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Old September 3rd, 2009, 11:30 PM   #361
Ekowc
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Great map!

Could you add freight only lines?
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Old September 4th, 2009, 12:53 AM   #362
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Excellent map

There are actually quite a few variations of Tokyo rail maps although all of them are either outdated or not drawn to scale.

It'll be great if you can show the greater Tokyo areas too ie Tama, Yokohama, Saitama and Chiba etc, if you already have them that is.
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Old September 7th, 2009, 06:51 AM   #363
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ekowc View Post
Could you add freight only lines?
I’m not very knowledgeable about freight operations, but it's definitely a possibility in the future… Perhaps as part of some "future proposals" map showing freight lines that have been proposed for conversion to passenger service.
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Old September 7th, 2009, 06:52 AM   #364
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nemu View Post
There are actually quite a few variations of Tokyo rail maps although all of them are either outdated or not drawn to scale.
Figured I'd post what's circulating online… Personally, I quite like the Suica / PASMO map, but I think the right side of the map is perhaps too compressed.

Suica / PASMO Capital Region acceptance area, JR East

Version 1



Version 2
http://www.pasmo.co.jp/about_pasmo/p...O_area_all.pdf

Greater Tōkyō Railway Network, FML
image hosted on flickr


Tōkyō-Yokohama-Chiba, Meik Design
They also have other versions of the map (both in English and Japanese), as well as maps of other urban areas in Japan, for purchase.
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Old September 7th, 2009, 06:54 AM   #365
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Pictures of renovated 209 series for Chiba area

Six-car train at Makuhari Car Center.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

Four-car train.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

Car No. 2, showing sealed window (now a restroom).

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

Inside Car No. 1, showing the semi-transverse seating configuration.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

The transverse seating is box-style.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

Table for holding beverages.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

Interior of a middle car, all longitudinal seating.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

The priority seating area, which is typically at the car end, has been relocated to accommodate the restroom.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

Car No. 2, accessible restroom and wheelchair space.


Operator’s cab.

Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/
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Old September 7th, 2009, 06:58 AM   #366
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Keiyō Line to receive E233 series trains
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2009/20090904.pdf

Quote:
In the near future, we will introduce E233 series trains, the latest trains in our fleet, to the Keiyō Line, helping to further improve the stability of transport operations and enhance our passenger service through interior amenities, including the provision of operational status and news through information display and announcement systems.

The E233 series trains are already in service on the Chūō Line rapid and Keihin-Tōhoku Line, and include the following special features:
  • Lowered overhead storage racks and standee straps at car ends (including priority seating areas), improved visibility of priority seating areas, and a reduced-height train floor to help close vertical gaps between the train and platforms.
  • WiMAX-based information display and announcement system above each door, featuring passenger information, operational status, and news.
  • Reduced crowding through use of wide-body cars.
  • Reduced train breakdowns and associated delays through use of redundant electrical and safety equipment systems.

Total car order: 250
Scheduled first introduction: Summer 2010
Operation: Keiyō Line (Tōkyō – Soga), Sotobō Line (Chiba – Katsuura), Uchibō Line (Soga – Kazusa Minato), Tōgane Line (Ōami – Narutō)
The design incorporates some of the other features of current E233 series trains, as well, including installation of air purifiers and use of bacteria-resistant straps for standing passengers.

Rendering:


Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/

This news also draws into question the fate of the E331 series, which is an experimental series developed by JR East:

image hosted on flickr

Source: lismatic_1259 on Flickr

The E331 series was constructed with some unique features, such as direct-drive motors and Jacobs bogies. Because the bogies are shared, the cars are actually much shorter than the typical 20 meters, meaning there are 14 cars per train instead of 10. However, the overall train length stays the same.

Jacobs bogies
image hosted on flickr

Source: powered_by_siemens on Flickr

The trains have been in revenue service testing on and off on the Keiyō Line for some time now, and are scheduled to continue in trial service until 2010.
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:02 AM   #367
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JR Himeji Station North Exit to be redone
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/hyo...OYT8T00047.htm

Quote:
As part of the JR Himeji Station North Side Redevelopment Project, Himeji City has selected a layout for the station plaza area (approx. 1.6 ha). The most important feature is that pedestrians will no longer need to cross traffic lanes when heading for the sidewalks along Ōtemae-dōri. Portions of the sidewalk to Himeji Castle will also be widened, helping to create a safe and pleasant station plaza for tourists and other users. Construction will begin in 2011 and be finished in 2013.

Currently, there are two general ways to access the main north-south sidewalks connecting the station and Himeji Castle: either crossing roads with a mix of buses and taxis, or by following the Miyuki-dōri Commercial Street north and making a left to meet up with the main pedestrian route.

The proposed plan would relocate the taxi boarding zone west from its current position, with public pickup and dropoff zones provided on the east and west ends. From a new plaza in the center, pedestrians will be able to access the east sidewalk long Ōtemae-dōri without having to cross any lanes of traffic.

JR West’s new building will be constructed 40 m south of the current station building. As a result, the station plaza area will increase to approximately 2,000 sq m, allowing for access by a streetcar currently being considered by the city, as well as by tourist rickshaws and tricycles.

In addition, public cars will be prohibited on approximately 200 meters of Ōtemae-dōri from Himeji Station to the Jūnisho-mae Route, lanes removed, and sidewalks widened. A “sunken garden” built into the ground will also be constructed at the station plaza.

Since November of last year, the city has been assembling proposals from the commercial district and city council parties and consulting with railway and bus companies on the plan before finally proposing the current plan.

“The plan really focuses on pedestrian safety. We want to make a plaza that welcomes tourists who have come from far away,” says the project manager at the city’s Himeji Station Area Improvement Office.
JR Himeji Station in Hyōgo Prefecture is Himeji’s primary station and a major station on the JR San’yō Main Line / Kōbe Line. The station is also served by the JR Bantan Line and Kishin Line, as well as the San’yō Shinkansen. San’yō Himeji Station for the San’yō Electric Railway Main Line is also adjacent to the JR station. Elevation of the station was completed recently in December 2008.

Ōtemae-dōri, taken from Himeji Castle. The North Exit of JR Himeji Station is at the end of the corridor.
image hosted on flickr

Source: idua_japan on Flickr

North Exit

Source: Wikipedia

North Exit. The building on the left is San’yō Himeji Station, with an adjacent aboveground bus terminal area. To the right is the JR Himeji Station building.

Source: Wikipedia

The North Exit is a bit of a mess, with a traffic circle, bus terminal, major pedestrian traffic, and a loading zone. The large crosswalk across Ōtemae-dōri at center leads to the San’yō Department Store and San’yō Himeji Station (to the right, outside frame).

Source: Wikipedia
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:03 AM   #368
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JR Tōkyō Station hosts ad technology experiment
http://www.asahi.com/business/update...909020185.html

Quote:
On September 2, “moving posters” which can be bent like paper while still projecting colorful videos were installed at JR Tōkyō Station. The installation is part of a trial to test “electronic advertisement boards,” and the technology is being considered for various future uses in advertisement, such as for wraparound-ads on columns.

The displays are two meters tall and three meters wide. As still images and videos appeared one after another on the one-millimeter thick screen, passengers stopped to take a look.

The test is a joint effort of Shinoda Plasma (HQ: Kōbe), which developed the display, and JR East Planning. The installation at the Marunouchi Underground Central Entrance at Tōkyō Station will continue until September 4.

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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:04 AM   #369
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Kishin Line reopens
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...908210022.html

Quote:
The section of the JR Kishin Line between Sayō (Sayōchō) and Harima Shingū (Tatsuno City), which saw service cancelled as a result of mudslides and fallen trees across its tracks from a torrential downpour on Sayōchō and other areas in Hyōgo Prefecture, reentered service on August 21. After restoration of service on this section, the entire line from the disaster areas to Himeji City has been reopened, fulfilling its previous role as a critical mode of transport for commuters, students, and volunteer workers. According to JR West, the section between Sayō and Mimasaka Emi (Mimasaka City, Okayama Prefecture), which saw extensive damage from the rainfall, will take at least another month and a half to reopen.

As a result of heavy downpours the night of August 9, the trackbed along the Kishin Line was damaged by mudslides and covered in earth and fallen trees. In addition, after Sayō Station was submerged in water and significant amounts of earth flooded into the station, JR West has been working to pump the muddied water out.

The damaged areas also saw other train service cancelled, including Chizu Express (HQ: Chizuchō, Tottori Prefecture) local trains from Kamigōri to Ōhara and express trains from Hirafuku to Ōhara, with reopening scheduled for August 30.
The Kishin Line is a small regional line in the Chūgoku region, but it also serves Himeji City on its eastern end, which is a major hub in Hyōgo Prefecture and part of the Kansai area (Ōsaka-Kōbe-Kyōto).

Some clips of the newest DMU trains on the line, which entered service on March 14, 2009:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MowbSyyXlOA Source: 223kyoto on YouTube
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:07 AM   #370
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Hotei Station elevation begins in October
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/aic...OYT8T00030.htm

Quote:
Construction as part of the elevation of the Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu) Inuyama Line around Hotei Station in Kōnan City will begin next month. The project will elevate approximately 1.8 km of the line from Tashirochō Nishinomaru to Hoteichō-Higashi surrounding the station, eliminating six at-grade crossings with National Route 155 and other roadways and eliminating traffic congestion. The project will also construct a station plaza. Completion is scheduled for 2015.

The project first began in 1981, with the establishment of the Hotei District Railway Elevation Advancement Committee, a local advocacy group. In conjunction with the 2004 approval of the urban plan for the area, the project was approved, with work proceeding on land purchase and surveying, as well as land readjustment for parcels around the station. This March, Aichi Prefecture, Kōnan City, and Meitetsu signed off on a memorandum of understanding for the project.

In an emergency meeting of the City Council in August, the budget request for construction of the temporary station building was approved, and the general account revised budget proposed at the September regular meeting of the City Council included budget items for construction of the station plaza on the east side of the station. Starting in October, work on the temporary station structure will begin, with construction of the temporary tracks to follow. The total estimated cost of the project is approximately ¥18.9 billion.
Kōnan City project page: http://www.city.konan.lg.jp/machiduk...ei/tekkou.html

National Route 155 at-grade crossing

Source: Kōnan City

National Route 155 after elevation of the railway

Source: Kōnan City

Improved West Exit of the station

Source: Kōnan City

New city road (Hotei Station Road) adjacent to the station

Source: Kōnan City

Kōnan City is part of the Chūkyō (Nagoya) Metropolitan Area and is just north of Nagoya City. Hotei Station is a small station (daily entries 4,200), but consists of two island platforms (four tracks).


Source: Wikipedia

Platforms. A Panorama Car train waits at the station.

Source: Wikipedia

Video:

Rear cab view of a Panorama Car train, from Fusō to Hotei.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zazebcZXIlM Source: mastergalaxydrinker on YouTube

Part 2, Hotei to Nishiharu.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-cPS6Ea0dA Source: mastergalaxydrinker on YouTube
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:12 AM   #371
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Miyanohira and Hinatawada Stations to get facelifts
http://www.jreast.co.jp/HACHIOJI/inf...hinatawada.pdf

Quote:
JR East is continuing its ongoing efforts to create stations that become neighborhood landmarks and enhance the safety and comfort of our passengers. As part of this effort, JR East will begin construction of new station buildings at Miyanohira Station and Hinatawada Station on the Ōme Line.

In addition, JR East will continue its renovation of other stations on the Ōme Line.

We apologize for the inconvenience to our passengers during construction, and request your understanding and cooperation.
  • Miyanohira Station
    • Construction start: July 2009
    • Scheduled opening: December 2009
  • Hinatawada Station
    • Construction start: August 2009
    • Scheduled opening: January 2010
Other stations:
  • 2009
    • Sawai Station: Station beautification and bench installation
    • Mitake Station: Station beautification and bench installation
    • Okutama Station: Station beautification
  • 2010
    • Futamatao Station: Station beautification (scheduled)
    • Kawai Station: Station replacement (scheduled)
    • Hatonosu Station: Station beautification (scheduled)
    • Shiromaru Station: Station replacement (scheduled)
The Ōme Line is part of JR East’s network in the Tama Area of western Tōkyō and is effectively a branch line of the Chūō Line. It serves multiple functions, including the following:
  • High-frequency urban / commuter service east of Ōme Station, serving a major hub at Tachikawa, with additional through-service via the Chūō Line rapid to Tōkyō Station
  • Local service linking towns and villages, particularly west of Ōme Station
  • Tourist and sightseeing line through mountain areas

Approximately half of the line west of Higashi-Ōme is single-track and low-ridership, so some stations like Miyanohira and Hinatawada operate without regular staff on hand.

Existing Miyanohira Station building, which is really just a small shack with a ticket machine.

Source: Wikipedia

Existing Hinatawada Station building, in log-cabin style.

Source: Wikipedia

Conceptual drawings and floorplans of the new station buildings are in the source PDF.

Window view of a train on the Ōme Line, from Tachikawa to Okutama.

Source: seigen120kaihin on YouTube
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:14 AM   #372
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Design revealed for new stations on Fukui Railway
http://mytown.asahi.com/fukui/news.p...00000909020005

Quote:
On September 1, the Fukubu Line Revitalization Committee—composed of Fukui Railway and the three jurisdictions along the Fukubu Line (Fukui City, Sabae City, and Echizen City), along with the Fukui Prefectural Government and city residents—convened a meeting and agreed to create one of four currently planned new stations in Iehisachō, Echizen City in between Nishi-Takefu and and Iehisa Stations. Construction of the new station will begin in late November, with completion scheduled for March next year. The construction cost of ¥25 million will be completely funded by the national and prefectural governments.

This represents the first new line on the station since the September 1997 completion of Harmony Hall Station (Fukui City). The station is unmanned and consists of 40 m long, 2.5 m wide platforms. As part of plans to encourage tourism to the area, the canopy over the platforms will feature Japanese cedar from Fukui Prefecture, as well Echizen-style Japanese paper from Echizen City. A waiting room and restroom will also be constructed at the station. The name of the station is currently undecided, but will be chosen via public submission.

As for the remaining three stations, the two stations inside Fukui City are scheduled for completion some time next year, while the station inside Echizen City is scheduled for completion in 2016. Construction costs are being subsidized by the national government as a Main Line Railway Revitalization Project. After accepting the funding, the Revitalization Committee will construct the station and transfer it over to Fukui Railway.

Fukui Railway (Fukutetsu) runs through central Fukui City north into Echizen City and Sabae City. It operates both as a tram / streetcar within Fukui City as well as a local railway line further north. The railway uses a hodgepodge of stock including Japanese-style streetcars as well as heavy-rail stock.



Amateur video of Fukui Railway operations:

Source: masanaga on YouTube
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:16 AM   #373
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New JR West president assumes post
http://www.business-i.jp/news/ind-pa...909010084a.nwc

Quote:
On August 31, JR West Vice President Sasaki Takayuki (63yo) assumed the post of Company President. “I will stand at the lead of our company and revamp our image into one that society can trust,” said Sasaki with determination, asking for help from the approximately 300 members of the company’s top brass assembled at JR West headquarters in Kita Ward, Ōsaka.

In a press conference following his speech, Sasaki formally apologized for the Amagasaki derailment and crash. “Through imaginative and creative ideas, we can definitely reduce expenses without a single impact to the safety of our operations,” said Sasaki in regards to the company’s safety-related investments. He explained that it is possible to reduce the ¥430 billion in expenses over the next five years (until 2012).

Sasaki is succeeding the post of JR West President from Yamazaki Masao, who is under house arrest as a result of corporate manslaughter in the derailment. In his speech, Sasaki said he will continue in the footsteps of Yamazaki by placing safety first, and noted that dealing with victims of the incident is the company’s most critical concern. “We will provide as much emotional care as is necessary,” emphasized Sasaki.

“We will look at both soft and hard improvements, with the aim of developing an administrative structure that is resistant to errors,” said Sasaki in regards to improving the railway’s safety. He also drew attention to the slumping economy and expressway toll discounts, saying, “We must unite as one company to protect our revenue flow and reduce expenses.”
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:20 AM   #374
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Tsukiji Market relocation thrown in doubt
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/tok...OYT8T00110.htm

Quote:
The change of administration is set to significantly impact top issues within Tōkyō Prefecture. The question of whether or not to move Tsukiji Market to the Toyosu area in Kōtō Ward is just one of those issues—one which the Democratic Party of Japan has steadfastly rallied against in elections for both the Tōkyō Assembly and the House of Representatives. The Metropolitan Government says it will attempt to convince Democratic members of the Assembly of the plan’s merits, but some say that the change of administrations means a change in environmental policy, and could make it difficult to move the market.

“It’s only going to get more difficult.” That’s what the Metropolitan Government official in charge of the Tsukiji Market relocation proposal said with a sigh, now that the Democratic Party holds power in both the Tōkyō Assembly and the national government.

The new market is scheduled to open in 2014. The Metropolitan Government has already invested approximately ¥100 billion for soil contamination cleanup, land purchase, and other expenses, and plans to spend another ¥330 billion on the relocation. However, the Democratic Party, which is against the relocation, won a majority of the seats in the Assembly elections, meaning it will be difficult to approve further budget requests related to the relocation of the market. With the change of power in the House of Representatives, one top official in the Metropolitan Government admitted, “The hurdles to realizing the plan have just increased.”

During his election campaign, Representative Nakayama Yoshikatsu, who was elected from District 2 (includes Chūō Ward), criticized the plan, saying “The only reason the Liberal Democratic Party and the Metropolitan Government are even continuing with the project is because they don’t want to stop public works construction.” After winning the election for District 15 (Kōtō Ward), Democratic Representative Azuma Shōzō said, “Their entire proposal was built on the premise that the market will move. We must reexamine the situation and look at alternatives, including improving the existing location.”

Yamazaki Yasuhiro (40yo) from the non-profit organization Committee for the Market, which has been against the relocation, said, “I have no shortage of fellow wholesalers who work at the market and are hoping that the Democratic Party scraps the plan altogether.” However, he also claims that the issue hasn’t gained enough recognition within the Democratic Party, saying, “I would like them to tackle the problem from the perspective of protecting Japan’s food security and safety, and develop a plan that will improve the market at its existing location.”

On the other hand, Director Itō Hiroyuki (71yo) of the Tōkyō Fish Market Wholesalers Union, which has approved of the relocation plan, retorted, “Don’t these people understand why the existing site was given up, and how many months and years it took before arriving at the conclusion of relocating the market?” Big-name restaurant chains and large-scale distributors have agreed to be involved in the relocation to the Toyosu area, but he wants to resolve the issue of financial difficulties due to reduced volume at the new market.

The proposed site for the relocated market is currently a large parcel of empty land. The Yurikamome’s Shijō-mae Station has opened, but ridership at the station is currently low. While some locals in the area welcome the relocated market, additional issues have come to the surface, including soil cleanup at the proposed site, increased truck traffic, and the possibility of increased congestion on public transport during commute hours, which has already become a problem as the population in the area increases. A leading member of the local neighborhood association (62yo) said, “If we can resolve these issues and get the market relocated, it’s great... But if the Democratic Party decides it wants to rethink the plan, there’s not much we can really do.”

The Metropolitan Government is on the alert that the change in political power may signal a change in environmental policy, revolving around the relocation of the market. The proposed soil contamination cleanup is drawing particular attention. A revised law scheduled to enter effect in April of next year would require cleanup of any sites fulfilling a given set of criteria, regardless of how long the industrial facilities have been closed. The proposed relocation site would be subject to the new law. The Metropolitan Government’s Central Wholesale Market Management Department has said it is already carrying out surveys and drafting up a cleanup program that satisfies the revised regulations, but one top official admitted, “The Democratic Party, which is riding on a wave of political change, could introduce new revisions to the law and make it difficult to relocate the market.”
Shijō-mae Station on the Yurikamome Line only recently opened in March 2006. The name of the station means “Market Station” and is based on the premise that the relocated market was supposed to move in adjacent to it. It’s currently built in the middle of nowhere in Toyosu, although the same could be said for a fair portion of the rest of the Yurikamome Line, since the area is all artificial islands undergoing redevelopment into a large mixed use district.

image hosted on flickr

Source: jetalone on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Source: chikashi75 on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Source: chikashi75 on Flickr
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:22 AM   #375
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Redevelopment planning process begins for JR Kashiwa East Exit area
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/ch...202000079.html

Quote:
The Kashiwa Itchōme Area Urban Planning Steering Committee, established to develop a redevelopment plan for the East Exit area of JR Kashiwa Station, convened its first general meeting in Kashiwa City.

It has been over 30 years since the last redevelopment plan for the area in the 1960s, and buildings are beginning to show their age. With the time ripe for a new redevelopment plan, the goal of the committee is to draft a set of rules to prevent disjointed urban planning.

In the general meeting, Director Ishido Shin’ichirō of the Kashiwa Nibangai Commercial Association, which is at the center of the redevelopment plan, was nominated as committee chairman. The committee will now research examples of regional cities that have had success in redevelopment plans where commercial associations were the lead entities, and aim to draft an “area plan” with the approval of landowners. “Keeping in mind Kashiwa’s unique qualities and merits, I want us to work together to think about how to design our neighborhood,” says Chairman Ishido.
Kashiwa Station is a major station on the JR Jōban Line (local), JR Jōban Line (rapid), and the Tōbu Noda Line, and the central station for Kashiwa City in Chiba Prefecture. JR Kashiwa had 124,000 daily entries in 2008, while Tōbu Kashiwa had 141,000 daily entries and exits in 2007.

JR Kashiwa Station, inside the faregates
image hosted on flickr

Source: oda.shinsuke on Flickr

Main JR entrance
image hosted on flickr

Source: oda.shinsuke on Flickr

Pedestrian deck on the West Exit
image hosted on flickr

Source: oda.shinsuke on Flickr

Main entrance to Tōbu Kashiwa Station

Source: Wikipedia

Morning rush, JR Kashiwa Station Platform 3, Jōban Line (rapid) for Ueno. The trains with aquamarine / green belt are E231 series trains on short-distance rapid service between Toride and Ueno. The train with the dark blue belt is E531 series running mid- to long-distance rapid service past Toride to Tsuchiura, Katsuta, etc. This is still 30 km from Ueno, and trains make an additional major stop at Matsudo (Shin-Keisei Line) before congestion eases at Kita-Senju, where passengers can transfer to the Hibiya Line and Hanzōmon Line.

Source: r319mito on YouTube
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:24 AM   #376
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E233-2000 series to enter service September 9
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/lifest...2002003-n1.htm

Quote:
On September 9, the first E233 series unit will enter revenue service on the JR Jōban Line local (all-stop service), which runs through-service with the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line and connects Toride Station in Ibaraki Prefecture with Yoyogi Uehara Station in Tōkyō.

The car widths on E233 series units for the Chūō Line rapid and other lines were reduced by 15 mm to conform to the Chiyoda Line loading gauge. In addition, emergency exit doors were installed at the end cabs of the train to meet subway train standards.

The train floor height was reduced by 7 cm to improve accessibility. A 10-car unit has a rated capacity of 1,400 passengers, with each train costing close to ¥1 billion. One train will enter service this year, and an additional 17 trains will enter service starting next year, replacing older rolling stock.
More clips of testing:

Arriving at and departing Platform 4 (for Toride) at Ayase Station, the official boundary between the Jōban Line (local) and Chiyoda Line.

Source: lukethegospelwriter on YouTube

Arriving at Platform 2 (for Ōtemachi, Ayase, Toride) at Yoyogi Kōen Station on the Chiyoda Line.

Source: x90td0625g on YouTube

Departing Nishi-Nippori Station on the Chiyoda Line.

Source: zyouban on YouTube
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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:26 AM   #377
quashlo
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”Health station” concept gains ground with Keihan
http://www.asahi.com/kansai/sumai/ne...909040025.html

Quote:
Passengers may soon be able to get their blood pressure or blood sugar level checked after the commute home from work or shopping. With the help of Kansai Medical University and Keihan Electric Railway, the “health station” concept championed by members of industry, government, and the academic world as a means to improve the health of residents along railway lines could soon become reality. Starting with examination offices to be established at major stations on Keihan’s network, data on residents’ health would be shared between households and fitness clubs. The project is the first of its kind in Japan, and is aimed at preventing lifestyle-related diseases.

Kansai Electric Power Company, Fujitsū, Omron Group, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, and Hirakata City (Ōsaka Prefecture) are also participating in the project. On September 3, representatives from the various participating entities gathered in Ōsaka City and agreed to work together to realize the project.

Examination offices would be established at Keihan’s major stations, and special trainers stationed at each location would measure patients’ blood pressure, blood sugar level, and cholesterol. The data records would be managed on a computer operated by Kansai Medical University. After physicians evaluate trends in the data, the data would be sent to fitness clubs and Hirakata City gymnasiums over the Internet, and be used in the development of specific exercise regimes to improve patients’ health. The data can also be viewed at home via television screen, allowing patients to regularly check up on their health condition.

The project marks the first effort to share health information centered around train stations. By 2010, the project aims to have examination facilities open at two to three Keihan stations including Kyōbashi and Hirakata-shi, expanding to approximately 10 major stations two to three years after.

“To increase individual awareness of personal health, we need to provide people with ready access to information about their health in convenient places. The project will also help to improve the image of Keihan and the surrounding neighborhoods,” says Kimura Yutaka, a health science professor at Kansai Medical University.

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Old September 7th, 2009, 07:27 AM   #378
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Tōkyō: Part 10

This is the start of my second full day in the metropolis. My first stop is Ueno.

Here, a Yamanote Line train bound for Tōkyō and Shinagawa boards at Platform 3 of JR Ueno Station. The Keihin-Tōhoku Line, Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and Jōban Line (rapid) all stop at JR Ueno Station. The station is also served by Shinkansen and several limited express and sleeper trains.

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Morning rush hour commuters continue to shuffle on board as the conductor steps out. As the terminus for the Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and Jōban Line trains, Ueno sees a large amount of transferring traffic from passengers trying to get to points further south, such as Tōkyō Station and the Marunouchi area.

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The platform staff get ready to give the signal to go, as the last passengers get on board. Southbound Yamanote Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line trains between Ueno and Okachimachi Stations during the morning rush hour are some of the most crowded trains in all of Japan, with passenger loads at over 200 percent of the rated capacity. This will change in a few years once the Tōhoku Through Line is constructed, eliminating the need for passengers from other JR lines to transfer at Ueno, since there will now be direct service to Tōkyō Station and points beyond on the Tōkaidō Line.

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Another train arrives… Rinse and repeat.

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The conductor checks her watch carefully. Schedules are measured in seconds, so punctuality is everything.

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I step out of JR Ueno Station and exit on the southeast side of the station, which has an expansive elevated pedestrian deck that winds around and underneath Shuto Expressway No. 1.

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I step down to street level.

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The taxi pickup area.

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I head underground to Tōkyō Metro Ueno Station. For subways, both the Ginza Line and Hibiya Line serve Ueno. This is on the Hibiya Line platforms as a through-service Tōbu Railway train pulls into the station. Ironically, the train is features exterior ads for Keikyū trains to Haneda Airport. Although Tōbu and Keikyū are hardly rivals, it demonstrates the need for operators to market on other companies’ trains in order to lure customers. Tōbu also advertises it’s limited express trains to Kinugawa and Nikkō on Keikyū trains.

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We take the Hibiya Line through-service train to Kosuge Station on the Tōbu Isesaki Line, just five stations out. The station is on the other side of the Arakawa River, opposite Kita-Senju Station.

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The Hibiya Line was Tōkyō Metro’s third line, following the Ginza Line and Marunouchi Line, with the first section opening in 1961. Trains are eight cars long, and at 18 meters, cars on the Hibiya Line are a little shorter than the standard, and mostly feature only three doors per side. However, the four end cars (two at each end) on some Tōkyō Metro 03 series trains feature five doors per car, part of an effort to reduce dwell times during the morning rush hour beginning in 1990.

These Tōbu 20000 series trains were built exclusively for Hibiya Line through-service and feature three doors per side. The similar 20050 series trains feature five doors. Stickers on the train, bound for Tōbu Dōbutsu Kōen (Tōbu Animal Park), say “Hibiya Line through-service.”

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Kosuge Station consists of one island platform served by the inner local tracks. A Tōbu 10000 series train, built in 1983, passes the station on the outside rapid tracks, on a section express run bound for Asakusa.

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Just a few steps west of the station are the elevated tracks for the JR Jōban Line. Straddling the Jōban Line tracks are tracks for the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line on the west side and the Metropolitan Intercity Railway Tsukuba Express on the east side.

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A six-car Tōbu 36000 series train on a local run for Takenotsuka stops at the station.

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An eight-car section semi-express passes the station on the rapid tracks, bound for Kita-Kasukabe, about 30 km north.

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As the section semi-express moves on, an E531 series train on the Jōban Line (rapid) peeks out from below, on a long-distance run bound for Ueno.

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An E653 series limited express train on a “Fresh Hitachi” run, bound for Ueno terminal.

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Tōbu runs some impressive long-distance through-services deep into Tochigi Prefecture. This six-car train composed of three two-car Tōbu 6050 units passes the station, bound for the Tōbu Nikkō Line, Kinugawa Line, and further north via the Yagan Railway and Aizu Railway into Fukushima Prefecture. At Shimo-Imaichi, the six-car train will decouple, with a portion heading to Tōbu Nikkō Station on the Tōbu Nikkō Line (135 km from Asakusa), and a portion to Shin-Fujiwara on the Tōbu Kinugawa Line (135 km from Asakusa) and beyond to Aizu Tajima on the Aizu Railway Aizu Line (220 km from Asakusa in Fukushima Prefecture).

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A Tōkyō Metro 03 series train arrives at the station, bound for Takenotsuka. This train consists of all three-door cars.

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A look at the two parallel double-track bridges across the Arakawa River. On the other end of the bridges is Kita-Senju Station.

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Just to the west are three additional double-track bridges, one each for the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line, JR Jōban Line, and Tsukuba Express (the closest one in). Together with the Isesaki Line, this makes four lines (each a different operator) and ten tracks running in parallel for this short section near Kita-Senju. Part of the Shuto Expressway network runs above.

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An outbound Tsukuba Express train (TX-2000 series) passes by.

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An eight-car Tōbu 20000 series local train bound for Naka-Meguro on the Hibiya Line departs the station. Both the Hibiya Line and Hanzōmon Line run through-service with the Tōbu Isesaki Line, but the Hibiya Line is restricted to local trains while the Hanzōmon Line is restricted to the limited-stop services.

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An Odakyū Electric Railway 1000 series through-service train on the Chiyoda Line.

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An E231 series train on the Jōban Line rapid passes by. The Jōban Line services can be a bit of a puzzle to figure out. The rapid tracks (Jōban Line rapid) primarily operate with both short-distance trains and mid- to long-distance trains. The short-distance inner suburban and commuter trains operate primarily between Ueno and Toride (about 35 km away) and use these E231 series trains which run on DC. These trains are in 10 or 10+5 configuration.

The mid- to long-distance commuter trains run on dual-voltage (AC / DC) units and include the E531 series trains and various limited express trains. The E531 series trains run between Ueno and as far as Takahagi, about 165 km from Ueno, stopping at all the same stations as the short-distance trains, and also run in 10 or 10+5 configuration. They are confusingly sometimes called “local” or “all-stop trains” to distinguish them from the limited express trains, even though all these trains use the rapid tracks and skip stops west of Toride. The limited express trains have fewer stops and continue further to Iwaki and Sendai, serving both as upgraded commuter trains and intercity trains. The use of dual-voltage equipment is a result of the Kakioka Magnetic Observatory, so the voltage switches from DC to AC between Toride Station and Fujishiro Station.

In addition to the rapid services, however, there is the Jōban Line local which stops at all stops between Ueno and Toride and runs through-service with the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line. It has its own set of tracks separate from the rapid tracks between Toride and Ayase, at which point the tracks become part of the Chiyoda Line.

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A Tōkyō Metro 03 series train, featuring the four five-door end cars, arrives at the station.

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The train is bound for Kita-Koshigaya and features a special “5 DOORS” sticker on the cab window.

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To be continued…
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Old September 11th, 2009, 05:20 AM   #379
Martini87
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Well, we all know japanese (specially Tokyo) trains are as frequent as crowded, but, how many passangers per hour per direction do these lines carry? I tried to find these data, but there's only in japanese, I guess.

Just a little comparison: São Paulo (my city) has a line that carries 82,000 pphpd in the morning peak. People here say that it's the most ridden metro line in the Earth (in terms of peak load). I don't know if that's true, but it's quite an impressive figure! Having 101s headways and 6 car-trains (and a horrible crowding of 10 passengers/sq m), there's almost 2,400 people per train. As the design capacity (4 pass./sq m) is 1140 passengers/train, there'a a congestion rate of 205% (!). But, differently from Tokyo, that's the only line for an entire region of the city...

If we mention rail corridors, then I think we have a clear winner: Tokaido between Shinagawa and Tokyo. There are the Tokaido Main, Keihin Tohoku, Yokosuka, Shinkansen and Yamanote lines! That must be like, 200,000 pphpd!

Last edited by Martini87; September 11th, 2009 at 03:56 PM.
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Old September 11th, 2009, 09:54 AM   #380
quashlo
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I'm fairly certain the single-line section with the largest peak ridership in Tōkyō (and Japan) is the Chūō Line (rapid).
  • Peak loading: 198% (Nakano – Shinjuku) (source)
  • Capacity: 29 tph x 1,580 pax / train = 45,800
  • Peak passenger load: 90,700 passengers per hour (peak direction)
There are several lines that have higher peak loading, but they have slightly less trains. There’s quite a few lines hovering in the 75,000 to 85,000 pphpd range, too, like the Yamanote Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, Sōbu Line (local), Odakyū Odawara Line, Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line, etc. The Yamanote Line loop has a lot of parallel sections, so a substantial number of passengers from the other JR lines (e.g, Saikyō Line, Tōkaidō Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, Yokosuka Line) don’t need to step foot inside a Yamanote Line train at all, which is partially why it isn't at the top.

The crowding is actually substantially better than it was historically, as the network gets even more built out through quadruple-tracking, new lines, etc., so the figures will only keep going down. Before Japan's economic bubble burst, it was much, much more crowded and unpleasant.

Last edited by quashlo; September 11th, 2009 at 09:59 AM.
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