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Old May 16th, 2012, 05:20 AM   #3821
k.k.jetcar
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Quote:
The railcars will be manufactured by Japan Transport Engineering Company (J-TREC)
The new name for Tokyu Sharyo, apparently.
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Old May 16th, 2012, 10:01 AM   #3822
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I'm a bit curious what the trains will look like... Manila's system has quite an unusual variety of stock, including repurposed Czech trams. I'm only somewhat fond of the Nippon Sharyō / Kinki Sharyō stock on the Yellow Line—or, at least the front of them... I still find them too narrow and short, and I despise the windows, among other things.

But since this is for an all-new line, perhaps they will just go with something similar to the Rotem stock on the Purple Line (i.e., modern "Chinese"-style five-door 20m+ cars). To my knowledge, Tōkyū Car never had experience with this type of train (closest thing might have been the C151 trains for Singapore), but Kinki has produced this design before (SP1900/1950 trains for KCR East Rail). Also wouldn't mind seeing an E233-based design...
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Old May 16th, 2012, 05:21 PM   #3823
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KEIO Underground project

I have been unable to find any recent information about Keio's huge underground project at Chofu station. A Japanese railfan sent me this link that has a nice animation showing how the shield tunnelling machine was used in that project. He said it is expected to be completed in August.

When the image in the link settles down, click on the blue box to start the animation. Very interesting.

http://www.keio.co.jp/train/chofu/index.html
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Old May 17th, 2012, 04:25 AM   #3824
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Yeah, for such a huge project, there's not much info available... There's only three months or so left until opening!

I think it partially has to do with it not really being as "glamorous" as a new line or new service (as opposed to the similar but somewhat simpler Fukutoshin Line / Tōyoko Line improvements), the fact that it's less visible (by virtue of being underground), and the fact that it's primarily being executed by the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government.
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Old May 17th, 2012, 04:26 AM   #3825
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Tōkyō Sky Tree, Hikarie lead railway retail drive
http://www.businessweek.com/news/201...s-retail-drive

Quote:
The Tokyo Skytree, twice as tall as the Eiffel Tower, opens next week as Japanese train operators counter an aging population by building malls, offices and tourist attractions.

The 634-meter (2,080 feet) structure in eastern Tokyo sits in a retail complex housing more than 300 shops and restaurants, a planetarium and an aquarium. Developer Tobu Railway Co. (9001) expects the project to draw 32 million visitors in its first year, surpassing the numbers at Tokyo Disney Resort. Tobu, whose revenue has fallen for five years, will also get a 28.3 billion yen ($352 million) sales boost in the year ending March 31, according to Kazuhiko Hirata, a general manager for finance.

The 143 billion yen development, which took four years to build, follows last month’s opening of Tokyu Corp. (9005)’s 34-story entertainment complex in the Shibuya shopping district and East Japan Railway Co. (9020)’s ongoing 50 billion-yen renovation of Tokyo Station. The companies are taking advantage of land they own around stations to generate new income and lure more travelers as Japan’s shrinking birthrate threatens commuter traffic.

“People will use the Tobu line to go to Tokyo Skytree and they will shop in Tobu shops when they get there,” said Masayuki Kubota, who oversees the equivalent of $2 billion in assets in Tokyo at Daiwa SB Investments Ltd. “It’s a very good investment.” He doesn’t own Tobu shares, he said.

The development will boost Tobu’s operating profit by 3.2 billion yen in the year ending March 31, according to Hirata. The company will have as many as eight trains an hour running from the Asakusa terminus to the development’s closest station, which has been renamed Tokyo Skytree.

856 Million Passengers
Tobu, which operates routes to the north of the capital, carried 856 million passengers in the year ended March 31. The company is the third biggest by ticket sales among the 11 major train operators in Tokyo and surrounding cities, according to JR East. (9022) The region is home to 35 million people. By contrast, Amtrak carried 30 million passengers in the U.S. in the year ended September 2011.

Tobu, which also operates buses, hotels, shopping centers, department stores, golf courses and sports clubs, fell 2.3 percent to 387 yen in Tokyo trading yesterday. It’s jumped 24 percent in the past year, compared with an 11 percent decline for the benchmark Topix Index.



Shrinking Population
Japan’s population peaked at 127.1 million people in 2005 and has been shrinking since, according to figures from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications. The population of Tokyo’s 23 wards will start declining after reaching a peak of 13.35 million by 2020, according to forecasts from the Tokyo Metropolitan Government.

Tokyu, the Tokyo region’s fourth-largest train operator, last month opened Hikarie in Shibuya ward, which houses 26 restaurants, about 200 shops and sales outlets, and a 1,972-seat theater. About 14 million people will visit a year, said Isao Watanabe, an executive officer at the Tokyo-based company.

“We have great hopes for the new building,” he said. “We’re sure it will increase the number of people using our trains as well.” Tokyu also operates hotels, supermarkets and entertainment facilities.

JR East, the largest train operator in the Tokyo area, is working to turn Tokyo Station in the Marunouchi financial district into a tourist destination. Plans includes adding more shops, restoring rooftop domes destroyed in World War II and building a plaza in front of the station that will be lit up at night. An expanded 150-room hotel will also open in October.

The Tokyo-based rail company is trying to increase its share of revenue from shops, hotels and offices to almost 40 percent from about 30 percent by the year ending March 2019.

“The railway companies have to put their energy into expanding other forms of revenue to grow,” said Ryota Himeno, an analyst at Barclays Capital Japan Ltd. “Train travel isn’t going to increase when the population is shrinking.”
The changing East Exit of Shibuya Station. Some really nice views of Shibuya from the building. I can just imagine when they replace the current station building with a proper terminal and skyscraper.



Tōkyō Station restoration work (2012.05.07):
Source: Kaoru Hayashi, on Flickr

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Old May 17th, 2012, 06:57 AM   #3826
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Sumitomo wins viaduct construction contract for Ho Chi Minh City Metro Line 1
http://www.sumitomocorp.co.jp/news/2...16_150000.html

Quote:
住友商事株式会社(本社:東京都中央区、取締役社長:加藤 進、以下 住友商事)は、ベトナムに
おける最初の都市鉄道であるホーチミン地下鉄1号線の高架土木工事を現地国営ゼネコン(*)と共同で総額約626億円で受注し、本日ベトナム・ホーチミン市人民委員会鉄道局と契約締結に至りました。

本件は、ベトナムにおける最初の都市鉄道計画であり、ホーチミン市にて深刻化している道路渋滞の
緩和および大気汚染の改善を目的とした同国における最重要案件の一つであり、住友商事にとっても大変意義深い案件です。

今回受注したのは、ホーチミン市中心部のBen Thanhから市北東部に位置するSuoi Tienに延びる
総延長19.7キロメートル(地下鉄および高架鉄道)の1号線建設計画のうち、17.2キロメートルの高架土木(11駅の建設を含む)および車両基地(約21ヘクタール)の建設工事です。
完成は2016年末を見込んでいます。

1号線の建設は、他のパッケージ(車両システム、地下土木工事)を含め日本政府からベトナム政府へ供与される本邦技術活用(STEP)条件付き円借款を用いて実施されます。
なお、同工事のコンサルタント業務についても円借款の下、日本工営株式会社を筆頭とするコンサル
タントグループが実施する予定です。

ベトナムでは今後ハノイ、ホーチミンの両都市において多くの都市鉄道が計画されており、南北高速鉄道を含め、成長する同国市場および他国で計画されている鉄道案件についても積極的に取り組み、受注拡大を目指していきます。

*現地国営ゼネコン Civil Engineering Construction Corporation No.6(略称:CIENCO6)。ベトナム国運輸省(Ministry of Transport)傘下の現地大手国営ゼネコン。

【ホーチミン地下鉄1号線】


【完成イメージ】
Sumitomo Corporation has won the viaduct construction contract for Ho Chi Minh City Metro Line 1 in a consortium together with Civil Engineering Construction Corporation No. 6 (CIENCO6), a local government-owned general contractor directly under the jurisdiction of the Vietnam Ministry of Transport. The contract is worth approx. ¥62.6 billion (out of ¥240 billion for the entire line, 80% or ¥197 billion of which is being financed by yen loans). The contract was officially signed with the Railway Bureau on 2012.05.16, and work will begin in July.

This will become Vietnam’s first urban railway, helping to relieve the city’s chronic traffic congestion and improve its air quality. Line 1 is comprised of underground and elevated sections, stretching 19.7 km from Bến Thành Market in central Ho Chi Minh to Suối Tiên. Sumitomo and CIENCO6 will be responsible for constructing the 17.2 km elevated section of the line (including 11 stations), together with the 21 ha railyard. Expected completion is in late 2016, reducing the currenet 1h10m bus journey to a mere 29 minutes.

Together with the other packages for Line 1’s railcars and underground civil works, the construction of the elevated sections of Line 1 is being executed using yen loans provided by the Japanese government to the Vietnamese government that stipulate the Special Terms for Economic Partnership (STEP)—i.e., use of Japanese technology. As a result, consultancy services for the other works will be executed by a consultant group led by Nippon Kōei. Four groups—namely, Hitachi / Hitachi Plant Technologies, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries / Sumitomo Corporation, Kawasaki Heavy Industries / ITŌCHŪ Corporation, and Tōshiba / Marubeni Corporation—submitted bids for the railcars, and it appears that the Hitachi consortium won that contract. Kajima Corporation, Shimizu Corporation, and Maeda Corporation have submitted bids for one of the two underground contracts.

This is Japan’s first railway project win in Vietnam (and hopefully not the last) as the country gets ready for major investment in urban railways in both Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City (8 lines each), as well as the high-speed railway connecting the two cities and other infrastructure projects including Lach Huyen Port (a ¥140 billion project to construct Vietnam’s largest deep-water port in Hai Phong, being carried out by ITŌCHŪ Corporation, Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, and NYK Line) and Nội Bài International Airport Terminal 2 (being constructed by Taisei Corporation).

A nice overview of Line 1.
Hopefully the trains don’t turn out anything like that….

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Old May 17th, 2012, 09:43 AM   #3827
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Quote:
Tōkyō Station restoration work (2012.05.07)
I see the copper cladding has already faded.

Quote:
Hopefully the trains don’t turn out anything like that….
Yeah, who shipped over the MTA rolling stock from Queens?? But later the rolling stock changes to much, much better A-train style stuff.
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Old May 17th, 2012, 10:47 PM   #3828
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Elevation of Keikyū Kamata Station to be completed in October, will improve access to Haneda
http://www.nikkei.com/news/local/art...E2E2EBE0E0E4E7

Quote:
 東京箱根間往復大学駅伝(箱根駅伝)で数々のドラマを生んだ東京都大田区の京急蒲田第1踏切。京急蒲田駅前の第一京浜(国道15号)を横切る同踏切では、数年前まで電車の通過時に選手が足止めされるハプニングが発生していた。今は電車を止めて選手の走行を優先しているが、2012年度中に終わる線路の高架化工事後はこの踏切はなくなる。

都内有数の交通量を誇る第一京浜は慢性的な渋滞の幹線道路として有名だ。原因の一つが京急蒲田駅周辺にある踏切。かつて朝のラッシュ時に1時間当たり40分以上遮断していた「開かずの踏切」が11カ所もあった。

今年度中に完工

 01年度に東京都や京浜急行電鉄、大田区などが連続立体交差化に着手。京急蒲田第1踏切は渋滞ピーク時の車の列がそれまで780メートルに達することもあったが、10年5月に上り線の高架化が完成した後は340メートルと半分以下に短くなった。

 現在は下り線の高架化工事が急ピッチで進み、12年度中に完工する。都は「踏切がなくなれば交通渋滞が減り、線路で分断された市街地が一体化する」とみている。

 京急蒲田駅から空港線はT字状に分岐している。従来は横浜と品川方面からの電車が1つのホームで行き交い、電車の「渋滞」が発生していた。京急は駅舎を改築し、10月から上り線と下り線のホームを2階と3階に分ける。

 これを受けて京急は羽田空港発着の電車を増便する。平日昼間の羽田空港への直通電車の運転本数について、品川方面からは現在の1時間6本から9本へ、横浜方面からは3本から6本程度に増やす計画だ。

再開発の契機に

 「鉄道の高架化は街を地元住民や観光客にとって望ましい形に変えるチャンス」。再開発事業を統括する大田区の野田隆副区長はこう断言する。京急蒲田駅の西口周辺はタクシーやバスが止まる広場がなく、道幅も狭いからだ。飲食店や住宅が密集しており、防災面の不安もあった。

 地元地権者でつくる再開発組合は区などと連携し、駅前1ヘクタールの敷地内に商業施設と住居が一体となった大型複合ビルを建てるプロジェクトを進めている。地上20階建てで延べ床面積は約3万5000平方メートル。駅前広場も設けてペデストリアンデッキ(空中歩道)を整備し、駅2階の改札口と直結する。総事業費は約190億円。12年度中にも着工し、14年度の完成を目指す。

 課題もある。蒲田は商店が多い地域。周辺の商店街と新しくできる商業施設が一体となった商業振興が求められる。国内屈指の中小企業集積地の特色を生かし、街をどうPRしていくか。ハード面の整備だけでなく、観光や産業の振興も加えたソフト面の工夫の余地は大きい。

 ▼京急蒲田駅周辺の都市計画事業 京急本線と空港線の連続立体交差と、駅周辺にビルや広場を整備する再開発事業。高架する区間は平和島駅―六郷土手駅の約4.7キロメートルと、京急蒲田駅―大鳥居駅の約1.3キロメートル。高架などに関わる事業費は約1890億円。

 2010年度に上り線の全線と、下り線の一部(環八通り付近)が高架になった。周辺の計28カ所の踏切のうち、4カ所が撤廃された。下り線の全線の高架化が終われば全ての踏切がなくなる。国は第一京浜と環八通りの南蒲田交差点の立体化工事も進めている。

 京急蒲田駅西口の再開発のほか、東口にもバスやタクシーが乗り入れる広場を造る。糀谷駅でも駅前広場や高齢者支援施設などを整備するプロジェクトが進行している。

第一京浜を横切る京急蒲田第1踏切付近は渋滞が頻繁に起こる(大田区)


Completion of this ¥189 billion mega-project to elevate 4.7 km of the Keikyū Main Line between Heiwajima and Rokugōdote and 1.3 km of the Keikyū Airport Line between Keikyū Kamata and Ōtorii is fast approaching, with the works scheduled to be completed in October 2012. A total of 28 grade crossings will be eliminated, including the particularly nasty one directly outside Keikyū Kamata Station, which would stay closed for a cumulative total of over 40 minutes during the morning peak hour. This was especially problematic given that this crossing traverses Dai-Ichi Keihin (National Route 15), a key arterial road.

The original crossing was single-track and there was only one platform at Keikyū Kamata to serve trains heading between the Airport and both the Shinagawa and Yokohama directions, resulting in traffic queues stretching as long as 780 m. Completion of the inbound (for Shinagawa) elevated track in May 2010 reduced the maximum queues by more than half to 340 m. In October, the outbound track will also be elevated, and inbound and outbound directions will now be split across the second and third levels of the station.

These improvements will also allow Keikyū to substantially improve service to and from Haneda… Service between Haneda and the Shinagawa end will increase from the current 6 tphpd to 9 tphpd, while service between Haneda and the Yokohama end will increase from the current 3tphpd to 6 tphpd.

The elevation of the station and tracks will allow for a major redevelopment at the station’s West Exit, currently incredibly cramped and dense with narrow roads and lacking a place for taxis and buses to stop. Pedestrian traffic is also high and the area is filled with shops and restaurants. A new West Exit station plaza will be created and a mixed-use residential / retail tower (20 stories, 35,000 sq m) is slated to go into a 1 ha site at this location, directly connected to the station’s second-floor ticketing hall with an elevated pedestrian deck.

Keikyū Kamata scenes (2010.02.20), before the inbound track was elevated:



Cab view on a Keikyū rapid limited express from Misakiguchi to Sengakuji.
The train departs Keikyū Kawasaki at 56:35, entering the construction site for the elevation works at 57:35. Gotta love Keikyū.

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Old May 17th, 2012, 11:12 PM   #3829
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
But later the rolling stock changes to much, much better A-train style stuff.
Hm, I guess I didn't watch enough of it...

Yeah, the first thing that popped into my head was "Why are they showing New York stock!?" But yeah, having worked with some transportation simulation software before, I'm guessing that's one of the few already-built models they had for showing the interior. Not a big deal, and maybe not worth the time and effort to build a specific model just for the train's interior, but I suppose it could give a layperson the wrong impression.
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Old May 18th, 2012, 06:59 AM   #3830
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Tsurumai Line N3000 series debuts in revenue service

Apparently, this slipped by completely under my (and everyone’s) nose, since the Nagoya Municipal Subway didn’t exactly advertise it. An Asahi Shimbun article quotes a June debut (perhaps they’re referring just to the second unit, N3102), so I’m a little confused, but it appears that the first day of service was actually quite some time ago (2012.03.16).

In any event, these are new trains for the Nagoya Municipal Subway Tsurumai Line, six-car formations manufactured by Hitachi.

A thorough look, inside and outside:

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Old May 18th, 2012, 07:00 AM   #3831
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JR Hokkaidō 733 series public test rides

One of the new JR Hokkaidō 733 series commuter EMUs entering revenue service in conjunction with the start of electrified train service on the Gakuen Toshi Line (Sasshō Line) on 2011.06.01 was put on test ride duties between Sapporo and Ishikari Tōbetsu on 2012.05.15. Here’s some pictures:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/hakodatehonsen_oasa/
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/hakodatehonsen_oasa/

B-103 + B-104 (3+3 formation) parked at Sapporo Station:



The exhibition at Ishikari Tōbetsu. Apparently it was only on display for 30 minutes, maybe because they didn’t have enough slots in the schedule?



I quite like the interior—simple and clean. The car walls are much thicker than you might see in standard stock elsewhere in Japan. The fold-up seats near the doors, found on the 731 series, have been removed, and the longitudinal seating has been extended out in its place.



Like the 735 series, the car floor has been lowered by a good 19 cm to improve accessibility. Doors are half-automatic, like the 731 series. A bit odd to see big single-leaf designs like this after getting used to the double-leafs everywhere in the big cities.



Accessible restroom



The wall separating the passenger cabin from the operator’s cab… No “railfan window” here. The floor of the cab is a bit higher up than the floor of the passenger cabin, and there’s a small ramp up.

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Old May 18th, 2012, 07:01 AM   #3832
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Right side of the cab



Side window. The operators / conductors control the doors from this location.



Destination signs are all LEDs, but they’re only single-color.



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Old May 18th, 2012, 02:21 PM   #3833
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Tokyo station looks absolutely amazing now. I look forward to an excuse to get sent to Tokyo on a conference now...
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Old May 19th, 2012, 01:41 AM   #3834
quashlo
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The secret to Tōkyō's rail success
http://www.theatlanticcities.com/com...-success/2044/

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Twice during my recent trip to Tokyo, once at Shibuya and again in a suburb to the west of the city, I exited a subway platform only to find myself swaddled in a massive department store. This was the Tokyu store. In Shibuya, at least, it felt every bit as gigantic as Macy's gigantic flagship store on New York's 34th Street. It had at least 10 stories to its name and a curious arrangement of chairs outside the elevator bank, which people sat in so attentively, you'd think that's exactly what they'd awakened to do.

In other words the railway itself was just a sideline attraction. This is no accident. As John Calimente reminds us in the latest issue of the Journal of Transport and Land Use [PDF], a major reason Tokyo's private rail lines are so successful is that they've diversified the business beyond transportation into real estate holdings and retail outlets. At the end of the day this means both profitability for the company and better transportation for city residents. Calimente writes:
Government regulation of fares coupled with limited subsidies for railway operations pushed the private railways to innovate and diversify into a wide variety of related businesses, most notably real estate. Due to their long-term interest in the communities they built along their rail lines, the private railways provided valuable social benefits through public transportation while still pursuing profits. High quality, frequent rail service to dense, mixed-use, safe, pedestrian-friendly developments has allowed Tokyo to achieve enviable rates of public transit usage and given Tokyoites the freedom to view automobile ownership as a lifestyle choice rather than a necessity.
Take, for instance, the Tokyu Corporation. Established in 1922 as a regional development company, Tokyu today is a massive "rail-based conglomerate" of nearly 400 companies that employs 30,000 people, only a tenth of which work directly for the railway. Beginning in the 1930s Tokyu surrounded its hubs with commercial and retail buildings and sold land near its intermediate stations to universities at good prices, to create reliable residential (and thus passenger) corridors.

Pretty good plan: Tokyu's seven main rail lines and branch line now carry about a billion riders a year. That's the most of any private railway in Japan, as of 2006, according to Calimente. That year Tokyu generated $2.63 billion in revenue en route to $587 million in profits. Rail fares brought in about a third of that figure, real estate holdings reap another third, and retail about a fifth.

Two stations in particular epitomize Tokyu's success to Calimente. These are Jiyugaoka Station, southwest of Tokyo, and Tama Plaza, about 20 minutes west of Shibuya. Both are surrounded by department stores. Both are located in dense communities that include schools, businesses, and government facilities. And both stations discourage automobile dependence.

The latter is achieved through frequency and land use. Trains run every couple minutes at rush hour at both stations, and 3 to 5 minutes during off-peak times. At Jiyugaoka in particular, there are only 569 parking spaces within a quick walk of the station, compared to 673 bicycle spots. As a result, the vast majority of commuters walk or ride to Jiyugaoka, and only 5 percent drive. The situation at Tama Plaza is similar, Calimente reports, with only 11 percent of commuters arriving by car.

This is more than American-style transit-oriented development, Calimente argues. Rather it's an example of robust "rail-integrated communities": dense, walkable, mixed-use centers with a "morning-to-night vibrancy" that turns riders into customers, and vice versa, at all times of day. He sees Tokyu as a model that U.S. rail companies might one day adopt as a guide to profitable transit development:
Rather than relying strictly on farebox revenue and taxation, transit agencies in North America should be freed to develop other revenue sources, just as the Japanese private railways have done to great success. Diversification into related businesses could hold the key to long term financial health for public transit in North America. ... A version of the rail integrated community model developed in Tokyo could be a key to greater financial stability for public transit in North America.
Calimente is notably light on concrete suggestions for how the West might achieve this change. Privatizing American rail in the Tokyo mold has been suggested on Atlantic Cities before, but of course there are a host of political, historical, and cultural differences to consider. As the elevator bank audience at the Tokyu store in Shibuya can attest, sometimes it's a good idea just to sit and watch.
The Atlantic Cities has hosted a few articles on Japan’s transportation system and its private railways (embedded in the various links throughout the article), and Calimente’s article in the Journal of Transport and Land Use is also a good general overview of Tōkyū, which is undoubtedly the poster child of the Japanese private railway industry. While much of that praise is due to their success in diversification (especially urban planning and real estate development), their railway business isn’t anything to scoff at, with some impressive daily ridership numbers for a network of only 100 route km.

Code:
Tōyoko Line:          1,114,571
Meguro Line:            324,052
Den’en Toshi Line:    1,162,575
Ōimachi Line:           438,979
Ikegami Line:           216,844
Tamagawa Line:          141,311
====================  =========
Type 1 Heavy Rail     2,845,749

Kodomo no Kuni Line:     11,573
Setagaya Line:           53,509
As someone who does urban / transportation planning for a living, I can say that I frequently look to examples in Japan for precedent and inspiration, and I often wonder about how concepts I see there might be adapted to the local situation in the U.S. Obviously, there are relatively cheap or simple things on the operation side that I think could be easily transplanted, such as through-service and limited-stop service.

But, no doubt, there are some major structural problems in the U.S. that need to be addressed… Some of it is land-use related—federal and state environmental policy (NEPA, CEQA, etc.) is being used as a mechanism to maintain the status quo, preventing any significant (and painfully necessary) change in land use patterns and density. We also have other local policies like absurd parking requirements and the constant obsession with how new development impacts intersections and roadway facilities, while impacts to transit service, the pedestrian realm, etc. are little more than an afterthought. For a lot of suburban jurisdictions, the environmental review process is little more than an exercise in determining how many additional lanes are needed to accommodate new car traffic or how to tweak traffic signals to “improve traffic flow”. We are only now taking a holistic approach that recognizes that sacrificing traffic operations for improvements to transit and non-motorized modes can still be an overall benefit, but this is still only in the big cities, and has yet to trickle to smaller cities and suburban jurisdictions.

Examples of modern TOD in the U.S. are also abysmal… We still focus too much on the aesthetic side of urban design (we want street trees, we want street furniture, we wants lots of open space, we want distinct architecture) and not enough on the more important things (adequate density, appropriate land use mix, limited parking). Our TODs are geared towards building bedroom communities where people commute into the city by train for work, but drive everywhere else for every other trip purpose—a far cry from the type of “rail-integrated communities” that Calimente describes in Jiyūgaoka and Tama Plaza, where residents will take the train for everything.

A stroll inside Tama Plaza Station, an integrated “suburban” mall and rail station developed entirely by Tōkyū and a modern example of Calimente’s “rail-integrated communities”:



I also don’t think you can ignore the multitudes of small, local stations outside of the Yamanote Line loop that are surrounded by walkable, dense, mixed-use development, each with a neighborhood commercial corridor. These are the older rail-integrated communities… They might lack the glamour of a large station building development like Tama Plaza, but they are still an important piece of the puzzle.

Ōyama Station on the Tōbu Tōjō Line, a somewhat famous station with a large covered shopping arcade extending straight from the station.



Kōenji Station area. Wonderfully narrow and intimate streets that make it a pain for drivers, but a paradise for pedestrians and bicyclists.

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Old May 19th, 2012, 05:34 AM   #3835
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Fukutoshin Line / Tōyoko Line through-service testing

A Tōkyō Metro 10000 series unit has been testing on the Tōyoko Line since 2012.05.06, allowing Tōkyū operators to familiarize themselves with these "new" trains.

Crossing the Tsurumi River into Yokohama City:



Departing Motomachi‒Chūkagai Station on the Minato Mirai Line in Yokohama (2012.05.13):



At Tsunashima Station on the Tōyoko Line (2012.05.13).
Looks like the platform extensions to allow for 200 m trains are complete, or at least, mostly so.

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Old May 19th, 2012, 05:35 AM   #3836
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And in the spirit of reciprocation, Tōkyū 5050 series trains have been testing on the Tōkyō Metro Yūrakuchō Line...
They're already in the extended 10-car formations that will be holding down the limited-stop runs once the through-service begins.

At Shin-Tomichō:



At Shin-Kiba.
Definitely new territory for Tōkyū!

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Old May 19th, 2012, 06:36 AM   #3837
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The single-leaf doors could be a JR Hokkaido aesthetic?

Also, it is awesome to see the through-servicing in Greater Tokyo take that next big step in connecting the area's two largest cities.
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Old May 19th, 2012, 07:54 PM   #3838
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Well, technically there's been the Keikyū / Asakusa Line through-service for decades now, and of course there's JR, but I understand what you mean... This one will hit the most important nodes of both central Tōkyō (Ikebukuro, Shinjuku, Shibuya) and Yokohama (Yokohama Station, Minato Mirai / Chūkagai), with underground segments in both areas, and there should be quite a variety of stock (Seibu, Tōbu, Tōkyō Metro, Tōkyū, and Yokohama Rapid Railway), making for some very interesting operations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
The single-leaf doors could be a JR Hokkaido aesthetic?
k.k.jetcar has a few reasons in the Japan Forum thread...

In any event, you've inspired me to to do a bit of research, and it appears the biggest reason is the weather. The door openings are only 1.15 m (versus 1.3 m for a standard modern train in Tōkyō), limiting the heat loss and the potential for snow / wind to get into the car when the doors open. It's also the reason for the "half-automatic" control with door buttons.

And given the passenger numbers for JR's network in the Sapporo area (about 300,000 a day for a network of about 170 km), a single-leaf door is probably sufficient, even if it reverts to single-stream flow and results in slightly longer dwell times. But it also means less moving parts than a double-leaf design.
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Old May 20th, 2012, 06:22 AM   #3839
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Private rail lines want Diet ranks to pay up
www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120520a5.html

Quote:
Gripe dates back 20 years while JR, airlines get bills taken care of
Both the Lower and Upper houses have failed for the last 20 years to respond to requests from an association of private railways to pay for the free train passes member companies provide to lawmakers.

The Association of Japanese Private Railways said it has been asking both Diet chambers to fork over money for the passes, but neither house has ever processed the requests.

All 722 Diet members have free access to most domestic transportation. Every year, the chambers budget ¥1.3 billion to pay for passes on Japan Railway Group carriers, which are technically private, as well as for Japan Airlines and All Nippon Airways.

However, the Diet has never earmarked funds to pay for passes provided by other private railways and bus companies. The association's member carriers provide lawmakers with passes every year.

The free-pass system started in 1946 for private railways and in 1961 for private bus lines at the request of the Lower House. The association agreed not to charge Diet members in either chamber after deciding that providing the passes would benefit them because lawmakers using their services would presumably better understand their needs.

About 20 years ago, however, the association started verbally asking both chambers to pay for the passes or abolish the system because it had become too expensive.

The group admits it has not kept records logging how much it cost to provide the passes or how frequently they have been used by lawmakers.

"It isn't fair for the other customers who pay for their services. It's . . . common sense," the association's spokesman said. Yet he acknowledged the association has never taken any action beyond mere informal requests.

The association said it plans to send an official document to request payment.

Both chambers said the requests have been informal as the association has never filed a formal document.

"It's impossible for us to process such requests and pass them on to the lawmakers without any official documentation," said Takayuki Oba of the Lower House administrative office.

Both chambers have been paying for passes from JR group companies since 1988, when legislation for such outlays took effect after the privatization of Japanese National Railways. Fees for domestic airline tickets have been paid since 1989 when a similar bill was passed. No bills to cover payments to the other private railways or to bus companies have ever been submitted.
I’m curious how frequently these passes are used… I suspect many of the Diet members are simply driven everywhere (?), so even if the private railways provide the passes, the actual loss of fare revenue may not be much at all.
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Old May 20th, 2012, 09:06 AM   #3840
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I'm a bit curious what the trains will look like... Manila's system has quite an unusual variety of stock, including repurposed Czech trams. I'm only somewhat fond of the Nippon Sharyō / Kinki Sharyō stock on the Yellow Line—or, at least the front of them... I still find them too narrow and short, and I despise the windows, among other things.

But since this is for an all-new line, perhaps they will just go with something similar to the Rotem stock on the Purple Line (i.e., modern "Chinese"-style five-door 20m+ cars). To my knowledge, Tōkyū Car never had experience with this type of train (closest thing might have been the C151 trains for Singapore), but Kinki has produced this design before (SP1900/1950 trains for KCR East Rail). Also wouldn't mind seeing an E233-based design...


May i know, if how many metro in japan are driverless? when it comes to

signalling.According to article, Nippon signal, will be provider for the MRT7.

It will be the first time japanese signalling system will be used in manila.
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