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Old June 21st, 2011, 08:57 PM   #2661
quashlo
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Keikyū Line construction updates: Part 3

Next, a short picture set at Keikyū Kamata Station and Kōjiya Station.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Ground level of Keikyū Kamata Station, southwest end (closer to Yokohama). Here, they are constructing the rest of the concourse level between the elevated inbound platforms and the ground level. Parts had been completed with the elevation of the inbound tracks, but the rest had to wait until the removal of the now-obsolete ground-level tracks and platforms. Above we can see the beams and girders that will support the future concourse level.



Moving a little closer towards the northeast end of the station, this part of the ground level is occupied by temporary passages connecting the ground-level and second-level platforms. Work on the concourse proceeds directly above behind the netting.



Better look at the concourse level under construction, from the ground-level platforms. Based on this, the concourse appears to occupy the entire width of the aerial structure.



Ground level, center part of the station. Here, the structural work for the concourse level is complete, and floorplates are already installed.



Moving to Kōjiya Station…
On the outbound platform, east end (closer to Haneda Airport). Still some ways to go here in constructing the elevated outbound track and the remainder of the elevated outbound platform. Judging from the completed platform section on the opposite side, there’s a good one carlength or more of platform that has yet to be constructed.



Looking up at the location of the previous shot, from ground level. They've removed the former ground-level inbound track and are now constructing the station facilities that will allow them to open the other elevated platform. It’s clear that this task is on the critical path and has priority over constructing the elevated outbound track, as it's already been some time since the inbound track was elevated, without much progress to show yet.

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Old June 22nd, 2011, 12:46 AM   #2662
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Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Hmm.......is that so?

That may look confusing (especially to first time users/travelers). If all services originate from that same platform, then there may be a chance that you might enter/board the wrong time. You then realized you made a slight mistake when your train does not stop at your desired station.

So I guess, if your station is not covered by all three services, then I guess it's better to take the green service (local).

It's slower but at least you're sure that you are fully guaranteed that you get to stop and alight at your desired train station
Many of the private railways have as many as 6 or 7 different service patterns with various names. For those who don't read Japanese, usually the Kyuko, Tokkyu, or other than local trains have different colors for the express names. So, generally speaking, on the rollsigns, if the kanji to the left of the station name is blue or green or red, it is some express service.
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 11:43 AM   #2663
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Minato Mirai Line platform extension construction updates: Part 1

Recent updates (2011.04.24) on the construction to extend platforms on the Minato Mirai Line in preparation for the start of through-services between the Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line and Tōkyū Tōyoko Line next year.

First up are Yokohama Station and Minato Mirai Station.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Yokohama Station, northeast end (closer to Shibuya). Platform extension here is complete, with protective fencing installed on the new sections for the time being. As cars don’t stop on this section yet, the yellow tactile warning tiles are not connected up yet.



Opposite end, closer to Motomachi–Chūkagai. Same situation here. The total length of the platform extensions appears to be slightly longer than two cars, so they may offset the stop locations in opposite directions, given how narrow the Shibuya end gets.



Minato Mirai Station, north end (closer to Yokohama and Shibuya). They aren’t doing anything to this end—the extension will only be on the southern end.



South end of the station, inbound side (towards Shibuya). Platform is structurally complete, but they still have to install the decorative elements and complete the electrical, HVAC, etc. in the ceiling.



Outbound side towards Motomachi–Chūkagai

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Old June 22nd, 2011, 11:45 AM   #2664
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Minato Mirai Line platform extension construction updates: Part 2

Next, Bashamichi Station and Nihon-Ōdōri Station.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Bashamichi Station, northwest end (closer to Yokohama and Shibuya), outbound side (for Motomachi–Chūkagai). The Bashamichi Station platforms will be extended at this end, and look structurally complete for the most part.



Inbound side (for Shibuya). This side looks especially narrow, but the walls are just temporary... They’re probably doing work behind them, as it appears that this space originally held electrical equipment.



There are these temporary panels closing off a section of the existing platform at the Yokohama end. This could just be materials and equipment storage, or perhaps they are doing something more, such as moving the electrical equipment into this space.



Next, Nihon-Ōdōri Station, northwest end (closer to Yokohama). They are extending the platforms behind the fencing at the end of the current platforms.



At the southeast end, they are constructing the majority of the platform extension. The platform is structurally complete. Considering the tubing sticking out of the platform and the narrow width, it almost seems like they are planning to install platform doors or something. Given that they haven’t done a similar thing on the other platforms, many of which are quite narrow as well, I’m not sure what to make of this just yet. However, the load-bearing wall running down the middle effectively divides the platform in two, so maybe it is platform doors (?).



Other side

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Old June 22nd, 2011, 11:46 AM   #2665
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Minato Mirai Line platform extension construction updates: Part 3

Last is Motomachi–Chūkagai Station.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

At the stub end of the station, north side of the platform. The stairwell adjacent to the escalator at this location is in the process of being removed behind these white panels.



Looking behind the white panels on the left in the photo above, we can see the platform extension and a new set of stairs being constructed to the right of the buffer stop. From this, it’s clear that there isn’t quite two-carlengths of space here, which is why they’re also expanding the northwest end of the station closer to Yokohama Station.



On the other side of the island platform, there doesn’t yet seem to be much movement. However, there is a temporary stairwell at this end on a secondary access route that branches off from the elevator in the distance ahead.



Closer to the end of the platform. There’s sufficient width in the passage leading to the escalator, so if they remove this fencing and the wall, they should be able to gain the necessary platform length without major work.



Temporary stairwell. Curious what the shutter is for... Perhaps for storing equipment and materials in a space behind the elevator.



Proceeding up these stairs a bit takes us to the permanent replacement stairwell (at least the part of it that’s already complete). They will just knock down the panels straight ahead of us when the last section leading to the underground platforms is complete.



The completed section of the replacement stairwell, from the station concourse.



Northwest end of the station. They’ve extended as much as they can at this end without messing with the double crossover.

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Old June 22nd, 2011, 11:49 AM   #2666
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JR Nara Station elevation: Part 1

A short tour of the recently-elevated JR Nara Station.

First, a cab view on a JR Nara Line train approaching Nara Station on the new elevated approach from the north. The aerial structure begins as a natural continuation of the embankment on the south bank of the Saho River (0:12). The Yamatoji Line / Nara Line was elevated in 2008 (four tracks and two island platforms), while the Sakurai Line was elevated in 2010 (one track and one island platform), producing the final configuration of five tracks and three island platforms. While the work is already complete, we can pick up a few details about the process of elevating the tracks, including temporary use of what is now a center pocket track to turn back and store trains (judging by the use of ballast for the southbound track compared to slab for the northbound track at 0:20) and the partial elevation after 2008 that required a separate, now-removed track into the left side of the center platform (judging from the remaining slab section and sleepers at 1:15).


Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

Next, some pics:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Track layout at the north end of the station, closer to Narayama. Tracks 3 through 5 (leftmost) connect directly to the pocket track further down, as well as the inbound track to Kyōto. Tracks 1 (rightmost) through four are directly connected to the outbound track leading into the station.



South end of the station, closer to Kōriyama and Kyōbate. The aerial structure veering off to the left is the Sakurai Line (Man’yō Mahoroba Line) while the one to the right is the Yamatoji Line (for Ōsaka). Just like the Narayama end, there is a pocket track to hold trains between the inbound and outbound tracks of the Yamatoji Line. Tracks 1 (left) through 4 can all access the Ōsaka-bound track, Tracks 3 and 4 can access the pocket track, and Tracks 3 through 5 connect to the Yamatoji Line track approaching the station. In total, there are four double crossovers at the station (two at either end).



Stairwell on platforms 4 and 5, Ōsaka end.
The décor of the platform facilities is pretty basic, using all white, but the translucent railings make it a little bit more interesting.



Single escalator is shifted to the Platform 5 (left) side, while the elevator is shifted to the Platform 4 side.



Moving to the Narayama end, there is a joint stairwell and single escalator. Basic design of vertical circulation for the platform is elevator in center, with escalators and stairs at the outer ends of the platform. However, the Ōsaka end splits the stairwell and escalator, probably due to space constraints.



Waiting room. While service on the Nara Line is frequent, the single-track sections of the line result in some gaps in service, making a waiting room a valuable amenity.

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Old June 22nd, 2011, 11:50 AM   #2667
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JR Nara Station elevation: Part 2

Second set, on the station concourse:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

The historic station building, its functions now replaced with a new building as part of the elevation of the tracks, has been converted to the main tourist information center for Nara. Thankfully, they preserved the building and are putting it to good use.



Ground level, north end closer to Narayama Station. The station was elevated in two phases, with the four tracks of the Yamatoji Line entering service simultaneously in 2008, followed by the single track for the Sakurai Line in 2010. As elevation projects require construction of temporary tracks, there is now a gap between the old station building and the elevated tracks, formerly used as the temporary Sakurai Line track. Right now, it’s being used as a small yard and staging area.



Looking at the opposite end, towards Kōriyama and Kyōbate. The empty space here is a little wider, as this used to be the location of the ground-level Sakurai Line platforms. With the completion of the tracks and station building, they will now be making improvements to the remaining areas surrounding the station.



Station concourse features a lot of wood, and the pedestal / roof design is supposed to be reminiscent of temple architecture.



One ticketing entrance, two arrays, with overhead departure boards. Aside from the wood, a pretty typical design for the faregate area.



Fare map and TVMs. There are 6 regular TVMs plus 1 limited express TVM for a total of 7, maybe a bit more than usual since Nara is a major tourist destination, and a larger share of the station’s users probably need to purchase tickets this way.



The concourse is quite large for the size of the station, but this likely has to do with construction constraints. Given the need to adequately serve passengers changing lines, they may have designed the concourse with a fair bit of additional circulation space.



Vertical circulation. The elevators are two-sided, making it easy to step in and step out without having to reverse direction. There’s lots of glass on both sides of the station, bringing in a fair amount of natural light.

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Old June 22nd, 2011, 11:51 AM   #2668
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JR Nara Station elevation: Part 3

Second set, on the station concourse:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

JR West assigns specific colors to each of the lines in its urban network in the Kansai region. These routes use the respective line colors (blue for the Ōsaka Higashi Line, green for the Yamatoji Line, and brown for the Nara Line), with different stopping patterns indicated using various tints of the line color. The top half shows the direct rapid through-service with the Ōsaka Higashi Line, followed by the Yamatoji rapid, the rapid / regional rapid, and the local service. The bottom half is the Nara Line, showing the Miyakoji rapid, the rapid, the regional rapid, and the local. A bit interesting to note is that the local on the Yamatoji Line is shown as kaku-eki teisha (各駅停車) while the local on the Nara Line is shown simply as futsū (普通).



Timetables:
(left) Yamatoji Line for Hōryūji, Ōji, Tennōji, JR Namba, and Ōsaka
(right, left half) Yamatoji Line for Kizu and Kamo and Kansai Line for Iga Ueno and Kameyama
(right, right half) Nara Line for Uji and Kyōto and Gakken Toshi Line for Shijōnawate

Limited-stop trains are in the respective line color, while local trains are in black, with additional differences handled by boxes and fills. Mostly pattern schedules, particularly during the midday, with some lines on 15- and 30-minute cycles.



LED departure boards inside the station concourse. Four rows each, probably to handle the schedule complexities during the peak hours.
(left) Yamatoji Line for Kamo
(left center) Yamatoji Line for Tennōji
(right center) Nara Line
(right) Sakurai Line



Platform LED departure board, Platforms 4 / 5. These are single boards for both platforms, similar to those at JR Ōsaka Station.
11:20 Yamatoji Line Yamatoji rapid for Kamo, Platform 5
11:23 Nara Line local for Kyōto, Platform 4
== Yamatoji Line Yamatoji rapid terminating at station, Platform 5
11:39 Nara Line Miyakoji rapid for Kyōto, Platform 4



Track 2 is served by platforms on both sides, so you can board Yamatoji Line trains on Track 2 from Platform 1, improving convenience for transferring between the Yamatoji Line and Sakurai Line. As a result, this display is a little unusual, as it’s signed for Platform 1 but displays information for both Track 1 and Track 2.
11:38 Man’yō Mahoroba Line for Wakayama, Track 1
12:09 Man’yō Mahoroba Line for Sakurai, Track 1
11:47 Yamatoji Line Yamatoji rapid for Ōsaka, Track 2



Cross-platform transfer between Track 1 (right) and Track 2

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Old June 22nd, 2011, 05:51 PM   #2669
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With the Tokyu Toyoko line getting longer platforms to handle 10 car trains from the Fukutoshin line, I've been wondering some things... I've noticed many stations have started the process already-- Major stations like Naka-Meguro, Jiyu ga Oka, Musashi Kosugi, and Kikuna... Then I thought "maybe the through-servicing will just be Rapid Express only, since these are the stops those trains make.. But then I noticed today that Tamagawa station's northern end suddenly has a lot of stored equipment and roping next to the platforms, a sure sign that construction is going to happen soon. So today I made it a point to see where the construction would need to happen in Hiyoshi station, my local stop on the line, and now a major stop since the Meguro line and Green Line subway starts here. I have yet to see anything in the way of construction here though. Since the station is literally in the sub-basement of a shopping complex, there will probably need to be some major work done since there's walls at both ends of the platform that would need to be knocked down...

Also the platform screen doors subject; there are those doors in the Fukutoshin subway, so of course anything running through there needs to adhere to that design--no worries there. Could use them in the mornings at stations like Jiyugaoka and Naka-Meguro where it's majorly crowded and narrow. But its rather expensive too... Guess we'll see...
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 07:30 PM   #2670
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Quote:
A bit interesting to note is that the local on the Yamatoji Line is shown as kaku-eki teisha (各駅停車) while the local on the Nara Line is shown simply as futsū (普通).
An interesting observation there. I have seen discussion of the terminology of railway services in books, and one explanation has it this way (not necessarily specific to JR West's usage):

"Futsu" describes the overall service of a stopping train including rolling stock, fare structure, etc, while "kaku-eki teisha" merely describes the service pattern. For example, Kodama services on the Tokaido/Sanyo Shinkansen are "kaku-eki teisha" but are definitely not "futsu", as they are categorized as shinkansen (with shinkansen fares)- even the English announcements declare the train as a "superexpress".
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 09:34 PM   #2671
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I never really thought about it, but that explanation seems to make sense as a general rule.

I just checked JR West's online timetables, and they have futsū for both the Yamatoji Line and Nara Line.
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Old June 22nd, 2011, 09:40 PM   #2672
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
I've noticed many stations have started the process already-- Major stations like Naka-Meguro, Jiyu ga Oka, Musashi Kosugi, and Kikuna... Then I thought "maybe the through-servicing will just be Rapid Express only, since these are the stops those trains make.. But then I noticed today that Tamagawa station's northern end suddenly has a lot of stored equipment and roping next to the platforms, a sure sign that construction is going to happen soon.
They are doing it for all services faster than a local.


Source: http://vvvf136.blog99.fc2.com/

So:
Naka-Meguro
Gakugei Daigaku
Jiyūgaoka
Den'en Chōfu
Tamagawa
Musashi Kosugi
Hiyoshi
Tsunashima
Kikuna
Yokohama
Minato Mirai
Bashamichi
Nihon-Ōdōri
Motomachi‒Chūkagai
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 07:10 AM   #2673
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Tōkyō, the megacity that works
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110622...siacitiestokyo

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TOKYO — On a satellite image of the Earth at night, there is no brighter spot. Greater Tokyo, home to an astonishing 35 million people, is by far the biggest urban area on the planet.

The most amazing thing about it, say its many fans, is that it works.

Although Tokyo dwarfs the other top megacities of Mumbai, Mexico City, Sao Paulo and New York, it has less air pollution, noise, traffic jams, litter or crime, lots of green space and a humming public transport system.

American writer Donald Richie, who first came to Tokyo in 1947 and recently published the coffee table book "Tokyo Megacity", has dubbed Japan's massive capital and primary city the "livable megalopolis".

Many visitors marvel at the politeness and civility that, along with the nation's wealth, have helped Tokyo avoid the pitfalls of other big cities that have become polluted, noisy and dangerous urban nightmares.

Amid the neon-lit street canyons, thoroughfares for millions every day, small shrines and quaint neighbourhoods survive as oases of tranquility, largely shielded from blights such as graffiti and vandalism.

Writing for the Los Angeles Times, a correspondent recently celebrated the ballet-like choreography of up to 2,500 people moving across Shibuya's massive "scramble crossing" every time the pedestrian lights turn green.

In the fashion centre, and elsewhere in the pulsating megacity, "despite so much humanity inhabiting such a confined space, there's rarely a collision, sharp elbow, shoulder-brush or unkind word," wrote the correspondent, John M. Glionna.

On Tokyo's noodle bowl of subways, a rapid and efficient system with a smartcard pay system, most commuters respect rules of courtesy, switch their mobile phones to silent and take their rubbish home to recycle it.

Streets are rarely choked with cars because most city-dwellers don't have one, in part because they would have to own or rent a permanent parking space for it, in part because buses, trains or bicycles are viable alternatives.

Despite its best-in-class sense of order, Tokyo also has a buzz and a pulse, with cutting-edge and quirky youth fashion, design, architecture and cultural offerings that keep setting trends in Asia and beyond.

France's Michelin Guide has crowned Tokyo as the world's culinary capital, awarding it the highest number of stars, more than Paris.

Tokyo may have had its heyday when Japan was Asia's economic top dog in the 1980s and early 90s, but much of the look has survived -- as have the famously astronomical prices that keep scaring off many would-be visitors.

Japan's capital, where a watermelon can famously cost $20 or more, was the world's most expensive city for expatriates in 2010 with the exception of exorbitant Luanda in oil-rich Angola, according to consultancy Mercer.

On Mercer's Quality of Living Survey, Tokyo was number two in Asia after the city-state of Singapore -- but only number 40 worldwide, beaten mostly by smaller European and American cities, from Vienna to Vancouver.

However, trendy London-based current affairs, lifestyle and design magazine Monocle begs to differ -- last week it ranked post-March 11 disaster Tokyo as the ninth most livable city in the world , and a few years ago it placed it at number three.

"You just look at Tokyo and think it shouldn't work with so many people living together, but it does," said the magazine's Asia bureau chief Fiona Wilson. "It would be a problem everywhere else.

"It's not just the great trains. It goes beyond the functionality. It's the service, the food, the restaurants, the shopping. It's all great."

Another fan and Tokyoite, Colin Liddell, who writes for city magazine Metropolis, said the city works because of the "texture of Japanese culture", including a tendency to seek harmony not conflict.

"Ideas that would be seen as antithetical in the West can peacefully coexist in Japan," he said. "Someone in a mink coat may have no problems getting along with radical vegans and animal rights activists.

"It?s just a different intellectual ecosystem and concept of each other that magically defuses the conflicts we find unavoidable in the west."

Of course, not everyone loves Tokyo.

For some the endless city brings a sense of alienation and loneliness, captured, albeit from a foreigner's perspective, as the backdrop to the Sofia Coppola movie "Lost in Translation".

Many abhor the over-the-horizon sprawl that spreads across the Kanto plain and its often drab "Legoland"-style residential architecture.

Then there are the rivers and canals, including one at Tokyo's historic centre at Nihonbashi, that have been concreted and roofed by expressways.

There is a good reason for the drabness of much of Tokyo.

Over the past century, much of the city has been destroyed twice -- once in the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake and again in the 1944-45 firebombings.

The March 11 earthquake and tsunami catastrophe that devastated northeast Japan once more badly rattled Tokyo, forcing hundreds of thousands to spend the night at work or walk home when the trains stopped.

The disaster, which caused several deaths, damaged buildings, emptied convenience stores and led to power outtages in Tokyo, also served as a reminder that the spectre of another "Big One" looms over the city.

This summer will be steamier than most for Tokyo's residents amid a power saving campaign that will see companies cut back on air-conditioning.

Love it or hate it, almost everyone marvels at the scale of Tokyo.

If it were a country, it would rank at about number 35 in population terms.

At the heart of it all is the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, which governs Tokyo proper with 13 million people from a skyscraper-scale town hall with a annual budget that, according to the Japan Times, equals Saudi Arabia's.

With over half the world's population now living in cities, Tokyo believes it has lessons for a crowded planet.

Last year Tokyo launched Asia's first carbon trading initiative, and the city government has pledged to cut Tokyo's greenhouse emissions by 25 percent by 2020 from 2000 levels.

Under a 10-year plan, Tokyo aims to create 1,000 hectares of new green area and plant one million roadside trees, improve air quality and aggressively push solar energy and hybrid and electric cars.
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 09:34 AM   #2674
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Construction resumes on Sendai Municipal Subway Tōzai Line
http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2011/06/20110621t11026.htm

Quote:
On June 20, work resumed on a portion of the Sendai Municipal Subway Tōzai Line (Dōbutsu Kōen – Arai, 14.4 km), where construction efforts had been suspended for about three months due to the effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake.

Work resumed on the eight sections being handled by the Sendai City Transportation Bureau and the Japan Railway Construction, Transport and Technology Agency (JRTT), including sections near Shin-Tera and Dōbutsu Kōen (Zoological Park) Stations. Among the eight sections, work at a portion of the future Arai Yard resumed at 8:00 am, with approx. 80 construction workers manipulating over 10 pieces of heavy equipment to build up the base of the yard with three-meter tall fill.

Ida Masato, field engineer for a joint venture (JV) comprised of Taisei Corporation and other firms, remarked, “Immediately after the quake, we were involved in getting the affected areas back up on their feet, but starting today, we’ll be refocusing our attention on getting the subway completed as quickly as possible.”

The earthquake caused damage to tunnel materials, sewer pipes, and other facilities on various sections of the Tōzai Line. The Sendai City Transportation Bureau will resume construction work at the remaining 13 sections of the line by August.

Spokespersons for the Tōzai Line Construction Department say, “While the earthquake caused a three-month hiatus in work, we hope to continue work without a change to the original FY2015 opening by considering other construction methods or taking other measures.”

Work begins again on construction of the Municipal Subway Tōzai Line after a three-month suspension (June 20; Arai, Wakabayashi Ward, Sendai City).
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 02:25 PM   #2675
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Originally Posted by quashlo
As a recent immigrant (back) into the metropolis, I can tell you there's nothing more awe-inspiring than waking up everyday, commuting over 3 train lines, and 40kms, and just seeing it plain work. Even New York City would have trouble moving people on the scale that the public transport systems here do-- and no one company is fully in charge--they all must work together to move people here. Could you imagine Amtrak interlining with the NYC subway? Physically impossible, but it would solve lots of issues there if it could be done.

I don't have any plans to leave here anytime soon; Yokohama is my home now, the Metropolis is my playground!
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Old June 23rd, 2011, 08:19 PM   #2676
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Judging from the scenes, the woman in that video lives in Hiyoshi and takes the Tōyoko Line.

The video also touched on the bikes, which often get neglected in discussions about Tōkyō's transport because the rail system kind of overshadows everything. Biking is a really popular means of travel, too, and you can find bikes parked everywhere, especially around train stations. Perhaps the other things to take away from the video are the limitations on parking and (not mentioned specifically in the video) tolled roads. I don't cover roads here since this is mostly a transit board, but the Metropolitan Expressway and other toll roads form a pretty awesome network in their own right.
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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:42 AM   #2677
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JR Hanwa Line construction updates

Next, some video updates (2011.05.07) on various construction work on the JR Hanwa Line in the Kansai area.
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

First, a tour of recently-elevated sections from Bishōen to Sugimotochō. The inbound (for Tennōji) track was elevated in 2004, while the outbound track (for Kansai Airport and Wakayama) was elevated in 2006. All stations on this section are two tracks + side platforms except for Tsurugaoka, which is two tracks + two island platforms to allow for passing. Interesting to note is how “natural” the Sugimotochō approach looks… Would be hard to tell that this was not originally designed as elevated without already knowing so.



Next, the elevation work at Higashi-Kishiwada Station, where work is ongoing to elevate about 2.1 km of the line (AG posted about this a while ago). Completion is scheduled for 2016. This is the northeast end, closer to Shimomatsu. Currently, they are constructing the temporary inbound track on the sections where they have enough clearance, although the temporary track gets quite close to the existing track around 0:10. Approaching the station, we can also see the temporary platform (an island platform, as Higashi-Kishiwada is a four-track station) and new platform bridge to get passengers across. We can tell from this that it’s going to be a typical one track at a time approach, so perhaps they will try to reuse the existing inbound track for outbound trains once the temporary inbound track is complete.



Departing the station towards Higashi-Kaizuka. Here on the southwest end of the station, they’re preparing the space for the temporary track. They haven’t laid anything yet, but we can see the temporary overhead supports already in place and sections of rail waiting to be laid.

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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:43 AM   #2678
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Nankai Main Line construction updates: Part 1

Next, video updates (2011.05.07) on various construction works on the Nankai Main Line.
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

First up is the elevation of the line around Izumi Ōtsu Station.

Inbound direction (for Namba), from Tadaoka to Izumi Ōtsu.
The approach into Izumi Ōtsu starts off with a short bridge across the Ōtsu River. The track in this area is already on a bit of an embankment, so it works out well. Around 0:55, we can see just how curvy and steep the temporary tracks needed to be designed for the river crossing, but because of that, the future tracks will be clean and straight. They’ve already removed the temporary inbound track after elevating the inbound track in 2008, and are in the process of constructing the elevated outbound (for Wakayama-shi) track. They have yet to start major work on the overhead though, which should come after the trackwork. There’s also quite a bit of cant on this section, as the curve into Izumi Ōtsu is fairly sharp. This will also be another four-track station when complete.



From Izumi Ōtsu to Kita-Sukematsu. As we leave Izumi Ōtsu, we can see more trackwork. It appears they will have a single crossover here, already partially installed, from the outbound track to the inbound track. Interesting to note is the differences in the track design between the south approach into the station (which used ladder track) and the north approach (an all-concrete design). Matsunohama Station is also being elevated as part of this project. Once the track is complete, they should begin work on the overhead.

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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:43 AM   #2679
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Nankai Main Line construction updates: Part 2

Next, a few photos at Izumi Ōtsu:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Northeast end, closer to Namba. The new island platform and canopy at right look largely complete, but they are likely still working on the tracks based on the progress on the track sections leading into and out of the station. Escalator / elevator installation and catenary / electrical systems should follow. With the slanted protective fencing, they’ve obviously tried to maximize as much as space as they can for construction without interfering with regular service.



Layout of the platform will be mostly identical to the already in-service elevated inbound platform. Escalators will be in the center, while the waiting room and elevator will be further down.



Southwest end of the station (closer to Wakayama-shi). Similar situation as at the other end. Most of the vertical circulation and platform facilities are concentrated in the central section of the platform, so the ends are free of obstructions.



Moving to the already-completed inbound platform… The outbound platform should look pretty much the same. The partitions around the escalator opening are thin and clear… I wouldn’t mind them using more of this style at other stations. This is by no means a narrow platform compared to other stations, but it does maximize the platform widths around the escalator and is aesthetically nice.



Stairwell. Simple, but I like it.

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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:44 AM   #2680
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Nankai Main Line construction updates: Part 3

Last part is a check of another elevation project on the Nankai Main Line, between Kita-Sukematsu and Hamadera Kōen.

First is an inbound cab view from Kita-Sukematsu to Takaishi. On this section, they are working on completing a temporary outbound track (they already completed a temporary inbound track), approximately 1.5 trackwidths from the original alignment. As we approach Takaishi, a four-track station, we can see the center tracks bow out quite substantially to secure as much clearance as possible to build the elevated tracks and stations.



Next, Takaishi to Hagoromo. Approaching Hagoromo, we can see the temporary track for the Takashinohama Line slip in on the left side. The Takashinohama Line is only directly connected to the inbound track, but this was the original configuration, even before work began. They’ve obviously tried to optimize space utilization, and the Takashinohama Line platform is really just a small pocket / cut in one side of the Nankai Main Line inbound platform. As at Takaishi, the tracks bow out substantially here, likely to make room for the future elevated Takashinohama Line track.



Hagoromo to Hamadera Kōen. The temporary track ends just a little past Hagoromo, which, when also considering the close distance to Hamadera Kōen Station, means we should see a pretty steep grade on the approach. Hamadera Kōen is supposed to be elevated as well, but it appears that they will likely build a temporary approach here, as the completion dates for either section are quite different. In this regard, it’s somewhat similar to the Seibu Ikebukuro Line elevation near Shakujii Kōen in Tōkyō, where sections of the line are being elevated in phases.

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