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Old June 16th, 2011, 08:23 AM   #2621
quashlo
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Trackway greening updates

A short update on trackway greening projects for tram systems in Kagoshima and Kumamoto:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

First, trackway greening and center pole conversion in Kagoshima:



Kagoshima Chūō Station



Kumamoto



Conversion to center poles removed some of the overhead clutter.



Nihongiguchi Station



Could Hankai Tramway in Ōsaka be next?

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Old June 16th, 2011, 08:24 AM   #2622
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Fukuoka City Subway 3000 series

Short series on one of my favorite trains, the 3000 series for the Fukuoka City Subway Nanakuma Line. These are “mini-subway” trains using linear motors, like the Toei Ōedo Line or Ōsaka Municipal Subway Imazatosuji Line. The design is by German industrial designer Alexander Neumeister.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/



Three doors per side, four cars per train. The paint scheme is similar to Keihan Electric Railway’s newer “Sumitomo–Mitsui Banking Corporation” livery. For railfans, the platform doors are a bit of an obstruction.



Unlike most Japanese trains, these have no overhead racks and no poster ads down the center aisle.



High-back longitudinal seating, but seats are separated in order to discourage improper sitting behavior.



Transparent glass doors separating cars are pretty standard now, but these units go a little further and put LCDs above the gangway, embedded inside mirror panels similar to those on the N700 series for the Tōkaidō Shinkansen.



The removal of the overhead racks and poster ads helps make the train seem larger than it actually is, especially when you compare to similar mini-subway stock. The fluorescent bulbs are warm-color and covered, a somewhat unusual style for commuter stock.



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Old June 16th, 2011, 12:40 PM   #2623
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I get the impression that angled bodysides are rather unusual for Japanese subway trains too.
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Old June 16th, 2011, 05:55 PM   #2624
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Great pictures.............specially I like the tram tracks
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Old June 16th, 2011, 07:25 PM   #2625
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gag Halfrunt View Post
I get the impression that angled bodysides are rather unusual for Japanese subway trains too.
Yeah, you're right... But all of the linear motor mini-subways have angled sides as a result of the narrow tunnel diameter.
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Old June 17th, 2011, 06:21 AM   #2626
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I haven't ridden the Fukuoka Subway Nanakuma Line for about 3 years, but as I recall the motor noise is much lower than the TOEI Oedo cars. An overall much nicer riding experience.
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Old June 18th, 2011, 03:32 AM   #2627
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Keihan, Marubeni, Sojitz, Tōkyū Land invest in Asian railway projects
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7HG2VA20110616

Quote:
(Reuters) - Japan will partner with Keihan Electric Railway Co and others for railway projects in Vietnam, Mongolia and Indonesia, The Nikkei business daily said.

Japan has reached a deal with the three nations to build four railway projects, which are expected to cost 535 billion Yen ($6.60 billion)in total, the newspaper said.

Japan will invest into railcars, signal systems and operations for these projects, the daily said.

Keihan Electric Railway will invest in the entity supervising the largest project, a 35 kilometre railway in Vietnam connecting central Hanoi with a high-tech industrial park, the Nikkei said.

Nomura Research Institute and others will conduct feasibility studies for the project, which is expected to cost 270 billion yen ($3.33 billion), the newspaper said.

In Mongolia, Marubeni Corp plans to invest in two subway lines that will be constructed in central Ulan Bator. JGC Corp and others will participate in feasibility studies. The total cost is expected to reach 180 billion yen ($2.22 billion), the daily said.

In Indonesia, Sojitz Corp and infrastructure design firm Japan Transportation Consultants Inc plan to join a 55 billion yen ($679 million) project to restore a 189km railway in southern Sumatra.

In Jakarta, for a project involving a major train station, Osaka-based Nikken Sekkei Civil Engineering and Tokyu Land Corp plan to participate. The project is worth 30 billion yen ($370 million), The Nikkei said.

The projects will be done in public-private partnerships and the feasibility studies for the railway projects will begin in August, the daily said.

The undertakings are expected to be eligible for funds under Japan's official development assistance program, which provides yen loans to foreign nations, the newspaper said.

The participating Japanese companies will tap loans from JICA and Japan Bank for International Cooperation, The Nikkei said. ($1 = 81.035 Japanese Yen) (Reporting by Rachana Khanzode in Bangalore; Editing by Jarshad Kakkrakandy)
Thanks to NihonKitty for spotting this…

Unusual to see private railways like Keihan and Tōkyū participating in overseas railway projects… Kintetsu, and Hankyū have overseas investments, but in side businesses like hospitality or retail.
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Old June 18th, 2011, 03:39 AM   #2628
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
[size=3]Could Hankai Tramway in Ōsaka be next?

Is there enough space in some portions of the line to stick those centre catenary poles?
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Old June 18th, 2011, 08:14 AM   #2629
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo
Kawasaki and Yokohama sign MOU on Blue Line extension and JR Nambu Line grade separation
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/ka...702000040.html
After driving around that part of Kawasaki, I can tell you grade separating the Nambu is very necessary-- especially since they want to run more expresses on it-- separating and quad-tracking some stations for overtaking operations could be done at the same time.

Speaking of yokohama subways, how about the extension of the green line to Tsurumi? There's a whole corridor in my area that's very difficult getting to on the bus stretching from just southwest of Keio University, through Hiyoshi 7-chome, straddling the Kawasaki-Yokohama city limits toward Tsurumi station, roughly following a small river. They could choose to go elevated over that river and save costs, if they design smartly; it's just a concrete lined channel, and could use some beautification.

At the other end of the green line, there's all sorts of opportunity to serve Midori, Hodogaya, Isogo, and more. There was a map that showed that end of the line connecting to the Minato-Mirai line at some point-- is that feasible?
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Old June 18th, 2011, 11:27 AM   #2630
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You mean this picture:

[IMG]http://i53.************/2vvtmzd.jpg[/IMG]
http://katarukai22.cocolog-nifty.com...post-631f.html

There are plans for extensions at both ends of the Green Line, they might even be the original plans for the complete Green Line. It will be very costly to complete the whole line, we could see it extended in steps over the next few decades.
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Old June 18th, 2011, 06:36 PM   #2631
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Wow, the Green Line extensions looks very interesting; am I correct in guessing that extension plans are just that, plans, or is there a definitive timeline to construct any part of the extensions?

Even more intriguing is the gray line labeled '京浜臨海線'; does anybody know anything about this line?
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Old June 18th, 2011, 07:40 PM   #2632
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
Wow, the Green Line extensions looks very interesting; am I correct in guessing that extension plans are just that, plans, or is there a definitive timeline to construct any part of the extensions?

Even more intriguing is the gray line labeled '京浜臨海線'; does anybody know anything about this line?
I think it's the Minatomirai line.

I'm probably wrong, though, so don't quote me on this.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 08:18 AM   #2633
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Gray line is the Tōkaidō Freight Line, which has been proposed for conversion to passenger service. This has been discussed previously in this thread as the "Keihin Bypass Line" (my nomenclature). The idea is to create a bypass for the busy six-track Tōkaidō Main Line tracks (serving the Tōkaidō Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and Yokosuka Line / Shōnan-Shinjuku Line) and create a branch off the line that goes to Haneda Airport. The northern end is supposed to branch in two, one part to Shinagawa and the other to the Rinkai Line in Tōkyō Teleport in Odaiba. The southern end will reach to Sakuragichō in Yokohama.

This is a long-term proposal, though, and depends on the level of redevelopment along the waterfront areas in the Keihin corridor, much of which is still highly industrial in nature at the moment.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 08:20 AM   #2634
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
Wow, the Green Line extensions looks very interesting; am I correct in guessing that extension plans are just that, plans, or is there a definitive timeline to construct any part of the extensions?
No definitive timeline... If I remember correctly, the Transport Policy Council recommended a groundbreaking before 2015, but I think most of the Yokohama Municipal Transportation Bureau's efforts are currently being devoted to the Blue Line extension to Shin-Yurigaoka, which was recommended to open by 2015.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 08:29 AM   #2635
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
Is there enough space in some portions of the line to stick those centre catenary poles?
Yeah, the Hankai ROW is too narrow. They are actually widening parts of Abeno-suji near the Kintetsu tower project (Abenobashi Terminal Building), but I don't think they are doing anything to the Hankai station or tracks immediately adjacent to the building. If they wanted center poles, they would need to move out the tracks a bit as there is not enough clearance right now.

They could still try greening though, although even then, there's sections where it isn't feasible because the road is too narrow, and vehicles need to drive on or weave into the center part of the road, occupied by the trams, to avoid parked cars / trucks, pedestrians, etc.
http://maps.google.com/maps?showlabs...02642&t=k&z=19
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Old June 19th, 2011, 08:40 AM   #2636
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Yeah, the Hankai ROW is too narrow. They are actually widening parts of Abeno-suji near the Kintetsu tower project (Abenobashi Terminal Building), but I don't think they are doing anything to the Hankai station or tracks immediately adjacent to the building. If they wanted center poles, they would need to move out the tracks a bit as there is not enough clearance right now.

They could still try greening though, although even then, there's sections where it isn't feasible because the road is too narrow, and vehicles need to drive on or weave into the center part of the road, occupied by the trams, to avoid parked cars / trucks, pedestrians, etc.
http://maps.google.com/maps?showlabs...02642&t=k&z=19
They could place catenary on either side of the track instead of placing centre poles.

Something akin to the catenary work on the Bergen Bybane system.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...enNesttun1.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ober2009_1.jpg

There looks to be some space along tramway alignments such as this one for the above kinds of catenary (for example in here, between the white line and the yellow numbering).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...amway_ja01.jpg

Last edited by manrush; June 19th, 2011 at 08:53 AM.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 10:46 AM   #2637
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京浜臨海線 ⇄ Keihin Rinkai Sen -- Keihin Seashore route.

There are proposals by various developers to do a Kobe/Odaiba-style redevelopment using some of these industrial areas along the shore. Since a lot of factories are no longer in parts of those areas anymore, they're looking at developments like Kobe's Port Island and others like it to redevelop. In that case, they'd need a new line in the area. Guess which companies own the land there?!?
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Old June 19th, 2011, 07:56 PM   #2638
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Hmm.......

So in this case, there are three types of train services. Green, red and orange (?).

So there are three platforms altogether then correct? One platform for each service.

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Old June 19th, 2011, 08:33 PM   #2639
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No, the services don't have their own platform at Haneda Terminal 2 or at Hamamatsucho station. At both ends there's 1 island platform with tracks on both sides. All services can leave at either side of the platform, it just depends on which side the train came into the station. All the services use the same kind of trains, it can come in as a local service and return as a non-stop. The express trains can pass the local trains at Showajima Station that has 2 island platforms with 4 tracks.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 09:19 PM   #2640
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
They could place catenary on either side of the track instead of placing centre poles.

...

There looks to be some space along tramway alignments such as this one for the above kinds of catenary (for example in here, between the white line and the yellow numbering).
Those might work on that section... Personally, though, I wouldn’t really recommend doing anything to these sections of the line, which are mostly residential in nature anyways (with some neighborhood-type commercial uses, of course)… I just don’t see much benefit to doing it for a quiet residential collector road, as any modification would need to be part of a comprehensive streetscape project, including grounding of all the utility poles, sidewalk improvements, etc. The priorities should be elsewhere.

I’m thinking (and I believe, the original blogger who took those photos was as well) of the major sections of the line, near Tennōji and perhaps around Sumiyoshi Taisha (a famous shrine). There’s also some older (but bare-bones basic) beautification already in place along the Hankai Tramway on the busier Kishū Kaidō.
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