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Old November 28th, 2011, 09:18 AM   #3081
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Is it true that if a train is late in Japan by 1 minute you get a refund and a piece of paper that you give to your boss?
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Old November 28th, 2011, 11:21 AM   #3082
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That's not true.

If a service is late or completely shut down due to an unforeseeable event (accident, power outage, unplanned maintenance, etc) the schedule boards will go dark and will stop showing next train information-- at this time you can hear station staff loudly announcing alternate means to get you your destinations. (and much to the chagrin of most non-natives, this information is usually only in Japanese! However there are LCD signs in bigger train stations where the delays are posted in English too.)

The actual white slip of paper is given out to you by the station staff before you leave the station so you can use it as a free transfer to use one of the alternates. THERE ARE NEVER REFUNDS FOR DELAYS!

As for how to notify your boss-- most of the time, they'll already know because they also use the trains to commute. For example, today we started 1 hour later than normal because the JR Musashino line was shut down earlier in the morning, and half our students use this line to get to our school.
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Old November 28th, 2011, 11:41 AM   #3083
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Corrections / amendments:
  • Keikyū has platform doors at the Haneda Airport International Terminal Station.
  • Ōsaka Airport Station has (fixed) platform fencing.
Installation of platform doors is (rightfully) being prioritized at stations which serve many times more passengers than the typical airport station. The issues related to rolling stock design mentioned by k.k.jetcar are a major obstacle for airports (1), (3), and (5), as they are served by both limited express and standard commuter EMUs that have entirely different seating configurations, carlengths, and door placement.
I'd also like to point out that Meitetsu has full height platform doors at it's Centrair-Chubu Int'l Airport station. µ-Sky service has oversized platform doors that allow boarding of the limited stop Special Express cars.




Regular service trains are served on another platform that has "doors-on-the-platform"; basically first two meters from the tracks to the middle of the platform are outside. Then there's a glass wall with doors that allow access from the interior of the station, creating a large waiting room of sorts. not really screen doors in the regular sense, but you're sealed off from the heat/cold/wind/rain none the less and Meitetsu can run as many variations of equipment as they want.
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Old November 28th, 2011, 12:09 PM   #3084
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Oh yeah, Quashlo, I'm mad at you... you stayed in Ikebukuro, and I work at Rikkyo University... Lunch and or dinner could have happened!!

Oh well, I'm sure you'll be back here soon.
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Old November 28th, 2011, 02:06 PM   #3085
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Is it true that if a train is late in Japan by 1 minute you get a refund and a piece of paper that you give to your boss?
Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
That's not true.

If a service is late or completely shut down due to an unforeseeable event (accident, power outage, unplanned maintenance, etc) the schedule boards will go dark and will stop showing next train information-- at this time you can hear station staff loudly announcing alternate means to get you your destinations. (and much to the chagrin of most non-natives, this information is usually only in Japanese! However there are LCD signs in bigger train stations where the delays are posted in English too.)

The actual white slip of paper is given out to you by the station staff before you leave the station so you can use it as a free transfer to use one of the alternates. THERE ARE NEVER REFUNDS FOR DELAYS!
Not for rapid transits but there are refunds for the express portion of intercity express when the train is later than three hours if I remember correctly.
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Old November 28th, 2011, 06:54 PM   #3086
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Is it true that if a train is late in Japan by 1 minute you get a refund and a piece of paper that you give to your boss?
In Japan, It isn't true. But, here in Sao Paulo, this procedure (not a refund, but a paper to boss) already existed in the 1970's, when suburban trains (built in Japan by Toshiba-Kawasaki in 1958) ran late (15 to 30 minutes of delay) and overcrowded. There was calling "Cupom de Atraso" (Dealy Coupon).
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Old November 28th, 2011, 07:31 PM   #3087
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The delay certificate (遅延証明書) you give to your boss. I believe these usually get issued at a minimum delay of five minutes, but I have heard that you are still entitled to get one even if the delay is one minute or less, depending on the operator... Of course, it's rarely such a critical situation that you will want to waste extra time and effort trying to get the certificate if it's only a few-minutes delay.

If it's a major disruption where service is suspended for extended periods of time, there is a separate piece of paper (振替乗車票, detour pass) that you will get that allows you to take the designated detour routes (bus / rail) at no extra charge. Often times, particularly in Tōkyō, this involves taking a "rival" company... In these cases, after the dust settles, the company with the service disruption will compensate the affected companies for the costs (i.e., fare revenue) of the additional passengers.

You usually do not get a refund unless it's an exceptional amount of delay on a limited express (e.g., Shinkansen, intercity trains) or it's a special situation like a timed transfer where you miss your second train because the first is late, and they have to take you back to your origin station at no cost to you (無賃送還).

It's not urban transit, but if you follow the news for long enough, you will usually hear of the Shinkansen "hotels" every once in a while, where a disruption on the Shinkansen requires the cancellation of service and the operator is unable to provide any (or enough) substitute trains. In these cases, the operator will usually open up one or more Shinkansen trains as free "lodging" for passengers to spend the night until service resumes the following morning:


Source: kaiy130 on YouTube

Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
Oh yeah, Quashlo, I'm mad at you... you stayed in Ikebukuro, and I work at Rikkyo University... Lunch and or dinner could have happened!!
Sorry, I like to keep a low profile when I travel.
But yes, I will definitely be back soon.

Thanks for adding the Meitetsu thing... I've been way too busy lately to give enough attention to this thread.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:51 AM   #3088
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Exiting the Keisei / Sky Access station to the concourse area

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Skyliner headways are normally 40 minutes, but this improves to 20 minutes during peak periods.

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On the JR platforms

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Keisei 3050 series for Sky Access services

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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:52 AM   #3089
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E259 series N’EX

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Every time I’ve taken the N’EX, the loads have been pretty good.

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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:53 AM   #3090
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Four-language double-screen LCD units

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Japanese + Korean

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English + Simplified Chinese

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Second screen shows news in both English and Japanese, as well as weather, ads, etc.

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Platform facilities at Tōkyō Station.
The Sōbu Rapid Line / Yokosuka Line platforms are on B5F of the station.

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The split at Tōkyō Station.

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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:53 AM   #3091
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Deck area

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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:54 AM   #3092
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Saikyō Line platforms at Shinjuku were in construction mode as part of the South Exit upgrades.

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Transferring at Shinjuku to the Saikyō Line was a bit of an adventure, as it was the height of the evening commute rush hour. I only needed to go one stop, though, so it worked out alright.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 07:12 PM   #3093
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Wow! These E259 are wonderful!
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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:05 PM   #3094
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Yes, the E259 series was definitely one of the better trains I had the opportunity to ride on my trip, together with the Chiyoda Line 16000 series, the N700 series for the Kyūshū Shinkansen, and the 885 series Kamome.

===========

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Took me a while to regain my “sixth sense” in navigating the floods of passengers at the JR terminals…

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Saikyō Line (埼京線) is often jokingly referred to as “The Almighty Line” (最強線) because it has some of the worst crowding. With a hotel in Ikebukuro, I got to experience this firsthand fairly often. The crowding is bad, but the time savings is worth it over the Yamanote Line, which makes three additional intermediate stops between Shinjuku and Ikebukuro over the Saikyō Line.

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Toei Ōedo Line, Shinjuku Station.
As a pseudo-circular line, the Ōedo Line has become a valuable component of the rail network in central Tōkyō, but the deep stations can be a small turnoff.

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Tochō-mae Station

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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:05 PM   #3095
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Shinjuku Station, West Exit (below-grade level)

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Lost yet?
The signage is pretty good all-around, especially considering the complexity of the services and the station layouts.

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Shinjuku Grand Overpass (新宿大ガード)
This is a popular place to shoot JR trains approaching Shinjuku Station against the backdrop of the East Exit of the station.

Yamanote Line

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Chūō Rapid Line

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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:06 PM   #3096
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I guess I got a bit lucky here, as I caught a snap of the Yamanote Line train equipped with the trial TrainNet service… Never got a chance to ride it though.

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Chūō Local Line
With 8+ tracks, the noise when trains cross above is music to a railfan's ears...

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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:07 PM   #3097
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Early Saturday morning (2011.10.29) on Tōkyō Metro
Marunouchi Line, Ikebukuro Station

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Transfer at Ginza to Hibiya Line

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Last edited by quashlo; November 30th, 2011 at 08:28 AM.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:11 PM   #3098
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Through-servicing Tōbu train bound for Naka-Meguro

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Platform convenience kiosk

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Old November 30th, 2011, 08:27 AM   #3099
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Damaged rail lines may be converted to BRT
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T00467.htm

Quote:
The East Japan Railway Co. is considering building highways exclusively for buses on out-of-use sections of three railway lines in the Tohoku region where tracks and stations were washed away in the March 11 tsunami, it has been learned.

In what is called the BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) system, these lanes will be used exclusively by buses, according to JR East.

Converting the sections to lanes to be exclusively used by public bus services will cost less than half the amount for rebuilding railway tracks there. The conversion work can also be finished more quickly, better benefitting local residents, the company said.

JR East will discuss the project with local governments affected in the disaster.

Unlike ordinary bus services that use general roads with other vehicles, the BRT system is not affected by traffic congestion. Therefore, it always operates punctually. The system has already been used in China, South Korea and Brazil to help alleviate heavy traffic congestion in large cities.

The sections of railway involved in the project, totaling about 154 kilometers, are on the Kesennuma Line in Miyagi Prefecture, the Ofunato Line in Miyagi and Iwate prefectures and the Yamada Line in Iwate Prefecture. These three lines are among seven JR lines in the Tohoku region that ceased operating in the wake of March 11 disaster.

The sections were seriously damaged by the tsunami. Not only the rails but also roadbeds and bridges were washed away. It is estimated that railroad reconstruction work would cost nearly 40 billion yen.

If urban areas are moved to higher ground in the future to avoid tsunami, it may become necessary to change the sections' routes for the convenience of railway users. Eight months after the quake, it is therefore still difficult to start full-scale reconstruction work.

Currently, bus services are provided as a substitute for train services in affected coastal areas. However, ordinary roads are particularly congested in the morning and early evening hours.

Some local residents complain that their commuting time on some days is twice as long as before the disaster. There are strong calls for resumed train services as early as possible.

If the BRT system is introduced on the railroad routes, it will become unnecessary to rebuild railway tracks. Only such simple facilities as bus stops are needed, and their construction can be completed quickly.

The BRT system will also make it possible to flexibly set routes. For example, the buses will be able to use ordinary roads to reach areas on higher ground where people have relocated or to avoid sections where railroad bridges have been washed away. The BRT system's operating cost would also be less than that of trains.

Though the project may cause worry that train services will be abolished with the introduction of the bus service, some municipalities are positive about the idea.

The municipal government of Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture, is considering including a new transport system to replace railway services in the reconstruction project now being planned. The city's planning section says it will not insist on train services if an alternative will make early recovery possible.

"Converting to bus services may sound negative. But our top priority is to provide means of transportation to local residents," JR East President Satoshi Seino said. "We'll discuss the project while listening to local people and experts."

Prof. Fumihiko Nakamura at Yokohama National University's Graduate School of Urban Innovation, an expert on urban transportation planning, is a strong supporter of the plan.

"The BRT costs enormously less than conventional train services regarding construction and maintenance. It can also better cope with local people's needs, such as making stops at schools and hospitals," Nakamura said.

"The project may prompt [local governments] to review existing transportation systems across the nation, not only in the disaster-hit region."

===

Ibaraki Pref., Nagoya use BRT

The Kashitetsu Bus in Ibaraki Prefecture and the Yutorito Line in Nagoya are working examples of the BRT system in Japan.

The Kashitetsu Bus uses about five kilometers of the defunct Kashima Railway, a section that was rebuilt exclusively for bus services. The railway had connected Ishioka with Hokota, both in the prefecture. BRT operations began in August last year.

Its buses also run on ordinary roads and stop at Ibaraki Airport.

According to the Kantetsu Green Bus Co., which operates the Kashitetsu Bus, substitute bus operations were launched on existing roads after the Kashima Railway shut down.

However, these buses were often caught in morning and evening traffic jams. As a result, the number of users decreased to an average of about 800 a day, about half of that for the railway.

However, BRT operations reduced travel time through central Ishioka by about 20 minutes, and the number of users recovered to about 1,100 a day.

"The number of bus stops is more than twice that of train stations. I'm sure we became able to provide even better service to our customers," an employee of the company said.

The company is considering making a new route using an ordinary road to travel through a residential area, said the employee.

"With the system, we can make new routes easily to meet our passengers' needs. That's difficult for a train," said the employee.

(Nov. 21, 2011)

The Kashitetsu Bus in Ibaraki Prefecture is operated on the BRT system.


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Old November 30th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #3100
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Niigata Transys delivers supplemental order of 10 cars for Nippori–Toneri Liner
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...1535022-n1.htm

Quote:
On November 2, IHI announced that it had delivered 10 fully-automated automated guideway transit cars for the Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation’s Nippori–Toneri Liner. The cars will be used on the 13-station, 9.7 km line that stretches from Nippori Station in Arakawa Ward, Tōkyō Prefecture to Minumadai Shinsui Kōen in Adachi Ward.

The contract value was not revealed. IHI hopes to take advantage of its success in producing automated rolling stock for the domestic market to accelerate its marketing efforts in Asia and other areas.

All of the cars bound for the Nippori–Toneri Liner were manufactured by IHI subsidiary Niigata Transys (HQ: Chūō Ward, Tōkyō). In addition to supplying an order of 60 cars for the line in 2008, the company also delivered another 10 cars in 2009, bringing the grand total to 80 cars with this latest order.

IHI is advancing efforts to strengthen its automated guideway transit marketing abilities, and since winning an order for the Ōsaka Municipal Transportation Bureau’s New Tram in 1981, IHI has supplied over 400 automated guideway transit cars, including trains for systems such as the Tōkyō Waterfront New Transit Yurikamome Line.

Niigata Transys (NTS) is the leading manufacturer of AGT stock in the Japanese market, having also produced trains for the Astram Line in Hiroshima, the Wing Shuttle at Kansai International Airport, and the Kanazawa Seaside Line in Yokohama.

Nippori–Toneri Liner cab view:
Source: ODEKAKE0920 on YouTube

Part 1: Minumadai Shinsui Kōen to Kōya



Part 2: Kōya to Nippori

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