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Old September 11th, 2012, 06:28 PM   #4001
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Panels instead of panes to the platform edge protectors must bring about a bit of claustrophobia in the trains or stations.

Tell me, please, are all of Tokyo's metros narrow gauge? Is their gauge narrow so that they can run over regional rail track? For having such broad cars, would you say they 'suffer' in some way compared to comparably broad ones set to standard gauge?
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Old September 11th, 2012, 08:54 PM   #4002
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The Tokyo metro and Toei Subway lines have a mix of gauges.

The 2 oldest lines on the Tokyo Metro (Ginza and Marunouchi Lines) are 1435mm standard gauge, the others 1067mm narrow gauge (Japanese standard gauge).

On the Toei lines there are 3 different gauges. The Asakusa Line and the Oedo Line have 1435mm standard gauge, the Shinjuku Line has a 1372mm gauge and the Mita Line has a 1067mm gauge.


Except for the 2 oldest lines all the lines have trough services on suburban railway lines. This is indeed the reason why there are different gauges on the Tokyo Metro. These suburban lines also have different gauges depending on the line and the railway company.

I would say that the standard gauge trains do have a bit more smoother ride then the narrow gauge trains. But because the speeds aren't that high it not that much of a difference.
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Old September 11th, 2012, 09:05 PM   #4003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
Panels instead of panes to the platform edge protectors must bring about a bit of claustrophobia in the trains or stations.

Tell me, please, are all of Tokyo's metros narrow gauge? Is their gauge narrow so that they can run over regional rail track? For having such broad cars, would you say they 'suffer' in some way compared to comparably broad ones set to standard gauge?
I'm sure Quashlo or someone else could give a much better answer but here's my stab at it: Though most of Tokyo's (and indeed all of Japan's) metro and regional lines are narrow gauge, some are standard gauge.

Among the metro lines, The Ginza, Marunouchi, Asakusa, and Oedo lines are standard gauge.

I don't know why standard gauge was chosen for the Ginza line (which started operation in 1927), but the Marunouchi line which opened in 1954 is standard gauge because it is connected to the Ginza line.

The Asakusa line opened in 1960 and was built as standard gauge so it could carry through trains from the Keikyu and Keisei commuter lines (both also standard gauge.)

The Oedo line is standard gauge because it's just weird. It's deep, has small trains, and uses linear propulsion.
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Old September 12th, 2012, 05:54 AM   #4004
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The Ginza Line was the first metro line in Japan (and Asia, I think), and much of the engineering expertise came from the United States. The first stations such as Asakusa were apparently planned using feet and inches measurements, rather than metric (I think the rolling stock was too). Naturally, standard gauge was specified. It was a traditional metro (i.e. a standalone operation). As others have mentioned/alluded, later metro lines were designed to allow interline running with private railways (or JNR), thus the use of 1067mm gauge. In retrospect, it was a good decision, as the current network with interline running is quite extensive, and will expand further, such as the upcoming Toyoko Line-Fukutoshin Line connection.

At speeds below 160km/h, the differences between 1067mm and 1435mm are negligible, especially at Japanese levels of track engineering/maintenance.
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Old September 14th, 2012, 09:42 AM   #4005
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More Toyoko Line trains spotted on Tokyo Metro's Fukutoshin Line
..and more testing other company's trains on the Toyoko line

The last pictures I showed you were of an 8 car train loaned out to Tokyo Metro to test in revenue service. This time I spotted a brand-new train from the 5050-4000 series, 4104F. Unlike the first three sets, this one has never been shortened to 8 cars and run on the Toyoko line. This one is loaned out to Seibu for testing on the Ikebukuro line's thru-services. I can tell because all the advertising inside the train is Seibu related, and the destination headsigns are programmed in Seibu's style as well. (I'm sure no one but myself would even notice that last part. Programming headsigns was one of my duties at Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority way back when, so I pay attention to those details )










UPDATE: Tokyu 4105F spotted in revenue service too!

I was late for work yesterday and wound up on the Fukutoshin line 20 minutes later than normal. I ran through the station as fast as I could and got on seconds after the melody ended. I flopped into the first seat I saw, looked up and noticed I was aboard the #3 car of 4105F! I couldn't get pictures-- my phone was trapped in my backpack from rushing... So here's a video of it on YouTube.



This set is being used by Tobu for testing on the Tojo line. As such, they treat it like any other train in their lineup; It may run into the Fukutoshin line, the Yurakucho line, or as a regular Tojo line train without thru-runs. One thing I've noticed with the 5050-4000s in the subway is that there is a lower level of tunnel noise. Things like wheel squeal, and motor howl don't really happen on these trains... Now the 7000 series sounds like a screaming mimi when running express from Wako-shi to Kotake-Mukaihara for example.
For those keeping score, that's 4 trains from the 5050-4000 series in service now. The first 3 to 8 cars and on the Toyoko line. At Motosumiyoshi yard, I've seen the 5th and 6th set as well, but not in service. Maybe Tobu will get a 10 car set soon too. Tokyo Metro still has 5155F; I see it going the other way every morning on my commute at Wako-shi.
I personally have yet to see any Tokyo Metro trains testing on the Toyoko line other than 10104F, but I'm still waiting patiently to get on a 7000 series old-school at Hiyoshi...

However, we do have a Seibu train (6152F) actively testing out of Motosumiyoshi. In this video, you can see it line up with the still under-construction platform at Kikuna station.


This one has it testing the ATSC at Yokohama. This along with all of the express stations on the Minato-Mirai line have already been upgraded to 10 cars now.


Most of the platforms are either finished or in the final month of construction, so we'll probably see 10-car trains start testing in revenue service possibly in November.

Last edited by starrwulfe; September 19th, 2012 at 07:21 PM. Reason: Updated
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Old September 27th, 2012, 08:29 PM   #4006
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Tokyu Toyoko line stations receiving upgraded train information displays

This is maybe one of those things some wouldn't notice unless you commute everyday on the line like I do.

Take a look at these 2 LED changeable message displays (CMD). The one on the left is for the inbound Meguro line, the other for the Shibuya bound Toyoko line... See any differences?

The one on the left is the now "old" type 3 color (red, green, amber) LED. Up until a week ago, every signboard in the station and most on the line were this type. The one on the right has been changed the "new" type. It's 3 color too, except in the service type category (the part that shows "local", "express", and so on.)

This part is a full color capable bank of LEDs now--also the font has changed from a roman serif/mincho type to a roman san-serif/meiryo type font that's easier to read at a distance.
As of today, all signs including the one on the left, are the "new" type. But why did they change to full color, if they're still using the same green (teal) for locals, red for expresses, and amber for limited express???


Check this sign out, and you'll see the answer-- this is at Musashi-Kosugi station. These signs have been reprogrammed to show the service types in color now...and they're the same exact colors that you'd find on the train's destination signs and on the schedule and route maps.




I also suspect we're going to see a few new types of service added once the connection to the Fukutoshin line is made on 3/16/2013. For example did you know that there are 2 different types of local trains on both the Meguro and Oimachi lines?


The blue locals stop at all stations. The green locals stop at all stations but run express between Futako Tamagawa and Misonoguchi, and skip 2 stations.

On the Meguro line, the locals make all stops on the line, but the blue local turns into the Toei Mita line and the green local turns into the Tokyo Metro Namboku line.

We'll probably see something similar to this on the Toyoko line... Also don't forget that there are also trains that will change services on different segments too-- as in a Toyoko Ltd Express turns into a Fukutoshin Express then a Tojo local. Or a Seibu Semi express becoming a Fukutoshin local, then a Toyoko express.

Things will be very complicated at first glance but Tokyu is all about making sure its customers have an easy time of it-- they were the first rail line in Tokyo to have full color destination signage for this reason I'm told.

Anyway, there's one sign I'll be sad to see go on that day...


This is the big board in Tokyu Toyoko Shibuya Terminal. There's another one downstairs at the South Gates too...

No need for these in the subway station next door-- they have LCD panels for this stuff now...

Last edited by starrwulfe; September 28th, 2012 at 02:02 PM.
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Old September 30th, 2012, 06:18 PM   #4007
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Tokyo Metro 7000 series hits the Tokyu Toyoko line for revenue testing


Last week, the 10000 series came over for a visit, and this time it's the 7000 series turn to play on the Toyoko line!


The old-school Tokyo Metro 7000 series are famous for their longevity, speeds, and effeciency. They were first assigned to the Yurakucho line in the early 1970s, and rebuilt in the late 90s for duty on the New Line--now the northern part of the Fukutoshin line. These trains run in 8 and 10 car formations on the Fukutoshin line and make up most of the "local train" runs. That won't change at all once they start running on the Toyoko line since only 8 car trains can stop at the local stops. Plus with the Tokyu 9000 series being pulled off the line, these are the only "old-school" trains we'll see... I'm still holding out hope for some 9000 series rebuilds though...


They haven't programmed the train announcement and information systems on board yet, so these are turned off for now. Remember last week's 10000 series was in the same condition.


The Tokyo Metro map that's usually here is missing; but over to the left is a map of the Tokyu Railway system instead.


Ladies car has moved from car #1 on the Fukutoshin/Yurakucho lines to car #5, like all other Toyoko trains. I wonder if they'll shift it back once the thru-service starts?


Typical 3 color side destinatoion sign on the 7000 series. These used to be roller signs at one time, so that's why the area is so small. Long worded places like Motomachi-Chūkagai takes up lots of space with the Kanji and the English wordings!


You know it's an "old-school" train when you look up and see regular old FANS for cooling purposes!! Don't worry, there's air conditioning though-- they left the fans in from the "no A/C" days to help circulate air. This train was made in 1973 BTW. She's got a lot of miles, and I'm sure she'll see many more down here in Yokohama! BTW I was wondering where 7116F was... This is my usual train home in the evenings out of Shiki station down to Shibuya! I haven't seen her in a month or so...


Some of her sisters have ended up as far away as Indonesia as well-- a testament to the reliability and safety of these Tokyu-built 7000 series trains.

Last edited by starrwulfe; September 30th, 2012 at 06:24 PM.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 04:38 AM   #4008
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How are they moving the trains between the Fukutoshin line and the Toyoko line? Is the track connection already in service?
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Old October 1st, 2012, 10:35 AM   #4009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz
How are they moving the trains between the Fukutoshin line and the Toyoko line? Is the track connection already in service?
Nope... the opening is covered by in-service Toyoko train tracks at daikanyama station. They use the meguro line's connection to the Namboku line, which has a non-revenue connection to the Yurakucho line. Of course you know the Meguro line and Toyoko line are quad-tracked from den'en-chofu to Hiyoshi, and yurakucho and Fukutoshin lines share tracks from Wako-shi to Kotake-mukaihara.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 11:58 AM   #4010
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So it looks like the Fukutoshin line will have another interline service... Heading south to Yokohama and Minato-Mirai. Question though: how far will the Shibuya station for the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin line will be from the current JR Shibuya station (to the Hachiko statue)?
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Old October 1st, 2012, 01:35 PM   #4011
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It's certainly farther in terms of vertical space that has to be covered than the current arrangement of the elevated Toyoko Line terminal.

http://www.tokyometro.jp/station/shi...map/index.html
*the Hachiko statue is near exit no. 8
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Old October 1st, 2012, 06:10 PM   #4012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar

It's certainly farther in terms of vertical space that has to be covered than the current arrangement of the elevated Toyoko Line terminal.

http://www.tokyometro.jp/station/shi...map/index.html
*the Hachiko statue is near exit no. 8
Ah. That could mean a long walk to and from the Yamanote Line... but of course, if one heads to Ikebukuro or Shinjuku, then those lucky riders can just stay on the train until they get to either destination. I wonder why can't the US think of such ingenious ideas as those out there in Tokyo... I do that in SimCity, and that actually works very nicely (that being rail-to-subway service).
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Old October 1st, 2012, 08:16 PM   #4013
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The connection to the Yamanote Line will become very impractical, but I guess they predict that nobody will change between the Toyoko and the Yamanote lines anymore at Shibuya station.

The best way to get out of the station at the Hachiko exit from the Fukutoshin line station is using the elevator to B2F, and then walk to the escalators to B1F and there you can easily exit at #8.

But it helps if you know your way around, and even then the underground floors are 1 big maze. I hope they will make some changes to the underground floors with the new Shibuya station. I would like to see a better entrance from the underground floors to the new JR platforms, that could make it all much more logical.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 09:00 PM   #4014
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Quote:
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The connection to the Yamanote Line will become very impractical, but I guess they predict that nobody will change between the Toyoko and the Yamanote lines anymore at Shibuya station.

The best way to get out of the station at the Hachiko exit from the Fukutoshin line station is using the elevator to B2F, and then walk to the escalators to B1F and there you can easily exit at #8.

But it helps if you know your way around, and even then the underground floors are 1 big maze. I hope they will make some changes to the underground floors with the new Shibuya station. I would like to see a better entrance from the underground floors to the new JR platforms, that could make it all much more logical.
I think so too, given that I've studied the Shibuya Station diagram taken from the JR website... it's a complicated station, with multiple overground and underground platforms, and so many trains operate to and from the station by multiple agencies. Not as bad as Shinjuku Station though, with 16 platforms for JR alone. But, I still think that a major inconvenience would be passengers traveling between Yokohama and Meguro or Tamachi wherein there is currently no direct rail service between the two (unlike Yokohama to Shinjuku or Yokohama to Tokyo) unless passengers transfer to the Yamanote Line in Shibuya and head counterclockwise...

And also, what would be the headsign for the trains be like should the interline service between the Tokyu Toyoko and Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin line be fully implemented?
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Old October 1st, 2012, 11:57 PM   #4015
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There is a direct connection between Yokohama and Tamachi, the Keihin Tohoku Line. And even without that line it's faster to travel via Osaki or Shinagawa. Meguro can easily be reached with just one change using the Tohoko Line and the Tokyu Meguro line. So there are already no commuters from Yokohama

It will be a bigger problem for the people connection to and from the Ginza Line. But even then you can use the Hanzamon Line to Omotesando Station and have a cross platform change to the Ginza line there.

There will be people that will have a worse change at Shibuya Station then before, but for most people it will just mean a change in their daily commute.
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Old October 2nd, 2012, 04:19 PM   #4016
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This is true.
Fieldsofdreams, my daily commute is from Hiyoshi on the Toyoko Line to Shiki on the Tobu Tojo line; in other words, I've been traveling on what will be the completed route for about 2 years now.

About the Yokohama to Tokyo commute pattern:
People traveling north into Tokyo from this part of Yokohama have 4 opportunities to 'zero in' on their destination before Shibuya.

1. At my station, Hiyoshi, the beginning of the Meguro line which splits into the Toei Mita and Metro Namboku lines after Meguro station. A large number of commuters alight my normal train before I get on because they make the cross-platform transfer here.

2. Just 2 stops away, Musashi-Kosugi station is now a busy transfer point for those wanting to continue on on the Shinagawa-Tokyo-Ueno side of the Yamanote loop, because JR made a platform for the Yokosuka line there about 2 years ago. It's a major stop too-- all trains stop here including the Narita Express. I stopped taking the airport bus from Shin-Yokohama because of this. (NOTE: The Shonan-Shinjuku line ALSO stops here, and is one reason why Tokyu Corporation signed on to the connection plan with the Fukutoshin line; Originally, they weren't going to interline I believe. This is one reason why the connection is opening almost 4 years AFTER the subway opening. Isn't competition good? )

3. At Jyūgaoka station, a transfer can be made to the Oimachi line. Oimachi is the gateway to Odaiba and Shinagawa seaside. A great number of offices are in that area, for example Rakuten's HQ

4. And of course at Naka-Meguro station, almost HALF of my train's passengers alight to make the cross-platform transfer to the Hibiya line. If you want a one-train right through the heart of Tokyo, then this is for you. Roppongi, Kasumigaseki (Diet Bldg and Gov't offices), Kamiyacho, Hibiya, Ginza, Akihabara, and Ueno can be accessed along this line. I expect this to continue-- at least until they rebuild the Ginza line platforms at Shibuya station and have them directly over Meiji Dori where direct escalators and elevators can access the platforms from the Fukutoshin line below. Yes that's the plan, but we're at least 8 years before that happens I reckon.

Now, let me address the actual transfer situation in Shibuya station.

The way we all do it is to use Exit 9 or 14 on the OTHER side of the station, and walk through either the north or south concourses to the JR gates... It's only a 1 minute walk... If you need to get to Hachiko plaza, just walk out the other side of the tunnel!

Also since the Hikarie building opened across the street earlier this year, those people that transfer to/from the Toyoko line are afforded a faster way to get from B3F concourse level to the Toyoko line gates (Yamanote line gates are here too) on 2F. Just walk over into the basement lobby of Hikarie and there's a direct elevator that zips between the levels! I use it everyday, and it's a lot easier than walking up/down 3 flights of stairs. The view from the pedestrian bridge is nicer now since they've demolished the old one next to it, and you get an unimpeded view of the Ginza line tracks crossing over Meiji Dori. This is the barrier-free way to get to the Yamanote.

One other thing to note: Remember Yokohama is Japan's 2nd biggest city, and has a lot of people that commute in from the north as well! Nissan, Fujitsu, Hitachi, Panasonic, Yokohama Rubber, and more have HQ here! The Toyoko line is crowded in both directions during rush hours because of this. Also don't forget the schoolkids. There are no such things as yellow school busses in Japan. Most school kids that are in private primary and middle schools and all high schoolers commute on public transit, and make up a large share of commuters throughout the day. Most of the good schools are in the suburbs, so you see a lot of suburb-to-suburb commuting happening here too.
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Old October 3rd, 2012, 07:03 AM   #4017
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Elevation of Keikyū Kamata Station to be completed in October, will improve access to Haneda
http://www.nikkei.com/news/local/art...E2E2EBE0E0E4E7



Completion of this ₯189 billion mega-project to elevate 4.7 km of the Keikyū Main Line between Heiwajima and Rokugōdote and 1.3 km of the Keikyū Airport Line between Keikyū Kamata and Ōtorii is fast approaching, with the works scheduled to be completed in October 2012. A total of 28 grade crossings will be eliminated, including the particularly nasty one directly outside Keikyū Kamata Station, which would stay closed for a cumulative total of over 40 minutes during the morning peak hour. This was especially problematic given that this crossing traverses Dai-Ichi Keihin (National Route 15), a key arterial road.

The original crossing was single-track and there was only one platform at Keikyū Kamata to serve trains heading between the Airport and both the Shinagawa and Yokohama directions, resulting in traffic queues stretching as long as 780 m. Completion of the inbound (for Shinagawa) elevated track in May 2010 reduced the maximum queues by more than half to 340 m. In October, the outbound track will also be elevated, and inbound and outbound directions will now be split across the second and third levels of the station.

These improvements will also allow Keikyū to substantially improve service to and from Haneda… Service between Haneda and the Shinagawa end will increase from the current 6 tphpd to 9 tphpd, while service between Haneda and the Yokohama end will increase from the current 3tphpd to 6 tphpd.

The elevation of the station and tracks will allow for a major redevelopment at the station’s West Exit, currently incredibly cramped and dense with narrow roads and lacking a place for taxis and buses to stop. Pedestrian traffic is also high and the area is filled with shops and restaurants. A new West Exit station plaza will be created and a mixed-use residential / retail tower (20 stories, 35,000 sq m) is slated to go into a 1 ha site at this location, directly connected to the station’s second-floor ticketing hall with an elevated pedestrian deck.

Keikyū Kamata scenes (2010.02.20), before the inbound track was elevated:
Is the elevated station still on track for a 2012.10.21 opening?
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Old October 3rd, 2012, 08:58 PM   #4018
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It looks like they are ready.

Last month they already had an open day of the top platform and everything looked finished.




Here's a "model" of the station, making it a bit comprehensible how the station works.

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Old October 4th, 2012, 09:28 AM   #4019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momo1435
It looks like they are ready.

Last month they already had an open day of the top platform and everything looked finished.
I walked from Tokyu/JR Kamata to Keikyu Kamata last month to transfer and visit friends near Ohmori Kaigan (they really need to bridge that gap somehow) and the interior of the station just needed some minor finishing and temp walls to come down from the exterior; using my layman's eye of course!
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Old October 9th, 2012, 02:05 PM   #4020
starrwulfe
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Tokyu posts the testing schedule of Tokyo Metro 7000/10000 series trains on its website


If you're in the Tokyo area and want to get a preview of Tokyo Metro trains running on the Toyoko line, then check this out!

http://www.shibuya-tsunagaru.com/dia.html

Over on the special Tokyu website for the Toyoko/Fukutoshin Thru-Service Project, they've posted the actual testing schedule for the 2 trains (7116F and 10104F) on loan. Both trains will not be in operation; just one at a time They seem to be swapping them out every 2 weeks on a Sunday... But that's cool-- We'll be able to catch these trains until February 17th. At that time, they will need to be returned to their depot in Wako-shi and be overhauled and readied for the opening a month later.

Unfortunately I PASS this train going in the OPPOSITE direction every morning... I may just wake up really early and catch this train... 50 minutes earlier than my normal schedule though!!
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