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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:38 AM   #2801
quashlo
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Limited-stop service on Saitama Railway extension will require additional ¥15 billion
http://www.nikkei.com/news/local/art...E2E2EBE0E0E4E6

Quote:
Regarding the extension of Subway Line 7 (Saitama Railway) to Iwatsuki, estimates have been revealed that peg the additional costs required to establish passing facilities at intermediate stations in order to introduce limited-stop services at a minimum of ¥15 billion. The estimates were revealed at the second session of a working group established by Saitama City and Saitama Prefecture on July 29.

The proposed extension stretches 7.3 km from Saitama Railway’s Urawa Misono Station to Iwatsuki Station on the Tōbu Noda Line. In order to realize the extension, strategies to attract riders—such as improving journey times compared to parallel lines such as the JR Tōhoku Main Line and Tōbu Isesaki Line—are needed, so rapid services are being considered for the line.

According to Saitama City and others, from the perspective of railway structures, installation of passing facilities is only feasible at Hatogaya Station. Construction work is necessary to establish passing tracks, requiring a minimum of at least ¥15 billion. In regards to rapid services, however, some opinions are less than optimistic, with Saitama Railway saying that “coordination with locals will be difficult,” and through-servicing Tōkyō Metro saying that “crowding levels will become irregular”.

The working group also discussed the method of constructing the terminal at Iwatsuki Station. While two proposals have surfaced—one constructing the station directly beneath Tōbu Railway’s Iwatsuki Station and another constructing it underground beneath Iwatsuki Station’s East Exit—the working group agreed on the proposal for an East Exit underground station, which is ¥9 billion cheaper in construction costs. With the East Exit underground station, the construction cost of the entire extension is forecasted to cost ¥77 billion.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:38 AM   #2802
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MLIT releases revised analysis of Asakusa Line bypass

Some interesting details I found regarding the proposed Asakusa Line bypass on the website of the MLIT’s Railway Bureau. This is the line proposed to bring travel time between Haneda and Narita under one hour, with a direct connection to Tōkyō Station. During FY2010, they did some refinements to the FY2009 analysis, the results of which were recently released on 2011.07.25.
http://www.mlit.go.jp/tetudo/tetudo_tk4_000006.html

Major changes from the FY2009 analysis
Estimated project cost: ¥350+ billion → ¥370+ billion (addition of train storage yard, etc.)
Forecasted demand: 220,000 passengers daily → 220,000 passengers daily (broken out into 30,000 Airport-related passengers daily and 190,000 urban passengers daily)
Benefit vs. cost estimate: 1.7

PDF is here:
http://www.mlit.go.jp/common/000161426.pdf

Details:

Project goals
20-30 minute access between Tōkyō and Haneda Airport (Domestic Terminal)
30-40 minute access between Tōkyō and Narita Airport (Terminal 2)
50-60 minute access between Narita and Haneda Airports

Proposed route
Oshiage Station – Shin-Tōkyō Station – Sengakuji Station (approx. 11 km in total length)
The location of Shin-Tōkyō Station as cited in the presentation is beneath Naka-dōri, which is the north-south road between Hibiya-dōri (Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line + Toei Mita Line) to the west and the road carrying the Tōkyō Metro Marunouchi Line and JR Yokosuka Line / Sōbu Main Line to the east. Perhaps this location was chosen for better access to existing lines.

Benefits of the project
Improved access between Tōkyō Station and Narita / Haneda Airports:
  • Tōkyō Station – Haneda Airport
    • Travel time: 25 min. → ~22 min. (~3 min. savings)
    • Transfers: 1 → 0
    • Current route: Keihin–Tōhoku Line – Tōkyō Monorail
  • Tōkyō Station – Narita Airport (Terminal 2)
    • Travel time: 50 min. → ~37 min. (~13 min. savings)
    • Transfers: 0 → 0
    • Current route: Narita Express
  • Narita Airport (Terminal 2) – Haneda Airport (direct trains)
    • Travel time: 92 min. → ~59 min. (~33 min. savings)
    • Transfers: 0 → 0
    • Current route: Keisei Line – Toei Asakusa Line – Keikyū Line
Improved urban transit:
  • Chiba New Town Chūō Station – Tōkyō Station
    • Travel time: 51 min. → ~32 min. (~19 min. savings)
    • Transfers: 2 → 0
    • Current route: Hokusō Line – Keisei Line – Hanzōmon Line – Sōbu Rapid Line
  • Keikyū Kamata Station – Tōkyō Station
    • Travel time: 27 min. → ~21 min. (~6 min. savings)
    • Transfers: 1 → 0
    • Current route: Keikyū Line – Yamanote Line
  • Keisei Takasago Station – Shinagawa Station
    • Travel time: 42 min. → ~23 min. (~19 min. savings)
    • Transfers: 0 → 0
    • Current route: Keisei Line – Toei Asakusa Line – Keikyū Line
  • Yokohama Station – Oshiage Station
    • Travel time: 47 min. → ~40 min. (~7 min. savings)
    • Transfers: 1 → 0
    • Current route: Sōbu Rapid Line – Hanzōmon Line
Service plan
Current: 24 tph peak
Proposed:
Toei Asakusa Line: 18 tph peak, 12 tph off-peak
Bypass: 10 tph peak, 6 tph off-peak
Basically, the total train throughput on the Asakusa Line will be increased to 28 tph, of which 10 tph will use the bypass.

Transfer routes between Shin-Tōkyō Station and the JR lines (east, right) and Imperial Palace side (west, left):


Chalk another one up for the underground maze of Tōkyō / Ōtemachi / Nijūbashi-mae / Hibiya / Yūrakuchō / Ginza / Higashi-Ginza.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:39 AM   #2803
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Tōkyō Metro IPO eyed as option to help fund Japan rebuilding
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7IR34620110727

Quote:
(Reuters) - Tokyo Metro Co, which operates a vast subway network stretching across Japan's capital, could be one of the first assets put on the block by the government as it scrambles to raise cash to pay for rebuilding the tsunami-hit northeast.

In the past few days lawmakers have floated the idea of selling the government's stake in Tokyo Metro through an initial public offering, as well as running down holdings in Nippon Telegraph & Telephone and Japan Tobacco Inc .

A Tokyo Metro IPO is seen by some experts as one of the more likely options for the government because it could be implemented fairly quickly and without a revision to the law, as would be required for share sales of Japan Tobacco and NTT.

A listing of the subway operator has been under consideration for years. The Ministry of Finance, which owns 53 percent of the company, has earmarked 115 billion yen ($1.5 billion) in possible proceeds into its budget for this year, based on the assumption it would sell 60 percent of its stake.

"It is desirable to generate cash by selling state-owned shares for the reconstruction efforts rather than raising taxes," said Tomonori Ito, a visiting professor at Hitotsubashi University's graduate school of international corporate strategy.

"The sale of Tokyo Metro is feasible and investors would buy the stock given the company's stable earnings," said Ito, who was co-head of investment banking at UBS Securities in Tokyo until earlier this year.

Japan plans additional spending of 13 trillion yen for rebuilding after the March 11 earthquake on top of a combined 6 trillion yen already set aside in two extra budgets.

To raise the money, it is considering issuing special bonds, scaling back other spending and selling national assets.

The state owns about 22 trillion yen worth of assets in 15 companies. These include Japan Post Holdings Co, Narita International Airport Corporation and Development Bank of Japan Inc, according to the finance ministry's website.

But most of those companies are not seen as candidates to be sold off anytime soon due to legal restrictions on share sales or a need for restructuring before a sale would be feasible.

The government's holdings in NTT, in which it holds a roughly one-third stake, and Japan Tobacco, in which it owns half, have already come down to the minimum required by law.

There is no legal hurdle to a sale of Tokyo Metro. A spokesman for the company, which is owned 47 percent by the Tokyo metropolitan government, said it has been making preparations so that it could IPO at anytime.

Tokyo Metro, which carries more than 6 million passengers each day over a 195 kilometre network of tracks, posted a 36.8 billion yen net profit for the financial year ended March 2011 on sales of 372 billion yen.

"Tokyo Metro shares could have been listed some time ago," said a Tokyo-based investment banker who asked not to be quoted by name given that concrete steps have yet to be taken on the possible IPO.

"I don't see any problem for the government if they went ahead with the sale."
There are some other reports where the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) says it is not considering an IPO, so it’s pretty clear there isn’t a consensus between MLIT and the Ministry of Finance regarding the issue. Tōkyō vice-governor Inose has also said that if there were an IPO, the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government would purchase 4% of the shares to become majority shareholder, accelerating the oft-mentioned merger between Tōkyō Metro and the Toei Subway.

More of 16000 series running sound. I suppose these motors will now become a standard for new Tōkyō Metro trains.
Source: umikazehomes on YouTube

On the JR Jōban Local Line from Kita-Kogane to Minami-Kashiwa:



On the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line from Machiya to Nishi-Nippori:

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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:40 AM   #2804
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The top 30 longest Tōkyō subway transfers
http://www.nikkei.com/life/gourmet/a...E2E2EBE1E3E3E7

Nihon Keizai Shimbun did a survey of the longest Tōkyō Metro transfers (by distance). Since it only looks at the subway (Tōkyō Metro + Toei Subway), it misses glaring candidates for JR and private railway transfers like the Keiyō Line at Tōkyō Station. The list also assumes the furthest distance (e.g., from the end of the first platform to the end of the second platform), but I found it interesting anyways. Bold is stations sharing the same name.

1. Marunouchi Line Kokkai Gijidō-mae → Ginza Line Tameike – Sannō: 765 m
2. Ginza Line / Marunouchi Line Akasaka Mitsuke → Namboku Line Nagatachō: 720 m
3. Yūrakuchō Line Nagatachō → Ginza Line / Marunouchi Line Akasaka Mitsuke: 715 m
4. Chiyoda Line Shin-Ochanomizu → Marunouchi Line Awajichō: 625 m
5. Hibiya Line Naka-Okachimachi → Ginza Line Ueno Hirokōji: 610 m
5. Marunouchi Line Kokkai Gijidō-mae → Namboku Line Tameike – Sannō: 610 m
7. Marunouchi Line Ōtemachi → Toei Mita Line Ōtemachi: 595 m
8. Tōzai Line Iidabashi → Toei Ōedo Line Iidabashi: 590 m
9. Toei Shinjuku Line Ichigaya → Namboku Line Ichigaya: 560 m
10. Toei Asakusa Line Kuramae → Toei Ōedo Line Kuramae: 545 m
11. Hanzōmon Line Mitsukoshi-mae → Ginza Line Mitsukoshi-mae: 510 m

11. Chiyoda Line Kokkai Gijidō-mae → Ginza Line Tameike – Sannō: 510 m
13. Tōzai Line Iidabashi → Yūrakuchō Line Iidabashi: 500 m
14. Chiyoda Line Shin-Ochanomizu → Toei Shinjuku Line Ogawamachi: 495 m
15. Namboku Line Azabu Jūban → Toei Ōedo Line Azabu Jūban: 490 m
16. Tōzai Line Ōtemachi → Hanzōmon Line Ōtemachi: 460 m
17. Yūrakuchō Line Ikebukuro → Fukutoshin Line Ikebukuro: 455 m

18. Marunouchi Line Kōrakuen → Toei Mita Line Kasuga: 450 m
18. Yūrakuchō Line Yūrakuchō → Chiyoda Line Hibiya: 450 m
18. Toei Ōedo Line Iidabashi → Yūrakuchō Line Iidabashi: 450 m
21. Chiyoda Line Kasumigaseki → Marunouchi Line Kasumigaseki: 440 m
21. Toei Asakusa Line Shinbashi → Ginza Line Shinbashi: 440 m
23. Tōzai Line Iidabashi → Namboku Line Iidabashi: 430 m
23. Hanzōmon Line Ōtemachi → Toei Mita Line Ōtemachi: 430 m
23. Chiyoda Line Ōtemachi → Marunouchi Line Ōtemachi: 430 m
26. Fukutoshin Line Shinjuku Sanchōme → Toei Shinjuku Line Shinjuku Sanchōme: 425 m

26. Hibiya Line Naka-Okachimachi → Toei Ōedo Line Ueno Hirokōji: 425 m
28. Toei Ōedo Line Iidabashi → Namboku Line Iidabashi: 405 m
29. Toei Shinjuku Line Bakuro–Yokoyama → Toei Asakusa Line Higashi-Nihonbashi: 395 m
30. Yūrakuchō Line Yūrakuchō → Hibiya Line Hibiya: 390 m

Interesting to note is that most of the longest ones weren’t originally intended to be transfers, but ended up that way through the opening of new lines. Some of them aren’t really “transfers” and more just interconnected stations, as there are easier transfers between the same lines at other stations.
  • For #1, this isn’t really a transfer, as it’s much easier to transfer between the Ginza Line and Marunouchi Line at Akasaka Mitsuke one station down. However, the opening of the Chiyoda Line’s Kokkai Gijidō-mae Station in 1972 and the Namboku Line and Ginza Line’s Tameike–Sannō Station in 1997 made it possible to make this transfer. The transfer involves going four levels down from the Marunouchi Line platforms, walking the full length of the Chiyoda Line platforms, up three levels to the Namboku Line platforms, walking the full length of the Namboku Line platforms and up one level to the Ginza Line platforms: http://www.tokyometro.jp/station/kok...dex_pdf_01.pdf
  • Likewise, #4 was made possible in 1980 when the Toei Shinjuku Line’s Ogawamachi Station opened, connecting the Chiyoda Line’s Shin-Ochanomizu Station and the Marunouchi Line’s Awajichō Station. In reality, transferring between these two lines is easier at Ōtemachi, one station down, or at Kokkai Gijidō-mae. This one’s easier than #1, though, as you don’t need to walk down the Shinjuku Line platforms… The transfer can be made entirely via the concourse levels: http://www.tokyometro.jp/station/shi...dex_pdf_01.pdf
  • #5 was made possible in 2000 with the opening of the Toei Ōedo Line’s Ueno–Okachimachi Station in 2000, connecting the Ginza Line’s Ueno Hirokōji Station and the Hibiya Line’s Naka-Okachimachi Station: http://www.tokyometro.jp/station/uen...dex_pdf_01.pdf
The labyrinth of Ōtemachi (4 Tōkyō Metro lines forming a large square + 1 Toei Subway line):


Because of the local geography (next to the Kanda River), Iidabashi (3 Tōkyō Metro lines + 1 Toei Subway line) is also one of the more difficult stations for transferring:


Some other interesting factoids:

Lines with connections to the most lines in the network
Marunouchi Line (11 lines)
Tōzai Line (11 lines)
Yūrakuchō Line (11 lines)
Hanzōmon Line (11 lines)
Ōedo Line (11 lines)
As there are 13 lines in the network, each of the lines is missing a direct connection to one line.

Lines with connections to the fewest lines in the network
Fukutoshin Line (7 lines)
Asakusa Line (7 lines)

Deepest stations
1. Toei Ōedo Line Roppongi: 42.3 m
2. Chiyoda Line Kokkai Gijidō-mae: 37.9 m
3. Namboku Line Kōrakuen: 37.5 m
4. Toei Ōedo Line Shinjuku: 36.6 m
5. Hanzōmon Line Nagatachō: 36.0 m
6. Toei Ōedo Line Nakai: 35.5 m
7. Fukutoshin Line Higashi-Shinjuku: 35.4 m
8. Toei Ōedo Line Higashi-Nakano: 34.2 m
9. Fukutoshin Line Zōshigaya: 33.8 m
10. Toei Ōedo Line Nakano Sakaue: 33.4 m
Most are newer lines like the Toei Ōedo Line, Fukutoshin Line, and Namboku Lines, built deep to avoid existing lines.

Highest elevation stations
1. Hibiya Line Kita-Senju: 14.4 m
2. Ginza Line Shibuya: 12.1 m
3. Toei Mita Line Takashimadaira: 10.1 m
3. Toei Shinjuku Line Higashi-Ōjima: 10.1 m

Longest escalators
Chiyoda Line Shin-Ochanomizu (Hijiribashi end): 41 m

Fastest section
Tōzai Line Urayasu – Myōden: 100 km/h

Longest distances between stations
Toei Shinjuku Line Hon-Yawata – Shinozaki: 2.8 km
Tōzai Line Nishi-Kasai – Minami-Sunamachi: 2.7 km
Chiyoda Line Machiya – Kita-Senju: 2.6 km
Chiyoda Line Kita Senju – Ayase: 2.6 km

Shortest distances between stations
1. Marunouchi Line Shinjuku – Shinjuku Sanchōme: 0.3 km
2. Hibiya Line Hibiya – Ginza: 0.4 km
2. Hibiya Line Ginza – Higashi-Ginza: 0.4 km
2. Hanzōmon Line Jinbōchō – Kudanshita: 0.4 km

Smallest curve radius
Toei Subway
Toei Ōedo Line Kuramae – Ryōgoku: 100 m
Toei Ōedo Line Shiodome – Daimon: 100 m
Toei Ōedo Line Daimon – Akabanebashi: 100 m
Tōkyō Metro
Ginza Line Inarichō – Ueno: 91 m

The area around Shin-Ochanomizu Station, which has the longest escalators in the subway network, is hilly terrain.


The Hibiya Line runs 14 m above ground in the vicinity of Kita-Senju Station:
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Old July 31st, 2011, 07:41 AM   #2805
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MLIT likely to request platform doors at stations with daily ridership of 100,000 passengers or more
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T00961.htm

Quote:
Following continued incidents of passengers falling off of train platforms, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) has finalized plans to request that railway companies install platform doors or fencing at stations with daily ridership of 100,000 passengers or more.

The MLIT will compile specific standards and other details by mid August.

There are 239 stations in Japan with daily ridership of 100,000 passengers or more, focused primarily in urban areas. In the National Capital Region, such stations primarily include JR’s primary terminal stations and express station stops on private railways. Of the approx. 9,500 train stations across Japan, platform doors are only installed on a mere 500 or so stations. In regards to stations where installing platform doors would be difficult due to platform strength and cost, the MLIT says it will request installation of fixed platform fencing or other designs.

Meanwhile, as a measure for passengers with visual disabilities, the MLIT will request that the approx. 2,000 stations across Japan with daily ridership of 10,000 or more receive special truncated dome tiles that clearly indicate the platform edge, instead of the current tiles.
The new tiles feature a line that clearly indicates which side the edge of the platform is located on. JR East is already installing these at its stations following an accident at Meguro Station several months ago. NHK news report (with video):
http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2011...506171000.html

As for the platform doors, it will be interesting to see what the response is, as I can imagine substantial additional costs. There’s also the issue of rolling stock design, as platform doors / fencing could severely restrict the operational flexibility of JR main lines, private railway lines, or lines with through-servicing. JR East alone has 92 stations with 50,000+ daily boardings (i.e., daily ridership of 100,000+). There will likely also be questions of which platforms deserve doors, as even a station like Tsurumi (77,000 daily boardings) has the otherwise insignificant Tsurumi Line.

A short list of the major railway operators and the number of stations affected. This is a rough estimate only, and some of the totals include through-service riders at stations shared between different operators as this is the only data easily available. In reality, I don’t think these would be counted towards the 100,000 passenger threshold. In addition, some of these already have platform doors. It’s just a bit short of the 239 mentioned in the article (this may be the result of not double-counting shared stations), but it should be clear that JR East has the biggest task ahead, with almost 40% of all the stations that would qualify for platform doors / fencing.

Sapporo
JR Hokkaidō: 1 station
Sapporo Municipal Subway: 2 stations

Sendai
JR East: 1 station

Greater Tōkyō
JR East: 91 stations
Tōkyō Metro: 29 stations
Toei Subway: 9 stations
Keikyū: 5 stations
Tōkyū: 13 stations
Odakyū: 11 stations
Keiō: 5 stations
Seibu: 5 stations
Tōbu: 10 stations
Keisei: 1 station
Yokohama Municipal Subway: 1 station
Sōtetsu: 3 stations
Tōkyō Monorail: 1 station
Tsukuba Express: 1 station
Shin-Keisei: 1 station

Greater Nagoya
JR Central: 5 stations
Nagoya Municipal Subway: 3 stations
Meitetsu: 2 stations
Kintetsu: 1 station

Greater Ōsaka
JR West: 10 stations
Ōsaka Municipal Subway: 10 stations
Kyōto Municipal Subway: 1 station
Kōbe Municipal Subway: 1 station
Kintetsu: 3 stations
Keihan: 2 stations
Hankyū: 2 stations
Hanshin: 1 station
Nankai: 1 station

Okayama / Hiroshima
JR West: 2 stations

Fukuoka
JR Kyūshū: 1 station
Fukuoka City Subway: 2 stations
Nishitetsu: 1 station
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Old August 1st, 2011, 01:43 AM   #2806
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It would make much more sense to use the number of people using a PLATFORM per day to determine the necessity of platform doors rather than using the STATION metric.

As for the "Shin-Tokyo" station, I wondered why an east-west alignment was not considered but this indicates that Perhaps the depth of the Yokosuka / Sobu line are the reason.
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Old August 2nd, 2011, 07:25 PM   #2807
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
It would make much more sense to use the number of people using a PLATFORM per day to determine the necessity of platform doors rather than using the STATION metric.
Perhaps

Or you could use both hehe
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Old August 3rd, 2011, 07:56 AM   #2808
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MLIT releases FY2010 peak-hour ridership and crowding data for urban rail lines: Part 1

PDF is here:
http://www.mlit.go.jp/common/000148640.pdf

These tables summarize a lot of basic data on the major lines, such as train length, frequency, and peak throughput. There’s even a few smaller lines covered, as well as lines in a few of the smaller cities.

Sapporo
The Sasshō Line (Gakuen Toshi Line) is currently being electrified, and three-door EMUs will debut on the service in spring of next year, which will allow for travel time savings and increased capacity, which should ease the crowding a bit and allow for more fleet interoperability with the Hakodate Main Line and Chitose Line. Unfortunately, there was no data provided for the tram line, which is currently being considered for extension.



Sendai
It will still be some time before we can add the Tōzai Line to this table.



Greater Tōkyō
For JR East, top is the Sōbu Local Line (203% from Kinshichō to Ryōgoku), followed by the Yamanote Line (201% from Ueno to Okachimachi) and Saikyō Line (200% from Itabashi to Ikebukuro). In addition, the Tōkaidō Line, Yokosuka Line, Chūō Rapid Line, Takasaki Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, Nambu Line, Musashino Line, and Keiyō Line all operate at ~190% of capacity. Interesting to note is that the Chūō Rapid Line has the highest throughput of any of the lines, with 86,000 pax. While the Tōhoku Through Line will help bring down the Yamanote Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line by allowing direct service to Tōkyō and beyond from the Tōhoku Main Line (Utsunomiya Line), Takasaki Line, and Jōban Rapid Line, there is no movement on the Sōbu Local Line or Saikyō Line. The Yokosuka Line posted a 12% increase in crowding levels over last year, likely due to the opening of the new Musashi Kosugi Station, which is probably related to the slight drop in crowding on the Tōkaidō Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and Tōyoko Line.

For Tōkyō Metro, the Tōzai Line tops the list again, operating at 196% of capacity, followed by the Chiyoda Line, Yūrakuchō Line, and Hanzōmon Line. The wide-door 15000 series and station improvements should help increase capacity and reliability for the Tōzai Line. For the Toei Subway, the newest line, the Ōedo Line, is a solid second thanks to growing ridership, and they are supposed to increase to 10-car formations soon. The Mita Line also posted a 10% increase in crowding levels over last year.

For major private railways, the Odakyū Odawara Line leads the pack at 188% of capacity, although capacity and throughput are actually less than #2 spot, the Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line. I believe the Ōimachi Line extension has helped bring down crowding on the Den’en Toshi Line, and the completion of the Odakyū quadruple-tracking project should ease crowding on the Odawara Line. The platform extensions on the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line and launch of through-services with the Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line should increase capacity for the Tōyoko Line. Naturally, the next in line will be the Keiō Line, already at capacity with 10-car formations and 30 tph, and the gears are in motion for quadruple-tracking west of Sasazuka.

For semi-major / minor private railways, interesting to note is the Tsukuba Express, beating out older lines like the Hokusō Line, Tōyō Rapid Line, and Rinkai Line in terms of throughput. For monorails, the Shōnan Monorail has the most severe crowding, but I don’t think there’s much they can do, as the line is single-track. For automated guideways, it seems like the Nippori–Toneri Liner could use some additional trains, especially when compared to the Yurikamome.



Shizuoka



Hamamatsu
Unfortunately, there was no data provided for the Tōkaidō Line, only for Entetsu, the local private railway.



Nagoya
The opening of the Sakuradōri Line extension should increase ridership on that line a bit, but further subway expansion is currently on hold at the moment. Hopefully, the maglev will bring some activity to Nagoya. On the private railway side, Meitetsu is still holding strong, and the east section of the Main Line actually posted increased crowding compared to last year. The Aonami Line is still struggling, but hopefully the new JR Central railway / maglev museum and upcoming developments in Sasashima will help boost ridership. Also interesting to note are some hard numbers for some of the lesser-known lines, like the Aichi Loop Line, the Linimo, and the Nagoya Guideway Bus.

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Old August 3rd, 2011, 07:56 AM   #2809
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MLIT releases FY2010 peak-hour ridership and crowding data for urban rail lines: Part 2

Ōsaka – Kōbe – Kyōto
For JR West, the most severe crowding is on the Kansai Main Line (Yamatoji Line), the Hanwa Line, the Katamachi Line, and the Ōsaka Loop Line. The Ōsaka Higashi Line is currently being extended to Shin-Ōsaka, which should eventually boost ridership there. Overall, most lines showed a decrease in crowding levels, although the Hanwa Line rapids posted a 7% increase in crowding over last year.

For subways, Kyōto is doing well, with throughput actually beating many of Ōsaka’s smaller lines. As for the Ōsaka Municipal Subway, the Midōsuji Line continues to be the breadwinner of the network, followed by the Tanimachi Line, Yotsubashi Line, and Sakaisuji Line. Smaller lines like the Nagahori–Tsurumi Ryokuchi Line and Imazatosuji Line are still underperforming. I believe crowding on the Sennichimae Line has also been dropping due to the Hanshin Namba Line. For Kōbe, the Kaigan Line continues to underperform, but there are talks of abandoning the competing JR Wada–Misaki Line. With continued development of Kōbe’s waterfront, we should hopefully see ridership increase.

For major private railways, crowding dropped all-around. The most severe crowding is on the Kintetsu and Hankyū networks. Hopefully they can look at ways to speed up the Hanshin Namba Line and make that a more attractive alternative for Kōbe – Nara trips.

For semi-major / minor private railways, the Kita-Ōsaka Express Electric Railway (Kitakyū) and Semboku Rapid Railway have the highest throughput as these are extensions of subway lines or major private railway lines. There are plans for an extension of the Kitakyū line north into Minoo, which would increase ridership. Also interesting to note is the Hankai Tramway, where the Hankai Line is struggling financially due to poor ridership through Sakai City. Ridership is much lower than similar tram networks like the Keifuku Electric Railroad in Kyōto, although Hankai Tramway has to deal with more severe competition from subways.



Okayama
Again, interesting if only to see numbers for lines that normally don’t get mentioned at all. There are proposals to convert the Kibi Line to an LRT-type service similar to what was done for the Toyama-kō Line (now the Toyama Light Rail).



Hiroshima
Hiroshima is doing well, although the future of proposed extensions is currently uncertain. There are plans to re-extend the Kabe Line, which should slightly increase ridership there.



Kita-Kyūshū
Bulk of the rail ridership is JR, which has a pretty extensive through-servicing that directly connects Kita-Kyūshū and Fukuoka.



Fukuoka
Perhaps surprising is Nishitetsu (Nishi-Nippon Railroad), which is actually #2 among all lines in terms of throughput, just a notch below the Fukuoka City Subway Airport / Hakazoki Lines. The Nanakuma Line is falling short of initial projections, but there has been lots of recent movement on the extension to Hakata.

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Old August 3rd, 2011, 07:57 AM   #2810
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
It would make much more sense to use the number of people using a PLATFORM per day to determine the necessity of platform doors rather than using the STATION metric.
Yeah, I'm not sure how the exact language reads as they haven't written it all out yet, but I agree that platform usage is generally a better metric, as you can capture cross-platform transfers, etc. that aren't reflected in simple faregate entry / exit data. Although I have to wonder what else they would want to consider, as I think platform slope, platform congestion (usage vs. actual circulation area), platform curvature, and possibly other factors could be important in deciding whether or not to add platform doors.
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Old August 3rd, 2011, 05:20 PM   #2811
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Hiroshima
Hiroshima is doing well, although the future of proposed extensions is currently uncertain. There are plans to re-extend the Kabe Line, which should slightly increase ridership there.

I would say very slightly. The re-extention to Kōdo station will be about 1km.

Here are some admittedly extremely crappy pictures I took of trains on the Kabe line at Sandankyo about 1 week before it closed back in 2003.

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Old August 3rd, 2011, 08:26 PM   #2812
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I'm assuming the last pic is regular service, right? Not a special run or event?

I had heard Sandan-kyō is / was really popular... A bit of a shame that they abandoned it.
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Old August 4th, 2011, 05:34 PM   #2813
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I'm assuming the last pic is regular service, right? Not a special run or event?

I had heard Sandan-kyō is / was really popular... A bit of a shame that they abandoned it.
It was regular service, but there were some special circumstances on that day that made it so busy.

But yes, sandankyo is indeed popular - especially at that time of year. This was around autumn leaf tourism season. The scenery in Sandankyo is pretty spectacular. Considering its name "three level gorge" there are also some impressive waterfalls as the stream falls from one level to the next.

The special circumstances on that day over even a normal fall day were that it was a weekend, the weather was fantastic, and there was additional publicity all over the TV and newspapers about the line shutting down in a week. One of the trains we rode was like 6 or 8 cars long and still standing room only to handle all the passengers. The trains were longer than many of the platforms on the line! The Kabe line's standard livery was yellow and white; the cars that are cream with green stripes were clearly borrowed temporarily from somewhere else to accommodate the extra passenger loads.

The truth is, though, by that time, the schedule was pretty sparse past Kabe, and EXTREMELY sparse past Kakei. This is another reason the train was so crowded - there were very few trains running out that far. With a schedule like that it would have been pretty much impossible for the railroad to turn a profit at all. I remember looking at the schedule posted on the platform and being a bit surprised that there weren't more than five or six trains each day serving all the way to Sandankyo.

Another important problem is that the line between Kabe and Kakei which was built in phases from the 1930s through 1950s is extremely curvy and slow, following the course of the Otagawa with few tunnels. From Kakei to Sandankyo opened in the late 1960s and was built to better standards with more tunnels and somewhat higher speeds, but the slow Kabe-Kakei section meant that reasonable trip times would never be possible.

The justification given for extending to Sandankyo in the first place, was that this would be a rail line connecting Hiroshima to Hamada, but, what's the point when the population density is so low and the line is so slow? According to wikipedia, they finally gave up the idea of a Hiroshima-Hamada railroad in 1980, and a few years later begun construction on the Hamada Expressway, which opened to traffic in 1991 and put the final nail in the Kabe line's coffin.
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Old August 17th, 2011, 08:09 AM   #2814
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Hitachi and Mitsubishi in talks over Chennai monorail project
http://www.rail.co/2011/08/09/hitach...orail-project/

Quote:
Japanese infrastructure companies Hitachi and Mitsubishi are in talks over the Chennai Monorail project.

Tamil Nadu has invited tenders in developing monorail in Chennai that covers a distance of 300 km.

In the 2005-06 budget the estimated cost of the project was Rs 5,086.85 crore.

The representatives of both firms said monorail was feasible in Chennai as it was simple in terms of construction and would ease traffic congestion.

Recently, Scomi Group Bhd, a Malaysian based firm, also submitted its proposal to take part in the proposed monorail project in Chennai to the government.

Yoshitaka Hirabaya, Global Rail Business Development Division General Manager of Hitachi said:

“Currently, we are in talks with the Delhi and Mumbai authorities for providing monorail technology.

“We have already supplied technology to the Taegu monorail in Korea, Chingqing monorail in China, Palm monorail in Dubai and Sentosa monorail in Singapore.

“We have more than five decades of experience in monorail. We are supported by Mitsubishi Corporation, (Japan) who will fund the project. We offer the technology and they provide the funding,” he added.

The proposed monorail will carry 62,400 people per hour per direction, similar to the current Metro Rail system.

In the first phase of construction, 111 km would be covered, and a phased construction would cover the whole of the 300 km route.

Monorail is flexible and the rehabilitation of project affected people is small as it does not interfere with existing buildings and properties.

In a bid to avoid land acquisition, minister of transportation instructed Hitachi officials to develop high capacity transit system in air.

The Chennai Monorail project will have 18 corridors which are aimed to be completed within 18 months after awarding the contracts.

After completion, it will be biggest monorail project in the world.
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Old August 17th, 2011, 08:10 AM   #2815
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Kinki Sharyō’s AmeriTRAM on display in Austin, TX

Looks like Kinki Sharyō has been busy marketing their battery-powered 100% low-floor streetcar around the U.S. First was Charlotte, followed by Dallas, and last week Austin, where vehicles running without overhead power are proposed for the Urban Rail project.
http://www.statesman.com/news/local/...y-1719237.html

A few pictures:
http://www.examiner.com/cars-in-aust...slide=36374986

Alongside Capital MetroRail at Downtown / Convention Center Station (2011.08.10):


Source: 1711and14 on YouTube
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Old August 17th, 2011, 10:26 AM   #2816
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too bad they couldn't actually run it on the rails. It appears to be merely sitting on the concrete of the street.
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Old August 17th, 2011, 07:45 PM   #2817
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Yeah, I suspect they may not have had much choice in terms of places to actually run it... MetroRail is single-track and unelectrified.
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Old August 19th, 2011, 07:42 AM   #2818
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Mikage Station barrier-free upgrades

A few more pics of the barrier-free upgrades to Mikage Station on the Hanshin Main Line in Nada Ward, Kōbe City.
Source: http://koberun.blog56.fc2.com/

Bus plaza.
In the background is the site of the former Mikage Industrial High School adjacent to the station, now redeveloped into a large retail facility (Mikage Classe) and a residential tower (Mikage Tower Residences), currently the tallest building within Kōbe City limits.



The pedestrian bridge that connects the station directly with the retail facility and residential tower.



The bridge itself opened in March of this year, and they are currently in the process of carrying out renovations and barrier-free upgrades to the existing station building.



This is a semi-major stop on the Hanshin Main Line, with everything except through-service rapid expresses stopping at the station. There are about 22,400 daily entries and exits (2009). Mikage Classe also includes a small Hanshin Department Store, the second largest branch of the store behind the flagship at Umeda in Ōsaka (although still 1/10th of the size).



The infamous curves that make this station a slow spot on the line…

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Old August 19th, 2011, 07:42 AM   #2819
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Meitetsu releases FY2011 infrastructure investment plan
http://www.meitetsu.co.jp/ICSFiles/a...subi110329.pdf

Quote:
Main elements of investment plan
  1. Development and improvement of station equipment and systems in preparation for interoperability of manaca IC card
  2. Elevation of tracks surrounding Ōtagawa Station and other improvements to station facilities
  3. Construction of the Shin-Chūkei Building (provisional name)
  4. Construction of railway administrative building
At Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu), we have finalized our FY2011 infrastructure investment plan to realize the main themes of the Meitetsu Group Mid-Term Business Plan (FY2009-11), including “expansion of the transport network” and “strengthening of our lifestyle sevices and urban development business”.

As our primary investment for this coming fiscal year, we will carry out development and improvement of station equipment and systems in preparation for interoperability of the manaca IC card (introduced this February) with other IC farecards, and elevation works near Ōtagawa Station (slated to enter service in FY2011). In addition, we will continue construction of the Shin-Chūkei Building (provisional name) in preparation for an opening in July 2012, as well as break ground on construction of a railway administrative building scheduled for completion in January 2012.

As a result of completion of the first stage of barrier-free upgrade works and investment related to the introduction of manaca (which had continued at high levels until last fiscal year), the total infrastructure investment for this fiscal year has been dropped substantially. However, we are scheduled to move forward with investment related to passenger and train operations safety at levels greater than typical years. The total investment will reach ¥13.265 billion, 10% less than last fiscal year.

Railway business: ¥8.994 billion
In or railway business, we will invest a total of ¥8.994 billion, including:
(1) ¥1.092 billion for capacity improvements including production of new commuter rolling stock (8 cars total) and upgrades to older rolling stock;
(2) ¥993 million for service improvement projects, including improvements to station facilities and development of station equipment in preparation for interoperability of the manaca IC card;
(3) ¥6.909 billion for passenger and train operations safety projects, including advancement of railway elevation and improvements to grade crossing safety equipment and civil / electrical infrastructure.

Capacity improvements (¥1.092 billion)
  1. Production of new rolling stock
    In order to upgrade rolling stock on the Seto Line, we will manufacture 8 cars (two four-car trains) of our new 4000 series commuter rolling stock designed exclusively for the Seto Line.
Service improvement projects (¥993 million)
  1. Development of station equipment in preparation for interoperability of the manaca IC card
    In response to farecard interoperability with the TOICA card issued by Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) slated for launch in spring 2012 and farecard interoperability with the Suica card issued by East Japan Railway Company (JR East) slated for launch in spring 2013, we will carry out development and improvement of related equipment and systems.
Passenger and train operations safety projects (¥6.909 billion)
  1. Safety and security measures
    • In addition to installation of ATS systems to prevent overspeeding through switches at 37 stations including Kanayama, Zengo, and Shin-Kiyosu, we will install grade-crossing safety ATS systems at 56 stations on the Nagoya Main Line, Inuyama Line, and Tokoname Line. In addition, as a measure to prevent passenger falls, we will install train emergency alert devices notifying train crews of emergency situations at six stations including Motojuku, Higashi-Biwajima, and Higashi-Ōte.
  2. Installation and improvement of grade crossing safety equipment
    • As a safety measure at grade crossings, we will install upgrade grade crossing obstruction detection devices at three locations and grade crossing arms at 22 locations, as well as install emergency buttons at grade crossings at 19 locations.
  3. Rolling stock improvements
    • We will reduce electricity consumption by introducing regenerative braking and converting to VVVF control equipment for one 100 series train, as well as upgrade ATC (automatic train control) equipment to improve safety.
    • We will install deadman emergency stop equipment in 30 cars, allowing trains to be automatically brought to a stop in the event that the train operator becomes unable to operate the train.
    • We will install train status black box equipment in 30 cars to record the status of train operations.
    • In order to prevent passengers from falling off the platform into the gangway area between cars, we will install gangway hoods surrounding the car body at the fixed joint between cars for 30 cars.
  4. Improvements to civil facilities
    • In order to improve train ride comfort, we will convert to prestressed concrete (PC) sleepers (a total of about 2.3 km on the Inuyama Line, Seto Line, and Nishio Line) and flexible switches (five locations).
  5. Improvements to electrical facilities
    • In order to stabilize the electrical power supply, we will carry out improvement works to the Biwajima transformer substation, upgrade electrical equipment such as transformers and high-voltage breakers at locations along our lines, and augment and improve feeder cables.
    • In order to improve safety, we will carry out improvements and upgrades to track circuits detecting the presence of trains and train wireless base stations.
  6. Track elevation
    • As part of advancement of our safety measures and urban planning business, we will carry out track elevation works at five locations:
      • Ōtagawa Station elevation works: Tokoname Line (Shin-Nittetsu-mae – Owari Yokosuka, 2.0 km) and Kōwa Line (Ōtagawa – Taka-Yokosuka, 0.7 km)
      • Chiryū Station elevation works: Nagoya Main Line (Hitotsugi – Ushida, 1.6 km) and Mikawa Line (Shigehara – Mikawa Yatsuhashi, 2.7 km)
      • Kitayama Station elevation works: Seto Line (Obata – Ōmori – Kinjō Gakuin-mae, 1.9 km)
      • Aoyama Station elevation works: Kōwa Line (Narawa – Age, 1.6 km)
      • Hotei Station elevation works: Inuyama Line (Ishibotoke – Kōnan, 1.8 km)
Real estate development business: ¥3.935 billion
  • Outside Nagoya Station, we will advance construction of the Shin-Chūkei Building (provisional name), a joint project together with the Chūbu Keizai Shimbun Co. The building is a steel-framed and steel-reinforced concrete office building consisting of two below-grade levels and 17 aboveground stories for a total gross floor area of approx. 30,100 sq m, scheduled to open in July 2012.
  • Outside the East Exit of Jingū-mae Station, we have broken ground on construction of a railway administrative building in order to ensure stable train operations and further improve our capabilities to respond in times of accidents and natural disasters. The building consists of a seven-story, steel-frame administrative building (7,300 sq m gross floor area) and a six-story, steel-reinforced concrete dormitory building (2,100 sq m gross floor area), scheduled to open in January 2011.
Other: ¥334 million
We will work to improve our IT environment, including development of an administrative system and advancement of upgrades to our office computer equipment.

Note: Meitetsu Group infrastructure investment for FY2011, including Meitetsu Railroad, is ¥27.452 billion.
Someone upped the 2011 CM for Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu) to YouTube… Like other Meitetsu CMs, the BGM is Oda Masakazu (Midori no Machi).


Source: 1234567gfedcba on YouTube

A fan remake:


Source: meitetsu1200 on YouTube
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Old August 19th, 2011, 07:43 AM   #2820
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TOKYO WONDERGROUND August posters

Click on image for larger size.
Source: Tōkyō Metro

These are taken at / near Yotsuya Station. The first shot is from Sophia University.



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