daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 17th, 2011, 06:52 AM   #2721
mike_feng90
Michael Feng
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 173
Likes (Received): 33

I'm going to Tokyo/Yokohama next month for about two weeks stay.
Where would be the best station to capture JR East Trains, such as the Yamanote Line, Chuo, Tokaido, N'EX, Keihin-Tohoku Line, etc? and most importantly the Shinkansen.. by camaera still photography?!

By ideal area means a place that is not as crowded and can easily get photos of trains at good angles? I have a lens that can zoom 55mm only.
mike_feng90 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 17th, 2011, 09:17 AM   #2722
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

I am only an amateur photographer, so I cannot comment much, but here's a stab at some possible spots. I suppose their usefulness to you will depend on what kind of photos you want to take.

- Around Nippori Station
Lots of JR trains (10 tracks), plus you can catch the occasional Skyliner or other Keisei trains. There's several overpasses above the tracks where you can shoot from. Never a dull moment, as there's plenty of train traffic:


Source: travelcecum on YouTube

- Ochanomizu. Pretty famous spot, looks like a model train set with the bridges, river, and three lines criss-crossing over and under.


Source: mogura72 on YouTube

Although I have to ask why you want to restrict yourself to JR… The private railway lines are interesting as well, and you can get more “unusual” shots like through-servicing trains from other companies, especially if you shoot at major junction stations:

Keisei Takasago:
Quadruple-track at-grade, plus one elevated track. Keisei (+ Hokusō + Shibayama Railway), Keikyū, and Toei Subway trains. Commuter EMUs plus Skyliner limited expresses.


Source: keikyu2100vvvf on YouTube

Yoyogi Uehara:
Quadruple-track elevated. Tōkyō Metro, Odakyū, and JR trains. Commuter EMUs plus Romancecar limited expresses.


Source: karibajct on YouTube

Other types of these junctions include Nakano (Tōkyō Metro, JR, and Tōyō Rapid trains) and Nerima (Seibu and Tōkyō Metro trains).

You can even get some really interesting photos just from street-level, like of the high Sōbu Line viaduct through Akihabara or any of the other elevated tracks. There’s also grade crossings (where the trains will pass just a few feet from you), like this one at Shinagawa that has Keikyū, Keisei, and Toei Subway trains. This location has sharp curves and a nice truss bridge over the JR tracks, plus it’s always busy with train traffic.


Source: keichansvideo on YouTube

If you want shots taken from the platforms, you can visit this railfan website:
http://syuto-tetsu.main.jp/

You pick the train operator, then the line, and it will give you all the stations, as well as a star-rating for how good it is for taking photos from the platform.

As for Shinkansen, I have heard Atami is best for Kantō area. There’s a tunnel at one end, it’s located on a curve, it’s only a two-track station, and only local trains stop, so you can get some pretty good shots and videos. There’s also Yūrakuchō Coline (有楽町コリーヌ)—a building near Yūrakuchō Station that has a rooftop garden where you can take photos of the Tōkaidō Shinkansen from the side—and Nippori (you can kill two birds with one stone by shooting JR commuter EMUs and Tōhoku Shinkansen here).

Perhaps k.k.jetcar or some others can chime in other favorite spots to take photos in the Kantō area.
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2011, 06:39 PM   #2723
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 769
Likes (Received): 460

Quote:
Originally Posted by mike_feng90 View Post
I'm going to Tokyo/Yokohama next month for about two weeks stay.
Where would be the best station to capture JR East Trains, such as the Yamanote Line, Chuo, Tokaido, N'EX, Keihin-Tohoku Line, etc? and most importantly the Shinkansen.. by camaera still photography?!

By ideal area means a place that is not as crowded and can easily get photos of trains at good angles? I have a lens that can zoom 55mm only.
When will you go? I live in Yokohama too, but I'm in America until 10 August. I'll be on holiday all August and I planned on doing a train photowalk too. I want to shoot some of the construction going on for the Toyoko Line and also get some shots of some lesser known lines like the Nambu, Yokohama, and Sotetsu lines...

Also my area is GREAT for trainspotting. I live in a very hilly part of Yokohama/Kawasaki and the best place to take pix of trains here is Musashi-Kosugi station area. There the JR Nanbu, Shonan-Shinjuku, and Keihin-Tohoku lines intersect with the Tokyu Toyoko and Meguro lines. Running parallel to the JR Shonan-Shinjuku line platform is the Tokaido Shinkansen. And there are lots of great areas to get shots from. Just up the road is the Tama river and all these lines have long bridges to cross over the river here-- you can stand off to the side and get great shots there. If I can find a high enough place in the area, you can look down on all 5 lines!
http://goo.gl/4oNs5

Speaking of-- I took the Keisei Skyliner from Nippori Station to Narita Airport 2 days ago. I wish I could've taken some interior shots as well, but I was running on 3 hours sleep, worked a half day, and was rushing to the airport to fly out to the States... So I fell asleep as soon as we crossed the Arakawa and didn't wake up until just before Terminal One.

Last edited by starrwulfe; July 17th, 2011 at 06:50 PM.
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2011, 11:39 PM   #2724
mike_feng90
Michael Feng
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 173
Likes (Received): 33

Hey, What a coincidence, I happen to be in Japan around the same time, arriving on August 9th in the evening from Canada. I will actually be in Japan between Aug.9-17, and Sept 1-4, so less than two weeks.

I'm definitely up for a train walk as I don't really know my way around Japan very much. I'm also looking into the other private companies such as Sotetsu, Keikyu, etc. so it sounds like a plan.

The Keisei Skyliner looks amazing btw.

Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
When will you go? I live in Yokohama too, but I'm in America until 10 August. I'll be on holiday all August and I planned on doing a train photowalk too. I want to shoot some of the construction going on for the Toyoko Line and also get some shots of some lesser known lines like the Nambu, Yokohama, and Sotetsu lines...

Also my area is GREAT for trainspotting. I live in a very hilly part of Yokohama/Kawasaki and the best place to take pix of trains here is Musashi-Kosugi station area. There the JR Nanbu, Shonan-Shinjuku, and Keihin-Tohoku lines intersect with the Tokyu Toyoko and Meguro lines. Running parallel to the JR Shonan-Shinjuku line platform is the Tokaido Shinkansen. And there are lots of great areas to get shots from. Just up the road is the Tama river and all these lines have long bridges to cross over the river here-- you can stand off to the side and get great shots there. If I can find a high enough place in the area, you can look down on all 5 lines!
http://goo.gl/4oNs5

Speaking of-- I took the Keisei Skyliner from Nippori Station to Narita Airport 2 days ago. I wish I could've taken some interior shots as well, but I was running on 3 hours sleep, worked a half day, and was rushing to the airport to fly out to the States... So I fell asleep as soon as we crossed the Arakawa and didn't wake up until just before Terminal One.
Also, thank you Quashlo for the suggestions and tips. I find these useful as each location and spot have different purposes.
mike_feng90 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 09:05 AM   #2725
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452

Quote:
Perhaps k.k.jetcar or some others can chime in other favorite spots to take photos in the Kantō area.
quashlo pretty much covered the biggies there. One of my favorites is Tobu Hikifune Station, which is the convergence of the Tobu Isezaki Line, Kameido Line, and Tokyo Metro Hanzomon line with considerable run through operation variety as well as simultaneous departures. You can also hop on an up Tobu Line train to the next station and see the almost complete Tokyo Sky Tree.

Front end view, you can see the more interesting up side trackwork at Hikifune, the cameraperson gets off at the next station to film the Sky Tree:


Another view:


Note-for those unfamiliar with the term, "up" and "down" refers to the direction of the train travel*, with up being in the direction of the main terminal or big city/capital, and down being away from same. The Japanese terms are nobori 上り and kudari 下り, respectively. Good to know these phrases when traveling on the big urban networks with many lines and multiple trackwork.

*this terminology is likely taken from British practice, which the Japanese adopted rather than the more confusing westbound/eastbound compass-based system used in the USA.

Last edited by k.k.jetcar; July 18th, 2011 at 09:11 AM.
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 09:48 AM   #2726
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Nankai 12000 series test ride

On 2011.07.04, Nankai Electric Railway offered a test ride of the new 12000 series Southern Premium to members of the public (36 people chosen by lottery, women or children only).

Some pics:
Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

The test train arrives at Nankai Namba Station in Ōsaka. The 12000 series units are four-cars, and in regular operation will run coupled at the north end with regular commuter EMUs like the 8000 series in eight-car formations.



The new Southern and the old Southern.



Members of the press and public wait on the platform to board the test ride train. Departure from Namba was at 13:27, bound for Hagurazaki in Izumi Sano City. The test ride was a full roundtrip, about 45 minutes each way. There was a 17-minute layover at Hagurazaki, which included the automatic rotation of the train seats to the northbound direction.



Train was signed for “test run”.



Inside the south end car (closer to Wakayama). The car also features lighting beneath the overhead racks, historically a hallmark of sorts for Nankai limited express sets.



Freshly installed information stickers on the underside of the tables. Towards the bottom, you can also see the umbrella holders.



On the gangway doors is a sticker for Sharp’s Plasmacluster air purification technology. This is the first private railway train in Japan to use the technology.



Unit 12001 returns to Namba. There were lots of railfans around, as this was likely one of the few times to see the unit operating separately, and not coupled with other cars. Service will start September 1.



Couple more, at Izumi Sano Station:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/tsuruatsu12/





asahi.com video (2011.07.04).

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 09:49 AM   #2727
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New Keihan CMs

Newest set in the latest series, featuring Hinata Chiho as the mascot character Kuzuha Keiko.


Source: kaeruiwa1963 on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 09:50 AM   #2728
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

JR East announces next Yamanote Line stations to receive platform doors
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2011/20110704.pdf

Quote:
At JR East, we are carrying out introduction of platform doors onto the Yamanote Line as a means to prevent passengers from falling off of the platforms or coming into contact with moving trains, but based on the state of trials at the two first-phase stations (Ebisu Station and Meguro Station), we will now begin major installation starting this fiscal year. This press release announces the stations to receive platform doors by FY2013.

Stations slated to receive platform doors by FY2013
FY2012: Ōsaki, Ikebukuro
FY2013: Ōtsuka, Sugamo, Komagome, Shin-Ōkubo, Mejiro, Takadanobaba, Tamachi

Implementation plan for FY2014 and beyond
We expect to complete all construction and installation by the end of FY2017, excepting the four stations where major upgrade works are foreseen at this time (Shinbashi, Shibuya, Shinjuku, and Tōkyō), but we will continue to consider any and all ways to accelerate this schedule.
Note: In regards to stations slated to receive platform doors in FY2014 and beyond, we will make announcements as construction plans are finalized.

Trial results at the two first-phase stations
*Current specifications at this time. The specifications may change based on the results of trials to come.
  • Improvements to the Train Automatic Stop Control (TASC) equipment
    We surveyed and analyzed train stop location data and improved the TASC equipment to increasestop precision, as well as conducted running tests of the new system.
  • High-performance platform door sensors (to be retained in final design)
    Performed effectively in ensuring safety. As some phenomenon occurred in some cases, leading to train delays, we have redesigned the sensor.
  • Emergency exit (to be retained in final design)
    Performed effectively in guiding passengers safely onto the platform in times of emergency, and will be retained in final design.
  • Improved visibility in wide-leaf doors at end cars
    In regards to the special wide-leaf doors for end cars, we will improve visibility by making portions transparent while still ensuring strength.
  • Installation of special lights to notify conductors that the train has stopped at the proper location
    We will install display lights to inform the conductor that the train has stopped at the appropriate location, preventing delays incurred when the train does not stop at the exact location.


Platform foundation works
Improvement of the construction method for platforms built on fill (e.g., portions of Ōtsuka and Komagome Stations)
We will continue carrying out improvements to the construction method to accelerate the completion schedule and reduce costs
Definitely some interesting things here. According to the press release, the trials at Ebisu and Meguro revealed some areas for improvement listed above. The platform reinforcement diagram also shows that this isn’t as simple as sticking some doors on the platform.

The other things that caught my eye:
They are only doing two stations this year. Granted, these are the only two stations on the Yamanote Line to have four tracks, but compared to 2013, the pace for 2012 seems a bit slow. It may just be that those two stations will take a long time.

Also, they mention four stations where large-scale improvement works are expected in the future (Shinbashi, Shibuya, Shinjuku, and Tōkyō). While there are projects going on at these stations, I’m just a little curious how the Yamanote Line platform door installations at some of these locations would be affected by these projects.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 10:01 AM   #2729
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Sky Access posts small ridership increase; calls for Tōkyō Station extension
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/homeguide/n...OYT8T00179.htm

Quote:
The Narita New Rapid Railway—the “Narita Sky Access”—linking central Tōkyō and Narita Airport will celebrate its one-year anniversary on July 17.

The line realized 30-minute travel times to the airport from central Tōkyō and hopes were high that it would be the “ace up the sleeve” in abolishing the image of Narita as an inconvenient airport for Tōkyō, but Keisei Electric Railway’s ridership posted only a minor increase.

The return of international flights to Haneda Airport was also a contributing factor, and more and more people are pushing for the line to be extended to Tōkyō Station to increase convenience.

For Narita Airport, located about 60 km away from Tōkyō Station, construction of a high-speed railway has been a long-awaited dream. Before the opening of the airport in 1978, there were plans for a Narita Shinkansen, but the plan was shelved after failing to receive support from local residents along the proposed route. In 1991, Keisei Electric Railway and JR began operating trains directly the airport’s terminal buildings, improving convenience, but either route still required 50 to 60 minutes.

The Narita Sky Access line opened in July of last year after constructing an approx. 19 km extension of the Hokusō Railway, with the target of 30 to 40-minute travel times from central Tōkyō. Journey times between Nippori and Narita Airport Terminal 2 Stations are now as fast as 36 minutes.

While passengers at Narita Airport last fiscal year trended flat, dropping one percent year-over-year to approx. 32.52 million, according to Keisei Electric Railway, ridership on the Nippori – Narita Airport section of its rail line was approx. 14.33 million, about a one-percent increase over the previous fiscal year but falling about seven percentage points lower than original estimates. In addition to the return of international flights to Haneda Airport in late October of last year, the elimination of many of Japan Airlines’ international flights as part of a business restructuring was also believed to have been a factor.

11 km tunnel, cost is a major issue
More and more locals are pushing to have trains run directly to Tōkyō Station, which boasts a high daily ridership potential, in order to further improve the convenience of the Sky Access line.

The background behind the story lies with a proposal announced by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) in April 2010 to bring the line directly into Tōkyō Station. The proposal calls for digging approx. 11 km of underground tunnel between Keisei Oshiage Station (Sumida Ward, Tōkyō Prefecture) and Keikyū Sengakuji Station (Minato Ward, Tōkyō Prefecture) and constructing a Shin-Tōkyō Station (“New Tōkyō Station”) en route in the vicinity of JR Tōkyō Station. If the Sky Access line passes along this route, the approx. 50-minute travel time to Tōkyō Station on JR’s Narita Express can be reduced to only 37 minutes.

At the May general meeting of the Narita Airport Strategic Committee, composed of Chamber of Commerce and Industry representatives from Narita City and local town council representatives, committee members decided on the Tōkyō Station extension as a goal of the committee’s lobbying efforts this fiscal year. Committee chairman Toyoda Ban says, “The extension would further improve convenience to Narita and abolish the reputation of Narita as a ‘distant’ airport.”

The biggest issue in realizing the extension is the massive construction cost: over ¥350 billion. The project envisions the national government, local jurisdictions, and the project executor each bearing one-third of the construction cost, but there are many obstacles remaining, including the high financial burden on local governments and close to ¥120 billion in costs that must be borne by the project executor.
Cab view from a Keisei 3050 series on the Keikyū Line from Yokohama to Kanagawa Shinmachi. These are typically used on Access limited express services between Haneda and Narita via the Sky Access Line, but this video is a bit unusual, as it’s running outside of typical haunts on the Keikyū Line, all the way down to Yokohama and Yokosuka. This was shot on March 12, one day after the earthquake. There was some disarray in deployment of rolling stock at the time, and Keikyū was forced to use this Keisei unit for one roundtrip to / from Misakiguchi.


Source: kawahama1107 on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 10:17 AM   #2730
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452


Thanks for posting that. That stretch of Keikyu is the most familiar for me (in fact I was born at a hospital just a couple hundred meters from Keikyu Kanagawa Station which is passed in the video). The 3050 seemed to be running with a flat wheelset.
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 11:03 AM   #2731
nouveau.ukiyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 25

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Note-for those unfamiliar with the term, "up" and "down" refers to the direction of the train travel*, with up being in the direction of the main terminal or big city/capital, and down being away from same. The Japanese terms are nobori 上り and kudari 下り, respectively. Good to know these phrases when traveling on the big urban networks with many lines and multiple trackwork.

*this terminology is likely taken from British practice, which the Japanese adopted rather than the more confusing westbound/eastbound compass-based system used in the USA.
In the US I think we sometimes say 'inbound' or 'outbound', 'inbound' meaning 'towards a city' and 'outbound' meaning 'away from a city'. You can also use terminal station names paired with '-bound' to describe a trains destination and direction of movement e.g. Tokyo-bound, Narita-bound, etc. There is a similar expression in Japanese, like Tokyo-yuki (東京行き), Narita-yuki (成田行き), etc. I also come across expressions like Tokyo-homen-yuki (東京方面行き) which means something similar.

Last edited by nouveau.ukiyo; July 18th, 2011 at 11:16 AM.
nouveau.ukiyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 03:15 PM   #2732
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452

Quote:
In the US I think we sometimes say 'inbound' or 'outbound', 'inbound' meaning 'towards a city' and 'outbound' meaning 'away from a city'.
Perhaps that's a term used on transit/rail systems on the Eastern Seaboard? Out in California they use eastbound/westbound in the employee timetables- the public is just informed of the destination.
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 03:39 PM   #2733
SamuraiBlue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,232
Likes (Received): 195

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
*this terminology is likely taken from British practice, which the Japanese adopted rather than the more confusing westbound/eastbound compass-based system used in the USA.
This is an Japanese original way back from the Edo period when they called Kyoto "Kamigata(上方)" sake from Kyoto in Edo was called "Kudari sake(下り酒)" the term "kudaranai(下らない)" meaning something mediocre is also derived from this idea meaning not worth sending.
The top by the way is the Emperor so when he moved to Tokyo from Kyoto the arrangement of Nobori(Up)/Kudari(Down) also changed.
SamuraiBlue no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 04:13 PM   #2734
nouveau.ukiyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 25

Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
This is an Japanese original way back from the Edo period when they called Kyoto "Kamigata(上方)" sake from Kyoto in Edo was called "Kudari sake(下り酒)" the term "kudaranai(下らない)" meaning something mediocre is also derived from this idea meaning not worth sending.
The top by the way is the Emperor so when he moved to Tokyo from Kyoto the arrangement of Nobori(Up)/Kudari(Down) also changed.
Hehe, I actually thought of this when I read the forum earlier, although I wasn't aware of the change. I remember back in my uni days when I lived with a Japanese family, the father told me once that the Japanese say they 'go up' to Kyoto and 'go down' to Tokyo no matter where they're coming from. I remember it not making sense to me because at the time I lived in Chiba; I wasn't sure how I'd 'go up' to Kyoto. We have similar expressions where I'm from (Philadelphia); I almost always say I'm 'going up' or 'down when I go out instead of just 'going'; however, I base my phraseology on actual, cardinal directions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Perhaps that's a term used on transit/rail systems on the Eastern Seaboard? Out in California they use eastbound/westbound in the employee timetables- the public is just informed of the destination.
Maybe it's an east coast thing, I don't know; I guess I haven't traveled around the US enough to know lol. However, we use inbound/outbound for all forms of transit, including air crafts and especially automobiles (e.g. newscast - 'all outbound lanes on 95 are bumper-to-bumper...'). Southbound/Northbound, etc. are used for transit within cities I think; you can't be 'in/outbound' if you're staying 'in' the city.

I guess in Japanese they use terminal station names to differentiate travel direction; I remember when first moving to Japan I frequently hopped on trains going the wrong direction because I couldn't tell where they were going! I remember when I first moved to Chiba I got on the wrong JR Chuo/Sobu line train and ended up in west Tokyo! And buses, forget about it! I don't know where they're going half the time. The maps at the stops aren't even maps; just a list of stops. Not very helpful at all if you're not a local.

Last edited by nouveau.ukiyo; July 18th, 2011 at 04:32 PM.
nouveau.ukiyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th, 2011, 08:13 PM   #2735
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Actually, San Francisco Municipal Railway uses "inbound" and "outbound" terminology, even for routes that don't go anywhere close to the center of the city or only travel on the periphery. I suppose that's why I tend to use these terms for nobori / kudari since they match very well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post

Thanks for posting that. That stretch of Keikyu is the most familiar for me (in fact I was born at a hospital just a couple hundred meters from Keikyu Kanagawa Station which is passed in the video). The 3050 seemed to be running with a flat wheelset.
Hm, I didn't realize you were born in Japan... Now I understand your avatar and handle a bit better...

As for the 3050 series, I feel like I've seen several videos of trains with flats... Don't know what the deal is.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 20th, 2011, 02:32 AM   #2736
hakubi
Registered User
 
hakubi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 38
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
The 3050 seemed to be running with a flat wheelset.
Yeah I noticed that too. Perhaps from emergency braking the day before when the earthquake happened?

Re nobori/kudari, I've always understood it and translated it as inbound/outbound relative to Tokyo, even if the service goes nowhere near it. Accordingly, when Kyoto was the capital, the terminology was relative to there, or so I read.
hakubi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 20th, 2011, 08:13 AM   #2737
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Here's one with a flat before the earthquake...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X40JfsoRBP8
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 20th, 2011, 08:23 AM   #2738
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Kawasaki likely to win option for 25 more Metro-North cars
http://journalstar.com/business/loca...1547ff8bb.html

Quote:
Kawasaki's Lincoln plant is likely to get an expanded order for commuter rail cars to run on the Metro-North line that serves Connecticut and New York City.

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said Connecticut will buy 25 more commuter rail cars for the heavily used New Haven line into New York City.

Kawasaki had no comment, and the deal's not yet done, but railroad officials and a memo from the railroad showed they expect to expand a previous order for Kawasaki cars.

Malloy said Tuesday that the 25 cars will cost about $93 million and will add to 380 already on order from Kawasaki, bringing the total cost of the order to nearly $1 billion. The first 38 cars were built in Japan and the rest of the order is being built at Lincoln's Kawasaki Rail Car plant, which is on the verge of shipping its first car of the order to the Metro-North railroad.

The New Haven line is owned by the state of Connecticut and is operated by Metro-North Railroad, a subsidiary of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of New York.

In an email, Metro-North spokeswoman Marjorie Anders confirmed the order would likely be built at Kawasaki's Lincoln plant, but she, too, acknowledged not all the paperwork and approvals are done. Connecticut is paying 65 percent of the bill and Metro-North pays 35 percent.

The order will go to the Metro-North committee on Monday and the full Metropolitan Transit Authority board on Wednesday, Anders said.

The money for New York's portion of this purchase is already in the 2010-2011 Metropolitan Transit Authority Capital Program, she said, and Connecticut is going to its bond commission on July 29 for its share.

"So it is not a done deal," Anders said.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 20th, 2011, 11:19 AM   #2739
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Here's one with a flat before the earthquake...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X40JfsoRBP8
Speaking of flats, the JR Yokohama Line moreso than others seems to always have units out running with flats. Really annoying when you're a passenger on that not-very-exciting line.
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 20th, 2011, 07:52 PM   #2740
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 769
Likes (Received): 460

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Sky Access posts small ridership increase; calls for Tōkyō Station extension
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/homeguide/n...OYT8T00179.htm



Cab view from a Keisei 3050 series on the Keikyū Line from Yokohama to Kanagawa Shinmachi. These are typically used on Access limited express services between Haneda and Narita via the Sky Access Line, but this video is a bit unusual, as it’s running outside of typical haunts on the Keikyū Line, all the way down to Yokohama and Yokosuka. This was shot on March 12, one day after the earthquake. There was some disarray in deployment of rolling stock at the time, and Keikyū was forced to use this Keisei unit for one roundtrip to / from Misakiguchi.


Source: kawahama1107 on YouTube
I know a good way to get the Keisei skyliner down to Tokyo station... Combine the effort with the Tsukuba Express to get that tunnel extended from Akihabara. Build one tunnel together, and that way the costs will be combined. Also of interest is the fact that the Chuo Shinkansen will be terminating at Shinagawa Station... And I'm sure the TX people wouldn't mind having their trains terminate there, or even beyond that to Yokohama...
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium