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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:43 AM   #2521
quashlo
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Hankyū Kyōto Line / Senri Line continuous grade-separation project: Part 1

An update on a fairly large project that’s been under our radar for some time now, mostly because my usual blog sources haven’t covered it. This project will grade-separate (elevate) the Hankyū tracks in and around Awaji Station, the junction between the Hankyū Kyōto Line and Senri Line. About 3.3 km of the Kyōto Line and 3.8 km of the Senri Line will be elevated, eliminating 17 grade crossings (6 on the Kyōto Line and 11 on the Senri Line). A total of four stations (Awaji, Sōzenji, Shimo-Shinjō, and Kunijima) will be elevated. Project lead is Ōsaka City and Hankyū Electric Railway (Hankyū Corporation) is construction lead. Land acquisition began in FY1997, construction began in FY2007, trains will switch to the elevated tracks in FY2018, and the entire project is scheduled for completion in FY2020.

First up is Awaji Station:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Construction notice at the site.
This project is similar in scale to the elevation of the Keikyū Main Line / Airport Line near Keikyū Kamata in Tōkyō, if not greater. The Keikyū project is a main line and branch line project (four tracks in, two tracks out), while the Hankyū project is more like two main lines (four tracks in, four tracks out). The eventual design is two elevated island platforms in a stacked configuration similar to the future Keikyū Kamata or the existing Aoto Station on the Keisei Main Line / Oshiage Line.



Red sections will be elevated. Awaji is an “×” junction—the Kyōto Line starts at top on the left but swings down to the right, while the Senri Line does the opposite.



Station cross sections. Yellow are the existing tracks and red are the new elevated stations.
Sōzenji (left), Awaji (center), and Kunijima (right). Awaji Station is being built entirely off to the east of the existing ground-level tracks and platforms. Shimo-Shinjō (not shown) will also be relocated about 200 m to the north as part of the project in order to provide enough clearance over the Tōkaidō Shinkansen viaduct immediately to the south of the station.



Closeup of Awaji Station cross-section.
For some reason the cross-section in the previous graphic shows five levels, but four is more likely, as shown here. Fourth level will be outbound trains (Kyōto Line for Kawaramachi in Kyōto, Senri Line for Kita-Senri), while third level will be inbound trains (Kyōto Line for Hankyū Umeda, Senri Line for Tengachaya on the Ōsaka Municipal Subway Sakaisuji Line). Although probably more expensive and difficult to engineer, this is the preferred configuration for these types of projects, and allows for cross-platform transfers between lines.



Awaji has been a bottleneck in the Hankyū network due to the track layout that has various directions crossing each other. Most trains have to wait for the signal to clear before entering the station, but this project will completely eliminate these conflicts.



Demolition of existing buildings in the way of the new viaducts and station is proceeding slowly.



A key for the next couple of pictures.



Location 1 on the Kyōto Line, from the east. Almost as high as the building behind it.



Location 1 from the north. In many respects, this is a bit easier than the Keikyū project as there’s more space to work with.



Location 2 on the Senri Line, from the north. Lots of scaffolding in place.



Location 2 from the south

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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:44 AM   #2522
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Hankyū Kyōto Line / Senri Line continuous grade-separation project: Part 2

Next up is Sōzenji Station:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Visualization of the new elevated Sōzenji Station.



Three-story station, two tracks in side-platform configuration.



Sōzenji is the one at top, on the Kyōto Line.



Right-of-way cleared on the south side, adjacent to the Kunijima Water Treatment Plant.



Existing station is also two tracks in side-platform configuration. The elevated station will be built directly above.



Looking east from the east end (towards Kawaramachi)



Looking west from the west end (towards Umeda)

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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:44 AM   #2523
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Hankyū Imazu Line grade-separation project construction update

This project involved the elevation of ~340 m of the southern half of the Imazu Line at Nishinomiya Kitaguchi Station. This was finished a while ago (2010.12.05 to be exact), but here’s another set.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

New elevated platform



Heading to the new platform, Platform 5.



This area is now all part of the paid-area of the station, so you can no longer use this corridor without already being inside the station.



People heading to Hankyū Nishinomiya Gardens need to use the East Exit.



New platform from the north end. Imazu Line is a minor line, so it’s just a single stub track.





The color palette used was pretty simple, but I’m liking the grays.



Looking south



The south end of the platform opens onto a new South East Exit, that also leads directly to Hankyū Nishinomiya Gardens.



“Hankyū maroon” stripe on the ramp up.



Because of the design of the station—a “cross” between the two branches of the Hankyū Imazu Line (one north and one south) and the east-west Hankyū Kōbe Line—they are unable to completely remove this one crossing.



A new building under construction outside the station just west of the Imazu Line.

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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:45 AM   #2524
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Ōsaka Station City opens: Part 1

Ōsaka Station City, the new station complex at JR Ōsaka Station, celebrated its grand opening on 2011.05.04. While we’ve had the chance to see some parts of the new facilities already, the last remaining sections we’re revealed to the public on 2011.05.04, marking the completion of one of the most ambitious station developments in Japan, lasting seven years at a total cost of ¥210 billion (basically a multiple-station extension or two for an existing line). Enjoy!

First, a few vids:

ANN news report (2011.05.04):



15-minute HQ tour on a “self-made Steadicam” (2011.05.07).
Fairly comprehensive, but even this doesn’t get everything.


Source: osakajyanbo on YouTube
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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:46 AM   #2525
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Ōsaka Station City opens: Part 2

For pics, we start off with a tour during the daytime:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

From the north side of the station.
Continuing on this level takes you to the platform bridge and the new Bridge Exit to enter the elevated station concourse and access the train platforms. Taking the escalators or stairwell up takes you to the newly-opened Time Square.





Looking down at this area from the JR Ōsaka Mitsukoshi Isetan department store end of the 7th-floor catwalk.



From the Lucua end of the catwalk. Most of the new Time Square was occupied by temporary cones set up to control flow into the department store, but hopefully should remove these soon to open up the space and allow everyone to enjoy it. The number of visitors to the new department store and Lucua reached 500,000 a day during the first weekend, so it’s perhaps understandable that they needed to cone off much of the Time Square for the time being. The café on left, however, was in business, and there were many visitors sitting down to take in the view.





The new gold clock that is the namesake for the Time Square. There is also a silver one at the south end of the square.





Facing the Lucua end of the North Gate Building



Looking through to the Atrium Square and the Ume-Kita area



The platform bridge and Time Square from the passage along the south face of the North Gate Building.



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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:47 AM   #2526
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Ōsaka Station City opens: Part 3

Next, scenes at dusk:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

North Gate



Atrium Square



For some strange reason, I thought they were going to do some sort of sun clock here… In reality, it was this “light clock”. Makes sense given there’s no sun… I think the sun clock is in one of the other public spaces.
You can also get a peek of a Thunderbird limited express at Platform 11.



Time to head up to the Time Square…



Facing the collection of specialty retail shops inside Lucua



Looking down from the 7th-floor catwalk



Time Square, with the lighting at the south edge of the canopy and along both edges of the square activated.







Back on the public passage / station concourse level



Thanks to the glass and the various lighting installations, the station has a different feel in daytime and evening.



The platform bridge spans all 11 elevated JR tracks at the station.



Platform 11, where they have removed the sheets covering up the glass on the right.





Can’t wait when the Ume-Kita area fills out… JR is forecasting 900,000 entries and exits daily at the station as a result of the new complex.

With the completion of Ōsaka Station City, two of JR’s central terminals in the Keihanshin area are now transformed (Ōsaka and Kyōto)… Perhaps Sannomiya (Kōbe) is next?
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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:48 AM   #2527
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Ōsaka Station City opens: Part 4

Next, a tour of the eight public spaces at the new station complex. Urban planning for cities often considers open space, and Ōsaka Station City—a city within a station—is no different.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

Start off with the North Gate Building public spaces…



Garden of Serenity
Located on the 10th floor of the North Gate Building, drawing in elements reminiscent of a traditional Japanese garden. The edge of the garden uses inu-yarai, a style of fencing used in traditional-style homes to prevent dogs from marking their territory on the walls of houses.



Right now, there’s not so much to see other than the Yodobashi Camera and the Umeda Sky Building, and the massive Umeda Freight Terminal, but this should fill out a bit as soon as the Ume-Kita developments come online.



Wind Plaza
Apparently this is supposed to be like an “English garden” (?).



Looks like one of the more popular places to take a breather, given the plentiful seating.



The space includes a café and a Famima, a variation on the typical Family Mart convenience store.





This will no doubt be a popular choice among the office workers in the complex when that space becomes active.



Sky Farm
Located on the roof of the North Gate Building, this space follows the increasing trend for urban farming. They will grow seasonal produce like cabbage and tomato, with a portion to be used within restaurants inside the North Gate Building. Other selected crops include grapes, cherries, apricots, kumquats, blueberries, persimmons, oranges, chestnuts, etc.





Apparently, this plot was planted by idol group NMB48, Ōsaka’s answer to AKB48.





Solar and wind generating masts



View of Nishi-Umeda from the Sky Farm



Carillon Square
Located at the east end of the North Gate Building, adjacent to the connection with the pedestrian deck towards Hankyū Umeda Station. Already lots of people moving back and forth along this particular route.





Atrium Square
This serves as the North Gate to the complex. The atrium is 35 m tall—for a railfan, that means almost two standard carlengths.



Construction in the Ume-Kita area



More to come later…
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Old May 9th, 2011, 09:49 AM   #2528
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Cherry blossoms and trains

It’s that time of the year again (more like was… I’m a little late).

On the Chichibu Railway, ex-JNR and ex-Tōkyū commuter EMUs (2011.04.17).


Source: rokutetsu on YouTube

Naka-Meguro Station on the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line (2011.04.06):


Source: YKO0315 on YouTube

On the Chūō Rapid Line:


Source: RAILWAYMOVIES on YouTube

Seibu Shinjuku Line between Musashi Seki and Higashi-Fushimi.


Source: QPSAexpress on YouTube

Meitetsu Nagoya Main Line between Kasamatsu and Kisogawa-zutsumi. Includes shots over the Kiso River.


Source: randonneur110 on YouTube
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Old May 9th, 2011, 10:00 AM   #2529
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asahi View Post
Thanks a lot!
I take this line everyday (Seijogakuenmae - Shinjuku) and really wanted to know how it looked like before.
How do you like it there? Seijō is supposed to be one of the most desirable neighborhoods within the 23 wards.

Seems like a lot has changed on that particular section, but other things elsewhere still remain the same... Chiyoda Line still has the same 6000 series trains.
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Old May 9th, 2011, 03:28 PM   #2530
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The new Osaka station looks amazing. Very different to the experience I had back in April last year. I can't wait to return to see it in its full glory! Excellent photos.
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Old May 10th, 2011, 10:55 AM   #2531
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Ōsaka Station City opens: Part 3
Why are there still canopies over each individual platform? Aren't they unnecessary since they got the huge canopy over the entire station? It also keeps one from viewing the new canopy and station from the platforms.
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Old May 10th, 2011, 11:21 AM   #2532
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Quote:
Why are there still canopies over each individual platform?
Those canopies don't just provide a roof- they are mounting points for lighting, digital information boards, electrical conduits, etc. Perhaps portions can be replaced with transparent material to allow natural light to reach the platforms.
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Old May 10th, 2011, 08:16 PM   #2533
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I think they are still figuring out the best solution.

After completion of the station canopy, they discovered that rain / snow could still get into the station (as far as the platform bridge / public passage) when the conditions are just right (high wind, rain / snow coming in at the right angle).

The station canopy design includes some "sails" at the east and west edges that were supposed to prevent precipitation from entering the station. You can see them in some of the pictures.

If worse comes to worse, I think they may still remain, but be replaced with synthetic fabric, glass, or some other type of transparent / translucent material.
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Old May 11th, 2011, 08:26 AM   #2534
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Localization key to winning India projects
http://www.nikkei.com/news/topic/art...E2E3E2E5E0E4E3

Quote:
Subway projects are debuting one after another in India’s largest cities, a product of modernization and population growth due to economic development. For Japanese firms hoping to expand their sales to markets in emerging countries, the attraction is a massive population reaching 1.2 billion people. Endless possibilities abound for winning bids and orders for subway projects aimed at eliminating the traffic congestion caused by growing motorization and serving as a means of transport connecting major cities and neighboring suburbs. But Japanese firms are facing a difficult-to-overcome obstacle in these endeavors.

One day in April, I boarded New Delhi’s increasingly popular subway system, the Delhi Metro. The coin-shaped tokens purchased at the ticket window cost anywhere from 8 to 30 rupees (about ¥15 to ¥54). Standing on the platform, I was amazed at the system’s modern design, high ceilings, and clean trains.

For this project to construct a subway system for the Indian capital, approx. 60 percent of Phase 1 and approx. 50 percent of Phase 2 of the project are financed by Japanese yen loans. Japan also recently received another formal yen loan request from the Indian government for Phase 3 of the construction. Hopes are high for Japan’s help.

“Despite the big opportunities, the participation of Japanese firms in the various projects has been limited thus far,” say disappointed spokespersons for the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), which dispenses the yen loans. For instance, Kumagai-gumi and Shimizu Corporation submitted bids and signed contracts for civil works for the Delhi Metro, but Japan’s major general contractors later failed to win any bids in consecutive subway projects for Bangalore, Kolkata, and Chennai.

Mitsubishi Corporation won a bid for rolling stock for Delhi and Bangalore in a consortium with Korean firms. However, France’s Alstom and Germany’s Siemens each won individual orders for Chennai Metro rolling stock and signaling systems, respectively. It would appear that firms from Europe, which has historically had a deep relationship with India, have a lot of pull.

Amidst the news, one ray of light shines down: In March of this year, Nippon Signal won an order to provide automatic faregates at a total of 32 locations on the Chennai Metro, becoming the first Japanese firm to win an order on its own. The products are slated to be imported from Japan, and the total contract value is approx. ¥2 billion. According to those involved in winning the bid, the sole factor behind the win was the pricepoint.

“As long as you meet the performance standards, the rest comes down to cost. This is how to do business in India,” asserts one trading company employee. The naïve line of thinking of “They’ll buy it even if it’s more expensive, as long as it is high-performance”—a common take among the Japanese firms struggling in India—doesn’t hold water with Indians seasoned in how to business.

As a result, everyone recognizes that the key to winning projects in India is moving towards local production. One good example referenced without fail is Canada’s Bombardier, which boasts the largest share of the global urban transport market. The company has two plants in Gujarat state in western India, and is manufacturing trains for Delhi Metro.

Localization of production in order to improve cost-competitiveness is now a critical condition in winning bids. Kawasaki Heavy Industries has already joined hands with the national railway Indian Railways, announcing a plan to manufacture railcars for freight railroads. Hitachi has also begun considering formation of a joint venture in India to manufacture railcars.

Not just subways but also large-scale infrastructure projects such as the Delhi–Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC), for which Japan’s public and private sectors are working cooperatively, will be in abundance in the coming future in India. It’s almost as if India’s massive untapped market of 1.2 billion people is forcing Japanese firms to make one of two choices: Either take roots in India with an eye to doing business, or stand by on the sidelines in envy.

Hitachi Zōsen received an order for TBMs for the Bangalore Metro.
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Old May 11th, 2011, 08:27 AM   #2535
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Tōkyū 4000 series in testing

These are the new 10-car sets for the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line / Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line through-services set to begin next year. These are the first 10-car sets to run on the Tōyoko Line, which currently only runs with eight-car trains (they are extending platforms to 10 cars).

The first set arrived from the the Tōkyū Car factory a few weeks ago and began testing on the Den’en Toshi Line on 2011.04.21.

Couple vids of the first unit, 4101F:
Source: tobu2181 on YouTube

Testing at Kajigaya, Nagatsuta, and Tama Plaza (2011.04.22):



Testing at Tama Plaza and Saginuma (2011.04.25):



A subtle reminder that we don’t have much longer to wait until we start seeing these units in commercial service on the Fukutoshin Line. :nod:
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Old May 11th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #2536
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New Tōkyō Metro ad campaign debuts

Tōkyō Metro’s new TŌKYŌ WONDERGROUND ad campaign debuted, including CMs. The new image character is model An (or Anne).

Official website:
http://www.tokyo-wonderground.jp/

Daily podcast Listen! Wonderground, a joint effort between Tōkyō Metro and Tōkyō FM:
http://www.tokyo-wonderground.jp/listen/index.html

60s CM spot “Start”:
BGM is “Atarashii Bunmei Kaika” (“A New Enlightenment”) by Tōkyō Jihen.


Source: pippi3lam on YouTube

Making of the CM:


Source: pippi3lam on YouTube

Posters (2011.05). Shot at Nishi-Nippori Station on the Chiyoda Line, with the latest trains in the Metro fleet, the 16000 series.
(Click here for 1600 × 1200)





Can’t say I’m very fond of it so far, but maybe it will surprise me later.
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Old May 11th, 2011, 08:42 AM   #2537
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Osaka station looks so good. makes shin-osaka look even more from the 60's now.
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Old May 11th, 2011, 04:15 PM   #2538
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Those 4000 series trains sound very similar to the E233 series trains running across the JR East network.
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Old May 12th, 2011, 03:34 AM   #2539
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Quote:
Osaka station looks so good. makes shin-osaka look even more from the 60's now.
I rather like Shin-Osaka station. It could use a refresh/update, but the original design used more steel than concrete, so it avoided the heavy institutional look prevalent back in the 60's.
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Old May 12th, 2011, 04:19 AM   #2540
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When it comes to rail japan is just Godly. If there was a God of Trains,and he had a heaven, Japan is it. The stations, especially the new ones, look amazing. They don't have a quantity vs quality issue either. Most of their trains are beautiful, especially the Shinkansens. I would move to Japan for the trains.
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