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Old June 23rd, 2012, 12:12 AM   #3901
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No, the Marunouchi Line and Ginza Line stock are both 6-car formations, although the Ginza Line cars are only 16 m compared to the 18 m Marunouchi Line cars. The Hibiya Line cars are also 18 m, but in 8-car formations. Later Tōkyō Metro lines switched to the now-standard 20 m cars, 10-car formations.
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Old June 23rd, 2012, 09:00 AM   #3902
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From what I have seen I would certainly say that the average passenger trip length on the Ginza line is just a couple of stations, shorter then on the Marunouchi line. And because it passes all these important districts the train just fills up over and over again, resulting in the impressive ridership numbers while the trains are not necessarily more busy then the trains on the Marunouchi line.
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Japan Projects & Construction
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Old June 23rd, 2012, 09:39 AM   #3903
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Sōtetsu Izumino Line extension to Keiō University SFC would cost ¥43.6 billion
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news...2440009-n1.htm

Quote:
湘南台駅(神奈川県藤沢市)に乗り入れている相鉄いずみ野線を慶応大湘南藤沢キャンパス付近まで伸ばす路線(約3・3キロ)の事業採算性を検討し てきた検討会は11日、交通システムを単線の鉄道、概算建設費を約436億円とし、採算性の確保には建設資金として無利子資金の調達が必要などとする検討 結果を発表した。

この検討会は県と藤沢市、慶応大、相鉄が平成22年6月に設置した「いずみ野線延伸の実現に向けた検討会」。交通システ ムとして鉄道とLRT(次世代路面電車)を検討し、速さと既存鉄道との乗り入れによる広域的なアクセスのよさから鉄道を採用した。新設する2駅周辺の町づ くりが進んだ場合の利用者数を、1日約2万5800人と推計。これを踏まえて単線とした場合の概算建設費を約436億円と算出した。

 鉄道運行事業者(未定)と整備主体を分離し、建設費を国と自治体が補助するスキームを想定。30年以内に黒字化するには、建設費として公的資金など無利子資金を調達することや、建設費と運行経費の圧縮が必要との課題を指摘した。
On 2012.06.11, the investigative committee for the proposed 3.3 km extension of the Sagami Railway (Sōtetsu) Izumino Line west from the current terminus at Shōnandai Station (Fujisawa City, Kanagawa Prefecture) to somewhere near the Shōnan Fujisawa Campus (SFC) of Keiō University released the results of its analysis. Assuming a single-track heavy rail line, the committee estimated the project cost at approx. ¥43.6 billion.

The investigative committee is comprised of representatives from Fujisawa City, Keiō University, and Sōtetsu, and was established in June 2010 specifically to evaluate the feasibility and profitability of the project. While an LRT option was considered early on, it was eventually dropped in favor of heavy rail to permit higher speeds and through-service with the existing Izumino Line. Total daily ridership at the two new stations on the extension was forecast to be approx. 25,800, assuming urban development takes place in the surrounding areas.

The committee also envisions a form of PPP common in Japan, with railway operations provided separate from the lead entity executing the project. Funding would be provided by the national and local governments. The committee also pointed out that, in order to attain full payback of all construction costs and associated debt within a 30-year period, the project will need to obtain no-interest loans and find ways to value engineer the project to reduce construction costs and operating expenses.

This extension is actually the first phase of a proposed extension of the Izumino Line to Kurami Station, an existing station on the JR Sagami Line and a proposed new station on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen (once it’s long-distance intercity functions are replaced by the maglev).

Google Map of extension:
http://goo.gl/maps/H3M7

Details from the committee report, which analyzed both a heavy rail option and a grade-separated LRT option for the extension:

Track layouts and alignment profiles

Heavy rail option would single-track, with the two new stations double-track to allow for passing. Both options assume two new stations.



LRT option would be entirely double-track and entirely grade-separated, including an underground approach needed to access Shōnandai Station.



Summary of options
Code:
                          Single-track     Grade-separated
                           heavy rail            LRT
                        ================   ===============

Train capacity             1,400 pax           150 pax
                        (assumes 10-car    (based on LRVs
                         Sagami Railway    in other areas)
                            trains)

Approx. average speed       40 km/h            25 km/h

One-way travel time          5 min              8 min

Trains per hour
  Peak                         5                 14
  Off-peak                     3                  7

Peak-hour capacity         7,000 pax          2,100 pax
In other Sōtetsu news…

Platform 4 at Seya Station debuted a few months ago (2012.04.29), part of the transformation of this modest three-track station into a standard four-track station with two island platforms. They’re only partially complete, as work is now taking place on the primary (middle) tracks now that Platform 4 is up and running. Some rail splicing in the early morning of the switchout:



Cab view (outbound track) around Nishiya Station (2012.04.24), which will be the future junction with the Sōtetsu–JR Link. Already lots of construction going on for this project, as Sōtetsu’s recent timetable changes a few months ago were partially designed to allow them to make minor changes to service as a result to permit construction activities at Nishiya. Eventually Sōtetsu trains will be able to use Tōkaidō Freight Line and JR Yokosuka Line tracks to run directly into the Yamanote Line loop, including Shibuya and Shinjuku Stations.

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Old June 25th, 2012, 07:03 AM   #3904
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Hiroshima City to study other potential alignments for Astram Line extension
http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201206220025.html

Quote:
 広島市は、財政難で凍結しているアストラムライン延伸計画3路線のうち、西風新都線(広域公園前―JR西広島、6・2キロ)の予定ルートを見直す方針を固めた。沿線の大規模開発エリア「ひろしま西風新都」(安佐南区、佐伯区)で大型商業施設を備えた複合団地の開発計画が動き始めたのを受け、延伸実現に向けて乗客増につながる新ルートを探る。

 西風新都線は、停滞する西風新都開発の起爆剤として、昨年4月に就任した松井一実市長が事業化に意欲を示している。

 西風新都線の予定ルートは市が1999年に設定。現在の終点の広域公園前駅(安佐南区)とJR西広島駅(西区)を結ぶ。事業費は当時の試算で約700億円。1日平均2万人の利用を見込む。

 予定ルートは西風新都南端の石内東地区をかすめる。ここに広島電鉄(中区)が2007年、約82ヘクタールの複合団地を造る方針を表明した。現在、15年の完成を目指して市に開発許可を申請中。2600人規模の団地となる計画で、流通大手イオン(千葉市)が大型商業施設の出店を検討する。大型商業施設は広島都市圏で最大級になる見通しだ。

 市はアストラムライン延伸計画について来年度中に事業化の可否を判断する予定で、判断材料を示すための検証作業を進めている。その中で「団地や商業施設を通って予定ルートより乗客増が見込める新たなルートを検討する」としている。

Hiroshima City has decided to re-evaluate the planned alignment of the Seifū Shinto Line (Hiroshima Kōiki Kōen – JR Nishi-Hiroshima, 6.2 km), one of the three proposed extensions to the Astram Line, which were shelved due to budget difficulties. With movement on a mixed-use planned redevelopment with a large-scale retail component in the Seifū Shinto area (Asa Minami Ward and Saeki Ward), the city hopes to get the extension jump-started, and will investigate potential new alignments that will lead to increased ridership. Mayor Matsui Kazumi, who was elected in April 2010, has expressed interest in getting the extension constructed as a catalyst for development in Seifū Shinto, which has stalled.

The original route of the extension was selected by the city in 1999, with an estimated project cost of approx. ¥70 billion and a forecasted average daily ridership of approx. 20,000 passengers. The original route just grazes past the Ishiuchi Higashi area at the southern end of Seifū Shinto, where Hiroshima Electric Railway (Hiroden) expressed interest in building an 82 ha mixed-use planned development in 2007. Hiroden is currently obtaining development approvals from the city, hoping to complete the project in 2015. The development will house 2,600 residents and includes what is scheduled to become the largest mall in the Hiroshima metropolitan area, with mall giant AEON likely to be on board.

The city plans to make a decision whether or not to move forward with the Astram Line extension sometime next fiscal year, and is currently assembling the necessary studies to inform the decision process, including studies of new alignments other than the original route that could generate more ridership.

Personally, I’m a bit curious what other alignments they had in mind, but this may just be a due diligence thing… Most of that area between Nishi-Hiroshima Station and the current Astram Line terminus is mountains, so I think they’re options are limited. Nishi-Hiroshima Station also seems the most logical terminus for the extension, as it is one of Hiroshima’s major terminals and allows for a potential future extension straight to Hiroshima Station. I suppose, however, they could try and bring the line down towards Itsukaichi and Hatsukaichi instead.
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Old June 26th, 2012, 06:00 AM   #3905
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maybe they just mean realigning it to take a different route between Koiki Koen Mae and Nishi Hiroshima. The previous route had a station planned in Satsukigaoka but if there is going to be a new Aeon mall and some massive development in the Ishiuchi area just south of there it might make sense.

But an extension to Itsukaichi or somewhere like that just doesn't seem like it would be very useful. Nishi Hiroshima really does seem like it would be the natural extension for the Astram Line. I think the natural extension from there would be to continue it and connect up at Hondori to turn it into a loop.

The Tozai line along Heiwa Odori from Nishi Hiroshima station to Hiroshima station, might be best as a modern at-grade light rail, maybe with a few grade-separated crossings at the main cross streets. All in all I think Heiwa Odori is an asset with tremendous potential that the city of Hiroshima isn't even coming close to realizing. If a light rail line is treated as an opportunity to rebuild parts of the street, that would be fantastic.
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Old June 26th, 2012, 04:21 PM   #3906
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Tōkyū Tōyoko line and Meguro line get new signage

It was posted here a while ago that some some metro Tokyo private lines would be adding signage that would give stations a unique number to make it easy for those who don't read Japanese, English, or sometimes the Chinese and Korean that the signs are presented in. A good example is the Tokyo Subway system station guides used on both Toei and Tokyo Metro lines. Tokyu followed that same approach and color coded all their lines (They always had a representative color on the maps and even on some train markings, but now it's official) The Den'en-Toshi line and Oimachi lines were the first to receive the new signgage, but at the end of service last Saturday, many of the Tokyu line's stations got the makeover too.


Here's my station, Hiyoshi's new sign-- <TY13> as it's the 13th station down from Shibuya on the ToYoko line.


But even I didn't know that the Meguro line has the exact same number of stations leading up to the shared ROW at Den'en-Chofu! That makes Hiyoshi <MG13> on the MeGuro line too.

One other thing I noticed-- There are no stickers covering the signs on the inbound (Shibuya) side; I expected to see "for Musashi-Kosugi, Jiyuu ga Oka, Shibuya {Shinjuku 3-Chome, Ikebukuro}" with the part in {} covered up--just like the new signs at Fukutoshin Shibuya station. I guess this means they'll be changing them again... There's space to *add* a sticker there... hmmm.....


Anyway, when I asked the station staff about the new signs, they told me some stations are still undergoing some work where signs will get relocated so they didn't do them all. Naka-Meguro, Musashi-Kosugi are the exceptions. The lady at the ticket window then gave me a folder that has all the markings system-wide for every station...for FREE!

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Old June 26th, 2012, 06:55 PM   #3907
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Why do these numbers begin with 01? Shouldn't they start with 11 to make room for possible extensions?
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Old June 26th, 2012, 09:05 PM   #3908
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As far as the Toyoko and Den'en-Toshi lines, they start at Shibuya station. It has 4 numbers in other words.
The Den'en-Toshi line becomes the Tokyo Metro Hanzomon line here so both <DT01>,<Z01> are on the B3 level. The Toyoko line is on the 2nd level upstairs but moves down to the B5 level to become the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin line here, so both<TY01> and <F16> are applied. Dont forget about the Ginza line on the 3rd level upstairs too-- it's <G01>.

As for the other Tokyu lines. The Tamagawa line starts at <TM01> Tamagawa station, on the lower level from the Toyoko line. It actually used to be a part of the Meguro line and was called the Mekama line. Tracks from downstairs continue past the platforms and merge into the Meguro/Toyoko lines between Tamagawa and Den'en Chofu station. These are used for shuttling trains, not in revenue service though.

The Ikegami line begins at <IK01> Gotanda Station, high above the JR Yamanote line platforms. Serious engineering work would have to be done to change this arrangement, as it stubs into the 4th floor of a shopping plaza that serves to also bring you down to the JR transfer gates on the 2nd floor and the Toei Subway Asakusa line station in the basement.

The Meguro line begins at <MG01> Meguro station in the basement level below the JR Yamanote line tracks. Meguro line trains become <N> Metro Namboku line or <I> Toei Mita line trains here when exiting inbound from here. So this station is also signed <N01> and <I01> too.

The Oimachi line is landlocked at it's terminal at <OM01> Oimachi station. Believe it or not, there was talk some time ago to make some thru-service arrangement with the Tokyo Waterfront Railway to send some trains into Odaiba, since that line runs directly below here. The gauges are the same, but the Oimachi line used to be a streetcar line back in the day, necessitating some really small platform lengths. Oimachi line train-lengths are half the size of TWR trains; 5 and 10 cars respectively. The JR Saikyo line thru-routes into the TWR line already, but there are enough holes in the schedule to run some Oimachi trains thru there, making it really interesting to see trains from as far away as Chuo-Rinkan end up at Shin-Kiba... Again though, this wouldn't change the station number.

Maybe they'll extend the <SG> Setagaya line? It's really a streetcar in private ROW. The Kodomo no Kuni line <KD> is a shuttle that runs along between Nagatsuta, Okuda, and a theme park called "Kodomo no Kuni" or "Kids Country" in English. Who knows though...
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Old June 26th, 2012, 10:23 PM   #3909
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starwulffe sort of touched on this already, but the numbering would only need to be changed if there were actually new Tōkyū stations… Connections like the one between the Tōyoko Line and Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line and the proposed connection between the Tamagawa Line and Keikyū Airport Line don’t fall into this category. Neither does a new third-sector operation, like the Minato Mirai Line.

Anyways, I doubt they’d ever extend the Setagaya Line, at least not at the southern terminus at Sangenjaya Station, where the numbering starts. An extension would only really make sense if it continued the line further south or east, but there’s no easy way to get over to that side. The area’s entirely built up and there’s no good roads to use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
maybe they just mean realigning it to take a different route between Koiki Koen Mae and Nishi Hiroshima.
Yeah, that’s what I thought they meant as well, but it just didn’t look like there were that many logical (and substantially different) alternatives for getting from the current terminus to Nishi-Hiroshima, as only certain parts are built-up with development, while the rest just looks to be hilly / mountainous terrain. It appears the new alignment would only mean a slight jog further south, so probably not a real drastic change to get a lot of benefit in return.
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Old June 28th, 2012, 03:30 PM   #3910
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^ speaking of new signage....

I came into the "Shibuya Dungeon" complex via the Hanzomon/Den'en-Toshi line platforms this morning and used the passage on the B3 level to get to the Fukutoshin line concourse.(I went to a convenience store on the Hachiko side after popping off the Toyoko line to grab a snack.) It seems they've posted some of the new electronic signs in that hallway too, but this one was actually TURNED ON!!



The new destination signs are full color LCD panels, not 3 color LED as is the standard elsewhere. Wow! :OMG:

I was fully expecting a regular LED display like everywhere else in the station... Makes knowing when to run for that express train a lot easier (shortly after I snapped this pic, I hauled @$$ down to track 4 so I could get to work!! )

Again, as construction progresses, I'll keep posting!

Last edited by starrwulfe; June 30th, 2012 at 07:00 PM.
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Old June 28th, 2012, 05:51 PM   #3911
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Nice, much cleaner lines and better readability than LEDs.
Thanks for posting.

I don't think I've ever seen this style of signage from Tōkyū... Perhaps this will be the standard for their LCD signage (This may actually be the first LCD signage I've seen from them... You probably know much better since you're a daily user). And they even put the macron on the "o" in "Wakōshi".
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Old June 29th, 2012, 05:10 PM   #3912
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Well-- this isn't the first time Tōkyū has had LCD signage...


This array is upstairs on the 2nd floor right in front of the main ticket gate. I'm just coming off the pedestrian bridge from the Hikarie building, and on the opposite side are stairs leading to to JR side of the station. There's also another set of LCD screens just like these at Tokyu's south entrance as well


The signs tell you the next 4 departures for Yokohama and Motomachi-Chūkagai, what track they're on, and sometimes there's a flashing red sign that reads "1st train to arrive at Yokohama" along with arrival time-- useful for Shibuya patrons since most people forget that it's both cheaper and faster to get to Yokohama on the Toyoko line than JR's Shōnan-Shinjuku line, which also has a platform 400 meters south of here.

Oh, before I forget...

Caught some Tokyu motormen training on Tokyo Metro's 7114F at Musashi-Kosugi today... Most people think one train crew takes the train from start to finish, but even on the same line, there may be 2 crews per run-- and of course when the route is a thru-service run, whatever company owns the tracks is driving the train, regardless of who owns the equipment. They're really ramping up the training pace now, and sightings like these are becoming not so rare. But think about this: Tokyu will have equipment from 3 Tokyo Metro lines, one Toei line, both Tobu divisions, Seibu, and in a few years Sotetsu-- all running on it's tracks. The train crews get to touch a lot of types of equipment!

Last edited by starrwulfe; June 30th, 2012 at 07:04 PM.
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Old June 29th, 2012, 07:38 PM   #3913
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Ok, that jogged my memory, thanks...

Those have been there for a while, though, no? They wouldn't have been able to fit these screen displays in that passage, but even the fonts and general style are still a bit different from the newer scroll / bar displays you posted.

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Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
But think about this: Tokyu will have equipment from 3 Tokyo Metro lines, one Toei line, both Tobu divisions, Seibu, and in a few years Sotetsu-- all running on it's tracks. The train crews get to touch a lot of types of equipment!
Yeah, not to mention that there is the possibility for each operator to have more than one rolling stock type operating on the line. Even the Minato Mirai Line has it's own trains, which are basically the same as the Tōkyū 5000 series, but I wouldn't be surprised if there are some minor differences in how they run / drive.

The other thing that could easily complicate things is that all three of the major private railway lines involved (Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, Seibu Ikebukuro Line, and Tōbu Tōjō Line) will be interlined with two different Tōkyō Metro lines. When it's all said and done, I think this may end up being the most complex series of non-JR interlining operations in Japan. Should be a wonder to behold (once they sort out all the bugs).
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Old June 29th, 2012, 10:33 PM   #3914
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Yeah, those signs have been there ever since 2008 at least; that's when I noticed them being there coming from Nagoya on trips prior to me moving here.
Quote:
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When it's all said and done, I think this may end up being the most complex series of non-JR interlining operations in Japan. Should be a wonder to behold (once they sort out all the bugs).
Complexity at it's finest! I forgot about the interlining with the Yurakucho line. And it's true -- whenever something happens on any one of these lines, it affects service all over the thru-servicing network. For example yesterday afternoon, all trains on the Fukutoshin line ran as locals because there was some incident on the Seibu Ikebukuro line where trains couldn't thru-service onto Tokyo Metro's lines past Kotake-Mukaihara. This caused a cascading effect in the schedule, so to compensate--no express service.

It's pretty rare for the Toyoko line to have some accident involving people (人身事故) that happen from time to time on train lines here in metro Tokyo. But other lines seem to suffer more. It'll be interesting to see how this will affect my commute once the thru-servicing starts.
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Old July 1st, 2012, 06:43 AM   #3915
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Now, Mumbai wants to be the next Tokyo
http://ibnlive.in.com/news/now-mumba.../268683-3.html

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Mumbai: This just in — Mumbai railways wants to reinvent itself on the lines of train services in Tokyo, one of the most efficient in the world. Even as the shattered political dreams of a Shanghai-like makeover for Mumbai continue to be source of debate among peeved citizens, the railway babus are weaving their own elaborate castles in the air, and this time their dreams have taken them to the capital of Japan.

At a meeting held last week between a delegation from the World Bank (WB) and railway officials in Mumbai, transport experts from Japan made a presentation which explored the possibility of developing railway stations in the city to emulate those in Tokyo — yes, our seedy, squalid, bustling stations where commuters, beggars, stray dogs and makeshift foodstalls jostle for space.

The main objective of the WB team’s visit was to gauge the progress made on phase-II of the Mumbai Urban Transport Project (MUTP), for which it has funded Rs 1,900 crore. Visiting delegates held meetings with administrators of the Central and Western Railways and the Mumbai Rail Vikas Corporation (MRVC).

Amid conversations that ensued, the commercial and overall development of suburban railway stations in Mumbai naturally came up for discussion. “The team, comprising experts who worked for Japanese railways, suggested ways to commercially develop the rail stations and other surrounding infrastructure, and drew comparisons with facilities existing in Tokyo,” said a senior railway official, on condition of anonymity.

While railway officials dream idly, MiD DAY offers you a reality check, by presenting a few practical stumbling blocks that our city’s stations may encounter in their sluggish race towards first-world standards.

Sluggish skyscrapers
Towering skyscrapers flank stations in Tokyo, and these featured in the discussions. “They suggested that the authorities develop commercial station buildings and lease them to private developers, saying that this was a good way to generate revenue,” said an MRVC official. According to sources, the authorities intend to implement this suggestion, hoping to earn over 40 per cent of their total revenue from them. But while highrises in Tokyo shoot skyward in a matter of months, Mumbai’s buildings inch upwards sluggishly, taking years at a time. If our railway authorities plan to even attempt such constructions, their applications for additional floor space index are sure to be stuck in red tape for months or even years.

It is worthwhile to remember that the state government’s own proposal of a ‘circle of influence’ wherein it intended to provide additional FSI and develop metro railway stations, has been lying in the cold storage.

“The whole idea is to disperse the commuters away from railway stations rather than allowing them to congregate at stations,” said transport expert Jagdeep Desai. A case in point is the Vashi railway station, the first station in Navi Mumbai that tried to emulate the stations in developed countries by building a commercial building atop the tracks. The building today is a picture of neglect, with hardly any takers for investment — it is mostly occupied by government agencies, with private players giving it a wide berth.

“Developing stations vertically are the only solution to the growing space crunch, but it has been practically applied only in Navi Mumbai stations, where there are still many possibilities to be explored,” said A V Shenoy, transport expert and member of the Mumbai Vikas Samiti.

Passenger pressure
Every day, about 70 lakh commuters jostle and elbow each other in suburban locals, choking the platforms and stairs on their way out of the stations. Serpentine queues of travellers wait for their ticket to ride sometimes breaking out into aggressive skirmishes. Trains or stations in Tokyo don’t have to deal with this crushing flow of commuters. “There is an urgent need for other modes of transport — the Metro and Monorail services, for example — to be networked with the railways,” mused a railway official.

Crowded stations
Platforms in Tokyo are spic and span, exclusively constructed and maintained for passengers to dismount from trains and make their way to the exits. Food stalls are only found on the platforms. In Mumbai, food vendors, beggars and their makeshift accommodations compete for attention. “Platforms are meant for faster movement and dispersal of people, but here they do not serve that purpose. Tokyo, on the other hand, has disciplined commuter-movement,” said Ashok Datar, transport expert.

Cash crunch
For years now, the railway authorities have been struggling to manage dwindling funds, with day-to-day operations, and maintenance guzzling up depleting funds. During a recent inspection, members of the Railway Board urged railway authorities to tighten their purse strings and make calculated expenses. Needless to say, this has slowed down projects, including those to increase the height of platforms and build new foot over-bridges.

Behave yourselves
Adding oodles of character to our stations but detracting equal measures of discipline and safety are the faithful railway commuters — they nonchalantly cross tracks even as trains loom dangerously close, and use the train roofs to innovate on their acrobatic skills — antics that are sure to attract heavy fines for commuters in Tokyo.

Experts said that a change in social behaviour was the first necessary step towards emulating train services in Tokyo. “There, people stand in queues in a disciplined manner, they even walk to the stations as vehicles aren’t allowed near them. People need to be more cooperative and restrained if high-end railway stations are to be proposed,” added Datar. Every day, at least 10 people die on the tracks.
An interesting comparison, as I think Mumbai and Tōkyō are actually fairly similar in terms of development pattern, and there are many parallels that can be drawn between JR East and the private railways in Tōkyō and the locals in Mumbai, as they are both extensive suburban railway systems that play important roles in mass transit in their respective cities (arguably even more important than their respective "metros").

A bit hard to believe, but this used to be the Takasaki Line, 50 years ago:



As for better “networking” with the railways, I’m curious why they didn’t give more thought to interlining between the locals and the Metro. Seems like a potentially huge blunder, although at least the Phase I lines appear to be Indian broad gauge (1,676 mm), despite different voltage for the overhead.
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Old July 1st, 2012, 10:55 AM   #3916
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Video taken from the Tokyo Sky Tree showing the grade separation works on the Keisei Oshiage Line between Oshiage and Yahiro.

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Japan Projects & Construction
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Old July 9th, 2012, 07:27 AM   #3917
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Hokuriku Jūki Kōgyō completes half of 16-car non-revenue train order for Taoyuan International Airport MRT
http://www.nikkan.co.jp/news/nkx0120120625baaf.html

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 【新潟】北陸重機工業(新潟市東区、霜鳥雅徳社長、025・274・3311)は、台湾・台北駅と台湾桃園国際空港を結ぶ新線「台湾空港線鉄道」に使われる客車救援用ディーゼル機関車4両とメンテナンス車両4両を完成、7月中旬に新潟港から船積みして台湾に出荷する。受注残のメンテナンス車両8両は8月中に完成して同ルートで納入する。
 同社が2010年夏に丸紅から受注した。丸紅が川崎重工業、日立製作所と共同で、台湾交通部傘下の高鉄局から台湾空港線鉄道の建設を06年に約910億円で契約した案件。総延長51キロメートルで、13年4月に開業、完工は15年10月の予定。
 客車救援用ディーゼル機関車は故障した客車の救援に使い、重量60トンで700馬力のエンジンを搭載。重連で220トンの客車をけん引できる。メンテナンス車両は重量24トンで260馬力のディーゼルエンジンや作業用のクレーンや発電機を装備する。
This is a small contract for 4 diesel locomotives and 12 maintenance cars for the under-construction Taoyuan International Airport MRT connecting Taoyuan International Airport and Taipei Station. Hokujū has completed the four locomotives and four of the maintenance cars, which will be loaded onto ships in July at the Port of Niigata for transport. The remaining eight maintenance cars will be completed in August. The locomotives are for emergency rescue duties in case of equipment failure.

A consortium of Marubeni, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, and Hitachi was selected in 2006 by Taiwan’s Bureau of High Speed Rail to construct the 51 km airport access railway, at a total contract value of ¥91 billion. Marubeni later tapped Hokujū in summer 2010 to provide the locomotives and maintenance cars. The new line is scheduled to open in April 2013, with full completion following in October 2015.

The actual passenger stock is being manufactured by Kawasaki.
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Old July 9th, 2012, 07:28 AM   #3918
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Mitsubishi Electric opens new railroad HVAC equipment factory in Pennsylvania
http://www.mitsubishielectric.com/news/2012/0625.html

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TOKYO/WARRENDALE, Penn. - June 25, 2012 - Mitsubishi Electric Corporation (TOKYO: 6503) announced that Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc., a US affiliate company of Mitsubishi Electric, has opened a 50,900 square-foot factory that will produce heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems for the railroad industry. The company currently makes propulsion and control systems for railroad cars.

The new factory, located near Mitsubishi Electric Power Products' headquarters and main manufacturing operations outside of Pittsburgh, is designed to produce HVAC systems for heavy rail vehicles, light rail transit vehicles and locomotives, targeting 30 percent market share in North American HVAC market. Full-scale production will begin this summer, which will increase Mitsubishi Electric Corporation's global HVAC production capacity by 50 percent.

"This new investment underscores Mitsubishi Electric's commitment to the North American transit agencies and locomotive producers," said Tim Logan, general manager of Mitsubishi Electric Power Products' Transportation Systems Division. "In addition to helping us to comply with 'Buy America' clauses contained in most bid requirements, our new factory will increase our local capacity to provide technical service support, testing, repairs and overhauls."
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Old July 9th, 2012, 07:28 AM   #3919
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Kawasaki to buy Yonkers, NY railcar plant
http://www.lohud.com/article/2012070...rs-retain-jobs

Quote:
YONKERS — More than a year after the state announced an agreement to keep a key manufacturing hub along the Hudson River, the deal might finally be closed later in the summer.

Kawasaki Rail Car Inc. is set to buy its industrial plant on Wells Avenue in southern Yonkers — a site where the Japanese company has been building railcars for the tristate area since 1985 — for about $25 million, including a $500,000 grant from the Empire State Development Corp.

The deal is expected to close by September, according to a mortgage review conducted by the Trepp real estate research firm.

“This is really great news for Yonkers, to have a mainstay company in the downtown area,” City Councilman Michael Sabatino said. “Even though Kawasaki has been here for so many years, it’s the fact that they’re buying the building that sends a strong message to other businesses thinking of coming to the area.”

The 239,000-square-foot facility, built in 1900, has been a key staple in the region’s once-robust manufacturing base, which has since contracted greatly.

Before Kawasaki moved in, the facility was the manufacturing center for Otis Elevator Co.

“It’s been a great job generator for the city of Yonkers and we really appreciate it,” Yonkers City Council President Chuck Lesnick said.

Under the terms of the grant, Kawasaki will have to maintain an employment level of 375 workers at the site through 2016 — a target the company is on track to hit with well more than 400 employees at the site now.

“The company has a strong presence as a job creator and source of economic activity in New York and we look forward to helping them stay and grow here in New York,” said Austin Shafran, a spokesman for Empire State Development.

There have been reports that Kawasaki might leave Yonkers and consolidate its American manufacturing operations with its Lincoln, Neb., facility; however, its rail-car production would not have been able to make the trip west.

“I’m not sure if Kawasaki would have left because some of the requirements with the MTA and other government agencies requires that they stay in New York state,” said Lesnick, who worked on Gov. Mario Cuomo’s staff in the 1980s when the guidelines were written.

They’re still busy at the Yonkers plant:
http://www.subchat.com/read.asp?Id=1164908
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Old July 9th, 2012, 07:29 AM   #3920
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New Tōkyō Metro CM

New CM and poster came out this month for the Sumida River Fireworks Show.

30 s CM spot:



Full 60 s CM spot is here.

Poster:

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