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Old May 12th, 2011, 10:53 AM   #2541
quashlo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AG View Post
Those 4000 series trains sound very similar to the E233 series trains running across the JR East network.
I'm not very knowledgeable on the sounds, but I think all modern stock tends to sound somewhat similar nowadays. I know there are at least a few small variations here and there, though.

During acceleration, the Tōkyū 4000s generate a distinctive short-lasting whir that rises in pitch. A few other new trains make a similar sound:

Tōkyū 5000 series departs Tsukimino Station on the Den’en Toshi Line. This is basically the model for the 4000 series.


Source: vvvflove on YouTube

Tōbu 50000 series departs Asakadai Station on the Tōjō Line.


Source: lovelymilfa on YouTube

Keiō 9000 series departs Funabori Station on the Toei Subway Shinjuku Line.


Source: rapid0104 on YouTube

The E233 series trains don’t generate this sound… Instead, they have the more common loud hum that kicks in when accelerating.

E233-1000 series departs Tōkyō Station on the Keihin-Tōhoku Line.


Source: E231keitsuiraku on YouTube

E233-3000 series departs Chigasaki Station on the Tōkaidō Line.


Source: TokaidoE231 on YouTube
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Old May 13th, 2011, 04:13 PM   #2542
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One of my favorite Japanese train sounds:


Source: hkvvvf on YouTube

When I was in Switzerland and Germany last year, I recall some OBB (Austrian Federal Railway) trains making similar sounds.


Source: milchy07 on YouTube

Edit: I read through some Youtube comments; it seems these two trains have a similar Seimens-made component called a '制御器搭載'. Perhaps someone more fluent in Japanese and railway lingo can tell us what this is lol.

Last edited by nouveau.ukiyo; May 13th, 2011 at 04:29 PM.
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Old May 13th, 2011, 04:36 PM   #2543
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Yamanote Song. To help those who wish to memorize all the Yamanote Line stations. If you're in Tokyo, it's not only handy to know all the stations when getting around, but it comes in handy when in the bar. I don't know how popular it is, but I've played the Yamanote Line drinking game a few times. I guess train nerds use other, more obscure lines to get drunk.


Last edited by nouveau.ukiyo; May 13th, 2011 at 04:57 PM.
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Old May 13th, 2011, 08:05 PM   #2544
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
Edit: I read through some Youtube comments; it seems these two trains have a similar Seimens-made component called a '制御器搭載'. Perhaps someone more fluent in Japanese and railway lingo can tell us what this is lol.
The Keikyū 2100 series units that generate the "musical scale" sound when accelerating use Siemens GTO-VVVF drives. However, as the electrical equipment approaches the end of its 10-year life cycle and needs replacement, the Siemens drives are gradually being replaced with domestically-produced IGBT-VVVF drives from Tōyō Electric. Apparently, there were some difficulties on the maintenance side since pretty much every other train in Keikyū's fleet and elsewhere throughout Japan uses domestically-produced propulsion systems.

New 2100 series unit with a Tōyō Electric drive:


Source: vvvflove on YouTube
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Old May 14th, 2011, 08:17 AM   #2545
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
I don't know how popular it is, but I've played the Yamanote Line drinking game a few times. I guess train nerds use other, more obscure lines to get drunk.
Well, there's this, which I believe is somewhat popular as karaoke (?) among diehard Keikyū fans and other tetsu-ota.


Source: sangyoon3 on YouTube

Personally, I despise it, and much prefer something like JR Kyūshū’s official corporate song:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PEwFROochY&hd=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbJr9efkjPU&hd=1

But, to each his own...
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Old May 14th, 2011, 08:19 AM   #2546
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Some clips of JR East running sounds:
Source: tiyodalain on YouTube

E231-0 series on the Jōban Local Line, between Kita-Senju and Minami-Senju:



E217 series (refurbished) on the Yokosuka Line, between Shinagawa and Nishi-Ōi:



E233-5000 series on the Keiyō Line, between Shin-Urayasu and Maihama:



E231-500 on the Yamanote Line, between Shinagawa and Tamachi:

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Old May 14th, 2011, 06:59 PM   #2547
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
much prefer something like JR Kyūshū’s official corporate song:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PEwFROochY&hd=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbJr9efkjPU&hd=1

But, to each his own...
Yeah, JR Kyushu's is the best of the JR Group, I think. Almost brings a tear to my eye. The Super Bellz thing is just going too far.
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Old May 15th, 2011, 08:56 AM   #2548
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Tosa Electric Railway tram festival: Part 1

The Tosa Electric Railway (affectionately known as “Toden” among Kōchi locals and as “Tosaden” outside of Kōchi to avoid confusion with the Tōkyō tram network) in Kōchi City recently held a tram festival at its Sanbashi Carhouse on 2011.05.03, showcasing it’s impressive collection of trams from other cities in Japan and around the world that beats even Hiroshima’s hodgepodge of Japanese cars. Enjoy!
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/at0513/

(left) Tosaden No. 7: A 1984 replica of the original 7 series units manufactured for Tosaden in 1905, a year after the railway’s opening. In 1985, it was given the nickname Restoration (from the Meiji Restoration).
(center) Tosaden No. 198: Ex-Oslo streetcar known as the “Goldfish” in their original home. This one began running in Kōchi in 1992, and features a world map on the ceiling.
(right) Tosaden Workcar No. 1: Manufactured by Tosaden’s Wakamatsuchō Works in 1952 using a reinforced frame from a retired work car and combining it with a newly-manufactured car body. This one makes an appearance every year as a float in the Yosakoi festival.



Tosaden No. 910, an ex-Lisbon car used for charter runs.
Manufactured in 1947, but was regauged from 914 mm to 1,067 mm in Japan and began running on the Tosaden on 1994.03.17 as part of the program to revitalize the railway by bringing in trams from outside Japan. This was the last in the group of foreign trams introduced onto the railway. The tram is on bogies from a former Nishitetsu 331 series unit used on the former Nishitetsu Kitagata Line in Kita-Kyūshū City.





Tosaden No. 607. Manufactured 1958. This is used for charter runs for drinking parties (hence the Asahi beer paint scheme).



(left) Tosaden No. 216. Manufactured 1950, based on the Toden 6000 series in Tōkyō.
(right) Tosaden No. 627. Manufactured 1963.



(left) Tosaden No. 605. Manufactured 1958.
(right) Tosaden No. 212. Manufactured 1954.



Tosaden No. 628. Manufactured 1963.





(left) Tosaden No. 592. One of two ex-Meitetsu cars (Minomachi Line) that began service on the Tosaden in 2005.
(right) Tosaden No. 604. Manufactured 1958, bearing ads for JA Kyōsai (National Mutual Insurance Federation of Agricultural Cooperatives) and the Kōchi Prefectural Police Department.

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Old May 15th, 2011, 08:59 AM   #2549
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Tosa Electric Railway tram festival: Part 2

Second set:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/at0513/







Inside No. 198, the ex-Oslo tram. The master controller and brakes were modified in Japan.



Interior is partitioned in two by the center doors.
The ceiling features a large world map.



No. 7, Restoration





Tosaden No. 603. Manufactured 1958, bearing an ad for the Anpanman Museum.



Tosaden No. 702. Ex-San’yō Electric Tramway (Sanden) car from Shimonoseki, manufactured in 1958 by Naniwa Kōki (one of the predecessors of Alna Kōki and Alna Sharyō).



Tosaden No. 735. Ex-Stuttgart tram that began running 1990.08 as the first foreign tram in Tosaden’s fleet.



It appears this one hasn’t been running for some time now… Not sure why, maybe due to replacement of some rare part.

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Old May 15th, 2011, 09:00 AM   #2550
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Tosa Electric Railway tram festival: Part 3

Third set:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/at0513/

Carhouse and traverser







Tosaden No. 320. A cute ex-Graz (Austria) single-bogie unit that began running on the Tosaden in 1993.







Ex-Lisbon car



The car still features an ad for Pingo Doce, a Portuguese supermarket chain.



Tosaden No. 1001: One of two new units manufactured for Tosaden in 1981 by Alna Kōki (now Alna Sharyō), which traces its roots to Kobayashi Ichizō, the pioneer of what is now Hankyū Electric Railway in the Keihanshin area. These two 1000 series cars inherited various equipment including master controllers and bogies from Nishitetsu 331 series units.

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Old May 20th, 2011, 11:00 PM   #2551
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Nationwide IC card interoperability to launch in spring 2013

I’ve been a little busy the past few days (too much work…), but I figured I would get this tidbit out…

Exciting news on the IC card front as the transport operators affiliated with 10 of the largest transport IC card systems across Japan announced on 2011.05.18 that they will begin interoperability in spring 2013. This means a holder of any one of the 10 cards can use their card to make fare payments for any transport operator / service (and electronic money payments at any affiliated store) that accepts any one of the 10 cards. This should be good news for domestic tourists, who will now have an even easier time using public transport across the country.

The 10 card systems in question are Kitaca, PASMO, Suica, manaca, TOICA, PiTaPa, ICOCA, Hayakaken, nimoca, and SUGOCA. The press release doesn’t provide specific details, but the aggregate coverage area should extend across the four largest metropolitan areas in Japan and a multitude of second-tier cities across Japan.

From north to south:
  • Sapporo [Kitaca, Suica]
  • Sendai [Suica]
  • Niigata [Suica]
  • Greater Tōkyō / National Capital Region: Tōkyō, Kanagawa (Yokohama), Saitama, Chiba, Gunma, Ibaraki, Yamanashi [Suica, PASMO]
  • Shizuoka [TOICA, PiTaPa]
  • Hamamatsu [TOICA]
  • Greater Nagoya / Chūkyō: Aichi (Nagoya), Gifu, Mie [TOICA, manaca, PiTaPa]
  • Greater Ōsaka / Keihanshin / Kinki: Ōsaka, Hyōgo (Kōbe), Kyōto, Nara, Shiga, Wakayama [ICOCA, PiTaPa]
  • Okayama [ICOCA, PiTaPa]
  • Hiroshima [ICOCA]
  • Greater Fukuoka – Kita-Kyūshū: Fukuoka, Saga [SUGOCA, nimoca, Hayakaken]
  • Ōita [nimoca]
A full list of the operators covered:

Kitaca
  • Railway operators: JR Hokkaidō
PASMO
  • Railway operators: Izu Hakone Railway, Enoshima Electric Railway, Odakyū Electric Railway, Keiō Corporation, Keisei Electric Railway, Keihin Electric Express Railway, Saitama Railway, Sagami Railway, Metropolitan Intercity Railway, Shin-Keisei Electric Railway, Seibu Railway, Tōkyū Corporation, Tōkyō Metro, Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation, Tōbu Railway, Tōyō Rapid Railway, Hakone Tozan Railway, Hokusō Railway, Maihama Resort Line, Tōkyō Waterfront New Transit Yurikamome, Yokohama Minatomirai Railway, Yokohama Municipal Transportation Bureau
  • Bus operators: Izu Hakone Bus, Enoden Bus Yokohama, Enoden Bus Fujisawa, Odakyū Bus, Odakyū City Bus, Kanagawa Chūō Kōtsū (Kanachū), Shōnan Kanakō Bus, Tsukui Kanakō Bus, Yokohama Kanakō Bus, Sagami Kanakō Bus, Fujisawa Kanakō Bus, Kawasaki Municipal Transportation Bureau, Kawasaki Tsurumi Rinkō Bus, Kantō Bus, Keiō Dentetsu Bus, Keiō Bus East, Keiō Bus South, Keiō Bus Central, Keiō Bus Koganei, Keisei Bus, Chiba Chūō Bus, Chiba Kaihin Kōtsū, Chiba Nairiku Bus, Tōkyō Bay City Kōtsū, Chiba Flower Bus, Chiba Rainbow Bus, Chiba City Bus, Chiba Green Bus, Keisei Town Bus, Keisei Transit Bus, Keisei Bus System, Keihin Kyūkō Bus, Haneda Keikyū Bus, Yokohama Keikyū Bus, Shōnan Keikyū Bus, Kokusai Kōgyō, Kominato Railway Bus, Sōtetsu Bus, Seibu Bus, Seibu Kankō Bus, Tachikawa Bus, CityBus Tachikawa, Chiba Kōtsū, Tōkyū Bus Corporation, Tōkyū Transsés, Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation, Tōbu Bus Central, Tōbu Bus West, Tōbu Bus East, Tōbu Bus Nikkō, Asahi Motor Corporation, Ibakyū Motor Corporation, Kokusai Jūō Kōtsū, Kawagoe Motor Corporation, Bandō Bus, Nishi-Tōkyō Bus, Hakone Tozan Bus, Odakyū Hakone Highway Bus, Hitachi Group, Fujikyū Bus, Fuji Express, Fujikyū Shōnan Bus, Fujikyū Yamanashi Bus, Fujikyū Heiwa Kankō, Fujikyū City Bus, Fujikyū Shizuoka Bus, Funabashi Shin-Keisei Bus, Narashino Shin-Keisei Bus, Matsudo Shin-Keisei Bus, Heiwa Kōtsū, Aska Bus, Yamanashi Kōtsū, Yokohama Municipal Transportation Bureau, Yokohama Traffic Development
Suica
  • Railway operators: JR East, Tōkyō Monorail, Tōkyō Waterfront Area Rapid Transit, Saitama New Urban Transit, Izukyū Corporation, Sendai Airport Transit, Sapporo City Transportation Bureau(*)
  • Bus operators: JR Bus Kantō, Niigata Kōtsū, Hokkaidō Chūō Bus(*), Jōtetsu Corporation(*), JR Hokkaidō Bus(*)
    (*)Start of service for Sapporo City Transportation Bureau, Hokkaidō Chūō Bus, Jōtetsu Corporation, and JR Hokkaidō Bus is slated for 2013.
manaca
  • Railway operators: Nagoya Municipal Transportation Bureau, Nagoya Railroad, Toyohashi Railroad
  • Bus operators: Nagoya Municipal Transportation Bureau, Meitetsu Bus
TOICA
  • Railway operators: JR Hokkaidō
PiTaPa
  • Railway operators: Ōsaka Municipal Transportation Bureau, Kintetsu Corporation, Hankyū Corporation, Keihan Electric Railway, Nankai Electric Railway, Hanshin Electric Railway, Kyōto Municipal Transportation Bureau, Ōsaka Monorail, Ōsaka Prefectural Urban Development, Kita-Ōsaka Kyūkō Railway, Mizuma Railway, Keifuku Electric Railroad, Shizuoka Railway
  • Bus operators: Ōsaka Municipal Transportation Bureau, Mizuma Railway, Shizutetsu Justline
ICOCA
  • Railway operators: JR West
Hayakaken
  • Railway operators: Fukuoka City Transportation Bureau
nimoca
  • Railway operators: Nishi-Nippon Railroad
  • Bus operators: Nishi-Nippon Railroad, Nishitetsu Bus Kita-Kyūshū, Nishitetsu Highway Bus, Nishitetsu Bus Saga, Nishitetsu Bus Kurume, Nishitetsu Bus Chikuhō, Nishitetsu Bus Ōmuta, Nishitetsu Bus Munakata, Nishitetsu Bus Futsukaichi, Hita Bus, Shōwa Bus, Ōita Kōtsū, Ōita Bus, Kamenoi Bus
SUGOCA
  • Railway operators: JR Kyūshū

I’ll post again the map I made a while ago for reference:



All the cards depicted here, except for SAPICA (Sapporo), PASPY (Hiroshima / Fukuyama), are part of the nationwide interoperability program. However, I expect both of the these will join the program eventually, along with the Sendai City Transportation Bureau card and possibly others. There's also EX-IC for the Tōkaidō Shinkansen which I suspect JR Central will begin to consider adding to the program after the first rollout of nationwide interoperability.

So far, it’s been intriguing to watch this almost “organic” development of a nationwide IC card system from the bottom up, where card systems are developed locally by individual transit operators and then gradually become interconnected within regions and now, across the country. Some might argue the efficiencies of a top-down approach, where a single entity (the government, an industrial organization, a private corporation, etc.) rolls out a unified system across the country… An interesting contrast to think about.
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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:10 AM   #2552
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Hankyū Kyōto Line / Senri Line continuous grade-separation project: Part 3

Next is Shimo-Shinjō Station:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Visualization of the new station.
The aerial structure needs to be fairly high in order to pass over the elevated Tōkaidō Shinkansen tracks.



Elevated station will be two tracks with a single island platform.





Existing ground-level station



From the south end of the station, looking south (towards Awaji)



The elevated Shinkansen tracks are about 50 m from the south end of the existing platforms.



From the north end of the station, looking north (towards Kita-Senri).
The elevated station will be located about 200 m north of the existing station due to the Shinkansen overpass.

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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:12 AM   #2553
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Hankyū Kyōto Line / Senri Line continuous grade-separation project: Part 4

Last is Kunijima Station:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/



Kunijima Station on the Senri Line will be at a more typical height for elevated stations.



Kunijima is actually quite close to Sōzenji on the Kyōto Line.



Existing ground-level station



From north end, looking north (towards Awaji)



A large hospital being relocated to near the station. A small road also fronts the station.



They’ve been excavating into the side of the hospital site, so perhaps they will shift this road out a bit temporarily, constructing the new station above the position of the the existing road.



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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:13 AM   #2554
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Yamato Transport to try out package delivery in Kyōto using Randen trams
http://e.nikkei.com/e/fr/tnks/Nni20110517D17JFA08.htm

Quote:
KYOTO (Nikkei)--Yamato Transport Co. and Keifuku Electric Railroad Co. (9049) said Tuesday that they will begin using trams to deliver parcels here starting Wednesday.

This is apparently the first time in Japan that courier services have used this mode of transport.

Yamato Transport will deliver packages by truck to Keifuku Electric's Sai depot to be loaded onto a tram and transported to Arashiyama, a tourist hot spot. There, the Yamato Holdings Co. (9064) unit will put the parcels on rear attachments for electric bicycles for delivery to businesses and residences.

A parcel-only carriage will be linked to a regular tram carriage. It will run once a day in the morning for the time being.

Traffic congestion around Arashiyama during the foliage season and other peak tourism times is intense. Yamato Transport believes that using trams will make it easier to deliver parcels on time and will help cut greenhouse gas emissions.

"By reducing the number of our vehicles on the road, we're helping ease congestion," President Masaki Yamauchi told reporters Tuesday.
This follows the news last year of Yamato Transport trying out package delivery on the Sapporo Municipal Subway (see here). I wonder if this could spark a small “rebirth” of sorts for urban railway systems as a means of goods transport.

Keifuku Electric Railroad (Randen) clips:

The famous sakura tunnel on the Kitano Line between Narutaki and Utano:


Source: angelspringsTavio on YouTube

At night time, when the railway turns on special lighting for the trees:


Source: plum1853 on YouTube

Randen action at Uzumasa Kōryūji Station (2010.04):


Source: quamegor on YouTube
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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:14 AM   #2555
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30000 series for the Midōsuji Line makes press debut
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/new...2520007-n1.htm

These are the first new trains on the Midōsuji Line, the breadwinner of the Ōsaka Municipal Subway system, in 20 years (the 20 series debuted in 1991). On 2011.05.09, the Municipal Transportation Bureau recently held a press-only event to show off the first unit, based on similar 30000 series trains for the Tanimachi Line that began service in 2009. The two types are virtually identical, but with some minor changes tailored for the Midōsuji Line. After various tests, the trains will enter service on the Midōsuji Line starting in December, replacing aging 10 series units. A total of 12 trains (120 cars) will be produced.
Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

At Kinki Sharyō’s plant, sporting the Midōsuji Line’s line color, red.



Car #8 (Car 31101).
Using the latest VVVF drives, the new trains consume 10 percent less electricity than the 10 series trains they are replacing.



Cars No. 7 and No. 8.
The panels between cars to prevent passengers (especially the visually-impaired) from falling down are standard nowadays.



The patch of line color at the ends of the train has been changed to a curve (the Tanimachi Line units had a rectangular patch). The destination signs have also been changed to large-screen white-color LEDs.



Operator’s cab.
At bottom right is the emergency exit (one on each end), also ubiquitous in all subway trains.



Slight changes to the interior from the Tanimachi Line units.
The placement and shape of seats, the color of the seat moquettes, the pattern on the laminate along the walls of the car, and the seat end partition design have all changed.



Door area.
The left side has been designed with additional clearance from the seat partition to allow passengers with luggage a place to comfortably stand without getting in the way of others. The Midōsuji Line is one of the primary lines serving Shin-Ōsaka Station, Ōsaka’s Shinkansen terminal, so these should be popular standing spots among Shinkansen passengers.



The lintels above the doors feature large LCD information displays capable of handling the four standard languages (Japanese, English, Simplified Chinese, and Korean). We also get a better view of the laminate used, which features a special “ginkgo leaf” design just for the Midōsuji Line.



Overhead racks were lowered by 40 mm to make them easier to use. The floor of the car is also 4 cm lower, reducing the height difference with platforms. From this angle, it might be easier to see how they’ve shifted the seating along the wall to make additional room on one side.



For reference, an LCD information display on a Tanimachi Line 30000 series train:


Source: wasinojinsei on YouTube
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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:15 AM   #2556
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Narita Yukawa Station: Part 1

We’re approaching close to a year since the opening of the Narita Sky Access and the start of Keisei’s 160 kph new Skyliner service. Here’s a look at the new station on the line, Narita Yukawa.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Bird’s eye view of the three-story station, nestled in between some hills. The station is located where the Narita Sky Access Line crosses over the JR Narita Line’s Abiko Branch Line (marked by the upside down triangle). Currently, there is no connection with JR, but perhaps in the future, we may see JR platforms here.



The line becomes single-track just east of the station. There is a special No. 38 switch (135 m long, 1.3 degrees) that allows Skyliner trains to pass through at 160 kph without slowing. On the left here is the ongoing construction of the Kita-Chiba Road immediately north of the station.



New Skyliner train at Nippori Station in central Tōkyō.



Track is combination ballast and slab using elastic sleepers.
The Narita Sky Access Line is the fastest zairaisen (conventional line) in Japan (together with the Hokuhoku Line).



Looking east from the east end of the station



Looking west.
Narita Yukawa is a four-track station with two side platforms, a similar design to smaller Shinkansen stations. The middle two tracks are for non-stopping trains (i.e., the Skyliner).



Middle section of the platform



Looking east from the west end of the station

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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:15 AM   #2557
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Narita Yukawa Station: Part 2

Looking west from the west end of the station, facing the Matsuzaki Tunnel, built with simple cut-and-cover method.



Second-floor concourse.
Almost feels too nice for such a small station. There are three elevators and six escalators at the station, but at least the escalators have activation sensors.



Ground floor



There is only one exit from the station, with only four faregates.



Pretty barren schedule is a 40-minute cycle, but hopefully that will pick up in the future.



Station plaza at the south side of the station, including a taxi pool at center and bus terminal at the bottom and right.



Kita-Chiba Road being constructed parallel



JR Narita Line is behind

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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:17 AM   #2558
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Hatanodai Station: Part 1

This station on the Tōkyū Ōimachi Line underwent radical upgrades as part of Tōkyū’s effort to develop the Ōimachi Line into a bypass for the over-saturated Den’en Toshi Line. These efforts included instituting express service on the Ōimachi Line to speed up access from Futako–Tamagawa Station in western Tōkyō (Setagaya Ward) to Ōimachi Station (Shinagawa Ward), where Tōkyū passengers can switch to the Keihin-Tōhoku Line to access the eastern half of the Yamanote Line loop. The other half of these efforts was quadruple-tracking the Den’en Toshi Line west from Futako–Tamagawa to Mizonokuchi and extending the Ōimachi Line onto these new tracks.

As a result of these upgrades to the line, Hatanodai Station—a transfer station with the Ikegami Line—was transformed from a two-track station into a four-track station, and received a few other improvements such as barrier-free upgrades. Express service began on 2008.03.28.

Some pics:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

I’m a big fan of Tōkyū signage.



The increasingly-popular translucent membrane roofs.
Station was transformed from two tracks (two side platforms) to four tracks (two island platforms), allowing for passing and cross-platform transfers between express and local trains.



Looking east (towards Ōimachi) from the east end of the station.
In the distance is Ebaramachi Station. The Ōimachi Line, together with the Tamagawa Line, Ikegami Line, and Setagaya Line, are Tōkyū’s minor lines, usually with shorter stop spacing designed to shuttle passengers to / from the Den’en Toshi Line, Tōyoko, and Meguro Lines. The improvements to the Ōimachi Line, however, were designed to bring it closer to a medium-capacity line similar to the Meguro Line.



Looking west.
Hanging from the canopy on the left are the video monitors that allow the conductor to check that all doors on the train are clear before giving the OK sign to depart.



From west end of the station looking east



Facing west (towards Futako–Tamagawa)

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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:17 AM   #2559
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Hatanodai Station: Part 2

Some pics:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

The transfer with the Ikegami Line originally required going down and up multiple sets of stairs, but these have now been made completely barrier-free with escalators. There are separate passages to transfer to each direction of the Ikegami Line, so they color-coded the escalator wells.

Blue is for the outbound direction, for Yukigaya–Ōtsuka and Kamata.





The coloring scheme also applies to the elevators.



Red is the inbound direction of the Ikegami Line for Gotanda.





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Old May 21st, 2011, 04:18 AM   #2560
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Tōkyō Monorail Haneda Airport International Terminal Station

It’s been about half a year since the new Haneda Airport International Terminal and new stations on the Keikyū Airport Line and Tōkyō Monorail opened on 2010.10.21.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Platform 1 for Haneda Airport Terminals 1 and 2 (domestic flights).
The station consists of two side platforms on a sweeping curve.



Like the rest of the Tōkyō Monorail stations, this one has platform doors.



After exiting from Platform 1, you’re pretty much at the International Terminal departure lobby.



Unlike the new Keikyū station, which is underground, the design of the new Tōkyō Monorail station allows for moving back and forth between the two platforms.



Platform 2 for Hamamatsuchō and central Tōkyō.
Not as flashy as the new Keikyū station, but nice.



Platform 2 departure board.
They did a good job of making this fairly easy to understand, with the color-coded stopping patterns and diagrams.
8:44 Local for Hamamatsuchō
8:47 Airport rapid for Hamamatsuchō
8:53 Section rapid for Hamamatsuchō
The rightmost column also identifies the first train to reach Hamamatsuchō, in this case the 8:47 Airport rapid.



Immediately south of the station is the mouth of the Tama River.
The old monorail track still remains, in the distance.

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