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Old May 27th, 2011, 06:46 PM   #2581
quashlo
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Three stations likely for Odakyū Tama Line extension to Sagamihara
http://news.kanaloco.jp/localnews/article/1105230056/

Quote:
In the proposed extension of the Odakyū Tama Line, on May 23 Sagamihara City revealed the results of a study into new stations on the extension, conducted jointly with Machida City in preparation for the project. While the project would pencil out assuming construction of three stations on the extension, the study revealed that construction of five stations on the extensions would make it difficult to recoup costs. Sagamihara City and Machida City now plan to move forward with studies for the proposed extension assuming that only three stations are built.

The proposed extension of the Odakyū Tama Line involves an approx. 8.8 km extension of the line from the current terminus at Karakida Station (Tama City, Tōkyō Prefecture), via Machida City’s Kami-Oyamada district, through a portion of land on the U.S. Army Japan’s Sagami General Depot expected to be returned to Japan, connecting to Sagamihara Station on the JR Yokohama Line, to Kamimizo Station on the JR Sagami Line.

In 2000, the national government’s Transport Policy Council identified the line “for future study." A total of 2 ha of the 17 ha of land inside the Sagami General Depot slated to be returned to Japan are reserved for railway and road rights-of-way.

The study, conducted across two years starting in FY2009, estimated that the total project costs for the extension would be approx. ¥95 billion, assuming a total of three stations: one intermediate station (aboveground), Sagamihara Station (underground), and Kamimizo Station (aboveground).

Assuming a fare surcharge of ¥100 for stations on the extension and a service plan that has a total of 6 trains per hour (3 expresses, 3 locals) during the morning and evening rush hours and three locals an hour during the midday or other off-peak periods, the study forecasts daily ridership of approx. 39,700 passengers. The study forecasts that the extension would be financially feasible, paying itself off completely 29 years after opening under this alternative.

Meanwhile, assuming a total of five stations—Sagamihara Station, Kamimizo Station, plus two underground stations and one aboveground station—the estimated project cost would be approx. ¥130 billion. Daily ridership is forecasted to be approx. 39,000 passengers under this alternative. The study concludes that this alternative would be difficult from a perspective of financial feasibility, and would be unable to completely pay itself off.

According to Sagamihara City’s Urban Rail and Transport Policy Division, the national and local government would each shoulder one-third of the cost of construction facilities for the extension, in accordance with the Act on Enhancement of Convenience of Urban Railways, etc. The remaining one-third in funding would be provided by the project executor, with the operator of train services on the extension paying facility usage fees to the project executor from operating revenues.

Sagamihara City and others are also considering a further extension from JR Kamimizo Station, via the Tana district, towards Atsugi and Aikawa.
Map of extension and possible stations:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT...,0.338173&z=12

The three-station alternative eliminates Station B and Station C. The study apparently assumes a 2020 opening.

An interesting table that compares service plan options against “payback period” and fare surcharge (¥80 to ¥100):


Source: Sagamihara City

Operating the extension mostly as an extension of the existing Tama Line—i.e., 9 tph during the peak and 8 tph off-peak (I believe this is the current off-peak… right now, they’ve replaced all the online schedules with the special “energy-conserving” schedules, so I have no way of checking)—the extension can pay back all costs in 37 years.

Time savings with the extension:

Oyamada to Shinjuku
Current: 1:23 (via bus to Machida and transfer to Odakyū Odawara Line)
After: 0:50 (Odakyū Tama Line local to Tama Center and transfer to express)

Sagamihara Station to Shinjuku
Current: 1:06 (via JR Yokohama Line to Machida and transfer to Odakyū Odawara Line)
After: 0:49 (one-seat ride)

Kamimizo Station to Shinjuku
Current: 1:14 (via JR Sagami Line to Hashimoto and transfer to Keiō Sagamihara Line)
After: 0:52 (one-seat ride)

The return of portions of the Sagami General Depot to Japan is the key element of the Sagamihara Shin-Toshin plan, which would develop the north / east side of JR Sagamihara Station into a new downtown. The new area will have 15,000 to 20,000 jobs and 1,000 to 1,500 dwelling units (2,500 to 3,000 residents).
Source: Sagamihara City

Sagamihara Station is already surprisingly built-out for its distance from central Tōkyō, but this will create new activity on the north side of the station. This will be a “suburban downtown” type development, complete with an expansive pedestrian deck that connects the station to all the buildings. Train at bottom right would be a JR Yokohama Line train—the Tama Line extension would run underneath the road perpendicular to the Yokohama Line.



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Old May 27th, 2011, 06:47 PM   #2582
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Kawasaki SWIMO LRV

Missed this DigInfo TV news report from the Mass-Trans Innovation Japan 2010 conference last year, but thought it was interesting regardless.

This is a low-floor LRV produced by Kawasaki Heavy Industries and powered by nickel metal hydride GIGACELL batteries running without overhead. After high-speed charging for a mere five minutes, it can run for 10 km without another recharge. The regenerative braking system also returns power back to the battery during deceleration.

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Old May 27th, 2011, 06:51 PM   #2583
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hakubi View Post
The 103s on the Osaka Loop, however, I think it's about time they go. I'll be interested to see what replaces them. Maybe something related to the 321s?
Seems likely since it meets the general requirements (4 doors, longitudinal seating).

And yes, the Ōsaka Loop Line especially needs some new rolling stock.

Btw, welcome to the forum.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 05:29 AM   #2584
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Seems likely since it meets the general requirements (4 doors, longitudinal seating).

And yes, the Ōsaka Loop Line especially needs some new rolling stock.

Btw, welcome to the forum.
Thanks. And thanks for all the articles you post.

I wonder where the first news appears when a railway is beginning a rolling stock procurement. But JR West has had a lot of new equipment over the last few years, I guess that can't go on forever.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 06:42 AM   #2585
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Three stations likely for Odakyū Tama Line extension to Sagamihara
http://news.kanaloco.jp/localnews/article/1105230056/



Map of extension and possible stations:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT...,0.338173&z=12

The three-station alternative eliminates Station B and Station C. The study apparently assumes a 2020 opening.

An interesting table that compares service plan options against “payback period” and fare surcharge (¥80 to ¥100):
I wonder if this is a prelude to the announcement of the maglev station in Kanagawa.
Both Hashimoto and Sagamihara are backed up by respectively by Keio and now Odakyu, are running for the seat.
If Sagamihara is selected I believe that Odakyu would be providing some of the ROW to JR Central in exchange for the designation of location for the station.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 06:58 AM   #2586
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I hope JR West can figure out a good solution for the canopy soon. I was looking forward to seeing an open air JR Ōsaka Station. Leaving the old canopies as they are or even building new translucent ones kind of defeats the purpose of building a new bigger one. I wonder how hard it would be to add more closure to the canopy...maybe add some large hanging walls (out of glass maybe?) on both sides to keep most of the rain out.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 08:18 PM   #2587
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hakubi View Post
I wonder where the first news appears when a railway is beginning a rolling stock procurement. But JR West has had a lot of new equipment over the last few years, I guess that can't go on forever.
Well, there's usually a press release on the railway's official website, e.g.,
http://www.westjr.co.jp/news/newslist/index.php

That's typically accompanied by newspaper articles summarizing the press release. These can easily be found using the Google News search function. I tend to do both (visiting operators' websites and searching Google News) when I look for articles.

I think maybe when they finish with the 225s for the Hanwa Line / Kansai Airport Line et al. and the Kyōto Line / Kōbe Line et al., they might begin replacing the 103s and 201s on the Yamatoji Line. Either that, or perhaps replacing the 201s on the Ōsaka Loop Line?
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Old May 28th, 2011, 08:19 PM   #2588
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
I wonder if this is a prelude to the announcement of the maglev station in Kanagawa.
Both Hashimoto and Sagamihara are backed up by respectively by Keio and now Odakyu, are running for the seat.
If Sagamihara is selected I believe that Odakyu would be providing some of the ROW to JR Central in exchange for the designation of location for the station.
Are you talking about the ROW near Sagamihara Station? I think that will be under the jurisdiction of Sagamihara City, in which case Odakyū won't really have much ROW to "give". Or are you talking about a different location elsewhere along the Tama Line extension?

I've always been under the impression that Hashimoto is the preferred location for the maglev station, as it's already got really good transport links (JR Yokohama Line, JR Sagami Line, Keiō Sagamihara Line) and the fact that a station at Sagamihara would likely require another arrangement between Japan and the U.S. regarding approval to put the maglev beneath Sagami Depot.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 08:21 PM   #2589
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winged Robot View Post
I hope JR West can figure out a good solution for the canopy soon. I was looking forward to seeing an open air JR Ōsaka Station. Leaving the old canopies as they are or even building new translucent ones kind of defeats the purpose of building a new bigger one. I wonder how hard it would be to add more closure to the canopy...maybe add some large hanging walls (out of glass maybe?) on both sides to keep most of the rain out.
I've been thinking about this too... Maybe they could install some of that synthetic fabric that's so popular over the opening. Could be lightweight enough that it may not require much additional work.

I'm also curious how often this situation occurs, just as I'm sure JR West is... If it's only 5 to 10 days a year, I'd almost venture to say just remove the platform canopies and have passengers use their umbrellas on those days, or wait inside the platform bridge or other parts of the station complex that are 100% sheltered.
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Old May 29th, 2011, 03:57 AM   #2590
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Subway construction in China presents opportunities for Japanese firms
http://www.nikkei.com/news/latest/ar...E39F9FEAE2E2E2

Quote:
By 2020, the Chinese government will increase the total length of subways and other urban transport systems to 7,400 km—just shy of 6 times the total length of such systems at the end of 2010. The total scale of investment is forecasted to reach three trillion yuan (approx. ¥40 trillion). In addition to becoming the “ace up the sleeve” in eliminating the severe traffic congestion in Beijing and other large cities, the Chinese government is also hoping that the public works projects will bolster the mid- to long-term economic outlook. It’s likely that business opportunities in China will expand for Japanese firms, many of which specialize in the railway field.

At the end of 2010, 12 cities in China were operating subways or other urban transport systems, with the cumulative length reaching approx. 1,300 km—third only to the United States and Germany. In addition, another 30 or so cities have announced plans to construct subways or other systems. Top government officials say that by 2020, the cumulative length of such systems will become “first in the world”, reaching 10 times the cumulative length of Japan’s current subway systems.

Looking at individual cities, Beijing’s 340 km network (as of the end of 2010) will expand to 1,000 km by 2020, while Shanghai’s 420 km network will expand to 880 km. Top officials from Beijing City’s transport committee explain, “In order to eliminate the severe congesting currently affecting central Beijing, we have no choice but to increase subway ridership and reduce car commuting.”

Secondary cities are also eagerly eyeing subway construction. In addition to coastal cities such as Ningbo and Hangzhou in Zhejiang Province, where automobile ownership is increasing as a result of economic growth, inland cities including Zhengzhou (Henan Province) and Urumqi (Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region) are also moving forward with subway plans. Top officials in Urumqi’s municipal government say they are eagerly awaiting the economic stimulus benefitis of public works projects.

Demand for subway rolling stock is expected to increase to 50,000 cars by 2020, with the cumulative value of rolling stock orders reaching around three trillion yuan. Japanese manufacturers are particularly strong in electrical components and other equipment, and Nabtesco and Tōyō Electric Manufacturing supplied components for the Chengdu Metro in Chengdu (Sichuan Province), which opened last year. Among Western firms, French’s Alstom has won orders for signaling systems for the Beijing Subway.

Following the 2008 financial crisis, the Chinese government bolstered its economy through public works projects, focusing on construction of high-speed railways. Since 2009, the government has been investing ¥10 trillion annually towards railways, but as construction of high-speed railways reaches a turning point in 2012, the government plans to position subways as a pillar of its public works projects from 2013 to 2020.
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Old May 29th, 2011, 03:58 AM   #2591
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New Skyliner AE series wins Blue Ribbon Award

Keisei Electric Railway’s new AE series for the revamped Skyliner service debuted in July of last year, with a selling point of a 160 kph maximum speed and a 36-minute journey time to central Tōkyō from Narita Airport. The interior and exterior of the train were designed by fashion designer Yamamoto Kansai, and were a breath of fresh air compared to the older Skyliner units. On May 24, the Japan Railfan Club selected the new AE Series for its highest honor, the Blue Ribbon Award. The last Keisei train to win the award was the original Skyliner in 1974.

Skyliner trains passing airport limited expresses waiting at Narita Yukawa Station.
The normal speed is 160 kph passing through this station, but the Skyliner trains have been reduced to around 130 kph in the aftermath of the earthquake.


Source: ayokoi on YouTube

Various scenes on the Narita Sky Access Line between Narita Yukawa and Inba Nihon Idai:


Source: 113icecream on YouTube

LCD information screens are programmed in four languages:


Source: buyumax on YouTube
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Old May 29th, 2011, 03:58 AM   #2592
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Tōkyō Metro 16000 series wins Laurel Award

The Japan Railfan Club also selected the Tōkyō Metro 16000 series for its second place award, the Laurel Award. These are the first Tōkyō Metro units to be manufactured with more energy-efficient permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) right off the bat, reducing electricity consumption. The trains are also quieter than older units thanks to the removal of fans typically used to help cool down the motors. The interior is also more open and spacious, with a raised ceiling and transparent partitions and gangway doors. This is Tōkyō Metro’s third train (including predecessor Eidan Subway) to win a Japan Railfan Club award, following Blue Ribbon Awards for the Chiyoda Line 6000 series in 1972 and the Ginza Line 01 series in 1985.

16000 series at Kanamachi Station on the Jōban Line:


Source: SuperHitachiGou on YouTube

Arriving at Shin-Yurigaoka Station on the Odakyū Odawara Line:


Source: joban415 on YouTube

Running sound between Shin-Yurigaoka and Noborito on the Odakyū Odawara Line, on a Tama Express run bound for Abiko on the Jōban Line:


Source: toukaidoue231kei on YouTube
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Old May 29th, 2011, 04:49 AM   #2593
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Are you talking about the ROW near Sagamihara Station? I think that will be under the jurisdiction of Sagamihara City, in which case Odakyū won't really have much ROW to "give". Or are you talking about a different location elsewhere along the Tama Line extension?

I've always been under the impression that Hashimoto is the preferred location for the maglev station, as it's already got really good transport links (JR Yokohama Line, JR Sagami Line, Keiō Sagamihara Line) and the fact that a station at Sagamihara would likely require another arrangement between Japan and the U.S. regarding approval to put the maglev beneath Sagami Depot.
Well the ROW up to Sagamihara from Karakida will be leased out to Odakyu and will probably be constructed under Odakyu jurisdiction.There is also the ROW from Sagamihara to Shinagawa in which Odakyu has ROW from Karakida to Shinjuku(the route between Shin-Yurigaoka and Noborito would probably fit JR Central's needs).
I believe under Japanese land ownership law the owner of land has say down to 100m in usage. If an agreement can be reached JR Central would not have to do any negotiation even if it was to tunnel the whole way.

As for land usage, at Sagamihara city it's written within the article you posted that the US will return it to Japan(which is actually not correct since the US does not own the land, the Japanese Government leases it from the actual land owners and then provides the land to the US military).
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Old May 29th, 2011, 05:36 AM   #2594
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I guess I don't understand how you are envisiong JR Central will make use of Odakyū ROW (or any existing rail ROW) outside of specific station locations or approaches, such as at Shinagawa or Hashimoto / Sagamihara. The maglev needs a fairly straight alignment anyways (or at least straighter than these existing lines), and building "deep" tunnels (40 m from ground surface or 10 m from existing foundation piles) was intended to facilitate this, avoiding land acquisition and compensation. The maglev was one of the reasons for the enactment of the so-called "deep underground" law. Existing lines, even comparatively newer ones like the Odakyū Tama Line, are much too curvy to be of any help to JR Central in this regard.

Anyways, I think this is a good place to start thinking about maglev alignment:
http://kenplatz.nikkeibp.co.jp/artic...081225/529210/

Funny though, in that this guy has an alignment passing nearby Kamimizo and Fuchinobe, even further away from where Sagamihara City wants it.
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Old May 29th, 2011, 05:54 AM   #2595
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Besides the light rail expansion in Kyoto, are there other big rapid transit proposals for the Keihanshin region?
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Old May 29th, 2011, 06:14 AM   #2596
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Driving rain delays removal of platform canopies at Ōsaka Station
http://www.asahi.com/travel/rail/new...105190031.html
I think they should consider putting in walls over the sides of the canopy to prevent rain from blowing in. Perhaps they should invest in something that retracts, like a fabric.

Last edited by nouveau.ukiyo; May 29th, 2011 at 06:22 AM.
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Old May 29th, 2011, 06:27 AM   #2597
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I guess I don't understand how you are envisiong JR Central will make use of Odakyū ROW (or any existing rail ROW) outside of specific station locations or approaches, such as at Shinagawa or Hashimoto / Sagamihara. The maglev needs a fairly straight alignment anyways (or at least straighter than these existing lines), and building "deep" tunnels (40 m from ground surface or 10 m from existing foundation piles) was intended to facilitate this, avoiding land acquisition and compensation. The maglev was one of the reasons for the enactment of the so-called "deep underground" law. Existing lines, even comparatively newer ones like the Odakyū Tama Line, are much too curvy to be of any help to JR Central in this regard.

Anyways, I think this is a good place to start thinking about maglev alignment:
http://kenplatz.nikkeibp.co.jp/artic...081225/529210/

Funny though, in that this guy has an alignment passing nearby Kamimizo and Fuchinobe, even further away from where Sagamihara City wants it.
Nice read though I thought it was 100m not 40m for deep underground usage.
Anyways even if you tunnel all the way you'll need air vents every 500~1,000m apart that could also be used for emergency evacuation routes which I believe is mandated by law. The train would not need to go 500Km/h beyond Sagamihara and could slow down to 200Km/h in which case radius of curves can be more tighter. (Its not going to make much of a difference in terms of arrival time since it needs to slow down anyways.)
I do not think the route all the way to Moto-Sumiyoshi then turning north from there would be feasible due to geological stability. I do agree on how the station would be developed under Shinagawa which should be parallel with the present station and not perpendicular as written within the link.
Hashimoto is unfortunately too developed to construct a new station on the other hand, the US depot site on the North side of Sagamihara station would be ideal for development if it is returned to Japan.
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Old May 29th, 2011, 10:45 AM   #2598
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Besides the light rail expansion in Kyoto, are there other big rapid transit proposals for the Keihanshin region?
Plenty. Been meaning to pull a list together for a long time now, so here it is.

These are images from the Kinki Region Transport Policy Council Report No. 8 (2004.10.08), which details future lines in the railway plan for the Keihanshin region, modified by me with English translation and some numbering.
Click on the images for full size.

Improvements to existing infrastructure to be considered in the Keihanshin region
Improvements to convenience of transfers
Mutual through-service
1. Hankyū Kōbe Line ↔ Kōbe Municipal Subway Seishin–Yamate Line (near Sannomiya Station); also consider express service on the Kōbe Municipal Subway Seishin–Yamate Line
2. JR San’in Main Line ↔ Tōkaidō Main Line in the Ōsaka direction (via Umekōji connecting track)
3. JR Nara Line ↔ Tōkaidō Main Line in the Ōsaka direction (via freight track from Kyōto to Umekōji)
4. Keihan Uji Line ↔ Keihan Main Line in the Ōsaka direction (Chūshojima Station)
5. Keihan Katano Line ↔ Keihan Main Line in the Ōsaka direction (Hirakata-shi Station)
6. Hankyū Kyōto Line ↔ Hankyū Kōbe Line (Umeda Station)
7. Hankyū Imazu Line ↔ Hankyū Takarazuka Line (Takarazuka Station)
Improvements to line functionality
Electrification
8. JR Kansai Main Line (east of Kamo)
9. JR Kishin Line
Improvements to speed (e.g., express operations)
10. Techno Port Line (Nankō Port Town Line) / Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 4 (Chūō Line) / Kintetsu Higashi-Ōsaka Line (Keihanna Line)
New stops on limited-stop trains
11. Keihan Main Line Tōfukuji Station (connection with the JR Nara Line)
12. Keihan Main Line Kadoma-shi Station (connection with the Ōsaka Monorail)
Improvements to service through capacity improvements, etc.
Double-tracking
13. JR San’in Main Line (north of Sonobe)
14. JR Kusatsu Line (Kusatsu – Tsuge)
15. JR Nara Line (Fujinomori – Uji, Shinden – Kizu)
16. JR Katamachi Line (Kizu – Matsui Yamate)
Improvements to service through new or upgraded stations
Major station upgrades
17. JR Kyōbashi Station (improvements to convenience of transfers, increased capacity)
18. JR Tennōji Station (increased mutual through-servicing)
19. Hanshin Sannomiya Station (improvements to convenience of transfers)



New lines in mid- to long-term vision of railway network
1. Kyōto Municipal Subway Tōzai Line extension (Tenjingawa → Umezu → Kami-Katsura → Rakusai): 7.7 km
2. Kyōto Municipal Subway Karasuma Line extension (Takeda → Ōte-suji → Keihan Main Line near Yoko-Ōji): 4.4 km
3. Kita-Ōsaka Express Line extension (Senri Chūō → Minoo Senba → Shin-Minoo): 2.5 km
4. Ōsaka (Itami) International Airport regional rail access (JR Itami → Nishi-Kuwazu → Ōsaka International Airport): 3.7 km
5. Kintetsu Keihanna Line extension (Tomigaoka → Takanohara): 3.8 km
6. Kintetsu Keihanna Line extension (Tomigaoka → Gakken Chūō → Hosono New Town → Shin-Hosono): 6.2 km
7. Ōsaka Monorail extension (Kadoma-shi → Kōnoike Shinden → Aramoto → Uryūdō): 8.7 km
8. Naniwasuji Line (Shin-Ōsaka → Kita-Umeda → Tamaebashi → Horie → JR Namba / Nankai Shiomibashi): 10.2 km
9. Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 3 (Yotsubashi Line) extension (Nishi-Umeda → Kita-Umeda → Jūsō): 2.9 km
10. Keihan Nakanoshima Line extension (Tamaebashi → Nishi-Kujō → Chidoribashi → Shin-Sakurajima): 6.7 km
11. Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 8 (Imazatosuji Line) extension (Imazato → Kumata → Nakano → Yuzato Rokuchōme): 6.7 km
12. Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 7 (Nagahori–Tsurumi Ryokuchi Line) extension (Taishō → Chishima → Minami-Okajima → Tsurumachi): 5.5 km
13. Sakai City East-West Railway (Sakai No. 2 District → Sakai → Sakai Higashi → Sakai-shi): 8.3 km
Also consider potential for LRT in southern areas of Shiga Prefecture and in Kyōto City, Kōbe City, and Amagasaki City.

In blue (underway):
Keihan Nakanoshima Line (Tenmabashi – Nakanoshima): 3.0 km (opened 2008)
Hanshin Namba Line (Nishi-Kujō – Namba): 10.1 km (opened 2009)
Hokkō Techno Port Line (Cosmo Square – Shin-Sakurajima): 7.5 km (on hold)
Ōsaka Higashi Line (Kyūhōji – Shin-Ōsaka): 20.3 km (Hanaten – Kyūhōji, 9.2 km, opened 2008)
Ōsaka Monorail Saito Line (Saito Nishi – Higashi Center): 2.2 km
Kyōto Municipal Subway Tōzai Line (Nijō – Uzumasa Tenjingawa): 2.4 km (opened 2008)



Other proposals submitted by local governments and railway companies for Report No. 8, but not accepted for inclusion by the Kinki Region Transport Council:
  • Biwako–Keihanna Line (Ōmi Railway Maibara → JR Kibukawa → Shigaraki Kōgen Railway Shigaraki → JR Kyō-Tanabe): 91.8 km
  • Kyōto Municipal Subway Tōzai Line (Rakusai → Nagaoka): 5.0 km
  • Kōbe Electric Railway Kōen Toshi Line (Woody Town → Culture Town): 2.5 km
  • Henna Connector (Kyō-Tanabe → Nagaike): 5.2 km
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 2 (Tanimachi Line) extension (Dainichi → near Torikai → near Takatsuki): 14.5 km
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 2 (Tanimachi Line) extension (Yao Minami → near Fujiidera → towards Tondabayashi): 12.5 km
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 3 (Yotsubashi Line) extension (Nishi-Umeda → towards Ōsaka International Airport)
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 3 (Yotsubashi Line) extension (Suminoe Kōen → Sanbō → Sakai)
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 7 (Nagahori–Tsurumi Ryokuchi Line) extension (Kadoma Minami → towards Katano)
  • Kintetsu Keihanna Line (Takanohara → towards Kizu): 4.8 km
  • Ōsaka Monorail extension (Uryūdō → Kyūhōji → towards Sakai): 21.7 km
  • Seishin–Oshibedani Line (Seishin Chūō → towards Oshibedani): 5.1 km
  • Seishin–Higashi-Harima Line (Seishin Chūō → towards East Harima): 19.4 km
  • Nishi-Akashi–Seishin Line (Nishi-Akashi → Seishin Chūō): 9.1 km
  • Kōbe New Transit Port Island Line extension (Sannomiya → Shin-Kōbe)
  • Kōbe New Transit Port Island Line extension (Kōbe Airport → west part of Port Island)
  • Maiko–Gakuen Toshi Line (Maiko → Gakuen Toshi)
  • Yodo River North Bank Line (from Taishō Ward / Minato Ward / Konohana Ward → Fuku → Tsukamoto → Jūsō → Shin-Ōsaka → towards Higashi-Yodogawa): 20.9 km
  • Matsuyamachisuji Line (Tennōji → Miyakojima Ward → towards Higashi-Yodogawa Ward): 12.1 km
  • Hankyū Shin-Ōsaka Connector (Jūsō → Shin-Ōsaka): 2.4 km
  • Hokkō Techno Port Line extension (Shin-Sakurajima → Umeda)
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 8 (Imazatosuji Line) extension (Yuzato Rokuchōme → towards Mihara): 7.8 km
  • Ōsaka Bay Cross-Railway (Kōbe Airport → Kansai International Airport): 27 km
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 5 (Sennichimae Line) extension (Minami-Tatsumi → towards Mito): 4.2 km
  • Ōsaka Outer Loop Railway (Ōsaka Higashi Line) extension (Kami → towards Hanwa Line Kumatori)
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 9 (Shikitsu–Nagayoshi Line) (Suminoe Kōen → Kire–Uriwari): 6.9 km
  • Semboku Rapid Railway southern extension (Izumi Chūō → towards Kaizuka)
  • Mizuma Railway New Line (Sechigo → Tsuchimaru → towards Inunaki)
Other proposals:
  • Biwako–Wakasa Bay Rapid Railway (Ōmi Imazu → Kaminaka): 19.8 km
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway Line 8 (Imazatosuji Line) extension (Itakano → near JR Kishibe)
  • KIX maglev or Shinkansen (central Ōsaka → Kansai International Airport)
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Old May 29th, 2011, 11:32 PM   #2599
manrush
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It seems that the east-west line in Sakai is part of an LRT project for that city.

This pdf is pretty old (c. 2006), but it explains some of the alignments.
http://www.jrtr.net/jrtr46/pdf/f06_sak.pdf
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Old May 30th, 2011, 06:04 AM   #2600
quashlo
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Yes, it's one and the same. The Sakai City LRT has been in this thread several times already.

It's currently on the shelf, though, as the current mayor won the election on a campaign promise to stop progress on the project. Some people thought it was a waste of money and the existing bus service was sufficient, while others (I think mostly merchants) didn't like the street modifications needed to make the LRT work. Still doesn't resolve what happens to Hankai Tramway, though, which continues to lose money on sections of its lines in Sakai City. They were hoping to get some long-needed track and rolling stock upgrades as part of the LRT project.

NHK news report (2009.06.23).
The cardboard box maker in this video (and other merchants) were against the LRT, as they wouldn't be able to handle loading activities on the street anymore.


Last edited by quashlo; May 30th, 2011 at 06:10 AM.
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