I wanted to transfer to JR here, so it’s time to exit the station…

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Passing underneath the elevated structure, we can see the bus plaza in the background and a large bicycle parking lot directly ahead. Bicycling is a popular way to commute between home and the train station.

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As part of the improvements to accommodate the Ōimachi Line, a new pedestrian deck is being constructed to connect Tōkyū Mizonokuchi Station with JR Musashi Mizonokuchi Station for the Nambu Line. Although they are already connected on the east side of the Nambu Line tracks, this additional pedestrian connection will improve access on the west side of the Nambu Line, where passengers currently have to walk down to ground level and then walk back up to the JR concourse.

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Construction staging area for the new pedestrian deck.

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The JR end of the new pedestrian deck.

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JR Musashi Mizonokuchi Station, concourse level. This is the fourth busiest station on the JR Nambu Line, with an average of 73,612 daily station entries (2007).

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This directional sign is designed as a giant ring.

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The existing pedestrian deck on the east side of the tracks, which also directly connects the JR and Tōkyū stations. These elevated decks are common at large suburban centers like Mizonokuchi, providing direct access between the station and nearby buildings.

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A Nambu Line train departs for Kawasaki Station. The Nambu Line is one of the periphery lines in JR’s Tōkyō network, cutting through dense neighborhoods in Kawasaki City and western Tōkyō Prefecture. The line makes connections with virtually all the radial lines in the southwestern quadrant of Tōkyō’s rail network:
  • Kawasaki Station: JR Tōkaidō Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line; Keikyū Kawasaki Line (Keikyū Kawasaki Station)
  • Musashi Kosugi Station: Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, Meguro Line; JR Yokosuka Line, Shōnan-Shinjuku Line (currently under construction)
  • Musashi Mizonokuchi Station: Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line
  • Noborito Station: Odakyū Odawara Line
  • Inadazutsumi Station: Keiō Sagamihara Line
  • Bubaigawara Station: Keiō Keiō Line
  • Tachikawa Station: JR Chūō Rapid Line
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After hopping on board a Nambu Line train towards Kawasaki, I transfer at Musashi Kosugi for the Tōyoko Line.

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Old July 7th, 2009, 07:33 AM   #238
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Thanks quashlo! Always good to hear from ya.

I'm thinking about emulating the business model for the Caribbean Rail networks and possibly on the mainland. I'm just having some trouble with up-front costs. Most of them started up with nothing and soon developed a strategy with many businesses such as real estate. How could I possibly find money for up-front costs associated with construction and studies required by the government in an automobile-dominated hemisphere?

How exactly did they do it, if you know...
They still fascinate me. Maybe I'll go to Japan to study the economic model of railway companies.
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Old July 7th, 2009, 04:54 PM   #239
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davsot View Post
Thanks quashlo! Always good to hear from ya.

I'm thinking about emulating the business model for the Caribbean Rail networks and possibly on the mainland. I'm just having some trouble with up-front costs. Most of them started up with nothing and soon developed a strategy with many businesses such as real estate. How could I possibly find money for up-front costs associated with construction and studies required by the government in an automobile-dominated hemisphere?

How exactly did they do it, if you know...
They still fascinate me. Maybe I'll go to Japan to study the economic model of railway companies.
If you have a chance, read how Shibusawa created his Tokyu empire.
He bought out a patch of farm land using government loan and developed a modern suburb in the middle of nowhere lending out part of the land to private schools and center of commerce with the train station as the center. Now Tokyu always develops a bus depot in junction with the station with multiple routes spurring out to the outer skirts of the station to maximize utility of the station. If you develop a nursery at the station, working mothers would drop off their children before going to work, buy groccery, pick up their laundry and their children after work and ride the bus home.
In essence the station becomes a one stop for all for commuting.
If you develop a theme park or ball park at the end of the line people living on that rail line will utilize the rail on weekends as well.
Here in Japan rail operators are land developers as well and they try to maximize amenity of the rail line to highten the overall value of the land centering the station.
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Old July 7th, 2009, 07:42 PM   #240
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Are they private communities (I'm referring to walled communities)? They're probably publicly-accessible though. So that's how it is... I should focus on real estate before lol. Puerto Rico is out of land to develop, so I'm not sure what to do. Maybe I'll go to Dominican Republic, they'll have space, though I would have to calculate the risk, maybe it'll be easier because they don't use the US Dollar. The only thing I could probably develop is high-rises or, if the govnt approves, reorganize communities lacking urban planning (there's quite a few).

However, Puerto Rico needs more hotels for sure and I always thought that market would be more successful. Or any kind of tourist thing. Local Tourism is a great market. But there's 3.4 million cars for 3.9 million ppl. Our highways are congested. Rail would do good. We used to have rail in every coastal town, but this anti-rail movement in the US tore out every single last rail on the Island.

And also sport venues or entertainment venues would help. Another thought was building an IMAX theater (currently there are no IMAX theaters on the island) which would help bring up ridership, I would make the theater big. The only thing I have to worry about is anti-trust lawsuits (but only if I'm successful).
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