daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 4th, 2009, 01:54 AM   #301
nouveau.ukiyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 25

Japan's maglev on track for financial crash
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-b...0090726pb.html

Quote:
By PHILIP BRASOR

About 40 people are crowded onto the observation deck of the Yamanashi Linear Test Line Center, holding their cameras at the ready and waiting for the world's fastest train — an experimental maglev model that's called a "linear motor car" (LMC) — to make its appearance.

On certain days, JR Tokai, which is in charge of the project, performs test runs at scheduled times, but the visitors have already been waiting a half hour for the 11:20 a.m. test. Finally, there's an announcement that the train, which can reach speeds of up to 580 kph, will pass by in a minute. Everybody points their lenses at the tunnel on the right. The train zips by in the blink of an eye, and most of the photographers end up with images of an empty track.

With its dioramas and full-scale recreations of LMC interiors, not to mention the souvenir shop selling linear motor manju (sweet buns) on the first floor, the test center doubles as a tourist attraction. It's located in a remote corner of Yamanashi Prefecture, wedged between rice fields and mountains. Though the exhibits sell the virtues of public transportation, the center itself is a 25-minute walk from the nearest train station along back roads with no signs. Most visitors drive there. The parking lot is big enough for tour buses.

Sightseeing is not the center's main purpose, but people can be forgiven for thinking that the LMC has a better chance of becoming an amusement park ride than a viable addition to Japan's railway infrastructure. Maglev trains have been in development here since 1962, and the latest estimate is that there will be a line in operation by 2025. Nobody is holding their breath.

However, JR Tokai is now indicating that it is taking concrete steps in that direction. The company announced at a June 8 Tokyo conference that it would bear all of the estimated ¥5.1 trillion for constructing the Tokyo-Nagoya leg of the system. Consequently, the media, not to mention the government, is finally taking the LMC seriously. The Construction Ministry never paid much attention to the project because it was busy expanding the existing network of shinkansen lines. And except for politicians who happen to live in regions affected by the proposed route, no one ever talked about it, but the business weekly Toyo Keizai reports that some high-profile lawmakers were at the conference hoping to bask in the glow of a bright, shiny future.

Toyo says that no private company in the world has ever single-handedly taken on such a huge infrastructure project. The shinkansen has always been overseen by the central government, and with the Construction Ministry out of the LMC equation for the time being, JR Tokai has to deal directly with local governments. JR Tokai's preferred route is a relatively straight line from Tokyo's Shinagawa Station to Nagoya Station, with one stop in each prefecture the LMC passes through along the way. However, Nagano Prefecture isn't happy with the proposed station in the city of Iida. It prefers a stop in the Suwa region, which contains a lot of precision manufacturers. That would require looping the route northward, and though it would only add about seven minutes to the 40-minute Tokyo-Nagoya journey, it would also add another half trillion yen to the cost.

JR Tokai doesn't want to go to Suwa, but there are also other issues to be worked out, such as who will pay for station construction, JR or local governments. Negotiations will have to be concluded quickly if the route is to be completed by 2025, since the environmental assessment will take three years and construction at least 10.

All this talk about who pays for what and whether the route goes through Suwa has effectively obscured the most significant question: Is there a demand for such a line?

Last December, the Asahi Shimbun ran an editorial by Reijiro Hashiyama, a professor of public policy at Meisei University in Tokyo, who says that not enough thought has been given to the LMC's practicality. JR Tokai has said that "there is a demand" for the LMC because present shinkansen technology will soon "reach its limit" as a means of transportation. Now you can get from Tokyo to Nagoya via the Tokaido shinkansen in as little as an hour and 40 minutes. The LMC promises to cut that time by more than half. In other words, the technology to go faster is available, therefore we should exploit it.

But Hashiyama points out that research has shown a slowing of demand for even present transportation systems, and as everybody knows, Japan's population is on the decline. JR Tokai presumes that half of Tokaido shinkansen users will switch to the LMC, but it doesn't provide any data to support this projection. It has not surveyed users at all.

Maybe that's because the only people who can effectively use the LMC are those in Tokyo or Nagoya. Stations along the route will not have transfer access to other train lines; as with the test center, people will have to drive to get to them. And 80 percent of JR Tokai's planned route is made up of tunnels, thus discouraging pleasure trips. It's like riding a very fast subway.

Hashiyama is almost certain that, based on this "subway" model, the cost will far exceed JR Tokai's estimate , meaning the Construction Ministry will have to step in after all, and costs will then be passed on to taxpayers. As of last December, JR Tokai estimated construction would cost ¥18 billion per kilometer, but subways normally cost from ¥20 to ¥70 billion per kilometer to build. And so far, no one has dared to come up with a possible price for a ticket.

So besides business users who need to get from Tokyo to Nagoya or vice versa really fast, the only people likely to ride the LMC are those, like the train freaks taking photos at the test center, who will want to experience its excitement at least once. They'll probably have to pay dearly for the privilege, but that's OK. They have 15 years to save up.
As cool as it would be to have a maglev, I always had my doubts as to whether it really was practical to have it at all.
nouveau.ukiyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:47 AM   #302
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by ruready1000 View Post
I know it's hard to renovate the exsiting station, maybe even harder than building new station, but I think 5 years are too long.
Yes, five years does seem like a long time… But there’s probably a good reason for it. The article isn’t specific, but it may be a timing thing where they plan to reuse or readapt the space from some of the existing faregate areas that will be removed. But they won’t be able to remove them until they have the new infrastructure up and running.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:49 AM   #303
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Sekisui Chemical backs out of Hasuda Station West Exit redevelopment
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/sa...902000086.html

Quote:
Sekisui Chemical (HQ: Minato Ward, Tōkyō) has announced that it plans to back out of the Hasuda Station West Exit redevelopment project, citing several reasons including low demand for residential units. Sekisui participated in the drafting process for the redevelopment plan and was expected to undertake construction of the project. On July 28, Hasuda City announced that it would look for a replacement firm to continue the work, but cautioned that the scheduled construction start of 2010 is expected to be pushed back.

At a full committee meeting of the City Council on July 28, Mayor Nakano Kazunobu said, “Redevelopment of the West Exit area is the city’s priority project,” and stressed that the city would not abandon the project.

According to city representatives, the main building in the redevelopment project (23 stories) would house commercial space on the first floor, municipal facilities on the second floor, and residential units on the third floor and above, and was scheduled to be completed in 2012. Sekisui Chemicals signed an agreement with the city as project consultant, assisting in developing the proposed redevelopment plan. The city had already announced its intention to put out a bid for a construction contractor for the project, but on July 23, Sekisui Chemicals President Negishi Nobufumi notified Mayor Nakano that the firm has no intention of putting in a bid.

Last edited by quashlo; August 13th, 2009 at 06:07 AM.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:50 AM   #304
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tōkyū Store opens online delivery service
http://www.asahi.com/digital/nikkank...908040011.html

Quote:
On August 3, Rakuten, Inc. announced that Tōkyū Store will join Internet supersite shokutaku.jp, managed by Net’s Partners, a subsidiary of Rakuten. For Tōkyū Store, the move will save on the cost of building an independent system and establishing a new service, and will open up their customer base to members of Rakuten. This marks the third supermarket to join shokutaku.jp.

Tōkyū Store will market its services under the name Tōkyū Store Internet Supermarket, and will initially operate out of three stores in Kanagawa Prefecture along the Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line. The service will offer approximately 4,200 items from food and liquor to everyday goods, delivering purchases within as little as three hours from receipt of the order. Tōkyū Store has set a sales goal of ¥570 million for the first year, and plans to increase the customer base to all areas served by Tōkyū’s rail network and expand the array of items offered.

Net’s Partners collects revenues from fees assessed on supermarkets who join shokutaku.jp. With the latest announcement of Tōkyū Store’s participation, the company plans to increase its efforts at expanding its nationwide network of supermarkets, especially in the Tōkyō, Nagoya, and Ōsaka areas.
Tōkyū Store is a supermarket chain subsidiary of Tōkyū Corporation, and is part of Tōkyū Group. They have stores all over the Kantō region, although they are mostly concentrated in areas along Tōkyū rail lines in southwest Tōkyō and Kanagawa Prefectures.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:53 AM   #305
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tōkyū, Odakyū, Enoden join fight against global warming
http://shonan.keizai.biz/headline/795/
http://www.eic.or.jp/news/?act=view&...1285&oversea=0

Quote:
Beginning July 21, Odakyū Electric Railway (HQ: Shinjuku Ward, Tōkyō) will run its seasonal limited express “Shōnan Marine” trains. The trains carry passengers heading out to Enoshima and Kamakura during the summer tourist season, and will operate with Romancecar MSE (60000 series) trains, which normally don’t operate on the Enoshima Line.

The service will operate weekdays until August 21, with one round trip departing Seijō Gakuen-mae Station on the Odakyū Line at 8:52 am, arriving at Katase Enoshima Station on the Enoshima Line at 10:09 am. The return half of the journey leaves Katase Enoshima at 4:33 pm and arrives back at Seijō Gakuen-mae at 5:32 pm. The train makes intermediate stops at Shin-Yurigaoka, Sagami Ōno, Yamato, and Fujisawa.

Trips between August 3 and August 7 will be operated as Cool Biz Trains, where the temperature control system inside the train will be set one to two degrees above normal and passengers will be asked to participate in a survey on the project. The Ministry of the Environment’s Team -6% is offering its special assistance in the experimental effort, which is part of Odakyū’s strategy to fight global warming by “encouraging use of environmentally-friendly public transport.” Odakyū’s other efforts include introducing low-energy rolling stock and offering discounted excursion tickets through use of carbon offsets.

“We’re introducing a new ‘Cool Biz Train’ this year, which we hope will become a good opportunity for our passengers to learn about global warming,” says Mikawa Shin’ichi, from Odakyū’s CSR and public relations department.
Quote:
Team -6% (Ministry of the Environment) announced that it will participate in an experimental Cool Biz Train project being undertaken by team member Tōkyū Corporation, with cooperation from Yokohama Minato Mirai Railway. The Cool Biz Train project will set the standard temperature inside trains one degree Celsius higher than usual during the midday period (10 am to 4 pm).

The change affects 5000 series trains on the Tōyoko Line / Minato Mirai Line and Yokohama Minato Mirai Railway Y500 series trains (a total of 26 trains), as well as four 7000-series trains on the Ikegami Line and Tōkyū Tamagawa Line. The project lasts from August 1 to 31.

Stickers publicizing the Cool Biz Train project will be posted on the exterior of trains, and information posters inside trains and key stations on the Tōkyū and Minato Mirai Lines will be on display.
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:56 AM   #306
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Sagamihara BRT alignment reevaluated
http://mytown.asahi.com/kanagawa/new...00000908010004

Quote:
With regards to a proposed bus rapid transit (BRT) system plan that is encountering local opposition, Sagamihara City has announced that it will discuss the issues with citizens and reconsider the alignment and width of the route. The municipal government announced its new position on July 31 at a meeting of the City Council’s Special Committee on Transport Issues.

At the two BRT public comment sessions held between February and June, a majority of comments received were in opposition to the project, with some citizens saying the project would cause environmental damage and others calling for the abandonment of the proposal altogether. But the city says its new stance “does not abandon all the work that has been done for the original proposal,” and emphasizes its ongoing intention to introduce BRT service.

Comments received from the public reached 3,033 cases in the first session and 6,247 cases in the second session. The major comments included the following:
  • Abandon the project (222 comments in the first session, 792 in the second);
  • The project will destroy livable neighborhoods (304, 204); and,
  • The existing transport network is sufficient (170, 139).
Other comments criticized the city’s poor handling of the project and criticized the proposal as an excuse to build a “symbol” in the city’s efforts to become a government-designated city (and be permitted functions typically only allowed for prefectural governments).

“We will discuss the project and exchange opinions with local residents, and hope to come to a consensus on the current state of these neighborhoods and the transportation issues they bear,” explained the city in regards to the significance of the new position.

While the basic route connecting Sagami Ōno Station on the Odakyū Line and Harataima Station on the JR Sagami Line remains the same, the city says, “We will continue to explore the exact alignment, width, and system, and consider the possibility of expanding the system to other areas.” With regards to the public comment process, the city has proposed establishing a group consisting of representatives from local organizations, citizen volunteers, and city staff.

BRT is a new transport system that would install bus-only lanes for approximately 8 km between Sagami Ōno Station and Harataima Station and would allow buses to travel at high speeds. The city claims the project would help establish a transport network in the southern parts of the city and aims to introduce the system by 2016. The total construction cost, including land acquisition, is estimated at ¥28.5 billion.

After the city released the basic plan for the system in February without discussing the proposal with local residents beforehand, residents along the alignment have criticized the project, forming Citizens Against the BRT Project (Chairman: Kumagai Keiko).
Sagami Ōno Station is a major station on the Odakyū Odawara Line (the main line of the Odakyū network), as well as the junction between the Odawara Line and the Odakyū Tama Line, a major branch line south to Chūō Rinkan, Yamato, Shōnandai, Fujisawa, and Katase Enoshima. Daily station entries and exits at Sagami Ōno Station are 121,338 passengers (2008). The station is the center of a large suburban-style downtown, located 32 km and 50 min. from Shinjuku via the Odawara Line.


Source: Wikipedia
North Exit.


Source: Wikipedia
South Exit.


Source: Wikipedia
Inside the station building (Sagami Ōno Station Square), which features a large mall and hotel operated by Odakyū.

Harataima Station is a small station on the JR Sagami Line, a periphery line that stretches from Chigasaki City in the Shōnan Area (southwest of Yokohama and Tōkyō) through Ebina City and Zama City to Hashimoto Station in Sagimahara City. Daily station entries at Harataima Station are 4,141 passengers (2008).


Source: Wikipedia
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:57 AM   #307
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Seibu ad posters

April 2009


May 2009


June 2009


July 2009


August 2009
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:58 AM   #308
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

More videos of E259 series

A public viewing event. More eye candy of the interior, including the new four-langauge LCDs, as well as the special baggage areas and restrooms. The green car makes an appearance at around 6:45.

Source: 313newrapid on YouTube

After testing at Yokosuka Station, the train heads back to the yard. You can hear the music horn as it warns bystanders.

Source: TokaidoE231 on YouTube

Train in 6+6 configuration on a trial run departs Shinagawa Station.

Source: tobu2181 on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 07:59 AM   #309
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

More videos of E233-2000 series

Test train arriving at Abiko.

Source: SHOICHI180 on YouTube

Test train departing Kashiwa.

Source: SHOICHI180 on YouTube

Test train arriving at Matsudo.

Source: musasinokyukou on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 08:23 AM   #310
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tōkyō: Part 8

After boarding a kaitoku (rapid limited express), the workhorse of Keikyū’s network, I get off at Keikyū Kamata. Keikyū is one of the faster private operators in the Tōkyō, with a maximum speed of 120 kph—second only to the Tsukuba Express. Keikyū is popular among railfans for a variety of reasons in addition to its speed, including complex operations (plenty of coupling / decoupling action and interlining, combined with a high frequency and limited infrastructure capacity) and an alignment that takes trains from Shinagawa terminal right through the heart of the Tōkyō-Yokohama Industrial Belt to the laid-back, almost rural, feel of the Miura Peninsula. Keikyū also has a diverse mix of old and new stock, in many different formations, but all featuring the unmistakable bright red livery.

Keikyū Kamata is the junction between the Keikyū Main Line and Keikyū Airport Line, which serves Haneda Airport. Despite this important function, the station only has three tracks, with one island platform and one side platform. This is Platform 1 and 2. Platform 1 is the Airport Line platform, and trains coming to and from Haneda Airport use this platform. Platform 2 is the outbound Main Line platform, for Kawasaki, Yokohama, and Yokosuka. The operations can get quite complex, as Keikyū runs through-services to and from the Airport Line from both directions of the Main Line. Trains from the Airport Line bound for Yokohama enter the station “in reverse” and then switch directions to continue their journey (and vice versa coming from the Yokohama end and entering the Main Line). It gets more complex when Airport Line trains are coupled with Main Line trains in 8+4 or 4+4+4. To and from the Yokohama direction, the 4-car Airport Line trains are coupled / decoupled at Keikyū Kawasaki, which is the next big station over.

Here, the sign for Platform 1 indicates the next train is for Shinagawa. When it departs, the train will need to cross over the outbound Main Line track to reach the inbound Main Line track. This is a critical bottleneck in the network, but will be solved when the station is finally elevated and expanded.

image hosted on flickr


This is Platform 3 at Keikyū Kamata, the Main Line platform for Shinagawa and the Asakusa Line. A second-generation 1000 series train, part of the latest series for Keikyū, departs the station, on a rapid limited express run for Shinagawa. The stainless steel body indicates it is one of the newer orders.

image hosted on flickr


A clearer look at the inside of the station from Platform 3. This station and the adjacent sections of the Main Line and Airport Line are being elevated, partially to eliminate problems with the nearby Airport Line grade-crossing across a major roadway. In combination with the elevation, the station will be expanded with two levels of platforms (similar to Aoto on the Keisei Line), eliminating the bottlenecks with having only a single track and platform for the Airport Line.

image hosted on flickr


I board a local train for a quick one-station journey back the way I came to Umeyashiki Station. This is from Platform 2, facing southwest towards Keikyū Kamata. With virtually no space available to the sides due to existing buildings, the Main Line is being elevated directly above the existing tracks. The Keikyū Main Line runs through dense neighborhoods between Shinagawa and Yokohama, but with the high frequency of trains—especially during the rush hours—many of the crossings only open for very short periods of time.

image hosted on flickr


The new steel elevated structure. The columns touch down on the platforms at the existing station.

image hosted on flickr


A closer look at the crossing immediately west of the station. The crossing arms are down in preparation for a train passing through.

image hosted on flickr


The train, an express bound for Haneda Airport, passes the station. This is a Hokusō Railway through-service, although the train itself is on lease by Hokusō from Keisei.

image hosted on flickr


A look down the north side of the tracks, in the direction of Keikyū Kamata. Umeyashiki is only 800 m from Keikyū Kamata, so the elevated outbound track will rise after leaving the new station to enter Keikyū Kamata on the third level.

image hosted on flickr


A closer look at the crossing itself. Keikyū actually runs on standard gauge, along with the Toei Asakusa Line and Keisei lines., giving trains a bit of stability on high-speed sections.

image hosted on flickr


Looking northeast in the direction of Shinagawa. The elevated structure will continue east from here past the adjacent Ōmorimachi Station and connect with the existing elevated section at Heiwajima Station.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


The corridor between Shinagawa and Yokohama is served by JR East (via the Tōkaidō Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line) as well as Keikyū, although Keikyū has many more stations on this section than the JR lines. The maximum distance between the JR lines and Keikyū Main Line on this section is still less than 1 km, and at several locations, the two are directly side-by-side. There’s also the JR Yokosuka Line, which also serves Shinagawa and Yokohama, but follows a slightly different alignment on a former cargo branch of the Tōkaidō Main Line.

Umeyashiki is a relatively minor neighborhood station, with 14,000 daily entries and exits, and only local services stop at the station.

image hosted on flickr


Sign indicating that six-car trains actually extend into the crossing when stopped at the station. The existing platforms are sandwiched by crossings on both ends and can actually only accommodate four-car trains. When the station is elevated, the new platforms will accommodate six-car trains, but for now six-car local trains use door cuts when stopping at the station.

image hosted on flickr


Here, the first two cars of a local for Uraga extend past the crossing as the train is stopped at the station. The workhorse of the Keikyū lines is the rapid limited express, which is designed for quick point-to-point travel and long-distance journeys, but these locals are vital for connecting the smaller stations with the rest of the network.

image hosted on flickr


The rest of the train. While subway-compatible stock such as this 1500 series is designed with three doors per side and all longitudinal seating, Keikyū also uses exclusive stock within its network, such as the 2100 series, which has only two doors per side and features all transverse seating. A trip from Misakiguchi on the Kurihama Line to Shinagawa is a good 65 km and takes over an hour (almost 90 minutes during commuter periods), so the 2100 series is used for non-through-service rapid limited expresses to provide a bit of passenger comfort.

image hosted on flickr


We exit the station temporarily and cross on the east side of the station, entering the outbound faregates to reach Platform 1. Here, a rapid limited express for Haneda Airport skips the station. Not all rapid limited expresses run the full length of the line, and some only run a short bit on the Main Line before turning off onto the Airport Line. Keikyū competes with the Tōkyō Monorail for trips to and from Haneda Airport.

image hosted on flickr


We run across another C-Flyer, an express bound for Imba Nihon Idai.

image hosted on flickr


The crossing arms open.

image hosted on flickr


Facing southwest towards Kamata. The elevated station will consist of two side platforms.

image hosted on flickr


This older 800 series stock, stopped at the station on a local run for Shinagawa, has now-rare wide single-leaf doors. This unit was manufactured in 1979.

image hosted on flickr


I make my way back to Keikyū Kamata to get some pictures of the construction work for elevating the station and grade-separating the tracks. Like Aoto Station on the Keisei Line, the new station will have two elevated platform levels. This is a view of the elevated structure for the Airport Line, with two tracks on separate levels to allow connections with both levels of the new station.

image hosted on flickr


A view of how the Airport Line will connect with the main station structure.

image hosted on flickr


Currently, the Airport Line crosses over this busy roadway, the Keihin No. 1, a part of National Route 15. Traffic volumes are high, and there is a lot of truck traffic, but the Airport Line maintains 8 to 10 trains per direction per hour throughout the day, so the congestion at the grade crossing is a big problem. In the past, the Airport Line also had a bottleneck grade crossing a little further down at Kanpachi-dōri, a critical ring road, but that section was undergrounded in 1997.

image hosted on flickr


A better view of the construction work on the east side of the station.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


In addition to this one and the one at Aoto, there are other examples of bi-level elevated structures elsewhere, including an elevated section of the JR Saikyō Line that runs underneath the Tōhoku Shinkansen tracks near Ōmiya Station. Many of these other cases are Shinkansen-related however, and its more difficult to find situations like Aoto and the future Keikyū Kamata, where the lines involved are all subway or commuter lines.

image hosted on flickr


A view of the work on the western side of the station, where you can see just how close the new elevated structure will be to existing buildings. The grade-separation will continue approximately 2 km west to Rokugōdote, where it will connect with existing elevated tracks crossing the Tama River into Kawasaki City.

image hosted on flickr


The tower crane at right is one of two working the site.

image hosted on flickr


A Keisei train on an express run for Haneda Airport crosses Keihin No. 1, as vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians queue up.

image hosted on flickr


The train has passed but the crossing arms stay down…

image hosted on flickr


After the Keisei train exits the single-track section, a Hokusō train on an express run for Inzai Makinohara enters the crossing from the other direction. This is the same Hokusō train on lease from Keisei that we saw at Umeyashiki Station.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Another view of the Airport Line construction… Just beyond this section, the track splits into double track.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Some girders sit in the staging area, probably in preparation to be lifted by tower crane into the “gap” in the elevated structure. A Main Line train from the Yokohama direction pulls into the station at ground level.

image hosted on flickr


The column for the bridge across Keihin No. 1 falls right at the corner of the existing crossing.

image hosted on flickr


A Keikyū train, an express for Shinagawa, enters the crossing and arrives at the station.

image hosted on flickr


A good view of how the Airport Line tracks curve into the station and connect with the Main Line. Platform 1 takes trains to and from both directions of the Main Line. This skill in maximizing infrastructure is one reason why Keikyū is popular among railfans. The coupling / decoupling operations at Keikyū Kawasaki, as well as the action in and around Shinagawa Station are some of the best spots for watching.

image hosted on flickr


To be continued…
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2009, 01:07 PM   #311
nouveau.ukiyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 25

I thought this was cool. I first saw it here: http://yeinjee.com/2009/paperclips-d...e-train-floor/


Source: kinchangnoodle on YouTube

Any other explanations?
nouveau.ukiyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 09:19 AM   #312
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

It's the magnetic field generated by the motors. I've seen and heard of other situations like this elsewhere.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 09:20 AM   #313
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keikyū to install PASMO coin lockers
http://www.keikyu.co.jp/corporate/pr...s/090805.shtml

Quote:
Keihin Electric Express Railway (Keikyū) (HQ: Minato Ward, Tōkyō; President: Ishiwata Tsuneo) has signed a business partnership with ALPHA Corporation (HQ: Yokohama, Kanagawa; President: Kinose Shigeru) to expand PASMO-accepting coin lockers.

PASMO-accepting coin lockers accept not only cash but also transport-related electronic money through PASMO and interoperable Suica cards, which have sold a total of over 40 million cards. The coin lockers meet the various payment needs of users and have multiple benefits, including decreased payment time, reduced management costs of small cash, and more effective promotion PR.

Both Keikyū and ALPHA Corporation agree that introducing PASMO, which allows users to simply place their card on the reader for payments, will increase the added value of coin lockers. With the partnership, Keikyū has contracted with ALPHA Corporation to expand PASMO-accepting coin lockers at railway stations and major commercial centers.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 09:21 AM   #314
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New surveillance system for railroad crossings
http://www.asahi.com/digital/nikkank...908060020.html

Quote:
Kyokkō Tsūshin System (HQ: Takatsu Ward, Kawasaki City; President: Sakai Fujio) has developed “VAC Series,” a wide-area surveillance camera system using communication lines. The surveillance system is designed for outdoor locations such as railway crossings and stations. The system allows real-time confirmation with audio and video, and allows for recording. The camera itself costs ¥150,000, but the recording equipment can vary, with an estimated price of ¥450,000. The company expects to sell 100 units during the first year.

The VAC Series system consists of surveillance cameras and recording equipment, as well as surveillance software that can replay and save video, and can be operated individually as a unit or via the mainframe computer. The camera and recording equipment are connected by coaxial cable. The camera uses a 3.8 megapixel CCD and comes with a microphone to meet the needs of railway operators who want proof that the warning sirens at railway crossings are operating properly. Electrical power is supplied by the recorder. The unit can be used within a temperature range of -10℃ to 40℃. The recording equipment uses 32 GB CompactFlash cards for image storage, and can store data for up to four days. The recorder can also be set to record for a given ten-minute period.
Perhaps for use as evidence at crossing incidents…
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 09:24 AM   #315
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Financial slump hits Tōkyō private railways
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1826009-n1.htm

Quote:
The consolidated financial reports for March through April 2009 for the six major private railways in the Kantō Region listed on the Tōkyō Stock Exchange, including Tōkyū Corporation, were all released on August 10. All railway companies except Keisei Electric Railway reported lower revenues than the same period last year, and all companies reported a decline in operating profit. As a result of several factors including sluggish demand in excursion travel, all companies reported declining passenger transport revenues from non-commuter travel. Related business ventures such as department stores and hotels also reported poor performance.

Tōkyū Corporation reported total sales of ¥298.0 billion (a 5.1 percent decrease over the same period last year) and an operating profit of ¥11.4 billion (a 15.7 percent decrease). Tōbu Railway reported a 5.5 percent drop in sales to ¥145.1 billion, and a 22.8 percent drop in operating profit to ¥8.0 billion. Odakyū Electric Railway posted operating profit of ¥9.8 billion (a 26.2 percent decrease), while Keiō Electric Railway reported ¥8.8 billion (a 22.2 percent decrease). Keihin Electric Express Railway (Keikyū) showed a 44.9 percent drop in operating profit to ¥4.6 billion. Keisei’s restructuring of its taxi business Teito Jidōsha Kōtsū as a consolidated subsidiary contributed to a 5.7 percent jump in sales to ¥60.9 billion. Operating profit for the company, however, was still down 3.5 percent to ¥6.8 billion.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 09:25 AM   #316
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Meitetsu posts drop in revenue and profit
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1948014-n1.htm

Quote:
In its consolidated financial statement for March-April 2009 released August 10, Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu) reported total sales of ¥141.6 billion, a 9.3 percent drop over the same time last year, with net profit dropping 69.9 percent to ¥900 million. A decline in commuter ridership due to a worsening employment market and a sales slump at department stores contributed to the declines, in addition to decreased outdoor activities by potential passengers as a result of swine flu.

Sales in Meitetsu’s various business ventures were all down, including a 12.1 percent drop in railway and transport-related business, a 20.5 percent drop in department stores and other distribution businesses, and an 8.5 percent drop in leisure businesses such as hotels and tourism. Meitetsu’s real estate business, however, posted a 23.7 percent increase as a result of condominium sales.

The company retained its financial forecast for the fiscal year ending March 2010, with expected sales of ¥650 billion and a net profit of ¥12 billion.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 09:26 AM   #317
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Kintetsu revises financial outlook
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1952015-n1.htm

Quote:
On August 10, Kintetsu Corporation announced that it would revise down its consolidated accounts for the fiscal year ending March 2010. Expected sales were brought down from May’s ¥1.02 trillion to ¥1.00 trillion, and net profit revised down from ¥14 billion to ¥11 billion.

In its consolidated financial statement for March-April 2009 released the same day, Kintetsu reported a 5.1 percent increase in sales over the same period last year, to ¥226.6 billion. Operating profit was down 46.5 percent to ¥6.9 billion, and net profit was down 95.6 percent to ¥1.0 trillion.

While its railway business posted a revenue boost of ¥300 million as a result of the Hanshin Namba Line, the swine flu scare and discounted tolls on expressways counteracted the benefit, resulting in drops in revenue of ¥650 million and ¥240 million, respectively.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 09:35 AM   #318
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tōkyō: Part 9

From Keikyū Kamata, we board a train to Haneda Airport, the main domestic airport in the Tōkyō area (although the airport does have international flights). This is Platform 1 at Haneda Airport Station. Currently there are three stations in the current terminals: Haneda Airport Station for Keikyū trains, plus Haneda Airport Terminal 1 Station and Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station for the Tōkyō Monorail. They’re all fairly close though, and within walking distance of each other. In addition, there are several other stations on both the Keikyū Line and Tōkyō Monorail serving other parts of the airport such as maintenance facilities. Both Keikyū and Tōkyō Monorail are also building new stations to serve the new International Terminal currently under construction.

As one of only two rail services to Haneda Airport, Keikyū focuses a lot of its advertisement campaigns at capturing airport-related traffic, often teaming up with other railway operators serving other airports, such as Nankai Electric Railway (serving KIX in the Kansai Area) throughout Japan to lure travelers.

image hosted on flickr


Here, a 1500 series local for Uraga is getting ready to depart.

image hosted on flickr


I make my way to Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station, the underground terminus of the Tōkyō Monorail. After departing this station, the train makes a half-circle arc to Haneda Airport Terminal 2 Station, with another station at Shin-Seibijō before surfacing on the west end of the airport. These platform gates began operation along the entire line in 2002.

image hosted on flickr


A 1000 series unit waits at Platform 1, a local bound for Hamamatsuchō, the central Tōkyō terminal for the monorail. All trains are six cars long, and frequencies can get quite high (18 tph during the weekday peak, 15 tph during the midday). Beginning in 2003, “rapid” trains began operation during the weekends and were afterwards gradually expanded to the rest of the schedule. After completion of passing tracks (beams?) at Shōwajima Station in 2007, the monorail now operates local, section rapid, and airport rapid services. The airport rapids are the fastest, making no intermediate stops between Hamamatsuchō and Haneda Airport and completing a one-way journey (18 km) in 18 minutes.

image hosted on flickr


The monorail is majority (70 percent) owned by JR East. The other shares are owned by Hitachi and All Nippon Airways.

image hosted on flickr


The interiors are designed with an unusual seating configuration, but otherwise, do not look drastically different from older conventional rail stock.

image hosted on flickr


The train is empty now, but after departure, soon filled up with business and leisure travelers coming back from the airport. After an 18-minute journey, we arrive at the terminal, Monorail Hamamatsuchō Station. I make my way to the adjacent JR Hamamatsuchō Station.

This is Platform 1 at the station, where a 209 series Keihin-Tōhoku Line train bound for Ōmiya waits at the platform. The conductor checks for passengers in preparation to push the button that queues the departure melody. These 209 series trains are being phased out and will disappear soon, replaced by the newest 233 series trains. The sticker on the front of the cab indicates that the train has six-door cars, but the newest 233 series trains only feature the typical four-door cars. Although the parallel sections of the Keihin-Tōhoku Line and Yamanote Line between Ueno and Akihabara are still the most crowded sections in Japan (over 200 percent of standard capacity), this is still much lower than historic peaks. Together with the planned installation of platform gates on the Yamanote Line, it was decided that six-door cars were no longer feasible or required, so the Yamanote Line will also see its six-door cars eventually be replaced with four-door cars as the platform gates come online.

image hosted on flickr


A look at how narrow the platforms are. On the right, a clockwise Yamanote Line train for Shinagawa and Shibuya departs Platform 3. The six-door car is just about to exit the frame of the image.

The Keihin-Tōhoku Line serves as a local service for both the Tōkaidō Main Line (from Tōkyō south to Kawasaki, Yokohama, and beyond) and the Tōhoku Main Line (from Ueno north to Akabane, Saitama, and beyond). As a result, the Tōkaidō Main Line is effectively six-tracked between Yokohama and Tōkyō, with rapid services provided by the Tōkaidō Line and Yokosuka Line / Shōnan-Shinjuku Line (on separate tracks) and local services provided on another set of tracks by the Keihin-Tōhoku Line.

image hosted on flickr


Facing south as the train departs. Just peeking in from the left is Car 10, one of the two six-door cars on each Yamanote Line train (the other is Car 7). Each Yamanote Line train is 11 cars (220 m).

image hosted on flickr


Immediately east of the Yamanote Line / Keihin-Tōhoku Line tracks are the Tōkaidō Line tracks, and east of that, the Tōkaidō Shinkansen tracks, shown here with a Shinkansen bound for the terminal at Tōkyō Station passing by.

image hosted on flickr


Another look at the platforms. The elevated structure running above is the Tōkyō Monorail.

image hosted on flickr


A Tōkyō Monorail train bound for Haneda Airport sneaks by…

image hosted on flickr


I boarded a Yamanote Line train to Akihabara, where I transferred to a Chūō-Sōbu Line local for Chiba, one of the larger cities in the Tōkyō area. The journey to Chiba, 40 km from Tōkyō Station, takes almost one-hour from Akihabara. The Chūō Main Line and Sōbu Main Line cut east-west through the center of the Tōkyō region.
Here, the train sits at Chiba Station, Platform 2, getting ready to depart back the other way for Nakano on the Chūō Line.

image hosted on flickr


Passengers on their commute home empty the train and walk down to the concourse. On the opposite Platform 1, a train is preparing for departure, bound for Mitaka on the Chūō Line.

image hosted on flickr


I grabbed a quick dinner inside the station before stepping outside.

This is one of the exits at Chiba Station. The station is a major transfer point, served by JR East’s Chūō-Sōbu Line (local), Sōbu Line (rapid), Sōbu Main Line (for points east), the Uchibō Line, and the Sotobō Line, with daily entries of 107,000 passengers. This doesn’t include ridership transferring between JR lines, however, so actual users of the station are much higher. The Sōbu Line (rapid), which through-services with the Yokosuka Line at Tōkyō Station, also runs some limited through-service on its east end with the various other lines in the Chiba area, including the Sōbu Main Line, Uchibō Line, and Sotobō Line. A train on a full journey, such as from Kazusa Ichinomiya on the Sotobō Line to Chiba, and then via the Sōbu Line (rapid) and Yokosuka Line to Kurihama on the other side of Tōkyō Bay, will travel a good 3 hours and 150 km.

image hosted on flickr


The Chiba Urban Monorail also serves Chiba Station, with about 11,000 daily station entries. This is inside the faregates.

image hosted on flickr


I board a monorail train and get off at the terminal, Chiba Minato Station. The monorail has two lines (Line 1 and Line 2), which share a short, 1 km section between Chiba Minato and Chiba. The system is a suspended monorail similar to the Shōnan Monorail in southern Kanagawa Prefecture.

Here, a Line 2 train waits at the platform, bound for Chishirodai.

image hosted on flickr


At Chiba Minato, I transfer to the other main JR line between Tōkyō and Chiba City, the Keiyō Line. The 43-km line, from Soga to Tōkyō, was originally constructed in the 1970s as a freight line to serve the waterfront industrial areas, but as the population exploded in the Tōkyō area, the line was converted for passenger use in the 1980s. The south and east waterfront is now being redeveloped for residential, commercial, and recreational uses and there are proposals to extend the Keiyō Line west from Tōkyō terminal via deep-bore tunnels through central Tōkyō to connect with the Chūō Line. This would create a second central east-west JR link in addition to the Chūō-Sōbu Line local service. Currently, the Keiyō Line also operates a through-service with the peripheral Musashino Line, which runs in a giant loop through Tōkyō suburbs. The Musashino Line was also constructed as a freight line, but saw passenger trains begin operation as the population in the suburbs grew.

Here, a train bound for the terminal Soga, one station away, waits on the opposite platform.

image hosted on flickr


After boarding an inbound train, I get off at the terminal Tōkyō to transfer to a Chūō Line rapid train. This is Platform 1 for Chūō Line rapid. Despite being one of the busiest lines in the JR network, the Chūō Line rapid only has a single island platform at Tōkyō Station, meaning dwell times must be kept to a minimum to maintain the 28 tph during the morning peak. The limited facilities at the Tōkyō terminal are also partially the reason why long-distance intercity trains on the Chūō Main Line, such as Azusa and Kaiji services, stop short at Shinjuku, which has ample platform capacity.

Here, passengers board a rapid train for Toyoda Station.

image hosted on flickr


The Chūō Line rapid is also largely converted to E233 series, although there are few of the older 201 series trains holding on.

image hosted on flickr


The E233 series trains are designed with wider bodies to maximize capacity. The Chūō Line rapid is the first of JR East’s lines to receive the E233 series units, which began service on the line in 2006.

image hosted on flickr


The three-screen display hanging from the canopy allows the conductor of the train to see the entire length of the train even though the platforms are curved.

image hosted on flickr


The doors have closed as the conductor peeks out for a final check.

image hosted on flickr


I get off at Shinjuku… Here’s a shot of the train trailing mine, a rapid for Takao.

image hosted on flickr


At Shinjuku, I transfer to a Yamanote Line train to get me back to Ikebukuro. Some views of the Tōbu Tōjō Line platform at 9:00 pm… There’s three “rush hours”: morning, evening, and then late evening. This isn’t the worst of it, as the last trains of the day around midnight are some of the most crowded.

image hosted on flickr


Passengers here are queued up for the train on Platform 2, an express for Shinrin Kōen. The Tōjō Line terminal at Ikebukuro consists of three tracks, so there’s another island platform beyond this behind the train.

image hosted on flickr


Tōbu Ikebukuro Station alone sees 519,000 daily entries and exits. With the opening of the Fukutoshin Line, however, the number of transferring passengers at Ikebukuro has since dropped, as the Tōjō Line now effectively connects with Shinjuku and Shibuya via the subway. When the Tōyoko Line and Sōtetsu Line through-services start, it will be possible to get as far as Yokohama and western Kanagawa Prefecture on one train.

image hosted on flickr


To be continued…
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 10:09 AM   #319
Vapour
Registered User
 
Vapour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Pop. 450
Posts: 6,327
Likes (Received): 27

^Terrific quashloさん, just terrific
__________________
♪ I love Morty and I hope Morty loves me, I'd like to wrap my arms around him and feel him inside me ♪
Vapour no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2009, 07:57 AM   #320
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

University of Tsukuba inaugurates carsharing trial
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/eco/news/20...OYT1T00022.htm

Quote:
Starting towards the end of last month, University of Tsukuba inaugurated a campuswide carsharing experiment, allowing multiple people to use a single car.

The plan is aimed at creating an environment where cars are only used when needed and encouraging users to instead shift modes from private automobiles to public transportation for trips to work and classes at the university. The ultimate goals of the program are fewer CO₂ emissions and reduced financial burdens on students. The trial will run for eight months until February 2010, and will analyze the amount of reduced CO₂ emissions and the changes in environmental awareness levels among users. The program will also be evaluated for implementation on a regular basis.

The university has already been promoting the use of public transportation, including charging for parking in campus parking facilities starting in 2003, and inaugurating a circulator shuttle connecting the campus with Tsukuba Station in 2005 to coincide with the opening of the Tsukuba Express.

However, the university is located away from the center of Tsukuba City, making it necessary in many causes to use cars for trips outside of commutes between home and school, including shopping trips, and trips to pick up and drop off guests. As a result, about 70 percent of faculty and 10 percent of students use private automobiles to commute to and from the campus. According to the university, this translates to approximately 6,000 to 7,000 vehicles on the road. Carsharing would eliminate these inconveniences and encourage users to shift to public transport for trips to and from campus.

A total of four light automobiles will be provided at parking facilities near the university’s main office and the student dormitories. Users will first sign up with the program and pay a membership fee, after which they will be able to use any computer or mobile phone to reserve the vehicle. After inputting a password sent by email into the car, the doors are unlocked and the car can be used.

In addition to membership fees, users are required to pay time-based charges (¥100 for every 15 minutes on weekdays) and distance-based charges (¥15 per kilometer traveled), but are not required to pay for gasoline and insurance-related expenses. According to UPR Corporation, the Tōkyō-based distribution company contracted out by the university to manage the system, using carsharing twice a week for three hours each session would save users ¥20,000 a month over using a private car under identical circumstances.

Moriguchi Ayako, who is a lecturer in the university’s Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering and who will evaluate the experimental program, says, “There’s a possibility that the program could encourage lifestyles that revolve around carsharing more than around private cars. We’ll analyze how the program is used and how satisfactory it is by conducting surveys of program members.”
When the Tsukuba Express opened, it definitely improved transit accessibility of the university and Tsukuba City, which was initially established as a research town. Although it is 60 km from central Tōkyō, it’s now only 45 minutes by train. There is a large share of reverse-commuting students and faculty who take the Tsukuba Express to and from campus, which helps balance out the rest of the passengers who use it to commute into and out of Tōkyō. Interetingly, there’s a strong nexus between the terminals of the line, as Akihabara is a technology and information center, while Tsukuba is a scientific research and academic center. The trains also have wifi Internet access, making it convenient and attractive as a commute mode.

Tsukuba Station (these are my pictures)

Showing taxi zone and bus station. The silo at the right is the entrance to the station.

image hosted on flickr


Some more bus waiting areas and the development surrounding the station. The Tsukuba Center Building (“TC”) is a mixed-use building that contains a hotel, commercial uses, and some cultural space.

image hosted on flickr
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium