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Old April 14th, 2011, 10:00 AM   #2421
quashlo
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Musashi Kosugi Station construction update

Now, a long overdue update on the work at JR Musashi Kosugi Station (2011.03.20). Most of the complex construction work for the new connecting passage connecting the Nambu Line and the Yokosuka Line / Shōnan-Shinjuku Line appears complete, and they are now installing the mechanical stuff (i.e., moving walkways).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

At the outbound (Tachikawa-bound) platform of the Nambu Line, we can already see the moving walkway taking shape. The slope is more gentle than a typical escalator, and each direction is double-width.



Apparently, the walkways on this section are not continuous, but instead two units placed in series, in each direction. The stairwell is on the left.



At the “underpass”. The stairwell may seem a little generous, but there is heavy transfer traffic in both directions (Tōkyū to Yokosuka Line and Yokosuka Line to Tōkyū). I believe the existing temporary passage gets quite congested during rush hour.



On the Yokosuka Line platforms. This particular location will use regular escalators, but once you get down to ground level, it’s moving walkway.

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Old April 14th, 2011, 10:02 AM   #2422
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Shinagawa Station construction updates: Part 1

A more recent update (2011.03.20) of the work at JR Shinagawa Station as part of the Tōhoku Through Line. I had posted another update recently, but I was late on that, and there’s been a lot of progress since then.

First, a view of the trackwork at the north end.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

From the Tōkaidō Line outbound platform, looking north towards Tōkyō at the various modifications to the track layout. Judging from the color of the ballast, it looks like the second switch in the middle was recently added or modified.



The new double crossover, about 2- to 3-carlengths down the platform. In the distance is a 285 series Sunrise Express EMU sleeper train used on Sunrise Seto and Sunrise Izumi services.



Looking at the two island platforms which are currently only used irregularly. They are taking the 4 island platforms and 8 tracks for the Tōkaidō Line and downsizing them to 3 island platforms and 6 tracks, widening the platforms in the process.



Further down the platform…
Looks like they’ve laid as much of this new track as they can at this particular location until they can decommission the existing outbound track. Looking above, we can estimate where the ultimate edge of the outbound platform will be once fully widened. Since the inside outbound track will be switched over, the outside outbound track may take a bit longer, as they will have to remove the existing inside outbound track first.



Looking down at the canopy from the elevated station concourse. The center island platform looks almost complete. Judging from the orientation of the canopy relative to the tracks, it’s likely this is the final configuration and not a temporary one.

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Old April 14th, 2011, 10:03 AM   #2423
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Shinagawa Station construction updates: Part 2

A closer look at the widened Platforms 9 / 10.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

In the original configuration, there was quite a large gap between Platforms 9 / 10 and Platforms 11 / 12, which curved east at the north end parallel with the Yokosuka Line. The widened Platforms 9 / 10 now parallel Platforms 11 / 12 a little more closely, with the reduced gap now becoming extra platform width.



Looking at the new platform sections from Platform 9. Judging from the way the left edge curves, I suspect they may actually be realigning Platform 9 a bit as well, but we’ll see later. Compared to some of the existing platforms at Shinagawa Station, this seems quite wide, but will no doubt be necessary if through-servicing Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and / or Jōban Line trains will be terminating here (Shinagawa is home to a large office district).



It’s wide enough at this particular location to do a full escalator pair plus stairwell. I think in the last update, all we saw was the steel frame, but these are now quickly taking shape. With the track already laid and work progressing on the platform facilities, it may not be long before this new section of Platform 10 is in service.



Inside the elevated station concourse, where they are tearing out the walls on this section for the new escalators and stairwell. Interesting to note is that the existing stairwell is adjacent on the left. They could ultimately demolish it once the new access is complete, or perhaps they will tear down the walls on the right side and connect it (?).



Moving down to platform level, where they’ve fenced off the sections of Platform 10 they are currently widening. It seems possible that once the widened Platform 10 is open they will try and shave off some of Platform 9, which could then allow them to “cascade” over the rest of the JR platforms at the station: Yamanote Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and the Tōkaidō Line (inbound direction). Unfortunately, JR East hasn’t released a whole lot of info on this project, so it’s difficult to know the full scope of the changes at the station, but perhaps a full-out upgrade of the station isn’t entirely out of the question.

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Old April 14th, 2011, 10:03 AM   #2424
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Shinagawa Station construction updates: Part 3

Now a look at the trackwork on the south end.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Outbound Tōkaidō Line platform looking south, where they are building a platform extension. Because the new double crossover is about 2- to 3-carlengths down the platform at the north end, they will need to extend by the same distance at the south end in order to preserve the platform length. There needs to be at least 300 m of platform to accommodate the full-length 15-car trains. For bearings, the Yokosuka Line platforms are on the left. Right now, they appear to be working on the canopy.



Platform 10. Like the north end, it seems likely they will connect the two canopies together.



Looking south, we can see that they appear to building a new outbound track. Given how Platform 10 curves a little, it seems likely the extension to Platform 11 will also follow the same curve. It may only look straight now due to the need to not intrude on the existing outbound track at center.



Looking south from Platforms 9 / 10. Closest to us on the left is the new Track 10, and then the new Track 11. I wonder if this is the final configuration for Track 10, or if they will add another switch (or do some other changes) later. If they are going to modify Platform 9, it seems they would want to use Platform 10 as a replacement once all the widening is complete, which may explain why Track 10 leads straight into Track 9.



Another view, this time from the Yokosuka Line platforms. We can just barely see the new Track 11, which it appears will eventually be connected to Track 12 in that area with freshly laid ballast. I think once Platform 11 is widened out, they will go back and start tinkering with Track 12, which currently has a bit of a kink.



Lots of progress on this project, but this one seems particularly interesting since no one other than JR really knows the full extent of the work.
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Old April 14th, 2011, 06:22 PM   #2425
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Quote:
Disaster could upset Auckland plans to borrow Kawasaki LRV
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/transport/...ectid=10712746
I don't see why the Tohoku Earthquake would have any affect- KHI's rolling stock operation is in Hyogo, some 600km away from the affected area. In fact, Western Japan, Tokai, and Hokkaido are humming along just fine, and life goes on as it always has.
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Old April 14th, 2011, 06:26 PM   #2426
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Quote:
JR West rescinds reduced service plans after news of replacement carbon brushes
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/new...4520026-n1.htm
Good to hear this news. When I was in Kansai a couple of weeks ago, the in-train announcements were of these upcoming service cutbacks. I was worried some of the older rolling stock might even be put of service permanently b/c of these developments. I hope to experience a few more years of 103 and 113 series operation, if possible.
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Old April 14th, 2011, 10:04 PM   #2427
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k.k.jetcar, the links to both the articles you posted don't work. If you roll over the links, you'll see that the shortened address isn't just for show, it's the real address that the browser will try to use.
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Old April 15th, 2011, 02:36 AM   #2428
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I was wondering something (don't I always): is there a difference in fares between local and rapid services?

I mean, is there a good juxtaposition for both modes of travel on the urban railways?
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Old April 15th, 2011, 02:49 AM   #2429
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
I was wondering something (don't I always): is there a difference in fares between local and rapid services?

I mean, is there a good juxtaposition for both modes of travel on the urban railways?
Japanese railway companies don't generally charge different fares for local and rapid services. However, they do charge an extra fee for limited express services, which are another level up on the rapid services. To complicated the matter further, some railway lines run various types of rapid services, and some railways run green cars on their regular commuter trains (JR East) which are special seating cars which also have an extra fee in addition to the usual fare.
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Old April 15th, 2011, 03:19 AM   #2430
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gag Halfrunt View Post
k.k.jetcar, the links to both the articles you posted don't work. If you roll over the links, you'll see that the shortened address isn't just for show, it's the real address that the browser will try to use.
Thanks. I just quoted those article headers to indicate which post I was referring to. You can get the actual link by going back to the OP. I didn't want to hog bandwidth by quoting the whole post.
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Old April 15th, 2011, 09:38 AM   #2431
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Hanshin Main Line construction updates: Part 1

Next, an update on a continuous grade-separation project in the Kansai area that hasn’t been getting much attention: the Hanshin Main Line between Sumiyoshi and Ashiya in Kōbe City. The project involves elevating about 4 km of the line, eliminating 11 grade crossings, reconnecting 33 roads that have been cut off by the tracks, and constructing 3 new frontage roads. Two stations—Ōgi and Fukae—will become elevated stations.

First, let’s look at Ōgi Station.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

On Platform 2 (for Amagasaki, Umeda, Namba, and Nara), looking east.



Plan view of the section being elevated.



Rendering of Ōgi Station at the construction site. Lots of blue, which is meant to represent the character blue in the local placename “Ōgi”, as well as the water of Ōgi Harbor.



Another panel at the construction site showing the general process. Ōgi is a four-track station, which means twice the amount of temporary infrastructure that normally needs to be constructed in elevation projects. The temporary tracks will be constructed on the north side.



Currently, they’ve already completed all the temporary tracks. They may only be used for a few years, but they look good enough to be permanent.



Moving to the west end of the platform, looking west towards Sannomiya. Now that the temporary tracks have been completed and they’ve removed the old tracks, they should be starting on the foundations for the columns supporting the new aerial structure.



A Kintetsu train on a through-service rapid express bound for Sannomiya.



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Old April 15th, 2011, 09:39 AM   #2432
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Hanshin Main Line construction updates: Part 2

Next, Fukae Station:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

All the infrastructure here is temporary. The work for the permanent facilities is happening on the other side of the fencing.



From the temporary inbound track (towards Umeda and Namba), looking east. To the left is the temporary outbound track for Sannomiya.



Rendering almost looks longer than 120 m… I wonder if they are taking this opportunity to increase the platform lengths on the Main Line, which typically can only handle six-car trains.





After completion of the elevation of this section, the Hanshin Main Line will be 90% grade-separated.

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Old April 15th, 2011, 09:40 AM   #2433
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Hanshin Main Line construction updates: Part 3

Next, another grade-separation project on the Hanshin Main Line surrounding Naruo Station in Nishinomiya City. Approx. 1.9 km of the line between Mukogawa and Kōshien Stations will be elevated as part of the project. Estimated cost is approx. ¥29.7 billion and the full project is scheduled for completion in FY2019.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/



Overview of the project. This is one of the smaller grade-separation projects, typically involving the elevation of a single station as part of the redevelopment and renewal of the entire station area.



A very simple render at the construction site… Naruo is a pretty minor station, so only a small taxi pool and transit plaza. However, there’s a large lot directly outside the station which it appears they might end up using as a station plaza (?). Seems a little big, though, so maybe they will try and build something on it.



Compared to the project between Sumoyishi and Ashiya, this one is a fairly recent start, and they are only just constructing the first temporary track, in the inbound direction (towards Umeda). The track is already laid, actually, and they seem pretty close to making the switch-out.



Temporary platform and track. Again, no frills but still looks good enough to be permanent. Once they switch-out the first track, they can demolish the old track and switch-out the second track to the temporary facilities.





In addition to the work at Naruo Station, one station west at Kōshien Station there are plans for major upgrades to help relieve platform crowding, particularly during game days at the baseball stadium.
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Old April 15th, 2011, 09:41 AM   #2434
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Hanshin Main Line construction updates: Part 4

Final installment is on Mikage Station in Kōbe City. This is one of the weird stations on the line, a major four-track station located an incredibly sharp curve (140 m radius for inner tracks and 160 m outer radius for outer tracks). Hanshin trains are slightly smaller than typical commuter EMUs, but still leave very little platform width and have difficulty negotiating the curves, having to slow down to 35 km/h through the station. Since the opening of the Namba Line meant that standard-size Kintetsu cars would be operating on the line, they actually had to shave off some of the platforms to avoid scraping.

Starting in 2010, Hanshin has been implementing improvements at the station: installing barrier-free upgrades (new escalators and elevators), raising the platform height, installing gap fillers on the platforms, and constructing a pedestrian bridge linking the station to Mikage Classe (a large shopping center directly outside the station that includes a Hanshin department store). The total cost of these improvements is about ¥300 million.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

The Mikage Tower Residences, a new condominium tower built together with Mikage Classe as part of a redevelopment project outside the station. Hanshin, as well as Kintetsu Real Estate, have a hand in the tower.



Pedestrian bridge to Mikage Classe



Pedestrian bridge and transit plaza. Kōbe has got to be one of the best cities in Japan when it comes to new developments… They’re always coming out with really high-quality stuff. Perhaps the only complaint about the bridge might be the lack of a canopy,



The “clash” of old and new where the pedestrian bridge connects into the station. They’re still renovating this, so eventually it should look new as well.



The new second-floor faregate entrance that was added as part of the station upgrade. Things here, including the station attendant booth, are still temporary.



Finally, the platforms, which are quite narrow even by Japanese standards.

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Old April 15th, 2011, 12:06 PM   #2435
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What i don't understand is what is the reason to elevate so many tracks and stations? So large amount of money just to make it nicer and slightly more modern?
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Old April 15th, 2011, 12:20 PM   #2436
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coth View Post
What i don't understand is what is the reason to elevate so many tracks and stations? So large amount of money just to make it nicer and slightly more modern?
It is to optimize efficiency while securing safety by segregating the trains with other modes of traffic in which both mode can speed up with out influencing one another.
Efficiency generates better economy leading to lower cost with higher profit.

That is why.
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Old April 15th, 2011, 12:31 PM   #2437
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To be able to offer greater service (more and longer trains) and reduce the footprint the railway is using. And removing grade crossings is also a great safety aspect and also improves access between neighbourhoods.
They are running so many trains in Japan that some grade crossings are shut for hours during rush hour....
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Old April 15th, 2011, 07:31 PM   #2438
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Quote:
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What i don't understand is what is the reason to elevate so many tracks and stations? So large amount of money just to make it nicer and slightly more modern?
The station improvements are only a secondary reason. The primary reason is safety (for the train passengers, as well as for all the peds, bicyclists, and drivers using the grade crossings). Then there's a slew of secondary reasons, some of which others have already noted:
  • Improved reliability of train services (no grade crossings → no accidents → no service disruptions)
  • Reduced roadway congestion at crossings (improves travel time for everyone using the crossings, as the arms can stay down for the good part of an hour)
  • Improved connectivity of the neighborhood (people no longer have to go through the station or wait at a crossing to get to the other side of the tracks). This can help spur redevelopment and improve the overall attractiveness of the neighborhood.
  • Gives an excuse for needed upgrades like accessibility improvements, general renovation, capacity (longer platforms), etc.
Just ask yourself:
Who builds a high-capacity urban line nowadays that ISN'T fully grade-separated?
Some of these crossings effectively shut down during the rush hour because there's too many trains:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2779
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Old April 16th, 2011, 09:04 AM   #2439
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New exit at Ōsaka Station opens: Part 1

As part of the various improvements to JR Ōsaka Station, a new exit recently opened at the station on 2011.04.11, and commuters can now see the whole platform bridge that spans the track (previously, only one side was open, with the other boarded up while they did work on it).
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

Who knew this was what was behind those temporary walls?



The full-color LED departure boards look great.
(left) JR Takarazuka Line for Takarazuka, Sanda, Kinosaki Onsen, Tottori, and Kurayoshi
11:58 Local for Takarazuka, Track 6, approx. 4 min. late
12:03 Limited express Hamakaze 3 for Kasumi, Track 4
12:05 Rapid for Takarazuka, Track 3
12:11 Limited express Kōnotori 9 for Kinosaki Onsen, Track 4
(center left) JR Kōbe Line for Sannomiya, Nishi-Akashi, and Himeji
12:00 Special rapid (shin-kaisoku) for Himeji, Track 5
12:05 Rapid for Kōbe and Kakogawa, Track 5
12:07 Local for Suma, Track 6
12:15 Special rapid for Himeji, Track 5
(center right) JR Kyōto Line for Shin-Ōsaka, Takatsuki, and Kyōto
12:00 Special rapid for Maibara and Nagahama, Track 8
12:02 Local for Takatsuki, Track 7
12:10 Rapid for Kyōto and Yasu, Track 8
12:11 Local for Takatsuki, Track 7
(right) Hokuriku Line for Fukui, Kanazawa, and Toyama
12:12 Limited express Thunderbird 19 for Wakura Onsen, Track 11
12:42 Limited express Thunderbird 21 for Toyama, Track 11
13:42 Limited express Thunderbird 23 for Toyama, Track 11



For Kyōto Line, Kōbe Line, and Takarazuka Line trains, special rapids are blue, rapids are orange, and locals are white. The red ones are tokkyū (limited express).



Fairly large digital signage (i.e., advertisement) installation. These are Sharp PNV601s—at 6.5 mm, the thinnest such model in the world. Up to 25 individual screens can be connected together and operated as a single unit. These are 12 across, and there are two of these 134 cm x 908 cm installations at the north and south of the platform bridge.



Looking further down, they’ve got another digital signage installation of the more conventional type. This is a 2×6 orientation (268 cm × 453 cm).







This new exit is called the Bridge Exit (officially, JR West is calling it “Bridge Gate”, but I don’t like using “gate” for “口”). It opens onto the platform bridge / public passage that spans across the entire station from the North Gate Building to the South Gate Building (the elevated station concourse is actually inside the platform bridge, but just separated off by faregates).



From the north end of the platform bridge, looking up at the new canopy.



Next, a video tour:


Source: ms110816 on YouTube

Overall, more awesomeness by JR West. The new station is definitely something to see for both railfans or regular visitors to the Kansai area. We are getting pretty close to the official grand opening on 2011.05.04.
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Old April 16th, 2011, 09:06 AM   #2440
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New exit at Ōsaka Station opens: Part 2

Next, a more comprehensive photo series.

First up is the digital signage.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Perhaps a bit reminiscent of the Shinagawa Station installation, with the V-shaped double-screen units. Of course, all the advertisements are for the new station building grand opening on 2011.05.04.







An ad for Lucua Ōsaka, the new shopping center inside the east half of the North Gate Building, managed by JR West.



A few more of the 1×12 installations inside the platform bridge.







Two more installations at the Atrium Square. These are from Panasonic, possibly their 3.4 m × 1.8 m plasma models (world’s largest, full-HD+3D capable, costing ¥5 million apiece).



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