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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:48 AM   #3221
quashlo
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Yokohama’s a mess, but a beautiful one from this angle.
The ramp at left is for Sagami Railway (Sōtetsu).

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Sōtetsu is a semi-major private railway primarily serving Yokohama, but when the Sōtetsu–Tōkyū Connection is complete, trains will be through-servicing from the eastern limits of Yokohama directly to central Tōkyō via the Tōyoko Line and Fukutoshin Line.

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Nishi-Yokohama Station
This is a Sōtetsu-only station.

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As it’s rush hour, the longer-distance trains on the major JR radial lines are running full 15-car formations, mostly 10+5. However, the Yokosuka Line and Sōbu Rapid Line use the more unusual 11+4 formation.

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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:49 AM   #3222
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This is what the operator / conductor sees on the TIMS (Train Information Management System) screen… The next station on the line (Ōfuna), plus information on connecting trains on the appropriate JR lines (Keihin-Tōhoku Line and Tōkaidō Line), including the destination station, estimated departure time, estimated delay, and departing platform. The conductor uses this information to make announcements as needed to supplement the automatic programmed announcements. Notice that the departure time is given down to the second.

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Passing Hodogaya Station…

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Tōkyō-bound Tōkaidō Line train
Most of the major JR radial lines also have “green car” reserved seat cars, typically double-decker like these. There’s two in every 10- or 15-car set. If you are an executive, tourist, or anyone else with a little more money to spend, these make perfect sense to use to avoid the crush loads in the regular cars.

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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:49 AM   #3223
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Another screen from TIMS showing information regarding the train…
The bars on the top and bottom of the train diagram indicate the doors. All are white, indicating they are closed and functioning properly. Yellow is open, red is malfunctioning, while a red box indicates that control of the door has been transferred to the redundant backup system. Given the high traffic density and passenger loads, many of JR’s newer trains have redundancies like this to help ensure that a train doesn’t need to be taken out of service. TIMS also keeps track of the interior temperature, humidity, and passenger loads in each car, as well the water tank level (as these are longer-distance commuter EMUs, there are restrooms located in several cars).

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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:50 AM   #3224
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Passing Higashi-Totsuka Station…

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Through-servicing Narita Express. These go as far as Ōfuna.

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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:51 AM   #3225
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This flyover allows southbound Shōnan-Shinjuku Line trains to get to the southbound Tōkaidō Line track at Ōfuna.

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At this point we’re already approaching Kamakura, and since this is the reverse commute direction, the passenger loads are comparatively light. Seating on the longer-distance commuter EMUs on major JR radial lines is generally a mix of box seating and longitidunal seating, the latter primarily in the immediate vicinity of the doors. However, several cars in each consist will also be all-longitudinal seating to help deal with crowding.

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These E231 sets are a little older and use LED units for passenger information… However, newer JR East series like the E233 are all LCD units.

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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:52 AM   #3226
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Door open and close buttons, useful during extreme cold or snow.

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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:52 AM   #3227
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Because of the peculiarities of the Japanese language (specifically, the difficulty of reading kanji, the Chinese characters), station names are displayed in both kanji and the simplified syllabary (kana).

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Typical LED type for destination signs and similar signage is three-color (orange, green, red), although some newer trains have full-color LEDs.

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Our train will continue on to Hiratsuka on the Tōkaidō Line. The longest Shōnan-Shinjuku Line through-services go all the way to Odawara, with the segments west of Odawara picked up by Tōkaidō Line trains originating from Tōkyō Station.

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Old January 24th, 2012, 07:44 AM   #3228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post

The famous train confluence. I got five this time: two Marunouchi Line trains at bottom, two Chūō Local trains, and one Chūō Rapid train.

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Excellent photo. Very busy but looks calm and orderly and focused.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 10:21 AM   #3229
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I've got a few photos taken while riding the Wideview Shinano from Nagoya through to Nagano while in a blizzard, would anyone be interested? And should I post them in here or in the general rail thread?
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Old January 24th, 2012, 01:39 PM   #3230
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I say post 'em if you got 'em.
I should have taken some pictures of the trains during our snowstorm last night-- we had THUNDERsnow! Too busy rushing to work, only to get 3/4 of the way there and have my colleague tell me classes are cancelled for the day... Awesome.

Also I think someone asked me a while back if I was teacher or something here in Japan. Yes, I work for a rather large university here in the Metropolis. I get a lot of break periods so there's plenty of time to chase trains and take pictures.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 05:48 PM   #3231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
I've got a few photos taken while riding the Wideview Shinano from Nagoya through to Nagano while in a blizzard, would anyone be interested? And should I post them in here or in the general rail thread?
Yes, please post them.
Unless they're pictures of JR urban / commuter trains, it's probably better to put them in the thread in the Railways forum.
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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:08 AM   #3232
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Most suburban stations (even some urban stations) will have a compact, but efficient space dedicated for connecting modes (buses, taxis, autos). In cases where the tracks are at ground level, there may even be two, one for each side of the station. Bus service can be a bit interesting, as it’s a mix of companies: bus-only subsidiaries of railway operators, private bus-only operators, and public bus operators. Most railway operators also operate bus service as the two are complementary, with the exceptions being the JR companies and Tōkyō Metro.

Here’s a few scenes from the large bus plaza outside Kamakura Station, where bus service is operated by both Keihin Electric Express Railway (Keikyū) and Enoshima Railway (Enoden). These are Keikyū buses.

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A pretty constant flow of passengers arriving at the station.

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Most private-railway bus lines will terminate at a station at one or both ends, as it’s beneficial as a feeder / connecting service. This Keikyū route actually connects two non-Keikyū stations, Kamakura and Zushi, although it also stops at Shin-Zushi (a Keikyū station) along the way.

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The taxi pool and bus layover area is in the middle, with the bus stops encircling the plaza.

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:08 AM   #3233
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Kamakura is an old town, and many of the streets are very narrow, complicating efficient bus operations. In larger cities, this may have been resolved with the use of bus lanes, but there’s simply no room to add them here, and the congestion can make buses a less desirable option for residents. Some people just choose to bike or walk, but as Kamakura is a major tourist area, it’s also beneficial to provide a good bus network to encourage tourism. The national government designated Kamakura as an “omnibus town”, receiving government funding to improve bus service through new park-and-rides and community bus routes.

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These are some of the streets buses have to contend with:

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Yes, this is a two-way street.

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:09 AM   #3234
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This is the typical side destination sign on buses, showing the route taken. This bus, Kama-20, goes from Kamakura-gū to Kamakura Station via Wakare-michi and Hachiman-gū.

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Typical bus interior

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Typical farebox
The farebox can make change for you, so you don’t need exact fare. You can also charge your IC card using the farebox, although of course, it’s generally smarter to do it at the train station, as you never know when the bus will make it back to the yard and upload the farebox data to the server database.

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Making our way to the Enoden…

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:10 AM   #3235
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Kamakura is a really popular fieldtrip destination, so it’s not uncommon to see large groups of kids at the ticket machines or inside trains.

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Perhaps a bit unusual for stations with more than one railway operator, but the Enoden platform numbers start at 3 to be continuous with the JR platforms (Platforms 1 and 2).

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Next train is a four-car train departing for Fujisawa from Platform 3.

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:15 AM   #3236
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In addition to genuinely older cars, Enoden has a few newer replicas… Can’t say they’re very authentic, but the younger kids probably wouldn’t notice anyways.

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:16 AM   #3237
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The Enoden can generally be classified as a streetcar / tram, and there are some sections of the route in mixed traffic. While the signs might say “four cars”, it’s really just two articulated units coupled together.

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Hase Station

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Besides the street-running sections (which we’ll get to later), there’s also some nice exclusive ROW through people’s front- and backyards.

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:16 AM   #3238
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The line is single-track, but there are passing tracks at several stations.

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Definitely an old-school station, with the faregates right at the platform.

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:17 AM   #3239
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Some nice wooden architecture still remains in some of the Enoden stations…

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Grade crossing spikes

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The single track limits the ability to run any more frequently than about every 12 minutes, as not all stations have passing tracks.

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Old January 25th, 2012, 01:17 AM   #3240
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I hadn’t realized it before, but Enoden also implemented station numbering like Tōkyō Metro and Toei Subway, as well as Keikyū and Keisei. Not sure if we’ll ever see a unified station numbering system for all of Greater Tōkyō, although it appears that we may be inadvertently heading that way regardless. Of course, the big question is what to do with JR East, which should have close to 1,000 or so stations in the area.

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Newer and older sets coupled together. This one has been painted in the colors of Randen (Keifuku Electric Railway), a tram operator in Kyōto in western Japan. There should also be a Randen tram in Enoden colors running in Kyōto.

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: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
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