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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:45 AM   #2681
quashlo
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Kintetsu Nara Line construction update

A couple cab videos (2011.05.08) covering the elevation of the Kintetsu Nara Line between Yaenosato and Hyōtan-yama in Higashi-Ōsaka City.
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

First, is outbound direction (for Kintetsu Nara), from Yaenosato to Hyōtan’yama.

The Yaenosato – Kawachi Hanazono section is being built with enough clearance from the existing track that no temporary tracks are needed. The Kawachi Hanazono – Hyōtan-yama section, however, requires temporary tracks. The video starts off on the already-elevated section of the line, and the connection with the newly-elevated outbound track. The curves here are sharp right now, and there’s a kink in the track around 0:20, but we can see that the track design changes from ballast with concrete sleepers to an all-concrete design at around 0:25, suggesting that the current alignment is only temporary. They’ll probably smooth out the curves and kink after they remove the ground-level tracks. On the kink section, we can also see cables wrapped around the base of the catenary poles, but this should be improved once they realign the tracks.

After Kawachi Hanazono, the aerial structure shifts over to the right one trackwidth or so (2:50), as this section requires temporary tracks due to space constraints.

Higashi-Hanazono will be a four-track station, but the elevated platforms will be shifted about 200 m east from the current location of the temporary ground-level platforms. The other constraint at this location is the need to provide access to a nearby car yard (5:05), resulting in the complex junction just east of the station. It looks like the final configuration will require inbound trains heading to the inbound track from the yard to cross over the outbound track, but the bigger question is how they will build the elevated inbound track and platform, as there as already a track to the right that comes down to ground level and connects to the ground-level inbound track. They could build the elevated platform and tracks where it doesn’t interfere with this ramp down, or they could build one of the elevated tracks first, remove the ramp down, then build the final elevated track in its place. It looks like they took care to design enough clearance from the elevated outbound track, so maybe it won’t interfere at all.



The view from the ground-level inbound track. This project has quite a bit more space to work with than other ongoing grade sep projects, but still quite interesting, particularly with the need to provide yard access east of Higashi-Hanazono. Hard to see much behind the piles and fencing, but here and there we can see the progress being made on the elevated inbound track. As we climb the ramp up to the existing aerial structure at the end of the video, we can see to our right the former ramp down to the temporary outbound track, still remaining and probably used for equipment access and materials transport.

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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:46 AM   #2682
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Keihan Main Line construction update: Part 1

Update (2011.05.08) on the elevation of the Keihan Main Line at Yodo Station. The inbound track was actually elevated on 2011.05.28, so I’m already late, but here’s the situation before then… I’ll do another set for the post-elevation.

First, some videos:
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

Inbound track (towards Kyōto Demachiyanagi).
At the beginning, we can see the elevated inbound track built parallel to the already-completed elevated outbound (for Ōsaka Yodoyabashi) track. At 0:08, we also see a partially complete track connection to the train yard on our left—they’ll finish this when they do the switchout. This elevated inbound track isn’t the final design, though, and starting at around 0:25, the rebar sticking out and lack of a soundwall indicate they plan on doing some more work on this even after temporary elevation. At 1:37, for example, we can clearly see the full extent of the section of aerial structure to be added on the outside. The Kyōto end of the new aerial structure is the final design, though, as there was enough clearance to build it without needing to do additional modifications after removal of all the ground-level tracks.



Outbound track (towards Ōsaka Yodoyabashi). This track is already elevated, so we get a completely different perspective on the progress of the project. We can see that the elevated inbound track to out right is largely complete, with catenary installed—we are now just waiting until the switchout. As we approach Yodo Station at 0:45, we can see they’re laying the outside track (currently holding a small construction truck). The asymmetrical canopy design is a bit jarring, but it appears they have a bit more to add to it on the inbound-track side.

As we depart Yodo at 2:05,we can see half of a double-crossover that is being built for the inbound track, just next to the existing crossover on the outbound track. Looks like this station will have four double crossovers when complete (!), but perhaps necessary from a flexibility standpoint, as the station does see a lot of passengers, particularly during horse racing events at the nearby Kyōto Racecourse. Passing these double crossovers, the track switches to ballast design, so we know they’re planning to adjust the alignment a bit later.

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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:48 AM   #2683
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Keihan Main Line construction update: Part 2

Next, some photos.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Northeast end of the station, closer to Kyōto. We can see work being done on laying the outside inbound track.



The Kyōto end of the inbound platform. The other side is sealed off by panels, so it’s clear that they will do a partial opening (only one track) until the second track and other facilities can be completed. The stairwell visible in this photo is for the special exit on event days at the racecourse. Other than that, we can also see a future signboard, but not much else yet.



Central part of the inbound platform. This stairwell also leads to the special exit.



The southwest end, closer to Ōsaka. New stairwell at the very end and the adjacent escalators are mostly ready to go, in preparation for the opening just a few weeks later.



Space looks tightest at this end, with the track built as close as they can get to the edge of the structure (at least what’s built of it currently).



Next, down to the concourse…
Faregates are surrounded by temporary walls on the inbound side, and the concourse area beyond is fenced off for now. The orange fencing they can take down easily for the opening, but it appears that the last faregate is only one direction (exiting the station), and is missing a parallel machine adjacent to it, so that may take a little bit longer (this part of the station is where the aerial structure is only partially complete).



Inbound part of the concourse is mostly complete, just waiting for the opening day.



The special racecourse exit (this leads directly to the racecourse, crossing the adjacent road via a pedestrian bridge, so they actually close this on non-event days so as not to confuse passengers). The left side is the inbound side, currently covered up with temporary walls.



The special exit and regular exit are connected by this passage.



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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:48 AM   #2684
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Keihan Main Line construction update: Part 3

Last in the Keihan Main Line series is a photo set at Yawata-shi Station. As work at the adjacent Yodo Station progresses, the passing tracks at Yawata-shi Station will eventually no longer be needed. Keihan has already demolished the outbound passing track and installed barrier-free upgrades in its place.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Faregates (five-machine array—4 + 1 wheelchair). Love the atmosphere of this exit… Compact, but it has everything you need. There’s actually a small funicular out of this station operated by Keihan that takes you to a shrine on the top of a nearby mountain. Together with the barrier-free upgrades, they did an all-around renovation, and the interior looks a lot brighter and more modern. The yellow guidance tiles start from the gate at the left end, which opens onto the staffed counter.



From the faregates, looking at the stairs up to the outbound (towards Ōsaka) direction Platform 3 (at right). The first picture was taken from this stairwell. Inbound Platforms 1 and 2, as well as the elevators to both platforms are on the left. These must be some of the smallest LED boards I’ve seen.



Looking to the left at the elevator to Platform 3 and the underground passage to Platforms 1 and 2. Due to limited space, they have reused the existing underground passage, but installed and designed the escalator to serve both Platform 3 and the underground passage, using space formerly occupied by the now-removed second outbound track.



Elevator to Platforms 1 and 2. The existing stairwells on the left and the right are actually in the center of the inbound platform, so there was no room to simply install the elevator on the outside… Instead, they moved the walls of the stairwell in a bit (losing about half of the stairwell width at the bottom here) to give them enough clearance to install the elevator shaft.



Elevator view from platform level. They’ve obviously tried to maintain enough clearance with the platform edge at the right without narrowing the stairwells on the other side too much.



This station has its own special exit on the outbound platform, serving visitors heading to Iwashimizu Hachimangū Shrine. It’s normally closed.

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Old June 25th, 2011, 08:49 AM   #2685
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Hankyū Kyōto Line Rakusai-guchi Station construction update

Next, an update (2011.05.08) on Rakusai-guchi Station on the Hankyū Kyōto Line. This is a new station that opened in 2003, but is on a section of the line scheduled to be elevated. As a result, it opened with all-temporary facilities, although it’s technically already been eight years since the station has been in service.

First, a video:
Source: okirakugoraku on YouTube

Cab view on the outbound track (for Ōsaka Umeda). Like the Keihan Main Line, the formal direction naming is “reversed” for the Hankyū Kyōto Line, so inbound is actually for Kawaramachi in Kyōto.

We start off departing Katsura Station, where the track switchout point is only 200 meters or so south of the platforms. A little bit unusual, but the base of the wall on the approach is actually complete. The video is taken on temporary tracks, while off to the right behind the fencing they are constructing the aerial structure. Approaching Rakusai-guchi, the tracks bow out even further, so they’ve got quite a bit of space to work with. The temporary track ends shortly after Rakusai-guchi Station, so the future ramp down back to ground level should start immediately after leaving the station.



Next, some photos:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

A look at the temporary platforms. Pretty simple design, but still looking new after eight years. The inbound track on the opposite side is protected by some fencing as that side is where the construction is going on. We can also see how the catenary is single side-pole design with cantilever masts spanning both tracks in order not to interfere with the construction on the other side of the station.



Outbound platform. Bare-minimum three-gate array, located at the very end of the platform, with a long slope up to platform height. To the left of the faregates is one of the new interphone assistance units that I believe Hankyū has been installing throughout the system.



Outbound-side station “building”, if you can even call it that. Nothing special here, as there’s no construction on this side.



Inbound-side station building. The exit and passageways have been designed and oriented not to interfere with the construction.



Inbound side faregates and slope

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Old June 25th, 2011, 10:55 AM   #2686
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Hankyū Settsu-shi Station: Part 1

A tour of Settsu-shi Station, which opened in March of last year on the Hankyū Kyōto Line. Like Rakusai-guchi, this station is on a part of the line slated to be elevated at some point, so the station facilities are somewhat temporary, but still designed to withstand use for some amount of time.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Outbound faregates. Three-gate array (like Rakusai-guchi Station) with two TVMs.



Inside the paid area. This is an at-grade station, so no need for vertical circulation… The platforms are just a few steps from the faregates. Unlike Rakusai-guchi, the barrier-free slope is outside of the station, so the entire station interior is level.



Platform view. Simple side-platform design, but as the station was built along the existing tracks, there’s actually a very gentle grade, captured in this photo. While there are separate exits from each platform (like Rakusai-guchi), there’s also an underground passage (including elevator for barrier-free access) connecting the two platforms, making access more convenient. They did not, however, put in escalators, which would have been added cost for a station that’s only temporary.



Stairwell to underground passage connecting the platforms. The openings face the faregates, reducing the crossing distance for passengers needing to get to the other side to board. Ideally, the elevator would have been placed here as well, but there’s simply no space.



Waiting room. To reduce the footprint of the station and improve space efficiency, the waiting room and vertical circulation is concentrated at the widened end of the station near the faregates.



Elevators are installed strictly as a barrier-free access to the underground passage. Elevators are dual-sided, opening on the other side on the underground level.



Further down the platform are the restrooms. A bit of an odd location, but they probably didn’t have much space inside the station building proper.



Timetable. This is a local-only station, with midday service of 6 tph, but there are some peculiarities, such as boxes to denote Sakai-suji Line through-services bound for Tengachaya (vs. non-boxed Umeda-bound services).



Transfer guide. As this is a local-only station, these are intended to provide some guidance to passengers on the quickest ways to the Tengachaya, Umeda, and Kyōto ends (i.e., where to transfer to what train, depending on which trains arrive at the station). Only about half of the trains go to Umeda, so this may be another impetus for this kind of guide. This is also a new station, in direct competition to the already well-established JR Settsu Station (about 600 m to the north), so Hankyū may have wanted to publicize the convenience of the station as much as possible.

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Old June 25th, 2011, 10:55 AM   #2687
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Hankyū Settsu-shi Station: Part 2

A tour of the facilities that helped the station earn a “carbon-neutral” designation.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

This LCD runs video describing the sustainable concepts incorporated into the station’s design.



Translucent canopy with solar cells, helping to reduce electrical load from station lighting during the daytime.



They have thin wires installed from the canopy down to platform height, allowing plants to grow from the ground up.



Should provide some decent shade once the plants actually grow out.



Small signs advertising the solar cells and LED lighting



LED lighting



Rainwater storage and recycling for the landscaping

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Old June 25th, 2011, 10:56 AM   #2688
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Kintetsu Kyōto Station construction update

Recent update (2011.06) on the ongoing construction at Kintetsu Kyōto Station. Kintetsu is building a large 368-room hotel (officially named the Hotel Kintetsu Kyōto Station) directly above its tracks and simultaneously implementing other improvements to its Kyōto terminal. Due to the limited space, the hotel itself is a narrow (10 m), but long (170 m) eight-story building targeting business users in the Kyōto area thanks to its awesome location at the hub of rail lines at Kyōto Station. The hotel will open on 2011.10.01 at a total construction cost of approx. ¥12 billion.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

Seems like just yesterday they were beginning this project, but they’ve made a lot of progress already. The scaffolding and coverings have been removed on two-thirds of the building, so we have a pretty good view of the (close to) finished product. Exterior is simple, but I like it.





Directly beneath the new hotel is the new track and platform constructed as part of the project. Despite being completely covered over, the open side lets in quite a lot of light.



We enter the Kintetsu station, where you can see the whole new platform and track under construction in plain view.



The hotel is not only super narrow, but curves in alignment with the platforms and tracks.



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Old June 27th, 2011, 06:50 AM   #2689
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Judging from the scenes, the woman in that video lives in Hiyoshi and takes the Tōyoko Line.

The video also touched on the bikes, which often get neglected in discussions about Tōkyō's transport because the rail system kind of overshadows everything. Biking is a really popular means of travel, too, and you can find bikes parked everywhere, especially around train stations. Perhaps the other things to take away from the video are the limitations on parking and (not mentioned specifically in the video) tolled roads. I don't cover roads here since this is mostly a transit board, but the Metropolitan Expressway and other toll roads form a pretty awesome network in their own right.
That is most definitely not only Hiyoshi Station, but the interview was done on the top level of Building #5 of Keio University where I sometimes grab coffee! One thing I can say though: they must have shot I live a 5 minute walk from the station itself so I hardly use my car; I'm thinking of selling it and either getting a light car (kei-jidosha--these cars use a 660cc engine and taxed very low) or Orix CarShare which recently placed cars throughout my neighborhood.

As far as bicycles go, I always ride my bike to grab groceries, and for trips 5km or less... There's a lot around Hiyoshi, including 2 shopping malls, a huge collection of shopping streets, and very bad traffic! Having a bicycle is necessary to life in Japan, and everyone rides them
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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:12 AM   #2690
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Wakayama Electric Railway Tama Train: Part 1

After Nankai Electric Railway abandoned the Kishikawa Line due to low ridership, ownership was eventually transferred over to Wakayama Electric Railway (100% owned by Okayama Electric Tramway). After only a few years, the Kishikawa Line is now a role model for turning around smaller local railways, and the idea of using animals as honorary stationmasters has caught on to similar systems throughout Japan. We now have dogs, rabbits, goats, even lobsters serving as stationmasters.

A tour of one of the Wakayama Electric Railway’s special units, the Tama Train honoring the famous feline stationmaster at Kishi Station.
Source: http://ameblo.jp/maimai24/

Ex-Nankai 22000 series, now redesignated as the Wakayama Electric Railway 2270 series.





Exterior features 101 caricatures of Tama.







If you can’t tell already, the design was the work of Mitooka Eiji.

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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:13 AM   #2691
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Wakayama Electric Railway Tama Train: Part 2

The ends feature whiskers, too.



Stopped at the recently-renovated Kishi Station, designed to look like a cat’s face from the front (hard to see from this angle, but you can see the pointy ears).









There’s also an Ichigo Densha (“Strawberry Train”) and an Omocha Densha (“Toy Train”).
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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:14 AM   #2692
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Wakayama Electric Railway Tama Train: Part 3

Next, the train interior:
Source: http://ameblo.jp/maimai24/



Color scheme draws from Tama’s fur (she’s a calico cat). Like in many other Mitooka works, wood is used in abundance.







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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:14 AM   #2693
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Wakayama Electric Railway Tama Train: Part 4



Even the strap handles are in three colors.



Cat seatbacks





Bench legs are designed to look like a cat’s legs

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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:15 AM   #2694
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Wakayama Electric Railway Tama Train: Part 5





Cat footprints on the car floor



Left is a small crib for infants, while the cage to the right is used when they bring Tama onto the train.





While the train is popular among tourists, like the other trains in the fleet it’s also used in regular service, and there is no fare surcharge.
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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:16 AM   #2695
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manaca takes off, exceeds expectations: Part 1
http://www.paymentnavi.com/paymentnews/14357.html

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manaca, the contactless IC card issued by Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu), Meitetsu Bus, Toyohashi Railroad, the Nagoya Municipal Transportation Bureau, the Nagoya Waterfront Rapid Railway, and the Nagoya Guideway Bus, began service on February 11, 2011. The card uses a prepaid system, and comes with an electronic money system from roll-out. We asked Nagoya Railroad, one of the operators introducing the card, about manaca and the status of various manaca-related campaigns.

Meitetsu Group issues 550,000 cards
Passengers earn mileage points by using the card on trains

In February 2006, Nagoya Railroad announced a joint effort with the Nagoya Municipal Transportation Bureau to introduce an IC farecard system. Afterwards, the railway established the Transpass IC Committee together with Nagoya Railroad group companies Meitetsu Bus and Toyohashi Railroad, as well as the Nagoya Municipal Transportation Bureau and its group companies. In addition to discussing the service and systems development needed to introduce an IC farecard system, the committee initiated development of station equipment including automatic faregates and ticket vending machines, rolling out the manaca service in February 2011.

The Nagoya area already has a pre-paid magnetic card known as Transpass. Nagoya Railroad also issues an SF Panorama Card, providing ¥5,600 of card value for only ¥5,000. As a result, manaca comes with a mileage point system that responds to how often card user takes buses and trains each month. For example, in the case of Nagoya Railroad, points are awarded based on how much money is spent on transit fares, as well as how often passengers ride. The accumulated points can be redeemed onto the manaca card and used for train and bus fares. The railway has actively promoted use of manaca, including a campaign that doubled the mileage points rewards during February and March. While redemption of mileage points has already begun, the campaign appears to have been a success, and the railway says that use of the IC card on public transit has exceeded expectations.

“Our group is aiming to issue 1,000,000 cards in one year, and we have already issued 550,000 cards. People are switching to the card faster than we expected. Seeing one customer after another place their card holders onto the faregates at Nagoya Station and Kanayama Station, we can tell that many of our customers are pleased with manaca,” says Oda Masatomo, project manager in the Projects Division, part of the Planning Department under Nagoya Railroad’s Railway Business Department.

The next steps include the start of transit farecard interoperability with JR Central’s TOICA card in spring 2012, followed by the start of transit farecard interoperability with JR East’s Suica card and electronic money interoperability with both TOICA and Suica in spring 2013.

Approx. 80 percent of cardholders use electronic money
Usage at affiliated stores exceeds expectations

In regards to the electronic money affiliated store networks, Nagoya Railroad and the Nagoya Municipal Transportation Bureau are each making efforts towards securing affiliated stores. Currently, Nagoya Railroad’s premier affiliated stores include Circle K Sunkus, Family Mart, BIC Camera, Meitetsu Department Stores, Seijō Ishii, and Doutor. While some cases involve the railroad expanding and managing affiliated stores on its own, others involve introductions through agreements with a credit card company. In addition, in regards to convenience stores, there are sometimes negotiations over which stores in which areas will be affiliated with certain transit operators. Nagoya Railroad is actively pursuing expansion of its affiliated store network, focusing on stores located around its rail network.

“While two months have passed since the start of service, approx. 80 percent of cardholders use the electronic money service, and usage has exceeded our original expectations. Before the rollout of manaca, there were other affiliated stores that had already introduced other electronic money systems or post-pay card systems, but manaca usage is especially high. Currently, manaca accounts for 10% of all settlements at affiliated stores we actively pursued on our own, with some affiliated stores reaching as high as 15%. We will now aim for 20% usage within a year, and hope to develop a win-win relationship with our affiliated stores introducing the manaca system,” says Yano Hiroshi, division chief in Nagoya Railroad’s Business Planning Department.

Currently, usage of manaca’s electronic money trends upwards the closer the store is to the station, partially due to the fact that manaca is a transit IC card. The average value of purchases using manaca is about ¥350 for convenience stores, about ¥1,500 for bookstores, and over ¥1,000 for drugstores.
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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:17 AM   #2696
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manaca takes off, exceeds expectations: Part 2
http://www.paymentnavi.com/paymentnews/14359.html

Quote:
Reward points for using electronic money
Capturing passengers through Meitetsu Tamarun points

As its own reward points service, Nagoya Railroad is offering the Meitetsu Tamarun points service. Passengers who tie their name to their manaca card or use a manaca commuter card can sign up for Meitetsu Tamarun membership, receiving Meitetsu Tamarun reward points each time they use the card’s electronic money feature at affiliated stores. The accumulated points can be exchanged for charge cards to charge value onto the manaca card, and can be used for transit farecard or electronic money payments. In addition, starting April 1, 2011, Meitetsu Tamarun points can now be exchanged for All Nippon Airways (ANA) miles and vice versa.

Currently, approx. 110,000 cardholders are members of Meitetsu Tamarun. Approx. 30% of cardholders who have tied their name to their manaca card have applied for the reward points service. While manaca cards cannot be charged with value until the cardholder has accumulated 1,000 Meitetsu Tamarun points, only a month after the rollout of the points service, some users have already redeemed their points. The results have exceeded Meitetsu’s expectations.

The railway sends e-mail magazines to Meitetsu Tamarun members once every two weeks, and Miyoshi Manabu, chief of Nagoya Railroad’s Business Planning Department, says, “Sending out too many e-mail magazines can turn our customers off to the service, so we’ve been careful to only send out issues during major milestones, such as the start of service at newly affiliated stores or for special campaigns.”

The cost to cover the redeemed points is covered by the affiliated stores. Meitetsu has formed agreements with the cardmaker and affiliated stores for “point” campaigns. For example, the railway joined with DyDo, rewarding 10 points to Meitetsu Tamarun members for every ¥100 spent using their manaca card to purchase drinks at vending machines. manaca usage during the campaign period was especially high.

Aiming for 200,000 Meitetsu Tamarun members in one year
3,000 electronic money affiliated stores is target

Within one year following the rollout of manaca’s electronic money service, Meitetsu is aiming to increase Meitetsu Tamarun membership to 200,000 users. While it’s only been two months since rollout, the railway says it’s already sensing a response from cardholders. The railway will now use the electronic money payment data to implement customer relationship management (CRM) efforts, such as providing information about stores where cardholders frequently use their cards. In addition, the railway has already introduced a security system for real estate properties using the card’s identification functions, and is considering additional options such as mobile FeliCa service or integrating the transit farecard use into the property security system.

Lastly, Yano recounted the railway’s upcoming efforts: “What’s important is increasing the number of visitors coming to affiliated stores, contributing to sales increases. Just saying that we’ve introduced an electronic money system and calling it ‘done’ is meaningless… We believe supporting the customers is our duty. Our first goal is to expand our affiliated store network to 3,000 stores within the year.”
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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:17 AM   #2697
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Yūrakuchō Line from Toyosu to Sumiyoshi would cost ¥90 billion to ¥110 billion
http://www.kensetsunews.com/article....=extra_pickups

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Tōkyō’s Kōtō Ward is moving forward with studies in preparation for the extension of the Yūrakuchō Subway Line. Currently, the Yūrakuchō Line connects Wakō City in Saitama Prefecture and Shin-Kiba in Kōtō Ward, but the Transport Policy Council has identified an extension of the line from Toyosu to Sumiyoshi. Kōtō Ward has estimated the total construction costs as about ¥90 billion to ¥110 billion, and in anticipation of the plan to move the Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market to Toyosu, has put its full weight behind getting the project started, initiating efforts to assemble funds for construction starting in FY2010.

In these latest studies, Kōtō Ward assumed a total extension length of 5.2 km and established Tōyōchō Station as an intermediate station connecting with the Tōzai Line. The study also envisions a scenario that builds two new stations, and officials will now incorporate high-level input from the perspective of the ward’s urban management policies and Tōkyō Metro’s mid- to long-term business plans to flesh out operations and facilities plans and ridership projections. Officials will also consider wider perspectives, such as securing redundancy in the event of earthquake damage or during service disruptions, in the debate.

The proposed extension was identified in the Transport Policy Council’s Report 18 as a line ideal for groundbreaking by 2015.

According to the proposed facilities plan, new stations are envisioned to be established between Toyosu Station and Tōyōchō Station and between Tōyōchō Station and Sumiyoshi Station. Including necessary work to connect the extension with existing lines at both Toyosu Station and Sumiyoshi Station, the estimated construction costs could reach as high as about ¥110 billion. Without establishment of new intermediate stations, the extension is estimated to cost approx. ¥90 billion

Officials are considering use of grant money from the Act on Enhancement of Convenience of Urban Railways to carry out the project, and envision a third-sector company serving as construction lead and Tōkyō Metro serving as the operator of the line.

Currently, the extension must clear a variety of constraining conditions, particularly with respect to rolling stock modifications and scheduling coordination, but after assuming an operating plan of eight roundtrips an hour during the peak hours, the study concluded that service between Toyosu and Sumiyoshi and between Sumiyoshi and Wakō-shi could pay off the costs of the extension in about 30 years.

The Yūrakuchō Line extension is under consideration as a leading project, and officials are also looking at other long-term extensions including the Oshiage – Kameari section of Subway Line 8 and the Oshiage – Matsudo section of Subway Line 11 (Hanzōmon Line).
Older Tōkyō MX news report (2010.12.11) about Adachi Ward residents pushing for the extension of the Yūrakuchō Line past Oshiage to Kameari and Noda City.

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Old June 27th, 2011, 09:36 AM   #2698
quashlo
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New Lotte CM on the Asakusa Line and Tōbu Isesaki Line

Following the previous Lotte CM featuring the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, we now have another in the same series, this time featuring stations on the Toei Asakusa Line and Tōbu Isesaki Line (transfer at Asakusa). The premise is a trip from the Tōkyō Tower (Daimon Station) to the new Tōkyō Sky Tree (Narihirabashi Station).

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Old June 27th, 2011, 10:48 AM   #2699
nouveau.ukiyo
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Manaca takes off, exceeds expectations: Part 1
http://www.paymentnavi.com/paymentnews/14357.html
I went to Nagoya in April and purchased a Manaca card; I thought it would function like Suica or PASMO so I was shocked when I realized I couldn't use Manaca at JR Central stations.
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Old June 27th, 2011, 10:59 AM   #2700
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Yūrakuchō Line from Toyosu to Sumiyoshi would cost ¥90 billion to ¥110 billion
http://www.kensetsunews.com/article....=extra_pickups
The article states that this line plus a Hanzomon Line extension are currently the leading Tokyo subway projects under consideration; how about the Asakusa bypass line? I thought there were some grand plans to build this line in order to connect Narita and Haneda airports in something like 40 mins via the Keisei line?
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