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Old October 14th, 2011, 12:18 PM   #3021
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Old October 14th, 2011, 12:18 PM   #3022
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Full mobile phone service to roll out on Midōsuji Line, Chūō Line by end of fiscal year
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/politics/ne...3310009-n1.htm

Quote:
On September 28, Ōsaka City revealed that it expects to roll-out a new service that makes it possible to send emails and conduct other tasks by mobile phone from inside moving Municipal Subway trains on the Midōsuji Line and Chūō Line by the end of the fiscal year. Regarding the remaining six lines, the city expects to roll-out service sometime next fiscal year.

According to the city, Japan Mobile Communiciations Infrastructure Association (JMCIA), an industry group representing mobile phone companies and the entity responsible for installing the antennas necessary to provide the service, will now break ground on the work for the Midōsuji Line and Chūō Line, starting before the end of the year. The service will roll-out in March of next year. Work on the remaining six lines will gradually begin starting this fiscal year, and the service is expected to roll-out “early next fiscal year”.

A spokesperson for the Municipal Transportation Bureau responded with the news at the session of the City Council’s Transport and Water Committee held on September 28.

Mayor Hiramatsu Kunio and Softbank president Son Masayoshi met in February of this year and agreed to work towards creating a service that would make it possible for passengers to check emails and transmit data even when inside tunnels on the Municipal Subway.
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Old October 14th, 2011, 12:19 PM   #3023
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First rollout of Sendai Municipal Subway IC card likely delayed to FY2014
http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2011/10/20111012t11027.htm

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On October 11, the September regular session of the Sendai City Council continued the Special Subcommittee for Earthquake Reconstruction. In regards to the timeline for introduction of an integrated circuit (IC) farecard for the Namboku Subway Line, the Municipal Transportation Bureau revealed its expectation that the program would not meet the original target of FY2013 as a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake, and would instead slip to FY2014. However, the farecard system is still scheduled to be rolled out onto the Tōzai Subway Line and municipal buses as planned, making it in time for the Tōzai Line’s FY2015 opening.

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Old October 14th, 2011, 12:20 PM   #3024
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Panasonic Electric Works develops LED lighting systems for railcars
http://www.nikkei.com/tech/news/arti...EBE2E2E2E2E2E2

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On October 12, Panasonic Electric Works (PEW) announced that it had developed light-emitting diode (LED) lighting for railcars. In addition to illumination systems inside passenger railcars that meets] strict fire safety standards, the company also developed headlights to be installed at train fronts and ends. The company received an order of the units for the new trains scheduled to be introduced onto the Tōkyō Metro Ginza Line in spring 2012.

The lighting system for passenger railcars meets the fire safety standards required of subway trains. Compared to the current fluroscent lighting, the LED lighting can reduce electricity consumption by over 40 percent. The headlights are a version of the incandescent lamps currently being used, and the company says they can be used for 40,000 hours—approximately 20 times the lifetime of halogen shield beam lights.

In addition to railcars, PEW now plans on expanding its LED products designed for public transit and public facilities, such as station buildings, grade crossings, and street lighting.
Official Panasonic Electric Works press release:
http://panasonic-denko.co.jp/corp/news/1110/1110-5.htm

The LEDs for passenger railcar lighting are 40 percent more energy-efficient (electricity consumption is 20 W vs. 47 W for fluorescent lighting), and have over three times the lifetime of current fluorescent lighting (40,000 hours vs. 12,000 hours). To meet the fire safety standards for subway trains, the lights are encased in inflammable glass covers. The LEDs are also 5,000 K brighter in color temperature. These lights are also environmentally friendly because they do not require the use of mercury.

The LED headlights last 20 times longer than current halogen shield beam lights (40,000 hours vs. 2,000 hours) and consume only 20% of the electricity (32 W for the primary light and 16 W for the secondary light, vs. 150 W).

Ginza Line 1000 series doing simple running tests inside Nakano Yard. Can hear the PMSMs…


Source: h057539 on YouTube
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Old October 14th, 2011, 12:20 PM   #3025
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Tōkyō Metro to introduce LED lighting at 10 stations by FY2015
http://www.nikkei.com/news/local/art...E2E2EBE0E0E4E7

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By FY2015, Tōkyō Metro will convert in-station lighting at six stations including Tawaramachi, Higashi-Ginza, and Ōtemachi to light-emitting diode (LED) systems in conjunction with station upgrade works. As subway stations use lighting even during the midday period, subways consume more electricity than other types of railways. By expanding the use of energy-efficient LEDs, Tōkyō Metro will reduce its total electricity consumption.

In February 2012, the railway will switch all fluorescent lighting at Tawaramachi Station—in restrooms, station staff rooms, on platforms, and in other locations—to LEDs. During FY2012, the railway will convert lighting at Higashi-Ginza and Urayasu Stations. By FY2015, the railway will also expand the program to Toyosu, Sendagi, and Ōtemachi. In addition, Tōkyō Metro will also convert a portion of lighting at four stations including Ogikubo and Hatchōbori Stations to LEDs.

The railway will also introduce LEDs into the headlights and interior lighting on the Ginza Line’s new 1000 series trains, scheduled to be introduced next spring.

Up until now, there have been precendents for introduction of LEDs into directional signage and other installations, but ceiling lights still used fluorescent lighting. By converting them to LED lights, the railway expects to not only reduce electricity consumption by approx. 40 percent, but also help reduce the amount of waste, as LED lights have a longer lifetime.
The two other stations receiving partial LED conversions are Akabane Iwabuchi and Kanda.

The FY2012 LED conversions alone involve about 1,700 fluorescent lamps, but will save approx. 259,000 kWh and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by approx. 140 t annually.

Official Tōkyō Metro press release:
http://www.tokyometro.jp/news/2011/p...0111011_02.pdf

Render of Urayasu Station post-LED

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Old October 14th, 2011, 12:21 PM   #3026
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Short films

Some short films on YouTube, to contemplate the intangible aspects of transit.
We need an interlude to all the technical and railfan stuff, after all.

Yamanote Line


Source: SobaiFilm on YouTube

Not trying to read too deep into it, but the woman doubles as the personification of the Yamanote Line, its trains moving endlessly in circles without a true destination, stopping at each station in search of passengers.

Commuters
Trippy commute scenes on the Ginza Line.


Source: goubymarc on YouTube
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Old October 18th, 2011, 04:56 PM   #3027
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Yamanote Line TrainNet service begins: Part 1
Very nice service. But how does the app know how crowded each car is?

Market will not let me download it. Do you know where I can get the .apk?

Thanks for the updates!
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Old October 19th, 2011, 08:23 AM   #3028
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northridge

Very nice service. But how does the app know how crowded each car is?

Market will not let me download it. Do you know where I can get the .apk?

Thanks for the updates!
There isn't an application for it. When you get on that particular car on the train just login to the onboard wifi router using your smartphone
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Old October 20th, 2011, 05:54 AM   #3029
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that Yamanote line film - it's like "Lost in Translation" and "Slumdog Millionaire" rolled into one
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Old October 20th, 2011, 04:28 PM   #3030
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woonsocket54 View Post
that Yamanote line film - it's like "Lost in Translation" and "Slumdog Millionaire" rolled into one
Interesting film takes on Tokyo, certainly reflects the aesthetics of the Western directors who made them.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 04:17 PM   #3031
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More of my pictures of trains and stuff.
This time, I was walking down by where the Tokyu Toyoko line and JR Yamanote line cross between Shibuya and Daikanyama. There is an ongoing project to create a tunnel here that will send the Toyoko line underground before crossing the JR tracks in order to connect it to the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin line under Meiji Dori-- effectively thru-servicing all the way to Shinjuku, Ikebukuro, and Saitama via Tobu Tojo and Seibu Ikebukuro lines. This will cause the current terminus at Shinjuku and the elevated tracks connecting to this point to shut down around July 2012 at the latest.
Here's what the scene looks like now (well 2 months ago anyway... whoops.)
You can click the picture and see on a map where the photos were shot.

1.Standing by the pedestrian bridge over the Yamanote line, south of the flyover.


2.


3.They keep things well hidden behind temporary walls like every other construction site in Japan; but I got a small glimpse of what I think was an equipment elevator here.


4.


5.


6.


7. This bridge was the only part of this structure that was elevated 2 years ago. Where the white temp walls are, used to be a concrete and earthen embankment. They raised the whole track deck up onto temporary steel structures and dug around them to create the scene today.


8.


9. Cool Shopping Street Merchant's Association sign.


10. Reminds me of New Orleans a little bit...


11. Wood decking on the "elevated" over the actual tunnel pit. There's hardly any room here to work, so the supply trucks must use the ROW to get to the postion where they can dump concrete and so forth, by driving about 20 meters on the decking.


12.


13.


14. Here are the plans as posted on the public notice board next to the station.


15. Striped is being left alone, yellow is slight cut to drop down about 1m max, and the green zone is where the trains will sit about halfway deeper than where they sit currently


16. You can see the full cross section and elevation of the tunnel along with the trajectory. The alignment follows the current elevated one about 3/4 of the way to Shibuya, then veers of to the right to jump onto Meiji Dori and join at the other end of the Subway station. I'm told that everything between the JR crossing and the south side of the FUkutoshin Shibuya sta. is complete for the most part.


17.


18.


19. There's a station in this rat-trap somewhere!


20. Oh, there it is!


21. Some times I can see the occasional head peering in the gap between the tracks and the platform. Workers literally crawling around this part, placing the new concrete track bed underneath the existing track.


22.


23.


24.


25. Daikanyama is a station wedged on the slope of a steep hill, so there's bridges everywhere to get into the place, and its kinda narrow--but its a really cool place to snap train pix!


26.


27.


28.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 06:59 PM   #3032
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Nice!

That scene with the truss bridge will soon be pretty boring once the trains go underground.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 11:40 PM   #3033
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'Eco-friendly' taxi stand opens at Tokyo Station
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TOKYO (Kyodo) -- A stand exclusively for electric and hybrid taxis opened Monday near JR Tokyo Station as part of a campaign led mainly by the government and the taxi industry to promote "eco-friendly" means of transportation.

"Passengers can have a less bumpy and more comfortable ride. I hope the establishment of the stand will make many people aware of the merit of the environmentally friendly taxi," said Akemi Watanabe, a 37-year-old driver of an EV taxi who picked up the first passenger.

The stand's operation hours are from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays. A similar taxi stand was opened at JR Osaka Station last May.

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/natio...dm041000c.html
Here is a video of the eco-friendly taxi stand



It is estimated that Taxi's in Tokyo are responsible for 20 percent of vehicle emissions. Hybrids will reduce that and electrics emit none.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 11:42 PM   #3034
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Tokyo Station Progress/Update

Render


Marounichi Side

The Marounichi side should be restored by March 2012, some station facilities will open in June 2012, JR EAST Travel Service Center and Gallery will open October 1 2012, Tokyo Station Hotel will open October 3 2012.

Render:


At Night time it will be lit with LED lights which is enery efficient



Construction updates of Marunouchi side 10/23/11







Yaesu Side

The North Tower phase II will be completed August 31, 2012. The Grand Central Roof will be completed in the Autumn of 2013 and the Yaesu Station Square should be fully completed in Autumn of 2014.

Renders:



Yaesu Station Square and the Central Roof (notice the greenery)





Construction updates of Yaesu side 10/23/11

North Tower Phase II



Square/Roof




All info/pictures from:

http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2011/20110906.pdf

http://urbanreallife.blog52.fc2.com/
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Old October 29th, 2011, 02:31 PM   #3035
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Tokyo Metro Shibuya Station: Fukutoshin Line-- Notices go up informing passengers of impending works

This happened maybe a month ago or so, but I didn't get pictures of it until this week (I'm always rushing to my train!)


These notices detail how the final platform configuration will look after the Toyoko line connection is made. It will become a 4 track/2 island platform setup. However the middle 2 tracks will only be handiling 8 car trains-- the outer two can handle 8 and 10 cars (as they do now)

So how will that impact the way they handle trains? As we know, they're lengthening the platforms on the Toyoko line to handle 10 cars at the express stops only, meaning local trains will still be 8 cars. Maybe most inbound local trains will terminate here from Yokohama? Then again, there are a lot of 8 car trains on the Fukutoshin line itself-- they run as locals on the line too, and usually terminate at Wako-shi. Most express runs continue on to Tokorozawa on the Seibu line, or Kawagoe on the Tobu line, and there's no rhyme or reason as to what trainset is going to be used-- I rode a Seibu train on the Toyoko line to Shiki just the other day, so I guess that aspect doesn't matter. However Seibu and Tobu have no 8 car trains running into the Fukutoshin (or Yurakucho line too) but the Toyoko line will have to-- its separate terminus at Shinjuku will go away, unlike Seibu and Tobu which still operate their separate stations at Ikebukuro.

Which leads me to another question... How will all those services mesh together with through-routing? On the Toyoko line there's three levels of service: Local, Express, Limited Express (which turns into commuter express during rush hours). On the Fukutoshin there's Local, Express (only stops at Shibuya, Shinjuku 3-chome, Ikebukuro, Kodaira-Mukohara, and Wako-shi (which turns Commuter Express during rush hours, and then all stops between Kodaira-Mukohara and Wakoshi are served). I'm guessing this will mean that the Toyoko line Expresses and Ltd. Expresses will run as Express with the subway... and turn Commuter express during the rush period. It's going to be very confusing indeed, and I'm sure there's people right now trying to get the schedules correct and matched up between agencies.


Here you can see the current state of those two middle tracks. They've been covered in 3 different places by a wide deck so people can freely walk between the two outer tracks which are in service. Those tracks (3-4, 1-2 are upstairs serving the Honzomon/Den'en Toshi line) have platform screen doors, but I wonder if the middle tracks will get those too? After all they need to handle 8 car trainsets from Tokyo Metro, and the Tokyu series 5000 and series 8000 trainsets... which might not be a problem as far as the doors lining up, but sometimes things get goofy on the Hibiya line and through servicing trains need to be able to get their passengers somewhere as in the picture below...



This is actually Tokyu Shibuya station, and that is a Tokyo Metro Hibiya line 03 series train that couldn't get onto the Hibiya line after coming from Kikuna as an inbound local, due to some troubles between Ebisu and Hiroo. So they kept them on as locals, and ran them up to Shibuya and of course, gave free transfers to the Ginza and Hanzomon line, which can put passengers back on track into Minato Ward. Because these cars are shorter 18m cars and only have 3 doors (or 5 doors) then maybe those middle tracks won't get screen doors for this purpose?


Current track 3 screen doors on the platform.


Looking to the north (towards Harajuku) from what will be the middle of tracks 4 and 5 when they "finish" the station out with the Toyoko Line connection. Notice the rails in the ceiling-- instead of wire, they use a "third rail" pickup in the tunnels here in Japan for the pantographs. They'll extend it down over the tracks when they get started finishing the station out.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 05:35 PM   #3036
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3rd Rail pick up , so its Catenary but in a 3rd Rail format?
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Old October 30th, 2011, 07:35 PM   #3037
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wow the last two metro stations are down right impressive!
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Old November 1st, 2011, 12:46 AM   #3038
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
3rd Rail pick up , so its Catenary but in a 3rd Rail format?
It's really a rail that's mounted to the tunnel ceilings that the pantographs make contact with-- cantenary would be a cable that is hung overhead-- its in the outside sections of rail here in Japan like normal, but I've always seen this overhead "rail" here, where pantographs are used in the tunnels.
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Old November 1st, 2011, 04:37 AM   #3039
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Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
It's really a rail that's mounted to the tunnel ceilings that the pantographs make contact with-- cantenary would be a cable that is hung overhead-- its in the outside sections of rail here in Japan like normal, but I've always seen this overhead "rail" here, where pantographs are used in the tunnels.
It's like that for maintenance sake. With the same amount shaved off with every train passing it's just more practical to use a rail than a wire since it lasts longer through wear and tear.
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Old November 1st, 2011, 01:55 PM   #3040
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I think that the main reason why they don't use catenary in subways is that it will make the construction cost soar, due to that they have to make the tunnels bigger to fit all the overhead gear. A rail type only needs some insulators bolted to the roof, the best thing with this is that safety is improved, no risk of tearing down the catenary (which trains here in Swedish love to do), so that trains won't get stuck in the middle of the tunnles and that maintenance is a lot simpler.
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