daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 13th, 2012, 12:13 AM   #3481
IanCleverly
A New Kind of Medicine
 
IanCleverly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Caerphilly, South Wales
Posts: 446
Likes (Received): 230

Quote:
Originally Posted by Me View Post
Is there space there to the right for maybe allowance for bicycles to be allowed on board, even if it was just a fold-up type?
Quote:
Originally Posted by hakubi View Post
The JRs at least allow bicycles on trains. I think the rule is that it must be covered and you have to buy a 270 yen ticket for it regardless of how far you're traveling.
Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I think all operators allow bicycles on trains, but they have to be folded and inside a bag, like you said. It should be free to bring them on, though... I don't think they charge for that.

Even a train like those Tōkaidō Line E233 sets, technically designed for "suburban" services with mixed longitudinal / transverse seating, can get pretty crowded... Especially since the car in question is right next to a green car.
OK thanks. What got me thinking was that some of the Trains I use in the UK, there are places for bikes to be stored near the Toilets, and saw from that photograph that there wouldn't be much room for a 'normal' bicycle.
IanCleverly no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 13th, 2012, 03:20 AM   #3482
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Mitsubishi, Hitachi keen on Manila monorail project
http://business.inquirer.net/49017/2...norail-project

Quote:
Japanese giants Mitsubishi Corp. and Hitachi Global have expressed interest in pursuing the P25-billion Phase 1 of the planned monorail way system that will link all the central business districts in Metro Manila, according to the Bases Conversion and Development Administration (BCDA).

In a briefing Monday, BCDA president and CEO Arnel Paciano Casanova said the two Japanese firms were looking at forging a partnership to pursue the monorail way project.

The project is expected to address the growing need for a more efficient mass transportation system in Mega Manila.

However, a feasibility study on the projects has yet to be done.

Under preliminary plans, the project will initially connect the Metro Rail Transit Guadalupe station to the Bonifacio Global City in Taguig and to the Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3.

According to Casanova, the feasibility study, which is being targeted for completion by next year, will also help determine whether the BCDA will pursue the project with funding assistance from the Japan International Cooperation Agency or if it will bid out the monorail project under the Public-Private Partnership program of the government.

In the meantime, BCDA chairman Felicito Payumo expressed confidence in the project’s viability.

Payumo said it was practically a “no risk” project given that the whole project, when completed, would connect the whole Mega Manila in a loop.

Specifically, the project will link central business districts, the Metro Rail Transit (Taft to North Avenue), the Light Rail Transit line 1 (Baclaran to Roosevelt) and the Philippine National Railways (PNR) system, which cuts across Metro Manila toward Southern Luzon.

Payumo believes that there will be strong investor interest in this project as there is a ready market for the system.

He said the BCDA hoped to complete the entire project during the term of President Aquino.
There was talk awhile back about a merger between Mitsubishi and Hitachi, although those were apparently just rumors now. However, the two have pledged to collaborate on overseas rail projects, so perhaps this may become one of the first such examples.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2012, 03:23 AM   #3483
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

In other export news, there’s been some more recent images of the WMATA 7000 series being manufactured by Kawasaki… WMATA sent some top officials to Kawasaki’s plant in Kōbe to tour a full-scale model. Bit interesting to spot the Japanese trains in the video:

0:03 Keikyū 1000 series commuter set
1:45 JR West 287 series limited express
2:05 Keihan 3000 series commuter set

I believe there’s also some Shinkansen cars in the background in a few shots.



There’s more pictures here: http://www.subchat.com/read.asp?Id=1144104

Not to go too far off on a tangent, but these might be my favorite rapid transit rolling stock in the U.S. That’s not saying much, but anyways…

With some similarities between WMATA and BART, I was originally hoping that Kawasaki would get the BART contract, but it appears that one is down to Siemens, Bombardier, and Hyundai-Rotem.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2012, 05:59 AM   #3484
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

IHI wins order for Hong Kong International Airport APM cars
http://e.nikkei.com/e/fr/tnks/Nni20111018D18JSN04.htm

Quote:
TOKYO (Nikkei)--IHI Corp. (7013) on Tuesday received an order to extend an automated people mover (APM) system for Hong Kong International Airport.

Valued at around 8 billion yen, the order calls for extending a railway, delivering 16 railroad cars and building a communication and signaling system compatible with the global standard. The upgraded system is slated to begin operating in 2015.

The order, received via affiliate Niigata Transys Co., is one aspect of an APM extension project being undertaken by Airport Authority Hong Kong, which operates the airport.

IHI competes against Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (7011), which also supplies APM systems to Hong Kong International Airport.
Never got around to posting these…
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2012, 05:59 AM   #3485
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Mitsubishi Electric to open plant in Pittsburgh area for railcar HVAC equipment
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/12014/1203450-28.stm

Quote:
Mitsubishi Electric Power Products Inc., based in Warrendale, will open a railway equipment factory early in the summer to manufacture heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems for subway and commuter railway cars.

The new plant will employ 55 to 60 office and factory workers.

It is the second new plant the company has announced within the past year. Mitsubishi Electric Power Products is currently building a factory in Memphis, Tenn., that will increase its output of large, utility-scale power transformers.

"This factory will strengthen on-time delivery of reliable, high quality HVAC systems whose demand will grow as the country upgrades and expands its railways," said Timothy Logan, general manager of Mitsubishi Electric's transportation systems division, which manufactures rail propulsion equipment at its Warrendale facility.

The 50,000-square-foot factory will be located in New Sewickley's Tri-county Commerce Park, about 25 miles northwest of Pittsburgh and less than four miles from the company's Warrendale headquarters.
Curious if this is just a general expansion into the U.S. market or being triggered by a specific car order…
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2012, 06:00 AM   #3486
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Jakarta starts MRT tender process
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/jakar...process/470813

Quote:
After its disastrous flirtation with a monorail, Jakarta is now searching for suitors to build a mass rapid transit rail line, with tender to open in November and followed by a tentative construction start date of June 2012.

The result of a pre-tender qualification check will be announced in October, according to MRT Jakarta, the city-owned company running the project. Qualifying consortia will then be invited to bid in a tender process to open in November and finish in April.

MRT Jakarta chief executive Tribudi Rahardjo said he is certain construction of the MRT will begin in mid-June.

“I want to emphasize that construction of the MRT will not be halted or deferred. This is because everything that is required to be in place is already prepared,” Tribudi said on Monday.

“The MRT project is completely unrelated to the monorail project. The fate of the monorail is irrelevant to the MRT.”

Conscious of Jakartans’ skepticism that they will ever see their city’s transportation system catch up with other metropolises in the region, Tribudi said the pre-qualification process was a sign that progress was being made.

He said the tender committee, which is composed of MRT Jakarta, the provincial government and the Transportation Ministry, already had a list of potential contractors but will not disclose their name soon.

Because of loan conditions placed by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) on the project, the lead organization in all consortia must be a Japanese company, Tribudi said.

He added that with the exception of two or three private companies, most of the Indonesian partners entering ventures with Japanese companies in the pre-qualification process were state-owned enterprises.

“There are some private, non-state-owned companies, but only a couple,” Tribudi said.

The first MRT railtrack corridor is targeted to be in operation by the end of 2016. A second stage then will be build to extend the line northward into Kota, and it is expected to begin running in 2018.

A pre-feasibility study is in progress for an East-West Corridor, which is targeted to operate at around 2024, according to MRT Jakarta.
If you are curious which Japanese firms are participating, it’s basically a sampling of Japan’s largest general contractors:

Announcement of Prequalification Result for Surface Section Construction of Jakarta MRT No. IP-554
Announcement of Prequalification Result for Underground Section Construction of Jkt MRT No. IP-554

Hazama
Sumitomo Mitsui Construction Company (SMCC)
Sumitomo
Tekken
Marubeni
Tōkyū
Kajima
Taisei
Zenitaka
Ōbayashi
Shimizu
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2012, 03:03 PM   #3487
nouveau.ukiyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 25

I always have mixed feelings about overseas projects. It seems like the general pattern in these types of articles is that Japanese companies bid on projects, then JICA comes in and promises to provide financing. Basically the Japanese government is in cahoots with these big companies and creates business opportunities for them in developing countries contingent on the fact that 'the lead organization in all consortia must be a Japanese company' or something else that benefits Japanese companies and workers rather than the locals. It reminds me of what China does in Africa; they donate huge sums of money to African countries in exchange for their natural resources, but they bring in Chinese companies and Chinese workers to do all the work and therefore the local people aren't employed, aren't involved, etc. and see no benefit.

If the Japanese were coming in and helping these countries develop their industries and technology and employ their people, then great. But instead there will be no technology transfer, a lot of the work will be done by the Japanese, future work is dependent on the Japanese and these poor countries will be in debt to rich Japan for eternity.
nouveau.ukiyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2012, 07:28 PM   #3488
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

I'm curious why you should feel so offended by a strategy that is hardly unique to Japan (or China, for that matter). European public and private entities often exercise similar strategies by placing restrictions such as that rolling stock must meet certain "global" (really, European-based) standards. For reference:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3049

Quote:
Standards business
European firms also have an edge in terms of standards. First, European consulting companies win the consulting contract, adding European standards such as safety certification to the prerequisites in the metro bid. European manufacturers then demonstrate their experience in meeting the very same European standards to win the contract. Since the 1990s, European countries have been moving forward with standardization, recognizing its critical importance in the construction and operation of railways crossing national borders. European firms now bring these standards to India, putting Japanese firms at a disadvantage. While JICA takes advantage of text refinements like “safety certification equivalent to European standards” in yen loan projects to prevent the disqualification of Japanese firms, Ōshima says, “Japanese firms need the ingenuity and will to push Japan’s standards as international standards.”
If you read the rest of that article I just linked to, you'll also see that it's not as if the Japanese are winning all, or even a substantial share, of the contracts, in India, despite helping to finance various metro projects there.

These loans also have pretty generous terms... They're not designed to gouge the recipient country of money and make them "in debt to rich Japan for eternity". Nobody is holding the recipient country hostage and forcing them to agree to the loan terms, whatever they may be. It's a win-win for both parties... The recipient country gets the investment it needs to improve infrastructure and Japan gets some work for domestic corporations.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 06:56 AM   #3489
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Construction on new Kotoden station to begin in FY2012
http://www.shikoku-np.co.jp/kagawa_n...20120309000172

Quote:
Ayagawa Town will break ground on a new station planned between Sue and Takinomiya Stations on the Kotoden Kotohira Line in the coming fiscal year. Officials will gradually carry out land acquisition and construction of the station plaza and access roads at the planned location in the Kayahara district while continuing project workshops with local residents, with the aim of opening the station in August of next year.

Ayagawa Town earmarked ¥264 million for the project in its preliminary budget for FY2012 under the item “Takinomiya Area Urban Revitalization and Improvements Plan Project”.

According to the town’s General Affairs Division, the improvements project has a three-year timeline lasting until FY2014, with total project costs of approx. ¥575 million. The town’s share of the costs is estimated to be approx. ¥380 million.

According to the plan, the new station would be constructed on privately-owned land approx. 700 m east of Takinomiya Station. In FY2012, the town will break ground on improvements including access roads and a station rotary to allow large buses to enter and exit the station. In FY2013, the town will construct the station building, aiming for an opening in August of that year, and will continue construction of the station plaza. In FY2014, the town will construct the remaining segments of the access roads and complete the project.

In FY2012, the town will finalize a Hub Function Enhancement Plan in order to give the station transport hub functionality for Takamatsu City, Takamatsu Airport, and central and western Kagawa Prefecture.

“We hope to link this station to revitalization of the town as we work with Kotoden and the Kagawa Prefectural Government on hammering out the details of the plan,” says the town’s General Affairs Division.
Map:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=...0feee68d&msa=0

The location is near a pretty large Aeon shopping center and some suburban big box retail. Good for Takamatsu that they see the benefit in upgrading and maintaining Kotoden,

A short tour of the Kotoden, one of my favorite small private railways in Japan. Last year was its 100th anniversary.

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 06:57 AM   #3490
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New Hakushima Station on San’yō Line, Astram Line in Hiroshima to open in 2015
http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201203090049.html

Quote:
On March 8, JR West announced that it will establish a new station, Hakushima Station (provisional name) between Hiroshima Station and Yokogawa Station on the JR San’yō Line in Hakushima Kitamachi, Naka Ward, Hiroshima City, serving as an interchange with the Astram Line. After news that the plans for the Astram Line’s new station, which will tie into the new JR station by a connecting passage, will be delayed one year and is now scheduled to open in spring 2015, JR West is also aiming for completion at the same time. In accordance with the Railway Business Act, JR West filed a request for approval with the Chūgoku Transport Bureau on March 8.

JR Hakushima Station will be constructed along the elevated section of track approx. 1.1 km east of Yokogawa Station. The railway will soon enter into detailed design, and is scheduled to break ground on the new station in FY2012.

Meanwhile, the new station to be constructed by the city on the Astram Line between Jōhoku and Hakushima near the intersection with the San’yō Line (provisional name Hakushima New Station), will be constructed as a half-underground station in the median along National Route 54. The two stations will be connected by a connecting passage and a bridge spanning the National Route.

This marks the first new station to be established on the section of the San’yō Line within the coverage area of JR West’s Hiroshima Office since the March 2008 opening of Waki Station (Waki Town, Yamaguchi Prefecture).

Regarding the new station on the Astram Line, the city’s detailed design revealed that additional foundation work is needed. After the national government also pointed out that ventilation measures were insufficient, the city delayed the scheduled opening from spring 2014 to spring 2015. Estimating that the costs for the entire project will balloon from the original ¥5.7 billion to ¥7.1 billion, the city will continue re-evaluating elements of the project.
Map:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=...6ef515d6&msa=0

Daily ridership at the station is forecasted at approx. 7,000. The JR West press release contains a plan view of the new station:
http://www.westjr.co.jp/press/articl...shiroshima.pdf

According to another article, the city’s done a bit of value engineering on the connecting passage, saving approx. ¥600 million in construction costs. The original passage featured a 150 m concrete canopy, but this canopy will now be reduced by 51 m, with the eliminated section replaced with a simpler design.
http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201202180173.html
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 06:58 AM   #3491
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Consolidation of three central Kawagoe stations proposed
http://www.asahi.com/travel/news/TKY201201100454.html

Quote:
Kawagoe City’s Architecture and Design Council (Representative Director: Maeda Katsuyuki) and the research office of Tōkyō Denki University School of Science and Engineering associate professor Iwaki Kazuya have compiled a plan to consolidate the three train stations in central Kawagoe City, Saitama Prefecture. The reason, they say, is that transferring between JR, Tōbu, and Seibu trains is inconvenient. However, there are many issues left to be resolved, including construction cost, land acquidition, and impacts to the existing retail zone. Just how feasible is the plan?

Kawagoe Station on the JR Kawagoe Line and Tōbu Tōjō Line, Kawagoe-shi Station on the Tōbu Tōjō Line, and Hon-Kawagoe Station on the Seibu Shinjuku Line—the plan calls for constructing a new consolidated station between these three stations, underneath the intersection of the three rail lines, eliminating grade crossings and converting the ground level into park space. Another alternative would consolidate Tōbu’s two stations, moving both the Tōbu station and JR station to a new location near the intersection of these lines with the Seibu Shinjuku Line, joining all three stations with a shared concourse.

This is the vision spelled out in the consolidation plan, which the Architecture and Design Council have been hammering out since 2009.

Hon-Kawagoe Station and Kawagoe Station are separated by approximately one kilometer, and not a small amount of passengers transfer between the two on foot. The surrounding area is home to many grade crossings, and roadway congestion is severe. Constructing a new consolidated station would be the best way to resolve these issues.

Meanwhile, the shared concourse alternative is designed to minimize the impacts to the existing retail area as a result of a change in the flow of foot traffic, with the distance needed to transfer kept to around 200 m. Both alternatives are estimated to cost approx. ¥350 billion each.

Kawagoe saw its first rail service in 1895 with the opening of Kawagoe Station (now Hon-Kawagoe Station) on the Kawagoe Railway, connecting to Kokubunji Station in Tōkyō. Afterwards, stations on what was then the Tōjō Railway and the Japanese National Railways (JNR) opened by 1940.

According to Kawagoe City records, a movement to consolidate the stations was already in the works at the time. A petition calling for establishment of a new station in a “convenient, appropriate location for transferring between the three lines” was submitted by the mayor, City Council chairman, and Chamber of Commerce and Industry chairman. However, the national government rejected the plan, saying the project would rob the livelihood of the retail area surrounding the station.

Plans to consolidate the stations would later surface and disappear multiple times. More recently, at a 2005 City Council meeting the city’s then-mayor made the following remarks: “Since the previous mayor’s time in office, I’ve already indicated my intention to drop the plan to unify the three stations. The only issue left to discuss is how to connect (by road) Kawagoe-shi Station and Hon-Kawagoe Station.”

Representative Director Maeda says, “We’ve explained the plan to top city officials, but they didn’t really seem interested. If we underground the lines, for example, it would be possible to extend the Seibu Shinjuku Line towards Kawajima Town. We should use our wisdom to entice the necessary capital investment from both the national government and the private sector. We are in dark times, and in need of vision.”
The transfer from Tōbu Kawagoe-shi Station to Seibu Hon-Kawagoe Station. Definitely not the fastest route, as he ends up having to loop around Hon-Kawagoe, but it gives a bit of an idea of the distance involved.



As much as I sympathize for the local retail area, their “livelihood” is based on an unusual set of historical circumstances that was never corrected. After all, if both alternatives cost approximately the same, there is no point in making people walk one full train-length (200m) to transfer. Better would be for the landowners to group together and propose some major redevelopment that could help offset the huge pricetag for such a project.

Alternatively, while it wouldn’t resolve the issues with the grade crossings, they could perhaps create a new exit out of Hon-Kawagoe on the south side of the station (currently, there’s only one exit, on the north side) and try and connect it to Kawagoe-shi and Kawagoe with some sort of moving walkway system, which would make the transfer less of a headache.

In other Kawagoe Station news, they will begin work on revamping the West Exit station plaza in July of this year:
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news...0420011-n1.htm

Kawagoe Station is a somewhat major hub, with approx. 200,000 daily entries and exits. The West Exit in particular serves both city buses and express buses to Narita, Haneda, and the Kansai area (Kyōto / Ōsaka), as well as taxis, school buses, and other traffic. To resolve conflicts between pedestrians and road traffic, they will construct a new pedestrian deck (approx. 70 m long, with a canopy) at the exit leading directly into the second level of the station, with barrier-free access provided by four new escalators. The station plaza circulation will be redesigned to completely segregate private automobiles and buses / taxis, and traffic flow will be one-way within the plaza. Completion is scheduled for the end of March 2014, at a total cost of approx. ¥433.5 million.

Render:

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 06:58 AM   #3492
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Funding remains biggest obstacle to quadruple-tracking last segment of Chūō Line
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/tok...OYT8T00634.htm

Quote:
Cost too large for JR alone; local jurisdictions hope to discuss project with national, metropolitan governments
The Council for Grade-Separation and Quadruple-Tracking between Mitaka and Tachikawa, comprised of 24 cities, towns, and villages in the Tama area, established a Project Investigative Committee this summer in the hope of realizing the quadruple-tracking of the Chūō Line. In the past, major lines in the Greater Tōkyō area were quadruple-tracked with the help of public financing, but work on the section of the Chūō Line between Mitaka and Tachikawa was being carried out at the same time that the Japanese National Railways (JNR) was being privatized, and the project never made progress due to funding allocation issues. The Council is finally making moves 42 years after its establishment, but the issue of cost still remains, and the road to realizing their goal is fraught with difficulties.

At a July meeting of the Council held inside a Tachikawa City hotel, news was announced regarding the establishment of the Investigative Committee, with attendees approving a resolution calling for the “approval of the project as quickly as possible.” Continuous grade-separation of the Mitaka – Tachikawa section (approx. 13 km) of the Chūō Line was largely completed in November 2010. “We’ve reached a milestone in the elevation works, and we’d like to take up the quadruple-tracking project as the second phase of the works,” explains Council secretariat and Tachikawa City Urban Planning Division chief Kurihara Hirokazu.

If the project is realized, many are hopeful that it will expand the catchment area of the zone surrounding Tachikawa Station, which is seeing continuing ridership growth thanks to a concentration of retail facilities. The project is aimed at alleviating congestion and reducing commute times to central Tōkyō, with estimates indicating that the number of trains per hour could be increased to as much as two times the current timetable and travel times could be reduced by around ten minutes. In addition, the project will help secure stable train operations, with one set of tracks able to serve as an alternative should there be a service disruption on the other set of tracks.

While the benefits quadruple-tracking will bring are huge, the dilemma surrounding the hefty pricetag remains unresolved, with progress at a standstill for many years. In November 1991, the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and JR East agreed to move forward with the project, and in May 1994, the project received urban planning approval from the Metropolitan Government. The language of the agreement includes some carefully chosen language: “We will continue investigating the project while ‘confirming’ future ridership trends.”

In a 2009 analysis, the quadruple-tracking project on its own was estimated to cost ¥360 billion. As the project is related to railway operators’ service, specifically in terms of increasing capacity, the default arrangement requires JR East to front the entire costs of the project.

JR East Investment Planning Department division chief Watanabe Akihiro explains, “In the midst of a declining population, we can’t expect much ridership increase (from the project), making it difficult to recoup the investment from railway operations alone. As a private corporation, we cannot disregard profitability. This is precisely the ‘confirmation’ of future ridership trends discussed in the language of the agreement.”

During the JNR era, quadruple-tracking projects were executed by taking advantage of public financing. But the massive investments resulted in JNR going in the red and eventually being privatized in 1987. Afterwards, the Council discussed the project with the aim of getting it jump-started, but there was no material progress made.

While all of society benefits from quadruple-tracking projects, the costs are so large that one company alone will be unable to recoup the investment. Herein lies the reason why little progress has been made, even as the project is viewed as beneficial to society. And unlike the remaining sections of the planned Shinkansen network, there is no funding structure that determines how to distribute the costs of the project between the national government and local jurisdictions along the line.

The Investigative Committee says it will invite the national government, Metropolitan Government, and JR East to discuss the appropriate funding allocation scheme and specific funding structures in the next two years. But can the Investigative Committee find solutions to long-standing issues? One top-level official from a jurisdiction along the line revealed his anxieties with the project, indicating that there are inevitably difficulties along the way: “Generally speaking, I’m supportive of it, but when the time comes for us to assemble our share of the funding, I’m not sure whether or not we’ll be able to secure that money given our current fiscal situation.”

Section to Mitaka Station completed in 1969
The Chūō Line is a key artery in the Greater Tōkyō area, serving approx. 700 trains a day including rapids, special rapids, limited expresses, and freight trains. The section between Ochanomizu and Mitaka has two tracks in each direction, but the section west of Mitaka remains double-tracked.

In order to deal with the ridership growth during Japan’s post-war miracle, in the 1960s the former JNR carried out its “Five-Line Commuter Strategy”, a plan to enhance capacity on five lines linking central Tōkyō and various parts of the Greater Tōkyō area, including the Tōkaidō, Chūō, and Tōhoku Lines. Quadruple-tracking on four of the lines was completed in 1982, with only the Chūō Line remaining. Quaudriple-tracking of the section of the Chūō Line up to Mitaka Station was completed in April 1969.

According to a report assembled in 2009 by the Council, the average travel time between Tachikawa and Shinjuku (27.2 km) is approx. 38 minutes, longer than the Kashiwa – Ueno (29.1 km) section of the Jōban Line (approx. 30 minutes) or the Tsudanuma – Tōkyō (26.7 km) section of the Sōbu Line (approx. 29 minutes).

In regards to the reasons behind the lack of progress on the Chūō Line compared to the other four lines, Tsuchiya Masatada, at the time a representative in the House of Representatives, gave the following response at a February 2008 session of a subcommittee of the House of Representatives Budgetary Committee: “It’s like having a fat right leg and a thin left leg.”
As mentioned in the article, this is the last remaining piece of JNR’s grand vision for its five mainlines in the Tōkyō area (Tōkaidō, Chūō, Tōhoku, Jōban, and Sōbu). While it may be true that not much ridership growth can be expected, that certainly hasn’t stopped other quadruple-tracking projects currently underway on the Seibu Ikebukuro Line, Keiō Line and Odakyū Odawara Line. There are other longer-range proposals hinging on this particular project, as well, including the extension of the Keiyō Line west from Tōkyō Station in a deep tunnel through central Tōkyō to Mitaka, where it would through-service with the Chūō Line. If I remember correctly, though, the recently-completed grade-separation of the Mitaka – Tachikawa section required construction of frontage roads along the alignment, meaning there is no longer enough ROW to quadruple-track the line with an additional set of elevated tracks—in other words, the additional tracks must be placed underground.

Cab view on a Chūō Rapid Line train from Shinjuku to Takao.
This was taken a while ago, as the section between Mitaka (22:40) and Tachikawa (37:45) has been fully grade-separated in both directions for some time now. There are existing sections on this segment that can be relatively easily quadruple-tracked—like at Nishi-Kokubunji (33:15), which is already in a fairly generous cut—but most of the elevated segments now lack sufficient ROW as new frontage roads are being built along the alignment. Can also note the variety of services, even while technically being the “rapid” line for the Tōkyō section of the Chūō Main Line. In particular, there is a timed overtake at Mitaka by a “Chūō special rapid” service (also bound for Takao) at 20:30, as well as at Tachikawa by an Azusa limited express for Matsumoto (Nagano Prefecture) at 42:30.

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 06:59 AM   #3493
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New station building at Seibu Tokorozawa Station partially opens: Part 1

Another project that we heard about a while ago:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=649

Tokorozawa is one of the key hubs of the Seibu network, served by its two mainlines to Ikebukuro and Shibuya and seeing approx. 210,000 passengers a day. The station first opened in 1895, with the most recent renovation in 1991. With age beginning to show, Seibu is now completely replacing the station building, with the first parts of the new station building recently opening on 2012.03.08.

Some pics on opening day:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/ennpitunosuke/

Climbing the stairs takes us to the station concourse area



Lots of display panels up about the project.



A model of the new station building



Nice and open… Reminds me of some of the grander Tōkyū stations that have received renovations recently, like Tama Plaza or Futako Tamagawa.



The new departure boards are six ultra-thin, full-color LCD screens in a row. An installation this large you typically only expect to see at a major JR station.



One of the great thing about LCDs is their versatility… You can do a lot of things that you simply can’t do with LEDs or old-fashioned analog signage. Makes it very easy to show things like stopping patterns, like for this Shinjuku Line rapid express for Seibu Shinjuku.



They even have a picture for the New Red Arrow (NRA) limited expresses on the Ikebukuro Line. Solid effort from Seibu, I must say.



Second set:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/ennpitunosuke/

Inside the paid area of the station



Also on display were old photographs of Tokorozawa Station. Work is still proceeding on the rest of the station building behind this large temporary wall.





Platforms 2 and 3
The old canopies have yet to be removed… Wonder if we’ll see a similar design to other Seibu stations, reusing sections of old rail in various parts of the station.



From Platform 4



The old West Exit that had direct access to / from Platform 1 is now closed, replaced by the new one approx. 40 m to the north.



Last is a small treat… Shouldn’t be hard to guess what’s behind these stickers, but it starts with a “Y”…

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 07:00 AM   #3494
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New station building at Seibu Tokorozawa Station partially opens: Part 2

Another set. Since most of the Tōkyō-area bloggers I used to follow no longer post, it’s harder to find high-quality, single-source blogs for Tōkyō projects.
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/

The new west exit.
Nice exterior. The green walls are becoming more and more common in all types of developments.



The staircase / escalators to the station concourse. Like typical projects of this type, the concourse is designed to also serve as a public passage across the tracks, with barrier-free access. The 11-person capacity elevators at the station have been replaced with larger ones capable of holding 20 persons.
The walls here feature reliefs representing the forests in this part of Tōkyō.



Another look at the faregate entrance from the opposite side. All the lighting is LED, and automatically controlled based on the ambient light level coming through the transparent roof. There’s also a Tomony (Seibu-run station convenience store), as well as Seibu’s first nursing room for mothers, located inside the faregates. I believe the area to the left is part of the new station retail facility Emio, which will debut in June with a supermarket and 11 other stores, followed by 7-8 restaurants and other stores in the fall.



Access down to platform level. There’s LCDs here as well.



“Yokohama” is covered up here, too.



The new TVMs for the ticketing area had not yet been installed.



Overall, very pleased with the results thus far.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 07:00 AM   #3495
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Station numbering expands in Tōkyō, Ōsaka areas

I must have missed some directive from the MLIT or something, as station numbering seems like it’s gone viral for the upcoming timetable changes in March. Currently, aside from subway systems, only a handful of railway operators make use of this system… Among the major private railways in the Tōkyō area, only Keikyū and Keisei (incl. Hokusō Railway and Shibayama Railway) currently use numbering systems, but they will soon be joined by Seibu, Tōbu, and Tōkyū, plus Nankai (incl. Hankai Electric Tramway and Semboku Rapid Railway) in the Ōsaka area.

For the Tōkyō area (red = new systems with numbering):
  • Tōkyō Metro
    • Ginza Line: G
    • Marunouchi Line: M
    • Marunouchi Line branch: m
    • Hibiya Line: H
    • Tōzai Line: T
    • Chiyoda Line: C
    • Yūrakuchō Line: Y
    • Hanzōmon Line: Z
    • Namboku Line: N
    • Fukutoshin Line: F
  • Toei Subway
    • Asakusa Line: A
    • Mita Line: I
    • Shinjuku Line: S
    • Ōedo Line: E
  • Yurikamome: U
  • Nippori–Toneri Liner: numbers only (no letters)
  • Keisei Electric Railway: KS
  • Hokusō Railway: HS
  • Shibayama Railway: SR
  • Keihin Electric Express Railway: KK
  • Tōkyū Corporation
    • Tōyoko Line: TY
    • Meguro Line: MG
    • Den’en Toshi Line: DT
    • Ōimachi Line: OM
    • Ikegami Line: IK
    • Tamagawa Line: TM
    • Setagaya Line: SG
    • Kodomo no Kuni Line: KD
  • Tōbu Railway
    • Tōbu Sky Tree Lines (Isesaki Line from Asakusa to Tōbu Dōbutsu Kōen; Kameido Line; Daishi Line): TS
    • Isesaki Lines (Isesaki Line from Wado to Isesaki; Sano Line; Koizumi Line; Kiryū Line): TI
    • Nikkō Lines (Nikkō Line; Utsunomiya Line; Kinugawa Line): TN
    • Noda Lines (Noda Line): TD
    • Tōjō Lines (Tōjō Line; Ogose Line): TJ
  • Seibu Railway
    • Ikebukuro Lines (Ikebukuro Line; Chichibu Line; Yūrakuchō Line; Toshima Line; Sayama Line: SI
    • Yamaguchi Lines (Yamaguchi Line): SY
    • Shinjuku Lines (Shinjuku Line; Haijima Line): SS
    • Kokubunji Lines (Kokubunji Line; Seibu-en Line): SK
    • Tamako Lines (Tamako Line): ST
    • Tamagawa Lines (Tamagawa Line): SW
  • Metropolitan Intercity Railway (Tsukuba Express): numbers only (no letters)
  • Yokohama Municipal Subway
    • Blue Line: B
    • Green Line: G
  • Yokohama New Transit (Kanazawa Seaside Line): numbers only (no letters)
  • Enoshima Electric Railway (Enoden): EN
I’m a little disturbed by the inconsistencies, with Keikyū and Keisei going with a single letter code for all their stations (KK and KS), versus other operators like Tōkyū going with individual letter codes for each line, versus other operators like Tōbu and Seibu going with a mix of the two systems, grouping some lines under a single letter code while assigning other lines or line groups different letter codes. After these changes, the only major railway operators not to roll-out station numbering will be JR East, Odakyū, and Keiō.

For the Ōsaka area:
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway
    • Midōsuji Line: M
    • Tanimachi Line: T
    • Yotsubashi Line: Y
    • Chūō Line: C
    • Sennichimae Line: S
    • Sakaisuji Line: K
    • Nagahori – Tsurumi Ryokuchi Line: N
    • Imazatosuji Line: I
    • Nankō Port Town Line: P
  • Kita-Ōsaka Express Electric Railway: M
  • Kintetsu Corporation:
    • Keihanna Line: C
  • Kōbe Municipal Subway
    • Seishin–Yamate Line: S
    • Kaigan Line: K
  • Kōbe New Transit
    • Port Island Line: P
    • Port Island Line loop: PL
    • Rokkō Island Line: R
  • Kyōto Municipal Subway
    • Karasuma Line: K
    • Tōzai Line: T
  • Keifuku Electric Railroad
    • Arashiyama Main Line: A
    • Kitano Line: B
  • Eizan Electric Railway: E
  • Ōsaka Rapid Railway (Ōsaka Monorail): numbers only (no letters)
  • Nankai Electric Railway: NK
  • Semboku Rapid Railway: SB
  • Hankai Electric Tramway: HN

Like Keikyū and Keisei, Nankai is going with a single letter code for all its stations (100 total).
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 05:29 PM   #3496
FordFalcon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 47
Likes (Received): 15

These new stations look much cleaner visually and also perhaps helps passengers navigate their way to the right tracks easy. From what I have seen in Japan the stations have too many varieties of visual signage directing from A to B. I wonder why they cannot simplify just like those at the airports. Such inconsistencies in small details ruin the architectural integrity and people get tired from chasing those small texts here and there instead of them positioned at the constant height, the same colour scheme and pictograms rather than words.

Also what bothered me was that there are too many artificial alarm sounds coming not only from the audio announcement systems but also the escalators, automatic doors and so on. Too many LED lights green red or orange coming from here and there. These constant electronic ping and pong sounds and voices telling you to hold onto the hand rest on escalators won't make the place safer for the visually impaired. I do not think the fatality from falling down in other countries without such systems is significantly higher. Also the photo above show that there is nobody using stairs but people travel on escalators up and down. I suppose these should be reserved for the disabled, the elderly and with heavy luggage. The collapse of common sense? Or is it simply due to those insurance companies pushing the limits?

Travelling by rail in Japan is an awesome experience however most railway stations are heavily polluted with unnecessary noises and sounds that I wanted to get out of them as quickly as I could.

Francis
FordFalcon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 07:51 PM   #3497
orulz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 314
Likes (Received): 47

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
New Hakushima Station on San’yō Line, Astram Line in Hiroshima to open in 2015
http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201203090049.html



Map:
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=...6ef515d6&msa=0

Daily ridership at the station is forecasted at approx. 7,000. The JR West press release contains a plan view of the new station:
http://www.westjr.co.jp/press/articl...shiroshima.pdf

According to another article, the city’s done a bit of value engineering on the connecting passage, saving approx. ¥600 million in construction costs. The original passage featured a 150 m concrete canopy, but this canopy will now be reduced by 51 m, with the eliminated section replaced with a simpler design.
http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201202180173.html
Previously it was necessary to ride the Kabe line to Omachi to transfer between JR and Astram (Affectionately アトム) which was fine for people starting or ending their trip at Yokogawa or Hiroshima stations, but pretty impractical otherwise since it involved two transfers. This is a long overdue connection. In addition, this is one of the densest parts of Hiroshima, so having a JR station there will serve the local population well.

There have been a lot of transit proposals that have seemingly withered on the vine in Hiroshima. Some people I talked to blamed it on the fact that the Astram does not earn its operating costs. The city became reluctant to pull the trigger on anything since Astram's opening in 1994 and instead turned its efforts towards building out the city's expressway network. It's nice to see something finally moving again on the transit front. I'm hoping that this connection will make the Astram more successful, increase the transit mode share in Hiroshima, and get some shelved expansion plans moving again.
orulz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2012, 09:21 PM   #3498
Blackraven
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Makati (in the Philippines)
Posts: 2,294
Likes (Received): 234

When it comes to urban rail transportation in Japan, has it ever reached (or will it ever reach) a point where there is no room for network expansion anymore?

Right now, at the back of my head, possible extensions:
-the Asakusa line (Haneda Airport<->Narita Airport)
-Yurikamome possible extension to Kachidoki train station (which belongs to Toei)

I wonder if the MLIT or any company/institution dealing in rail transport reach a point where: "We covered as much as we can. We can't ******* build any more train station"

Just a hypothetical question...............but I ask: Has it ever or will it ever reach that point?
Blackraven no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 15th, 2012, 04:19 AM   #3499
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by FordFalcon View Post
These new stations look much cleaner visually and also perhaps helps passengers navigate their way to the right tracks easy. From what I have seen in Japan the stations have too many varieties of visual signage directing from A to B. I wonder why they cannot simplify just like those at the airports. Such inconsistencies in small details ruin the architectural integrity and people get tired from chasing those small texts here and there instead of them positioned at the constant height, the same colour scheme and pictograms rather than words.
The signage on the last page is pretty clean and consistent, at least to me. Inter-company, there is definitely some variation in color schemes, etc., but intra-company, it's generally consistent. The exceptions are some of the older or really small stations, as signage is typically only replaced when they do station renovations.

I'm not sure why you think there aren't enough pictograms... They do make good use of pictograms, as well as shapes, colors, even things like placement (on floors, in the tracks, etc.):

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by quashlo, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by quashlo, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by quashlo, on Flickr

A lot of the signage might just seem like blocks and blocks of text, but that's because they need to provide signage in at least 2 languages, in many cases 3 or 4. It's not necessarily a routine task to make a sign in 3 or 4 languages look "simple". While the Japanese do tend to use more signage, they need it… You can’t necessarily design a system with multiple operators, stations with multiple exits, or lines with multiple stopping patterns and destinations to be “intuitive”.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FordFalcon View Post
Also the photo above show that there is nobody using stairs but people travel on escalators up and down. I suppose these should be reserved for the disabled, the elderly and with heavy luggage. The collapse of common sense? Or is it simply due to those insurance companies pushing the limits?
Not really sure what you're trying to get at here... Do you want everyone who is not disabled, elderly, or with heavy luggage to use the stairs?
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 15th, 2012, 04:20 AM   #3500
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
Some people I talked to blamed it on the fact that the Astram does not earn its operating costs.
Actually, it did last year:
http://astramline.co.jp/situation22.html

Looking at historic performance, this is the best single year for the Astram Line (excepting FY2001), although it's really not much profit at all and the rest of those tables are splashed with red.

Operating revenues: ¥4,322,508,000
Operating costs: ¥4,273,880,000
Operating profits: ¥48,627,000
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium