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Old October 1st, 2011, 08:01 PM   #2981
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I think you want to avoid that unless it's absolutely necessary. The whole point of platform doors is to remove the danger of falling off the platforms or coming into contact with the trains (and the associated service disruptions). However, there's probably at least a few situations where it could be permitted... Tōkaidō Shinkansen already does this at stations with platform doors like Shin-Yokohama, but this is probably because the door leaves are some of the largest you'll find anywhere.


Source: express22rt on YouTube

The trains also begin moving before the doors have completely closed:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0pKhEbYsQ0&hd=1
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Old October 1st, 2011, 08:44 PM   #2982
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
unless it's absolutely necessary. The whole point of platform doors is to remove the danger of falling off the platform
By the time the train has braked to the non-threatening speed of 0.4m/s, 99% of the train will have pulled into the platform, most likely leaving only the forward platform gate the one to be exposed; besides, my rationale started out with "With such broad gate leafs,"
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Old October 2nd, 2011, 08:22 AM   #2983
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Those platform door leaves on the Yūrakuchō Line aren't very large at all... They're average size, maybe slightly larger. Regardless, I don't believe opening the platform doors before the train has come to a full stop is widely-accepted practice.
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Old October 2nd, 2011, 08:23 AM   #2984
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E233-3000 series recent movements

Recently, there has been a lot of movement surrounding the E233-3000 series, which is the E233 series variant for the Tōkaidō Main Line. Production of the first two units has been sporadic—the first unit (10+5 formation) debuted several years ago, followed by another 10+5 early last year. These are both stationed out of Kōzu Car Center. In September of this year, however, delivery started up again in earnest, and the third unit (10-car base unit NT01 and 5-car auxiliary unit NT51) arrived from JR East’s Niitsu Rolling Stock Plant, to be stationed out of Tamachi Car Center. A total of 30 15-car units (450 cars total) are scheduled to be manufactured in preparation for the Tōhoku Through Line—except for the bilevel green cars, which are being manufactured by Tōkyū Car Company in Yokohama, this entire order will be manufactured out of Niitsu. The average pace will be one car a day.

Eight bilevel green cars being delivered from Tōkyū Car Company to Niitsu (2011.09.29). There are two of these in each 10-car formation, but it’s rare to see bilevel cars coupled together like this.


Source: yukikazeyochan on YouTube

The latest unit (NT02 and NT52) being delivered from Niitsu, here spotted at Ōmiya in Saitama Prefecture and Akabane in Kita Ward, Tōkyō (2011.09.11):


Source: tobu2181 on YouTube
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Old October 2nd, 2011, 08:24 AM   #2985
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Press tour of Marunouchi Station Building restoration work at Tōkyō Station

The Marunouchi Station Building is being restored to its original appearance when it first opened in 1914, including the third floor and the north and south domes. Using domestically-produced brick, copper, and other materials—including natural slate roof tiles from Ogatsu Town and Tome City in Miyagi Prefecture, areas damaged in the Great East Japan Earthquake—the building will be restored to its original state for the first time in 67 years since being damaged during the Tōkyō air raids in World War II, at the cost of approx. ¥50 billion.

On 2011.09.28, JR East invited the press in to see the progress being made on this Important Cultural Property. Tōkyō MX news report (2011.09.28):



A couple pictures from Asahi Shimbun:



Reliefs of an eagle and the animals of the Chinese zodiac



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Old October 4th, 2011, 12:07 AM   #2986
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Renovated Shin-Shizuoka Station opens: Part 1

In coordination with the 2011.10.05 opening of a new station tenant building (Shin-Shizuoka Cenova) at the site of the former Shin-Shizuoka Center, Shizuoka Railway (Shizutetsu) also completed barrier-free and universal-design upgrades and other renovation work to its Shin-Shizuoka terminus.

SBS news report (2011.10.01):



Some pics from September, before the opening:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

First, Shin-Shizuoka Cenova. The building is nine stories tall (plus one underground level), and is comprised of a large-scale retail facility, Shin-Shizuoka Station, and a bus terminal. Gross floor area is 86,000 sq m, of which approx. 32,000 sq m is for retail. Total project cost was approx. ¥14 billion. Work began in 2009.04.



This is no small tenant building, with 153 stores, 82 of which are making their debut in Shizuoka Prefecture. Anchor tenants are Tōkyū Hands (general merchandiser), Nojima (home appliances retailer), and MARUZEN & Junkudō (bookstore). Other tenants include a cinema complex and Shizutetsu Store (Shizutetsu-owned supermarket chain).



This has historically been “central” Shizuoka City, although things are a bit odd now with the annexation of the nearby Shimizu City and other smaller jurisdictions starting in 2005. Other tenants in the neighborhood include Shizuoka 109 (Tōkyū-owned fashion mall) and a Marui (department store).



Main entrance to Cenova. The first floor houses the bus terminal (on the right side of the central passage) and parts of the mall (on the left side). The bus terminal will open later on 2011.10.11.





Central passage. This was before the opening, so the stores aren’t open yet. The passage continues to Shizutetsu’s Shin-Shizuoka Station. The ornamentation looks a bit like Hankyū Department Store style.

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Old October 4th, 2011, 12:08 AM   #2987
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Renovated Shin-Shizuoka Station opens: Part 2

Renovated station includes an all-glass staffed counter for passenger assistance. A bit unexpected to see this type of modern facilities for a small local private railway like Shizutetsu. This is a first for Shizuoka Prefecture, although they are now pretty common in the larger metropolitan areas.



Faregate array is five wide, including two wide gates. Shizutetsu has its own farecard LuLuCa, which is valid for its railway line (the Shizuoka–Shimizu Line), as well as Shizuoka City bus lines operated by its fully-owned bus subsidiary, Shizuoka Justline. For whatever strange reasons, as part of interoperability agreements, Shizutetsu also accepts PiTaPa (mostly a Kansai area card) and ICOCA (JR West’s card, used in Kansai and Okayama / Fukushima / Hiroshima). Still doesn’t accept TOICA (JR Central’s card), though, but hopefully that will change in the next year or two with the nationwide IC card interoperability program. Also interesting is the two-screen LCD departure board, again a bit unusual for a local railway.



Wouldn’t be too hard to mistake this for a major private railway in one of the larger metropolitan areas…



For railfans, Shizutetsu has some retro corrugated stainless steel trains manufactured by Tōkyū Car Company. In the past, Shizutetsu was part of the Tōkyū Group (major private railway in the Tōkyō area), and while it has broken official ties, Tōkyū still owns shares in Shizutetsu. Also of note are the new “platform threadlines” (located just outside of the truncated dome tiles at each of the openings in the platform fencing) installed as part of the station renovation, which blink on and off to alert passengers when trains are approaching the platform. This is another first for a private railway in Shizuoka Prefecture.



The Shizutetsu 1000 series is based on the Tōkyū 7200 series, and features one-man, two-car formations. This is at Naganuma Station, not Shin-Shizuoka.



Another Shizutetsu oddity is the frequent daytime service (six-minute headways).



A final shot of the entire complex from the Shizuoka Prefectural Offices.



Together with these station improvements, Shizutetsu has also reinstated express service for the first time in 15 years. Although they’ve downsized the bus terminal from 19 bays to 9 bays and slightly reduced the number of bus trips, the new bus terminal is also supposed to be pretty nice, with automated full-screen platform doors. Hopefully we’ll get some more pictures when Cenova and the bus terminal open. JR Central also just completed a full-scale renovation of Parché, the JR Shizuoka Station tenant building, on 2011.09.22, so hopefully these projects will help keep central Shizuoka City active into the future.
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Old October 4th, 2011, 12:09 AM   #2988
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Enshū Railway construction updates: Part 1

Next, onto Shizuoka Prefecture’s largest city (by population), Hamamatsu. Another local private railway, Enshū Railway, is carrying on the private railway tradition in a small way as it nears completion of the annex to its flagship department store outside its central Hamamatsu terminus, Shin-Hamamatsu Station (adjacent to JR Hamamatsu Station). The annex is scheduled to open on 2011.11.09.

Some recent pics (2011.09):
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

The site was originally developed by Hamamatsu Urban Development, a joint third-sector entity created by Hamamatsu City and Enshū Railway (Entetsu), as a retail and office building (Forte). The new building (approx. 44,000 sq m; 13 aboveground stories, 2 belowground stories) replaces the old one, and houses offices and the department store addition.



New building is on the right, existing department store is on the left.



Entetsu Department Store is fairly new, only opening in 1988. After the closure of competitors like Matsubishi and Seibu, however, Entetsu has now found itself in possession of Hamamatsu City’s only department store (within city limits) and one of the top-grossing stores in Shizuoka Prefecture (annual revenues of ¥33.2 billion in FY2009, expected to increase to ¥40 billion one year after the opening of the annex).



The existing building and annex are connected on the 3rd through 6th floors, as well as Basement Level 1.



Escalators to the connection, known as Ikoi Square.



The grand staircase connects down to the underground levels from the general bus terminal / station plaza area.



On the other side of the building-to-building bridge is an all-weather gallery mall, Soramo, which features a large atrium space and a 259 in (3.20 m by 5.77 m) outdoor video screen.



Proceeding through the gallery mall takes us to Shin-Hamamatsu Station, the Entetsu terminus. This is a two-track elevated station that has been renovated to a modern design like the recently-completed Shin-Shizuoka Station in Shizuoka City.



Ticketing entrance. Daily boardings and alightings at Shin-Hamamatsu are about 15,700 (FY2007). Like Shizutetsu, Entetsu also has its own IC card system (nice pass!).



Unlike Shin-Shizuoka, however, there’s no automated faregates, just these simplified card reader terminals.



Station plaza is pretty large for the central station of a third-tier city, and has an unusual central bus rotary that has bays aligned along the circumference. While the Entetsu terminal is called Shin-Hamamatsu to distinguish it from JR Hamamatsu Station, which is served by the Tōkaidō Main Line and Tōkaidō Shinkansen, they’re basically part of the same station complex.

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Old October 4th, 2011, 12:09 AM   #2989
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Enshū Railway construction updates: Part 2

Next, a series of window views that show the progress on the two grade-separation (elevation) projects currently underway. The line is single track, but most of the stations have at least two tracks, allowing for some decent service frequencies (every 12 minutes) for this small, local private line.

The first elevation project covers about 1 km between Enshū Shibamoto and Enshū Kobayashi. This is a small project, mostly a grade-separation to avoid conflicts with the National Route 152 bypass being constructed.

The second elevation project covers 3.38 km of the line from Sukenobu Station to the Magome River crossing (between Enshū Kamijima and Jidōsha Gakkō-mae), with three stations (Sukenobu, Enshū Hikuma, and Enshū Kamijima) being elevated. A total of 21 grade crossings will be eliminated. Total project cost is approx. ¥17.2 billion.

Window view (west side) from Nishi-Kajima to Shin-Hamamatsu:
Source: seigen120kaihin on YouTube

Part 1: Nishi-Kajima to Hamakita
The first project starts at around 5:25 and ends around 6:20.



Part 2: Hamakita to Enshū Hikuma
The second project starts at around 10:35 and ends around 3:05 of Part 3.



Part 3: Enshū Hikuma to Shin-Hamamatsu



Reverse direction (east-side), Shin-Hamamatsu to Nishi-Kajima:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgZ3DsGpdwE&hd=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsQ0faJjRYw&hd=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpcsc188Wi4&hd=1
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Old October 4th, 2011, 12:10 AM   #2990
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Use of electronic money from transport-related IC card expanding
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...0504000-n1.htm

Quote:
Services accepting electronic money from transport-related IC cards such as the Suica card issued by JR East are expanding. Kinokuniya Bookstores and used bookseller chain Book Off will begin accepting IC cards from five JR companies starting in October, while Seicomart, which operates convenience stores in Hokkaidō and other areas, will begin accepting IC cards from two JR companies next spring. Railway companies struggling with decreasing ridership as a result of population aging and a declining birth rate are hoping to expand their business domain and capture new sources of revenue.

Starting October 3, customers will be able to use IC cards from five JR companies at all 50 Kinokuniya Bookstores across the country. After doing a trial implementation at 15 stores in Kantō, Kinki, and Kyūshū, the program was well received among users, and Kinokuniya finalized plans to expand the system. “We are hoping to improve customer convenience by accepting electronic money from transport-related IC cards, which have strong local connections and have spread across the entire country.”

Starting October 1, Book Off will also begin accepting IC cards from five JR companies at approx. 430 stores across Japan. This is the first such implementation in the used bookstore chain industry. According to operator Book Off Corporation, the average value of purchases at its stores is approx. ¥1,000, and the company says, “Introduction of electronic money, which has a close affinity with small-value purchases, will be effective.”

The company says it will now consider expanding the service to allow customers who sell their books, CDs, and other items to load the value onto their IC cards as electronic money.

Starting next spring, Seicomart will accept Suica and JR Hokkaidō’s Kitaca at approx. 1,100 stores in Hokkaidō, Ibaraki, and Saitama Prefectures.

Use of the electronic money functionality on transport-related IC cards, which is expanding to restaurants, vending machines, and other locations, is performing well. According to JR East and others, electronic money purchases in July using Suica and PASMO (used on private railways and other operators in the Greater Tōkyō area) jumped 4.29 million from the previous month to 66.86 million.

As a result of population aging, a declining birth rate, and other factors, railway ridership has topped out at 22 billion passengers annually. Railway companies are hoping to capture business opportunities and augment their services, strengthening their IC card businesses as a revenue base.

Railway companies are expanding services for their transport-related IC cards, strengthening their revenue base.
Cute commercial for Meitetsu’s Tamarun rewards points program, which builds off the manaca IC card system that launched earlier this year in the Nagoya area:


Source: a301m088 on YouTube

New Sony marketing piece for Felica:

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Old October 8th, 2011, 03:04 AM   #2991
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I expected something more exciting to happen when they tapped their phones in the end than "Special Gift: The Making of Journey into Space."
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Old October 8th, 2011, 12:04 PM   #2992
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TOKYO WONDERGROUND October posters

Click on image for larger size.
Source: Tōkyō Metro

Echika (Omote-Sandō Station)



Kita-Sandō Station on the Fukutoshin Line

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Old October 8th, 2011, 12:04 PM   #2993
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Suica celebrates 10th anniversary

Suica will celebrate its 10th anniversary on 2011.11.18. First debuting in 2001 after an extensive testing process, Suica has expanded to become a critical part of daily life for millions of residents in the Greater Tōkyō area. Initially covering only 424 stations in the Greater Tōkyō area, the system has since expanded and is now interoperable in multiple areas across Japan. As Suica approaches the 10-year mark, JR East just released a new batch of data to help us track Suica’s most recent progress:

Quote:
Cards in circulation: Approx. 37.16 million
  • Cards with electronic money functionality in circulation: Approx. 34.82 million
  • Mobile Suica membership: Approx. 2.61 million
Cards with interoperability agreements: PASMO, Kitaca, TOICA, ICOCA, SUGOCA, nimoca, Hayakaken

IC farecard stats
Accepting stations:
  • JR East: 758 stations
  • Nationwide: 2,987 stations across 38 rail operators, plus 89 bus operators
Electronic money stats
Stores accepting Suica electronic money: Approx. 154,190 (as of end of August 2011)
Locations accepting Suica electronic money (number of reader terminals): Approx. 294,730 (as of end of August 2011)
Highest single-day usage: Approx. 2.88 million transactions (2011.07.15)
Monthly usage: Approx. 71.91 million transactions
Suica Points Club membership: Approx. 1.33 million

Suica View Card credit card
Suica View Card membership: Approx. 3.34 million
Affiliated distributors of Suica View Card: 9 companies
I created a new graphic showing all the IC cards in Japan and their interoperability… This one lacks the map of Japan I had in the last one (instead, I tried to group by region as best as possible), but is a lot more comprehensive, including pretty much every IC farecard currently operating in Japan, excepting some extremely small systems and experimental systems that are in trial phase. It’s impossible to find vector logos for some cards, so those bubbles are gray. Enjoy!


Last edited by quashlo; October 8th, 2011 at 10:07 PM.
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Old October 8th, 2011, 12:27 PM   #2994
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Suica celebrates 10th anniversary

Suica will celebrate its 10th anniversary on 2011.11.18. First debuting in 2001 after an extensive testing process, Suica has expanded to become a critical part of daily life for millions of residents in the Greater Tōkyō area. Initially covering only 424 stations in the Greater Tōkyō area, the system has since expanded and is now interoperable in multiple areas across Japan. As Suica approaches the 10-year mark, JR East just released a new batch of data to help us track Suica’s most recent progress:



I created a new graphic showing all the IC cards in Japan and their interoperability… This one lacks the map of Japan I had in the last one (instead, I tried to group by region as best as possible), but is a lot more comprehensive, including pretty much every IC farecard currently operating in Japan, excepting some extremely small systems and experimental systems that are in trial phase. It’s impossible to find vector logos for some cards, so those bubbles are gray. Enjoy!

Near every post you make is wonderfully informative, and I appreciate it.

Currently I am in Naogya and am using my Manaca every day, it's very useful!
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Old October 8th, 2011, 09:59 PM   #2995
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Ginza Line 1000 series makes press debut

On 2011.10.05, Tōkyō Metro invited the press to its Nakano Yard to take a tour of the new 1000 series for the Ginza Line. Drawing from the history of the Ginza Line as the birthplace of subway-building in Japan and the Orient’s first subway line, the retro exterior is reminiscent of the original 1000 series for the Ginza Line, which was the first series to serve on the Ginza Line and has been designated by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) as a Heritage of Industrial Modernization.

Some pics:
Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

The top number unit at Nakano Yard.
Apparently, the yellow is not actually paint but wrapping, similar to train / bus wrap ads.



Top number Car No. 1 (Shibuya end car). Destination signs, as well as the headlights and taillights, are all LED. Like the existing 01 series trains on the line, these are six-car aluminum alloy trains, but it appears they’ve boosted the acceleration to 3.3. km/h/s. Design maximum speed is still 80 km/h. The top-mounted highlights draw straight from the old 1000 series, although these have two bulbs instead of one.



Interior of Car No. 2. Similar to the 10000 series (Yūrakuchō Line / Fukutoshin Line), 15000 series (Tōzai Line), and 16000 series (Chiyoda Line), the interior space is designed to be very open and brightly lit, with open space underneath seats, energy-efficient LED lighting, and semi-glass partitions at the ends of the bench seating. Each set of doors features two extra-wide LCD screens (left for advertisements, right for passenger information), which is the standard nowadays in the Tōkyō area. The low sections of the car ceiling have also been removed, and the height of the standee rings and overhead racks has been lowered.



The Car No. 2 end of Car No. 1 features the priority seating and wheelchair space. In contrast to the bright orange for the rest of the seating, the priority seating features deep red moquettes to increase visibility. Easier to see in this picture is the slightly pinkish laminate of the car walls and partitions, also drawing from the original 1000 series trains. The other end car, Car No. 6, is designed with the same seating and wheelchair area.



While fire regulations require doors between cars, the recent trend has been to design them as full-height glass doors to improve visibility into the adjacent cars. These sticker / etch designs to improve visibility of the glass surface are pretty standard, but the newest Ginza Line trains use pictograms of iconic landmarks along the line, such as the statue of Hachikō at Shibuya (bottom left corner), the giant Kaminarimon lantern at the entrance to Sensō-ji Temple in Asakusa (top right corner), and the pandas at Ueno Zoo (two over from the top right corner).



Car No. 1 operator’s cab. One-handle controller, with three-LCD dashboard (two front-facing and one diagonal-facing) for train information.



In contrast to the retro look, the new 1000 series features the newest technologies, including permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) and special monolink bolster “steering” bogies. Only one of the axles is powered, with the other axle being steered around curves using a device connecting the bogie frame and axle. The device adjusts the axle-to-axle distance in response to the displacement of the bogie relative to the car. These bogies can reduce the lateral pressure (and associated noise) when passing on curved track sections by approx. 20%, helping to deal with the sharp curves that are one of the weak points of the Ginza Line.

These are Sumitomo Metals SC101 bogies. The axles further out from the car center (on the left here) are the powered axles, the ones closer to the car center (on the right here) are the steered axles.



Diagram of how the steering device works



Tōkyō MX news report (2011.10.05):

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Old October 8th, 2011, 10:00 PM   #2996
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Press tour of Marunouchi Station Building restoration work at Tōkyō Station: Redux

A few more photos from the press tour of the work on the Marunouchi Station Building at Tōkyō Station (2011.09.28):
Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

South Dome and portions of the reconstructed third-floor, visible behind the scaffolding. They are approx. 70% done and fast nearing the opening. The entire building exterior will be visible for the first time starting in March next year.



A better rendering of the South Dome interior. The third floor was demolished and the building downsized to two floors during temporary repairs after suffering fire damage in air raids on Tōkyō in May 1945. During this “temporary” repair, the domes were also much simplified and lost a lot of their original beauty. This project will restore these elements of the station building to the original Tatsuno Kingo design.



Better picture of one of the eagle reliefs, each with a 2 m wingspan. For safety reasons, these are composed of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP).



Ram relief



North Dome just starts to peek out… That copper (?) paint is shiny!



New third-floor reconstruction



As we are in the heart of earthquake country, the restoration project also placed the aboveground building on seismic isolators and installed oil dampers (i.e., shock absorbers), isolating it from the new underground sections. These should help reduce the vibration of the building and the adjacent Chūō Main Line viaduct.

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Old October 9th, 2011, 10:14 AM   #2997
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Seibu Line construction updates

I’ve been neglecting construction updates for some time now, so time to get back into the thick of things…
First up is some short updates on minor work, starting with the Seibu Line (2011.08.12):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Ongoing adjustment of the track layout at Hōya Station.
The center track at the station recently opened for service, and they’ve been cleaning up the switches at the west end of the station. With the sidings between the inbound track and outbound track taken offline, trains turning back at Hōya have instead been using the sidings to the north of the inbound track. As a result, they’ve removed half of the double crossover between the center track and inbound track.



Now only a single crossover. Still some work left, though, as there is supposed to be a new switch to all those tracks in the storage yard just west of the station.



Next, the elevation of the Haijima Line at Fuchū Kaidō, between Ogawa and Hagiyama Stations. The outbound track for Haijima had already been elevated for some time, and they have since been working on construction of the ramp up for the inbound track.

Here, we can see the approach under construction in the distance, just to the left of the outbound track coming down. Judging from this, the inbound track will have to cut to the right across at least a portion of the Kokubunji Line inbound track, so it’s likely they’ll replace that entire section of both tracks.



Cab view from Ogawa to Hagiyama.
Not much work on constructing the actual aerial structure just yet, probably due to the space constraints, which require use of some of the area behind the fencing for staging.

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Old October 9th, 2011, 10:14 AM   #2998
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Shinjuku Station construction update

As part of improvements at the South Exit of the station, they switched out passages inside the station on 2011.08.06.

Some pics (2011.08):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

The two stairwells connecting Platforms 1 and 2 to the New South Exit and the Southern Terrace Exit have been closed, replaced with two new stairwells further south closer to Shibuya. The newly-opened section of passage is basically the extension of the relocated passage that previously opened for Platforms 3 / 4 and 5 / 6.

This is the view fom the passage connecting to the New South Exit, looking at the newly-opened section of the passage, leading to Platforms 1 and 2 for the Saikyō Line. We can see in this picture the stickers placed on the overhead signage, indirectly reaffirming the recent changes.



One of the new stairwells, looking down from the station concourse level. This one is a bit narrower than the stairwells on the other platforms (as well as the Ikebukuro-end stairwell for Platforms 1 / 2), but this is due to the structural frame supporting the deck above, which prevented anything wider from being built.



At the bottom of the stairwell, we can see the stairwell was designed to avoid this support column as much as possible.



The old stairwells and the passage leading up to them have been boarded up. Only one access down to Platform 3 remains, and passengers can no longer continue onto Platforms 1 and 2 from this point.



The old stairwells to Platforms 1 / 2 are still there, but similar to Platforms 3 / 4 (closer to us), they should disappear soon.

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Old October 9th, 2011, 10:14 AM   #2999
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Old Tōkyō Monorail viaduct removed

After the construction of a new section of viaduct to serve the new Haneda Airport International Terminal Station, which opened last year, the old Tōkyō Monorail viaduct remained standing for some time, with short sections missing where the new viaduct ties into the existing viaduct. All traces of the old viaduct, including beam sections and columns, have since been removed.

Some pics (2011.08.15):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Near Haneda Airport International Terminal Station, looking east towards the direction for Haneda Airport Terminal 1 Station and Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station.



Opposite direction, for Hamamatsuchō.
Not sure what they plan to do with the right-of-way…



Strangely enough, Haneda Airport International Terminal Station has about one carlength of additional platform space currently unused… Could they be considering extending train lengths to seven cars as part of the proposed extension to Shinbashi Station (and eventually Tōkyō Station)?

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Old October 9th, 2011, 10:15 AM   #3000
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Urawa Station construction update: Part 1

As part of the elevation of JR Urawa Station (Urawa Ward, Saitama City), a temporary east-west public passage recently opened on 2011.08.28, directly connecting the East Exit and West Exit at the station and making it easier to pass through the station for non-passengers. One of the aims of the project is to improve cohesiveness of the two neighborhoods on either side of the station, previously separated by the four busy ground-level tracks (two each for the Utsunomiya Line / Takasaki Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line). With the elevation of all the tracks and opening of this temporary passage, the ticketing entrance was consolidated into a single location underneath the aerial structure.

Some pics (2011.09.03):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Starting off with the station concourse, paid area, with these new LED departure boards. There are four of these lined up at the new central ticketing entrance. The Keihin-Tōhoku Line boards are two rows, while the Utsunomiya Line / Takasaki Line boards are three rows.
19:58 Local for Ueno, 15 cars, 3 doors per car, Arrives at Ueno Platform 6
20:07 Local for Ueno,15 cars, 3 doors per car, Arrives at Ueno Platform 8

Displaying the arrival platform at the terminus is a bit unusual, but because of the unique configuration of JR Ueno Station, which has both ground-level and elevated platforms, some passengers will want to know this information, particularly during the morning rush hour. Transfers to the Ginza Line, for example, will be easiest from the lead car of a train stopping at a ground-level platform. It will be interesting to see what happens to these displays in the near future when they build the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line platforms and begin stopping those trains at the station, as northbound trains (for Ōmiya, Takasaki, and Utsunomiya) will then be split across two different platforms. Perhaps three rows is enough if they plan to combine them on one board, but I can see it getting slightly confusing as the Utsunomiya Line / Takasaki Line rapid services (Rabbit and Urban) have different stopping patterns than the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line rapid services.



New ticketing entrance. Based on the construction diagrams posted at the station, this appears to be pretty close to the final location / design for the new entrance. There are already 10 faregates in this array, and the tiles, signage, etc. look permanent, so I don’t think we’ll see drastic additional changes. The area outside the faregates will eventually be home to the 25 m wide permanent public passage, but we can see from all the work being done on the floor and the short ramp up due to height differences that there’s still quite a bit of work left.



Looking at the west side of the new ticketing entrance, we can see the portion for the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line (Tōhoku Freight Line) side is temporarily boarded up at the moment. No doubt we won’t see this removed until they’ve completed at least a good portion of the elevated structure, which requires a lot of space for materials and equipment. The staffed counter on the right looks completely finished, though, so I think there won’t be much movement at this end.



South stairwell for Utsunomiya Line / Takasaki Line Platforms 3 and 4, for Akabane / Ueno, and Ōmiya / Takasaki / Utsunomiya, respectively. Previously, the white construction hoardings went all the way up to the wall of the stairwell, but we can see here that they’ve opened up a narrow passage next to the stairwell. Behind the panels is the area for the future Shōnan–Shinjuku Line southbound viaduct, so again, this will likely remain like this for some time.



With the new centralized ticketing entrance, the north-end passage connecting to the West Exit of the Station has been closed. They haven’t installed the floor tiles on this particular section yet, but should start doing that now.



North stairwell for Platforms 3 and 4 is pretty much in the same state it was when they elevated the outbound Utsunomiya Line / Takasaki Line track. Again, behind the white panels at left is the area for the future Shōnan–Shinjuku Line southbound viaduct.

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