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Old June 20th, 2011, 09:05 AM   #2641
Blackraven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momo1435 View Post
No, the services don't have their own platform at Haneda Terminal 2 or at Hamamatsucho station. At both ends there's 1 island platform with tracks on both sides. All services can leave at either side of the platform, it just depends on which side the train came into the station. All the services use the same kind of trains, it can come in as a local service and return as a non-stop. The express trains can pass the local trains at Showajima Station that has 2 island platforms with 4 tracks.
Hmm.......is that so?

That may look confusing (especially to first time users/travelers). If all services originate from that same platform, then there may be a chance that you might enter/board the wrong time. You then realized you made a slight mistake when your train does not stop at your desired station.

So I guess, if your station is not covered by all three services, then I guess it's better to take the green service (local).

It's slower but at least you're sure that you are fully guaranteed that you get to stop and alight at your desired train station
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:20 AM   #2642
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Hitachi officials pay visit to Philippine president Aquino
http://rtvm.gov.ph/index.php?option=...mnts&Itemid=60

Quote:
President Benigno S. Aquino III received the officials of Hitachi Ltd., a Japanese multinational corporation, led by its chairman Mr. Takashi Kawamura in Malacañang.

Hitachi officials expressed their intention to engage in Private-Public Partnership (PPP) program especially in the sector of railways system. With this, the President discussed the three mass railway transits which are planned to be constructed in Antipolo, San Jose del Monte and Bacoor, Cavite. He further talked about the installation of mass freezing and cold storage facilities to improve fisheries and aquatic production as well as the protection of thirty six thousand miles of Philippine coastline.

The Japan-based company thanked the President for the assistance that the government extends in the operations of Hitachi in the country.

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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:21 AM   #2643
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Sony to launch next generation FeliCa contactless IC chip
http://www.sony.net/SonyInfo/News/Pr...66E/index.html

Quote:
-- New security with AES encryption standard –
Tokyo, Japan - Sony Corporation announces today the launch of the next generation FeliCa IC chip with enhanced security adopting the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) encryption. The new IC chip will support AES as well as the existing DES encryption system for mutual authentication and data communication. The sample chip will be available for shipment from this winter, and mass production will start in the spring of 2012.

Sony’s contactless smart card technology “FeliCa” is widely deployed in card or mobile phone products for various applications including transit and payment where high performance and security is required. To date, more than 500 million FeliCa cards and mobile phone IC chips in total have already shipped throughout the world. (*1)

The newly developed IC chip will have the same command sets as the current DES-based FeliCa card system so that the FeliCa card with the new chip can easily be introduced into existing services. The new chip will have a security-migration function so that it will easily be able to migrate from the existing security system to the new AES encryption-based security.

JR East Group cooperated with Sony regarding the specification for the new OS.

With the new IC chip, Sony will develop and market a variety of forms of card, and in addition plans to develop next generation compatible products for mobile devices and reader platforms. The new IC chip will create a new lifestyle and range of applications where users feel daily convenience simply by “tapping” in an expanded FeliCa world.

(*1): As of end of March 2011

Features of next generation FeliCa contactless IC chip
  • Highest level of security for contactless smart card chips
    It is planned to achieve the highest security level for this product by adding AES cryptographic functionality in addition to the current DES encryption for communication between card and reader/writer. Leading-edge anti-tampering technology will be implemented to achieve higher than EAL5+ certification level according to ISO/IEC15408 common criteria.
  • Multi-application platform with higher performance and reliability
    Both higher transaction speed and longer communication distance will be achieved for every type of card application such as transportation ticket and electronic money. This will be achieved by pursuing further lower power consumption than the current FeliCa IC chips. It will improve reliability of nonvolatile memory data by implementing new Error Checking and Correcting (ECC) functionality.
  • Security-migration function and backward compatibility with the current FeliCa IC chips
    New FeliCa IC chip will be compatible with the current product in terms of the command set both for DES cryptography and without security. It will be compatible to existing infrastructure using cryptographic communication with existing reader/writers supporting DES encryption and non-secure-based communication with readers such as FeliCa Port and PaSoRi. In addition, it will include a security-migration function in order to support the existing DES cryptography-based system as well as future upgrades to the AES based system.(Please see the below)

<Comparison with the current FeliCa(Standard) IC chip>

The new version of FeliCa is also supposed to be cheaper, which will hopefully help increase its acceptance. Cost is one of the larger hurdles in implementing IC card systems, particularly for smaller transit operators that do not necessarily expect to get much value out of it.

In FeliCa-related news, the technology is quickly being adopted as part of contactless campus cards at universities and other institutions after Sony teamed with Blackboard Inc. Clients include Santa Clara University, Florida State University, Tulane University, the University of Texas at Tyler, and Mercer University. This particular implementation of Sony FeliCa technology for campuses won the SESAMES Award last year for innovation in the smartcard industry.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...11+PRN20110207
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:22 AM   #2644
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Editorial on Okinawa rail system
http://ryukyushimpo.jp/news/storyid-...ytopic-13.html

Quote:
While it’s been eight years since the monorail began running and central Naha City has boosted its urban vibe, Okinawa still remains a car-oriented society. Bus service, ideally supposed to meet locals’ travel needs, is spread among four competing companies, and connections with the monorail are not ideal—certainly not “easy to use”. Faced with an unstructured public transit system, users ultimately turn to their cars.

Individuals who use cars enjoy comfort. In addition to serving as a means of travel, many people treat their cars as their second homes. It is the monopolization of public space—roads—for private use. Drivers become addicted to these comforts, and will continue to use their cars. The impact is increased area devoted to roads and parking facilities.

In reality, many people are likely becoming more aware of the limits of a car-oriented society. While the monorail was one fruit of this realization, the monorail is a supplementary mode of travel to the car, and one that does not interfere with road transport—it is not an alternative to the car. Recently, discussion has finally focused on railways and LRT as a public transit alternative to the car.

In Okinawa’s “21st Century Vision” released at the end of FY2009, one can find references to steel-wheel rail, LRT, and other public transit scattered throughout. The official website for the plan features a cartoon of a future Okinawa, where streetcars like those from France’s Strasbourg run through former U.S. military base land.

Filled with anticipation for human-friendly urban planning, universal design for all users, the realization of a low-carbon society, the revitalization of the tourism business, and the rebirth of the central city, there is no room for doubt concerning the policy to introduce a steel-wheel rail system to Okinawa. The question is when, where, and what type of train to run.

In 1914, streetcars began running in Okinawa between Naha and Shuri, followed by three narrow-gauge railways operated by the prefectural government that ran until their demise due to damage from the war. The scale of the ruins after World War II far exceeded the damage in the Great East Japan Earthquake. While we have yet to repair the damage suffered by the narrow-gauge railways in the war, perhaps we can use this opportunity as a starting point for constructing a steel-wheel rail system.

(Tsutsumi Jun’ichirō, professor of engineering at University of the Ryūkyūs)
Proposed LRT network (6 lines) from an advocate group (original article is here):
http://maps.google.co.jp/maps/ms?msa...0&ie=UTF8&z=11
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:22 AM   #2645
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Matsue City delays decision on LRT proposal
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news...3100000-n1.htm

Quote:
In regards to the possible introduction of light rail transit (LRT), on June 17 Matsue City mayor Matsuura Masataka revealed plans to delay a decision, originally slated to happen in FY2012. Mayor Matsuura made the comment during the June regular session of the City Council. As a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake, the mayor prioritized the safety aspects of urban planning.

It was rumored that introduction of an LRT system was to be included in the second-term basic plan (FY2012-16) of the city’s Comprehensive General Plan, but Mayor Matsuura remarked that the LRT project would “not be detailed in specifics” in the plan. In regards to introducing an LRT, the mayor indicated that he plans to make a decision based on discussions following publication of the plan.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:23 AM   #2646
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Kyōto Municipal Subway to get new ekinaka facility at Kyōto Station
http://www.kyoto-np.co.jp/politics/a...20110610000063

Quote:
On June 10, the Kyōto Municipal Transportation Bureau announced the details of the stores inside the Kotochika Kyōto ekinaka (station retail) facility targeted to open next fall at Kyōto Station (Shimogyō Ward, Kyōto) on the Municipal Subway. The four stores currently in operation will close their doors in late FY2011, and the Transportation Bureau will do a full-scale renovation of the area around the faregates. By reusing space currently used as a passageway, the Bureau will expand the store floor area to 610 sq m—five times the current area—and establish ten tenant spaces. The project will break ground during FY2011, and spokespersons for the Transportation Bureau say they hope the ekinaka project becomes a catalyst in improving the subway’s bottom line.

The Transportation Bureau opened ekinaka facilities at Shijō Station (Kotochika Shijō) in October of last year and at Karasuma–Oike Station (Kotochika Oike) in May. The openings led to increased ridership and revenues, with daily passengers on the subway reaching 102,000, and the Bureau is now looking to establish ekinaka at the largest station on the subway network, Kyōto Station.

Convenience store and plaza
According to the plan, portions of the passageway (approx. 370 sq m) near the information center at the north ticketing hall will be renovated, making space for seven new stores including a convenience store, a fashion accessories store, and a general merchandiser. The information center will be relocated approx. 50 m to the south. At the east side of the central ticketing hall, the ticket vending machines will be shifted 10 m to the south, creating space for two stores. The space currently occupied by a general merchandise store at the north side of the central ticketing hall will be converted into a café or other restaurant. Benches and a large clock will be installed in the area, converting the space into a “Hospitality Plaza” that people can designate as a meeting spot.

Work in the area around the north ticketing hall will begin in the new year, with the stores opening next fall. The Transportation Bureau will break ground at the central ticketing hall area in FY2012, opening the stores in spring 2013. The total project cost is ¥750 million, and the Transportation Bureau forecasts tenant revenue of over ¥120 million annually.

Scheduled site of the Kotochika Kyōto ekinaka station retail facility opening next autumn inside Kyōto Station on the Municipal Subway. Passageway space will be renovated into retail space. (Near the north ticketing hall, Shimogyō Ward, Kyōto City)


Areas of Kyōto Station slated to be renovated.
These will not be inside the paid area, but that’s probably better, as they will be able to capture the loads of passengers who use JR and Kintetsu.

Morning rush hour at JR Kyōto Station:
Source: INCJapan on YouTube

Kyōto Line inbound to Ōsaka and Kōbe:



And outbound, for the Biwako Line and Kosei Line:

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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:24 AM   #2647
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On 30th anniversary, Kyōto Municipal Subway looks to station retail as key element of reducing debt
http://mainichi.jp/area/kyoto/news/2...20551000c.html

Quote:
On May 29, the Kyōto Municipal Subway will celebrate its 30th anniversary. While the subway has established itself as a means of transport for citizens and tourists, ridership growth is stalling and a massive deficit is accumulating. While officials are looking to ekinaka (station retail) business as a means of escape, the path to clearing the subway’s notorious reputation of having the largest deficit in Japan is poised to be a long one.

The Karasuma Line opened in 1981 between Kyōto and Kita-Ōji. Now, the line runs between Takeda and the Kokusai Kaigikan (Kyōto International Conference Center). The project cost for the Tōzai Line, which opened in 1997, exceeded the original estimates by ¥206.5 billion, ballooning to ¥451.5 billion—bringing the total project cost for the subway network to ¥851.4 billion and contributing to strained finances. Even today, the subway continues to run while generating a daily operating loss of approx. ¥32 million.

At the end of FY2009, the accumulated deficit of the subway was ¥319.3 billion, placing its fiscal state squarely at the top of the country’s nine publicly-operated subways.

Ekinaka (station retail) business was identified as one pillar of the financial rehabilitation plan enacted in March of last year. In October of last year, the subway opened Kotochika Shijō, housing a popular donut shop, supermarket, and other tenants—at Shijō Station. In May of this year, the subway opened Kotochika Oike. Revenues from ekinaka business were ¥50 million in FY2007, but increased to ¥196 million in FY2009 and are projected to surpass ¥264 million in FY2010.

Officials have also taken steps towards improvements in the core business. In March of last year, the subway made the first revisions to the subway schedule in 10 years with the aim of improving convenience, such as by reducing the time required to transfer between the Karasuma Line and Tōzai Line.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:24 AM   #2648
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Cost of Fukutetsu – Echitetsu through-service: ¥2.4 billion
http://www.chunichi.co.jp/article/fu...502000125.html

Quote:
In the plan to interline Fukui Railway (Fukutetsu) and Echizen Railway (Echitetsu) trains at the hub at Tawaramachi Station in Fukui City, on June 14 Fukui Prefecture revealed that the estimated cost for the station and track improvements required for bilateral through-servicing is between ¥2.3 billion and ¥2.4 billion. The Prefectural Government plans to cover one-third of the cost with funding from the national government.

The news was announced at a meeting of the working group evaluating the through-service project held at AOSSA in Teyose 1-chōme, Fukui City. Regarding the local funding share to cover the project costs, there has been difficulty in coordinating funding shares between the Prefectural Government and cities and towns along the railways, including Fukui City. With detailed design of the construction, originally slated to take place this fiscal year, looking more difficult, the possibility has surfaced that the FY2013 start of bilateral through-service could slip.

According to the Fukui Prefecture Transport and Urban Planning Division, the project costs include ¥800 million to ¥900 million for construction works on the tracks and platforms at Fukutetsu’s Tawaramachi Station and ¥900 million for introduction of three low-floor LRV trains for Echitetsu. Additional costs are also separately required for a public transit priority system (PTPS) consisting of priority traffic signals and other measures.

The Prefectural Government had originally planned to move forward with detailed design this fiscal year, starting Fukutetsu through-service in FY2013 and Echitetsu through-service in FY2014. However, anxiety runs deep over the fate of elevation of the Echitetsu tracks (as being pushed by Fukui City) and the prospects for increased ridership as a result of the bilateral through-service. Spokespersons for the Transport and Urban Planning Division explained that a groundbreaking this fiscal year would be “difficult”. Meanwhile, the two railways revealed plans to initiate preemptive measures to capture new riders, including schedule coordination and fare adjustments. Higashimura Kenji, head of Fukui Prefecture’s Integrated Policy Department, emphasized that elevation of the Echitetsu tracks was “critical”, and said that the government is hoping to “break ground on the through-service project as early as possible.”
Another article gives ¥1 billion for improvements to Fukutetsu stations and other facilities and ¥1.4 billion for improvements to Echitetsu stations and the cost of introducing low-floor LRVs. That article also says that annual operating costs would increase by ¥41 million as a result of the through-service, but an increase in annual ridership of 100,000 passengers would allow the added cost to be covered by fare revenues. The local share of the funding would be ¥1.6 billion total, but Fukui City wants to prioritize other projects, like the elevation of the Echitetsu Katsuyama–Eiheiji Line in conjunction with construction of the Hokuriku Shinkansen, which may make negotiations on funding arrangements between the various local governments more problematic.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:25 AM   #2649
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Toyama Light Rail celebrates fifth anniversary
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/toy...OYT8T00061.htm

Quote:
”Opening fever” cools, tourists decrease; Aid for elderly in ridership growth strategy
The Toyama Light Rail running through northern Toyama City will celebrate its fifth anniversary on April 29. The line began as Japan’s first light rail transit (LRT) system, established in preparation for the FY2014 opening of the Hokuriku Shinkansen. While ridership has been slowly decreasing since the line opened, the number of new homes breaking ground in the surrounding areas is increasing, and the line is still in the process of achieving its goal of creating vitality in central Toyama City.

The opportunity to introduce the light rail line came with the abandonment of the JR Toyama-kō Line as a result of an accelerating ridership decline. In 2004, Toyama City established a third-sector railway company together with private corporations and other entities, inherited the railway section of the line (6.5 km) from JR, and constructed a new 1.1 km extension, opening the line between Toyama-eki Kita (Toyama Station North) and Iwasehama in April 2006.

In the LRT Network Proposal put forth by the city, JR Toyama Station will be elevated with the opening of the Hokuriku Shinkansen, and the Toyama Light Rail will be connected in FY2017-18 with the Centram city loop line, which opened in December 2009. By connecting the northern areas of the city with the central core, the city is aiming to shift the city away from one of automobile dependence to one where residents can walk to meet their daily needs.

According to Toyama Light Rail, ridership in FY2010 was 1,578,330 passengers (4,324 average daily riders)—a five-year continuous decline from when the line opened in FY2006, when ridership was 1,651,730 (4,901 average daily riders).

What’s obvious is the flat ridership growth on weekends. In FY2006, 545,800 passengers rode the line on weekends, but that number has continued to decline, reaching 404,970 passengers in FY2010. Weekday ridership has reached 1,173,360 passengers (an increase of approx. 6% compared to FY2006). Spokespersons for the railway say, “Tourists coming to take a ride on the Light Rail have decreased, and the ‘opening fever’ has subsided.”

The railway has been trying a variety of campaigns as part of a strategy to attract riders. Setting its eyes on railfans, the railway has developed a joint campaign with Toyama Excel Hotel Tōkyū (Toyama City) that combines a chance to operate a real Light Rail train with hotel lodging. The railway has also been selling joint tickets also valid on the solar boat operating on the nearby Toyama Canal. The railway has also been targeting elderly users, deploying attendants on a portion of trips (incl. weekdays) to assist passengers with boarding and alighting and perform other tasks.

Meanwhile, according to the city’s Transportation Policy Division, the number of new homes that broke ground in FY2008 in a 500 m swath along the 7.6 km length of the line reached 145—50 more than before the line opened in FY2005. The Transportation Policy Division says, “People have realized the convenience of the light rail, and it has contributed to revitalization of the area.”
Toyama Light Rail scenes:
Source: 109fan on YouTube

At Toyama-eki Kita Station (Toyama Station North Station):





At Iwasehama Station:

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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:25 AM   #2650
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Sendai Airport Transit to partially reopen July 23
http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2011/06/20110616t13029.htm

Quote:
It was revealed on June 15 that the Natori – Mitazono section the Sendai Airport Access Line, where service has been completely suspended as a result of damage from the Great East Japan Earthquake, will reopen on July 23. Service will be temporarily reinstated before the full reopening of Sendai Airport this autumn.

For the time being, the railway expects to keep the number of trains at 70 to 80 percent of service before the earthquake, or approximately 30 roundtrips a day. The train operations control center at Sendai Airport Station, completely destroyed by the tsunami, has been relocated to the first floor of Mitazono Station and will begin operating on a temporary basis.

The section of the line between Natori and Mitazono Stations suffered damage, with the earthquake vibrations causing platform lighting to fall and rails to shift out of alignment. Sendai Airport Transit, which operates the line, and others have been prioritizing this section of the line for repair work, and a date for the restoration of service has been determined.

Substitute bus service will continue on the section of the line between Mitazono and Sendai Airport Stations until service on the full length of the line is restored. The railway will continue repair work to restore service on the Mitazono – Sendai Airport section, targeting a reopening in late September in time for the full reopening of Sendai Airport.

The cost of the damage to the Sendai Airport Access Line is projected to reach approx. ¥4 billion, including electrical infrastructure, viaducts, tunnels, station buildings, and other facilities.
Not mentioned here explicitly, but service will really be restored all the way to Sendai, as the Sendai – Natori section of the line is officially part of the Tōhoku Main Line. Apparently, two trains (4 cars total) are still stranded at Sendai Airport Station (this station is elevated, but the line tunnels underneath the runways). As the line is fairly short, they don’t have many trains to begin with… The four stranded cars represent 30 percent of their entire fleet.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:26 AM   #2651
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As towns and cities formulate restoration plans, LRT proposals floated
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T110526006118.htm

Quote:
Fifteen coastal towns and cities in Miyagi Prefecture battered by the Great East Japan Earthquake are formulating their own restoration plans, The Yomiuri Shimbun has learned.

The Iwanuma city government plans to utilize traditional yashikirin woods that surround houses as an anti-tsunami measure, while the Wataricho town government is studying the construction of evacuation buildings in coastal areas.

The main theme of plans by the 15 local governments is to construct towns or cities that can withstand disasters by learning from their experience of the massive quake.

Besides Iwanuma and Wataricho, the other municipalities devising their own reconstruction plans are: Sendai, Kesennuma, Minami-Sanrikucho, Onagawacho, Higashi-Matsushima, Matsushimamachi, Ishinomaki, Shiogama, Shichigahamamachi, Tagajo, Natori, Yamamotocho and Rifucho.

Officials and experts in each coastal community are discussing a number of projects, but the progress of their talks varies. The Natori city government was the slowest off the mark, but it plans to formulate a plan within the year.

"We will discuss the matter by creating a study panel comprising representatives of farmers and other residents," a Natori official said.

Fourteen municipalities plan to compile restoration plans within the year. The exception is Wataricho.

Iwanuma will devise a plan to efficiently use Igune, a local name for yashikirin woods, to counter the force of a tsunami. Igune is planted around houses in agricultural villages on the Sendai Plain to reduce the effect of wind and snow. The city also plans to use debris left in the wake of the tsunami to build "hills" in coastal sections of the city.

Sendai has made "securing energy" one of the main pillars of its restoration plan as gasoline and gas supplies were disrupted by the quake. The city will have electric vehicles on standby for a disaster and its own emergency stockpile of gasoline. It also plans to establish more than one route along which gas supplies and other essential items can move.

As a number of people survived the tsunami by evacuating to steel-reinforced buildings, Wataricho is planning to construct such buildings near the coast for this purpose.

The Ishinomaki municipal government aims to utilize renewable energy sources such as tidal power and wind power generation to secure electric power generation facilities within the city. After the quake, a wide area experienced power outages and fuel shortages.

The city also experienced traffic jams in urban areas, hampering transport of materials. To reduce its dependence on automobiles, the city will build a light rail transit (LRT) system.

The plans of the municipal governments are not that different from those of the central and prefectural governments, especially in moving houses to higher ground. However, municipalities do not have the revenue for such a big undertaking as building an LRT system, so negotiations and coordination with the central and prefectural governments will be necessary.

Compared with the general progress in formulating restoration plans in Miyagi Prefecture, municipalities in two other severely hit prefectures--Iwate and Fukushima--are relatively slow.

In Iwate Prefecture, out of 12 coastal municipalities hit by the tsunami, only a few, including Kuji, have a clear idea of what to do. Reconstruction of coastal communities in Fukushima Prefecture has yet to move into full gear.
Although I can’t say that we will actually see anything serious come out of these proposals, it’s still good to hear that smaller cities and towns are considering LRT.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:27 AM   #2652
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TOKYO WONDERGROUND June posters

Click on image for larger size.
Source: Tōkyō Metro

Hibiya Station:



Nagatachō Station:

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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:04 PM   #2653
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Keihan expands presence internationally with Vietnamese, Chinese projects
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/new...2470038-n1.htm

Quote:
In the joint public-private partnership (PPP) overseas infrastructure improvement projects being offered by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), a joint proposal by Keihan Electric Railway and two other firms for preparatory studies for Hanoi Line 5, an urban railway in Vietnam, was provisionally selected on June 20. Keihan announced the news the same day. Keihan is also making inroads into China’s real estate development market, and through participation in railway operations projects in Hanoi is seeking to expand its overseas business.

The preparatory studies for the railway project were jointly proposed by Keihan; the Japan Railway Technical Service (JARTS) (HQ: Bunkyō Ward, Tōkyō), which handles consulting services for overseas railway projects; and the Nomura Research Institute (NRI) (HQ: Chiyoda Ward, Tōkyō). A formal decision will be made in mid-August.

Hanoi Line 5 is a 35 km long railway connecting the central area of the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi with suburban areas. In the preparatory studies, Keihan will be responsible for the railway business aspects, including service plans, while JARTS will handle demand projections and environmental impact assessment and NRI will handle financing and other tasks.

Keihan has exchanged memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with local real estate development firms regarding project cooperation, and if the project moves forward, there is a high likelihood that Keihan will be tapped for the railway operations contract. The preparatory studies are slated to take place over a one-year period starting in August. The project would break ground in 2015, opening gradually in phases between 2019 and 2022. The construction capital cost is projected to reach ¥270 billion.

Keihan has already made the decision to join mixed-use development projects featuring residential units and other uses in Shenyang, China. The two projects are joint ventures with Tōkyō Tatemono and local real estate development firms: the Tomorrow Square (明天广场) project slated to open at the end of this fiscal year, directly connected to a subway station, and the Chun He (春河) project, adjacent to a park in the central area of the city.

Keihan ridership reached its peak in FY1991 at 419.97 million riders. Ridership in FY2010 was 280.59 million riders, a 33% drop from FY1991 levels, and executives say, “In order to strengthen our revenue base, we must look towards the Asian market, where there is considerable growth.”

Rendering of Keihan Electric Railway’s Tomorrow Square project in Shenyang, China. (Courtesy of Keihan).
This is a supplement to the article posted previously.

Full press releases from Keihan are here:
Hanoi Line 5: http://www.keihan.co.jp/news/data_h23/2011-06-20.pdf
Shenyang development projects: http://www.keihan.co.jp/news/data_h23/2011-06-17.pdf

Hanoi Line 5 Project
Length: 34.5 km (planned)
Route: South side of West Lake to Hoa Lac via the Hanoi International Center for Exhibition
Line design: Double-track electrified railway (planned)
Gauge: 1,435 mm (international standard gauge, planned)
The line is slated to gradually open in phases by extensions from central Hanoi City out towards Hoa Lac.
The local firm partnering with Keihan in the project is Kinh Bac City Development, a core business under the Saigon Invest Group.

As for the Shenyang developments, the Tomorrow Square project is composed of 4,600 condo units, 95,000 sq m of retail, and 40,000 sq m of office, located adjacent to Century Plaza (世纪广场) Station on Shenyang Metro Line 2. The Chun He project is 2,700 condo units, 44,000 sq m of retail, and 51,000 sq m of office, located near Youth Park (青年公园) Station on Metro Line 2.

Overall, very nice from Keihan... I think other private railways will need to start taking a look at this as ridership continues to decline and domestic competition increases.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 10:19 PM   #2654
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Quote:
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Hmm.......is that so?

That may look confusing (especially to first time users/travelers). If all services originate from that same platform, then there may be a chance that you might enter/board the wrong time. You then realized you made a slight mistake when your train does not stop at your desired station.
This is standard practice throughout Japan on pretty much any rail line, although it's less common on subways and really small railways. I can understand foreigners getting confused because they aren't used to this added layer of complexity, but that's why the stopping pattern diagram is on the right half of the display. Most people who reside in Japan will know to check the electronic and paper displays or listen to the announcements before boarding. In general, announcements are pretty detailed on limited-stop trains, and tell you the next next station as well as where to transfer to local trains for what stations.
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Old June 21st, 2011, 06:57 AM   #2655
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Hmm.......is that so?

That may look confusing (especially to first time users/travelers). If all services originate from that same platform, then there may be a chance that you might enter/board the wrong time. You then realized you made a slight mistake when your train does not stop at your desired station.

So I guess, if your station is not covered by all three services, then I guess it's better to take the green service (local).

It's slower but at least you're sure that you are fully guaranteed that you get to stop and alight at your desired train station
Having used trains quite a bit when I was in Japan, I can tell the operation of the Tokyo Monorail Line is almost basic compared to some of the operations seen on other lines in Japan! They might all have different stopping patterns, but at least they all run along the same line for the entire length!

If you want the definition of confusing, look up the Osaka Loop Line! Not only do trains with different stopping patterns depart from the same platform, but they also serve a number of different lines! Futsu (local), kaisoku (rapid), Yamatoji kaisoku (Yamatoji rapid), Kanku-Kishuji kaisoku (Airport-Kishuji rapid), Kukan kaisoku (Regional rapid), Chokutsu kaisoku (Direct rapid) and a number of other limited express services depart from the same platform at Osaka Station! Those services run to four different lines - the Osaka Loop Line, Sakurajima, Yamatoji and Hanwa Lines. Plus the stopping patterns and services operating change depending on the time of day! And trains to Tennoji run both ways in opposite directions, some serving the station twice! And some trains don't run the entire loop (trains for Sakurajima and trains starting/terminating at Kyobashi).

Just to complicate things further, some of those services are actually two services in one. For example, the Airport-Kishuji Rapid services are mostly run as 8-car trains which are coupled and uncoupled at Hineno to form two 4-car services to Kansai Airport and Wakayama. A similar thing happens for some Yamatoji Rapid services at Oji.

Last edited by AG; June 21st, 2011 at 07:10 AM.
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Old June 21st, 2011, 08:54 PM   #2656
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Seibu Haijima Line construction update

Short video (2011.04.24) on the recently partially-elevated section of the Seibu Haijima Line between Hagiyama and Ogawa. The goal of the project is to grade-separate the crossing with Fuchū Kaidō, a major local road. So far, only half of the line—the inbound direction towards Hagiyama—has been elevated, but due to limited space at the site, they are using a special construction method, sliding in the overpass above Fuchū Kaidō one track at a time. As we travel across the overpass and towards Ogawa Station (the train is traveling in the “opposite direction” as this track is officially the inbound track), we can see the work being done on the elevated outbound track.


Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube
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Old June 21st, 2011, 08:54 PM   #2657
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JR Nambu Line elevation construction update: Part 1

Update (2011.04.24) on the grade-separation (elevation) work on 4.3 km of the JR Nambu Line between Inadazutsumi Station and Fuchū Honmachi Station in Inagi City, Tōkyō.

First, some videos:
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

Part 1
Cab view in the inbound direction (towards Kawasaki), between Fuchū Honmachi and Minami-Tama. Departing Fuchū Honmachi, we run parallel with the Musashino South Line (used mostly by freight trains) and cross the Tama River into Inagi City. Approaching Minami-Tama Station, we can see all the progress made on the new approach and elevated station. The elevation will be a one-track-at-a-time deal, and the outbound track for Tachikawa will be the first to be elevated. The sections between columns are designed like arches in a “colonnade” style, a bit unusual for newer examples of similar projects, to improve the aesthetics of the structure.



Part 2
From Minami-Tama to Inagi Naganuma.
A bit more difficult to see this section behind the fencing, but much of this section appears to be completed. Particularly south of Inagi Naganuma, it appears they were able to secure enough space to construct both elevated tracks in one shot.



Part 3
From Inagi Naganuma to Yanokuchi.
This section looks mostly complete. As we ramp up on the temporary approach and shift onto the existing viaduct, we can see they have part of a new switch in place, probably to replace the function of the existing siding at the northwest end of the station, used to turn back trains.

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Old June 21st, 2011, 08:55 PM   #2658
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JR Nambu Line elevation construction update: Part 2

Pictures:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

First up is Minami-Tama Station.
There is an existing crossing at the west side of the station (towards Fuchū Honmachi), and the new aerial structure features a concrete truss overpass similar to the existing one at Yanokuchi Station (seen in the end of the last video).



The location of the temporary outbound platform prevents completion of both elevated tracks at the station simultaneously. The future configuration is supposed to be one island platform instead of two side platforms.



East end of Minami-Tama Station. Here, they look mostly done with the elevated structure for the time being until they can switch the outbound track to elevated track. They started this section earlier than the others.



Looking west from the platform bridge. We can see the elevated platform being built, with parts just jutting over the temporary ground-level outbound platform. Perhaps the green fencing will be the extent of the elevated platform to be built-out for the elevation of the outbound track.



East end. The platform at this end looks substantially wider than at the west end. The opening at right will likely become a stairwell, allowing access directly from ground level, but I wonder if they will have a separate connection to the platform bridge.



Next, Inagi Naganuma Station.
At the northwest end of the station, there’s no canopy on the temporary platforms, and part of the partially-completed viaduct already juts out above. This will be a three-track station when complete (originally, the station was three-track, but they had to close off one of the tracks due to the elevation work).



Southeast end of the station, where there is a canopy that prevents them from completing both elevated tracks at once. Past the ground-level platform, though, the structure itself looks mostly complete.



Peeking from the platform bridge. The closest track is the inside inbound track. They cannot construct the outside inbound track yet because the temporary ground-level outbound platform is in the way.

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Old June 21st, 2011, 08:55 PM   #2659
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Keikyū Line construction updates: Part 1

An update (2011.04.24) on the various construction projects along the Keikyū network.

First, some videos of the grade-separation (elevation) of the Keikyū Main Line and Keikyū Airport Line surrounding Keikyū Kamata Station.
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

Part 1
Inbound direction (towards Shinagawa), from Rokugōdote to Zōshiki. As we depart Rokugōdote and take the ramp up to the new aerial structure, to our right we can see the very tight conditions, with heavy equipment tucked into a narrow storage area between the inbound and outbound tracks. This is one of the more complex elevation projects in Japan, with a bilevel viaduct around Keikyū Kamata and very limited space to work with. They’ve built out as much of the outbound track as possible, up to the very edge of the aerial structure, but have yet to string the catenary. We can also see the new tracks, which are ladder track, no ballast.



Part 2
Zōshiki to Keikyū Kamata.
A short ways after leaving Zōshiki, we come to the frenzy of scaffolding and fencing surrounding the under-construction outbound ramp down from the third level of Keikyū Kamata, while we slip in underneath. To our left is a temporary track formerly used by inbound trains but repurposed for outbound trains, allowing them to build this ramp down from the third level. This repurposiing is a bit unusual, as trains travel in the opposite directions from convention in Japan. Approaching Keikyū Kamata, we can see just how much it has changed already, only half complete.



Part 3
Next, we transfer to the Airport Line, for a journey from Keikyū Kamata to Kōjiya. We take a sharp curve across the infamous crossing just outside the station, while to our right is the ramp to / from the third level of the station. We do an unusual switch over to the other track before approaching Kōjiya Station, currently in a strange double platform configuration due to limited space below. Until the elevated platform at right is complete, they must use the temporarily-widened platform on the left. When the platform on the right is complete, they can switch boarding / alighting to that side, remove the temporary sections of the platform on the left, and reveal the already-completed second track at the station, currently in “hiding”.

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Old June 21st, 2011, 08:57 PM   #2660
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Keikyū Line construction updates: Part 2

Next, the grade-separation (undergrounding) of the Keikyū Daishi Line between Sangyō Dōro and Kojima Shinden in Kawasaki City.
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

Part 1
Inbound direction, from Kojima Shinden to Sangyō Dōro.
Quite a bit of progress has been made since the last update on this, but I still find it a little odd that they want to underground such a comparatively minor line. East of Sangyō Dōro, the line has been temporarily converted to single-track and placed on temporary support frames to allow them to dig the ramp down to the new underground station.



Part 2
Sangyō Dōro to Higashi-Monzen

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