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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:43 AM   #2821
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Fuji Electric supplies world’s first transformers using palm oil fatty acid esters to railways
http://eco.nikkeibp.co.jp/article/news/20110802/107184/

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Fuji Electric has supplied Tōbu Railway and Keiō Corporation with transformers using insulating oil derived from palm trees. This is the first such use of such transformers for railways anywhere in the world. Compared to the more prevalent mineral oils, the new insulating oil is much easier to decompose, minimizing environmental impacts and reducing use of fossil fuels. The transformers began operations at Tōbu’s Fujimino Transformer Substation (Fujimono City, Saitama Prefecture) and Keiō’s Kami-Kitazawa Transformer Substation (Setagaya Ward, Tōkyō Prefecture).

The insulating oil used is known as Pastel NEO, based on chemical compounds known as palm oil fatty acid esters (PFAEs) developed jointly by Lion Corporation and Japan AE Power Systems, a transformer equipment manufacturer connected with Fuji Electric. The oil was developed after focusing on a plant oil that was both environmentally-friendly and served as a high-performance insulating oil. The product has received an Eco-Mark designation in recognition of the high biodegradability of plant oils.

The transformer supplied to Tōbu provides electricity to the control power source and safety equipment at the transformer substation, as well as to station equipment, while Keiō’s transformer provides electricity for running trains. Both companies selected the transformers in the aim of introducing electrical equipment that is environmentally-friendly. By using insulating oil derived from plant oils instead of mineral oils, it’s expected that carbon dioxide emissions can be reduced by approx. 65% compared to existing transformers.

Transformers using insulating oil derived from palm trees have high environmental performance, as the insulating oil can be decomposed into carbonic acid and water by microbes, and can feature compact designs by taking advantage of the high cooling performance of palm oil fatty acid esters. The transformers also have well-suited electrical characteristics due to the high temperature stability. In addition to railways, Fuji Electric plans to apply the technology to plants, buildings, and other applications, aiming for sales of ¥1 billion in 2012.
Official press release is here:
http://www.fujielectric.co.jp/about/...101/index.html
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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:44 AM   #2822
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Shin-Ōsaka Station construction update

A few pictures of the ongoing construction at Shin-Ōsaka Station:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

At center is the elevated Shinkansen section, while below are the ground-level zairaisen platforms on the JR Kyōto Line. Behind the station on the north side is a new mixed-use tower being constructed by Hankyū, which includes a remm Hotel (Hankyū’s high-grade business hotel chain), offices, and retail.





To the east of the existing zairaisen platforms is some ongoing construction work for what would appear to be the Ōsaka Higashi Line platforms, in preparation for when the line is extended from Hanaten to Shin-Ōsaka.



There’s no official info on the web about this work, but judging from the shape in this zoom-in, we can easily surmise that it’s a new platform. The 11.1 km Ōsaka Higashi Line extension is supposed to open in 2018.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:45 AM   #2823
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Kōrien Station redevelopment: Part 1

Some pictures (2011.07) of the recently completed redevelopment project outside Kōrien Station on the Keihan Main Line in Neyagawa City, which included a series of station improvements.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

First, the centerpiece of the redevelopment, the Kōrien Tower, a 37-story residential tower with 331 units similar to typical suburban station redevelopments. Other blocks in the redevelopment area include retail, office, and hospital uses. Keihan (through its real estate subsidiary) was involved with the redevelopment, but others including Sumitomo Corporation and Orix Real Estate are also partners.







The new station plaza constructed as part of the redevelopment. The previous plaza was quite small, but the functions have now been relocated to this larger facility. Another redevelopment tower is visible on the opposite side of the station.



A covered pedestrian deck connects the new tower with the station, which also features an elevated concourse above the ground-level tracks. As a result, it’s quite easy to get to and from the redevelopment buildings, despite being built on ground that is 15 to 20 m higher than the station.



Bus terminal and the three-story retail facility, which includes a pharmacy, restaurants, and a convenience store. Bus service out of this station is operated by Keihan Bus, seen her in their red-and-white paint scheme.



While the larger tower is complete, there is another 27-story tower in Block 1 of the redevelopment that has yet to be finished.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:45 AM   #2824
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Kōrien Station redevelopment: Part 2

A few more pictures from a different blog (2011.08):
Source: http://blog.osakanight.com/

Some idea of scale. Neyagawa City is located approximately halfway between Ōsaka and Kyōto.



Taxi pool



The hospital at the station, operated by Kansai Medical University. Hospitals / clinics appear to be very popular uses in redevelopment projects, especially suburban projects… Tōkyū made headlines a few years ago when it opened Tōkyū Hospital in a new building directly atop Ōokayama Station in Tōkyō.



Block 1 of the redevelopment area under construction, scheduled for completion in 2014.



The tower on the other side of the station is 37 stories and was completed in 2007.



A smaller 24-story residential tower near the station, completed in 2009. Kōrien isn’t even in central Neyagawa City, but there has been a lot of recent development projects which have brought some new activity to this area. Hopefully, this will help reverse the declining ridership trend for Keihan, which has already pushed them to look into other businesses (and other countries) to boost their bottom line. Keihan is at a bit of a disadvantage when competing against Hankyū and JR in the Ōsaka – Kyōto corridor due to all the curves, limiting average speed and resulting in much longer travel times.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:46 AM   #2825
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Keihan Main Line Yodo Station elevation construction update

On 2011.05.28, the elevated inside inbound track (towards Kyōto) was completed, leaving only the outside inbound track to be elevated. Some pictures (2011.08):
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

Local for Demachiyanagi stopped at the new elevated inbound platform.



The outbound track to Ōsaka was elevated on 2009.09.12. The outer side of the inbound platform (at right) is boarded up as they work to complete the last track.



Looking towards Kyōto



New inbound platform



With the opening of the elevated inbound platform, the second-floor concourse was also expanded. The area on the left is the expanded concourse area.



They have removed the ground-level inbound track and are expanding out the aerial structure for the second inbound track.



The ground-level inbound platform has already been demolished.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:48 AM   #2826
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JR Takatsuki Station south pedestrian deck barrier-free upgrade construction update

A few pics (2011.07) of the barrier-free upgrades being conducted on the pedestrian deck at the south exit of JR Takatsuki Station on the JR Kyōto Line.
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/



The work involves seismic reinforcement and redesigning the stairwells and slopes connecting the deck with ground level, as well as installation of one elevator and two escalators to improve accessibility. Work began on 2011.03.16 and will last until 2012.03.20.



The complicated first-floor approach to the deck will be redesigned into a much simpler configuration, improving accessibility and convenience.



Demolition of original approach. The stairwell is already gone.



The area on the right cordoned off with the orange fencing was the original stairwell to ground level. Hopefully they’ll take this opportunity to give the rest of the deck a facelift, as it’s showing its age…



The South Exit deck connects the station (off to the right, out of frame) with the adjacent Matsuzakaya (department store) and two retail complexes (Green Plaza Takatsuki).

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:48 AM   #2827
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Renovated Hankyū 6300 series for Arashiyama Line

With two doors per car and all transverse seating, the 6300 series was originally designed for limited express services on the Hankyū Kyōto Line, but has been shifted off the Kyōto Line starting in 2003, replaced by the more practical three-door 9300 series. Three four-car trains were renovated for service on the Arashiyama Line. Some pics:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/



Interior has been refitted with reversible transverse seating like the 9300 series, plus partitioned longitudinal seating like the 9000 series. Transverse seating is in 2+1 configuration, securing plenty of aisle space in comparison to the original 2+2 configuration.



These are the same-style seats as the newest series, the 9300 series, but in 2+1 instead. The Arashiyama Line is a short, relatively minor feeder line serving primarily local and visitor traffic, so I suspect the 2+1 is an attempt to save a bit on costs.



Green moquettes plus wood is a bit of a trademark for Hankyū…





The traditional Hankyū shutter blinds were switched out with these curtains. The overhead racks were also replaced with a similar design to the 9300 series.



Stopped at Hankyū Arashiyama. With the recent refurbishment, it’s hard to think these sets were manufactured in 1975.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:51 AM   #2828
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Kintetsu Kyōto Station construction update

First, some pics from 2011.07:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

New Kintetsu business hotel is basically complete, and is scheduled to open on 2011.10.01. They managed to fit 368 rooms in this narrow (10 m wide), 170 m long building built directly above the station.



Lots of workers down at track level, though I’m not sure what that’s all about.



From 90-degrees to the side, we can also see the new track and platform at the terminal constructed directly underneath the building.



View from SUVACO, the ekinaka retail facility inside the elevated concourse of JR Kyōto Station.



The green 103 series Nara Line train gives a good idea of just how long the building is.



Another set (2011.08.08) focusing on the track construction:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

The new Track 4, scheduled to open in spring 2012.



Kintetsu Kyōto Line and Tōkaidō Shinkansen trains in the background.





The bilevel cars of a Kintetsu limited express pass in the background.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:52 AM   #2829
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Hiyoshi Station

A short series on “junctions” in the Tōkyū network.

First up is Hiyoshi, the junction of the Tōyoko Line, Meguro Line, and future Sōtetsu / Tōkyū Through Line.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Aerial view of the station (running left-right in the center) and the nearby Hiyoshi Campus of Keiō University. The station is technically a surface-level station, but was decked over and covered with a large multi-level terminal building in 1991, making it feel more like an underground station. In the future, the Sōtetsu / Tōkyū Through Line will connect into this station, providing a direct Tōkyō connection for Sōtetsu trains.



Hiyoshi is a four-track station, with the center tracks (Tracks 2 and 3) used by the Meguro Line and the outside tracks (Tracks 1 and 4) used by the Tōyoko Line. Feels like an underground station, but it’s simply been covered over.





The inside tracks have platforms doors, like the rest of the Meguro Line stations.



The south end of the station has two sidings used to reverse and hold trains, but these will eventually connect to the Sōtetsu / Tōkyū Through Line.





There isn’t a lot of space to work with, so the dive underground will need to be a fairly steep grade. They’re also supposed to construct a new siding here, but there’s not much space, so it will be interesting to see just how they accomplish that.



The north end of the station



Hiyoshi Station on the Yokohama Municipal Subway Green Line, which intersects the Tōkyū station in a “T” shape four levels underground. This recently opened in 2008.



Hiyoshi Station tenant building, with a big fat “Tōkyū” logo on top.



The East Exit of the station, opening onto Keiō University, features a large atrium and gate. Tōkyū and Odakyū have some of the most impressive station buildings out of all the Kantō-area private railways.



The West Exit of the station is a dense neighborhood retail zone with a bunch of small streets radiating out of the station.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:52 AM   #2830
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Futako–Tamagawa Station

A few pics of Futako–Tamagawa Station, the junction between the Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line and Ōimachi Line.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Futako–Tamagawa has one of the more complex layouts, with three tracks each from the Den’en Toshi Line and the Ōimachi Line coming together into a four-track station. Major upgrades to the station were completed in 2000, when the station was renamed from “Futako–Tamagawa-en” to “Futako–Tamagawa”. The 2000 upgrades included widening of the platforms, station concourse, and ticketing entrances; switching the location of the Den’en Toshi Line and Ōimachi Line; construction of a new track connection between the Ōimachi Line and the inbound Den’en Toshi Line track; and construction of two sidings for the Ōimachi Line on the bridge above the Tama River.



A good portion of the station lies above the river.



Some of the elevation involved in the junction



The widest sections on the north side of the platform reach about 20 m.



The station is also located on a bit of a curve.



The platform width narrows considerably at the south side of the station.



As part of an effort to reduce overcrowding on the Den’en Toshi Line, the sidings in the center have since been converted into full tracks, extending a quadruple-track section all the way to Mizonokuchi Station.

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:54 AM   #2831
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Ōokayama Station

Next in this “junction” series, a few pics of Ōokayama Station, the junction between the Tōkyū Meguro Line and Ōimachi Line.
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

Originally a difficult-to-use three-platform station, work on major upgrades began in 1990, with a new two-platform station completed in December 1998. The major work involved grade-separation of 1.1 km of the Ōimachi Line and 0.9 km of the Meguro Line approaching Ōokayama Station in order to allow for cross-platform transfers in the inbound (Ōimachi and Meguro) directions and outbound (Hiyoshi and Mizonokuchi) directions and undergrounding and reconfiguration of the station to two island platforms.



The Meguro Line uses the outside tracks, while the Ōimachi Line uses the inside tracks.





Platforms 3 and 4



Meguro Line platform doors



The widest section of the platforms is 11 m.



A bit unusual are the air-conditioned waiting rooms. While it’s an underground station, the tracks immediately surface outside the station.



There’s almost room for a third track in the middle.



From the west end of Platform 2 looking west



From Platform 3



From the east end of Platform 2 looking east

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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:55 AM   #2832
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Kanagawa Prefecture, Keiō University, Isuzu unveil new electrically-powered bus
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/phot...2420010-p1.htm

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In an effort to expand electric-powered buses, a finished model of the Electrically-Powered Full-Flat Bus developed by Kanagawa Prefecture, Keiō University, Isuzu Motors, and others was revealed to the press on April 20 in a ceremony held outside the main entrance to the Kanagawa Prefectural Offices in Naka Ward, Yokohama City.

The project was selected by the national government as a Joint Industry, Academia, and Government Model Project for the Expansion of Cutting-Edge Green Technologies. The bus’s tires were increased to eight and the bus was designed to more compact dimensions, with motors for propulsion provided in each of the bus’ wheels. As a result, the bus floor is close to the ground and largely flat. After recharging overnight, the bus can run for an entire day.

Keiō University professor Shimizu Hiroshi, who developed the bus, explained, “A compilation of Japanese technologies for producing motors, bus bodies, and other components has created a bus that is both user-friendly and kind to the environment, solving problems related to energy.” Kanagawa Prefecture governer Matsuzawa Shigefumi was all smiles: “I’m pleased that I was able to see this in the last days before my term is over. I am confident that Kanagawa is now a leading prefecture in electrical vehicles.” In the next project, field tests will be conducted in accordance with actual operations.

Missed this from a few months ago, but test runs with volunteer monitors will be conducted later this month (August).

A couple more pictures:


Source: http://busgazou.exblog.jp/


Source: http://busgazou.exblog.jp/
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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:55 AM   #2833
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PPP split construction-operations scheme planned for Yūrakuchō Line extension
http://www.nikkei.com/news/latest/ar...E39EE5E3E2E2E2

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Tōkyō’s Kōtō Ward has compiled a project plan to extend the Tōkyō Metro Yūrakuchō Line from Toyosu Station to Sumiyoshi Station on the Hanzōmon Line. Implementation of the extension is envisioned for public-private split construction-operations, with a third-sector company composed of Kōtō Ward and other entities responsible for constructing the extension, and Tōkyō Metro responsible for operating the extension after opening.

The extension stretches 5.2 km between Toyosu and Sumiyoshi, and an intermediate transfer station will be established where the extension crosses the Tōzai Line at Tōyōchō Station. New stations are also proposed to be constructed between Toyosu Station and Tōyōchō Station and between Tōyōchō Station and Sumiyoshi Station, with the total costs of the extension forecasted at ¥90 billion to ¥110 billion.

To carry out the project, the Ward is hoping to use the Act on Enhancement of the Convenience of Urban Railways, etc., where the costs are split evenly three ways between the national government, the local governments, and the company executing construction of the line. The third-sector project executor would receive ¥2 billion to ¥3 billion in annual payments from Tōkyō Metro as facility usage fees, and the Ward hopes to pay back all costs within 30 years of opening.

The compilation of the project plan is an effort by Kōtō Ward to improve the convenience of north-south transportation within the ward. While there are already several east-west railway lines running through the ward, north-south transportation is currently handled primarily by bus lines.

According to estimates by Kōtō Ward, the residential population living along the extension is forecasted to rise from the current 160,000 residents to 290,000 residents by 2029 as a result of condominium projects and other developments currently being planned. Anywhere from 180,000 to 220,000 people are forecasted to use the extension daily.

Both Kōtō Ward and Tōkyō Metro are hoping that the extension will relieve chronic overcrowding on the Tōzai Line, JR Keiyō Line, and other surrounding lines. Crowding on the Tōzai Line was 197% (2009), making it the most crowded line among private railways. Kōtō Ward believes that crowding on the Tōzai Line can be reduced to between 182% and 184% if the extension is constructed.

The proposed extension was recommended for groundbreaking by 2015 in a 2000 report issued by the national government’s Transport Policy Council.

At the same time, the report also identified extension of the line past Sumiyoshi Station. As the remaining extensions cannot be carried out without completion of the extension between Toyosu and Sumiyoshi, Kōtō Ward is now moving forward with negotiations to get jurisdictions located on the remaining extensions—including Sumida Ward, Katsushika Ward, Chiba Prefecture’s Matsudo City, and others—to join the third-sector company.

A split construction-operations scheme, intended to stabilize railway operators’ finances and allow for the maintenance and revitalization of regional transportation in the midst of a declining population, has been permitted by revisions to the law enacted in 2008. By distributing the risk, with local jurisdictions responsible for management of tracks and other facilities and the railway company responsible for the task of operating the infrastructure, the law makes construction and operation of new lines easier.

Crowding on the Tōzai Line reaches close to 200% (Tōyōchō Station in Kōtō Ward).
Plans to relocate Tsukiji Market to the Toyosu area were also approved on July 29, and the new market is targeted for opening in FY2014, which could give a bit more urgency to improving access to the area and help spur the proposed branch extension of the Yūrakuchō Line to Sumiyoshi and beyond.
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...002000023.html
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Old August 22nd, 2011, 07:12 AM   #2834
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I noticed the presence of Saitama Railway trains and Toei Mita Line trains in the Tokyu network. Pretty good variety of service.
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Old August 22nd, 2011, 07:16 PM   #2835
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Yes, Hiyoshi to Den'en Chōfu on the Tōyoko Line is a good section to take photos if you are a railfan... Quadruple-track, with lots of train variety: Tōkyū (two lines), Toei Subway, Tōkyō Metro (two lines), and Yokohama Minato Mirai Line trains. There's also quite a bit of variety just among the Tōkyū trains.

Next year, this section should also see some Fukutoshin Line trains, and maybe some Seibu and Tōbu trains as well. Plus there's the Sōtetsu trains when the new Sōtetsu / Tōkyū connection is completed in 2019.
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Old August 23rd, 2011, 08:07 PM   #2836
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Not to mention lots of junction stations with it's own sister lines as well as a variety of different structures (elevated, surface, tunnel)

...It's a really fun line to ride on as well--it winds through some of the most interesting neighborhoods in the Metropolis and connects the two biggest cities in the country to each other. I'm eagerly waiting on the day when I can see those Tobu Tojo Line trains stopping at Hiyoshi station here too... (which will also mean I get a one-seat ride to work finally )
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Old August 26th, 2011, 11:19 PM   #2837
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Sneak peek at Ōedo Line’s newest trains

I’ve been lazy on the updates, but I figured I’d post this news… Someone captured one of the two new sets for the Toei Subway Ōedo Line. They are officially designated as 12-600 series, two of which will be manufactured this year (FY2011) to allow for increased frequencies during the morning rush hour to help cope with growing ridership. I had thought they were going to increase to 10 cars soon, but perhaps my memory failed me and I was getting it confused with the Shinjuku Line (?).

At the Kawasaki plant in Kōbe (2011.08.12), alongside new a N700 Shinkansen train (Unit S15) for the Kyūshū Shinkansen and an E5 Shinkansen train (Unit U6) for the Tōhoku Shinkansen.
Source: 55oresama on YouTube



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Old August 26th, 2011, 11:19 PM   #2838
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Toei celebrates 100th anniversary

Government-operated transport in the Tōkyō area—i.e., what is now known as the “Toei” system, comprised of the Toei Subway, the Arakawa Line, the Nippori–Toneri Liner, and Toei Bus—is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year (officially August 1).

Official website:
http://www.kotsu.metro.tokyo.jp/100th/index.html

Tōkyō MX news report from earlier this year (2011.01.12), which includes some historic shots of the Toden streetcar system. During the heyday of the Toden system in 1962, there were 41 lines. The latter half of the report focuses on Toei’s efforts to boost ridership on its bus network and the proposed merger with Tōkyō Metro.



A more recent Tōkyō MX report on the special exhibit at the Edo Tōkyō Museum (2011.07.13):



A short TV Asahi (2011.08.12) news feature, including scenes at the special exhibit at the Edo Tōkyō Museum (including Line 1, the Asakusa Line) and a short tour of the Magome Maintenance Facility for the Asakusa Line and Ōedo Line. There’s an explanation of the unusual situation due to the smaller size of Ōedo Line trains, which means they must be moved around the yard using a special electric locomotive.


Source: v11n1 on YouTube

Scenes on Tram Day (2011.06.12) at the carbarn for the Arakawa Line. Lots of trains on display, including the latest series (the 8800 series), the special open-air Hana-100 series (designed similar to a parade float), and Car 6086 (used in the filming of Always Sanchōme no Yūhi). Also some scenes of the traverser in action.


Source: karibajct on YouTube
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Old August 26th, 2011, 11:27 PM   #2839
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I wonder when the Toei Asakusa and Mita lines are going to receive new rolling stock.
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Old August 28th, 2011, 06:06 AM   #2840
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The oldest Toei trains on the Asakusa Line are from 1991, the youngest from 1997, so not technically that old. The Mita Line trains are even younger: it’s oldest from 1993 and youngest from 2000. Both are single-series lines (5300 series for Asakusa Line and 6300 series for Mita Line), and there’s no “old trains” still running that need to be replaced. I doubt we’ll see any new Toei trains on these lines until 5-10 years from now. However, what could work in the Asakusa Line’s favor is the proposed bypass line between Oshiage and Sengakuji to speed up connections between Haneda and Narita, which may also require Toei to purchase a few new trains.
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