daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:03 AM   #4041
fieldsofdreams
PH + SF Super Moderator
 
fieldsofdreams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Manila • San Francisco
Posts: 18,804
Likes (Received): 11243

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo

In regards to the extension of Subway Line 7 (Saitama Railway) to Iwatsuki Station, Saitama City mayor Shimizu Hayato announced on October 1 that he would postpone the start of work on the project, originally targeted for sometime in FY2012. The mayor will focus on trackside urban planning along the extension, aiming for a start in approximately five years. The plan also calls for revising the ridership projections, financial feasibility, and other studies in five years, with the extension now expected to open around FY2025.

In his Double the Happiness Plan 2009, his 2009 manifesto, Mayor Shimizu promised to begin work on the extension project by FY2012. A report compiled in March of this year by a third-party committee comprising the city and Saitama Prefecture, however, revealed that the recouping the full costs of the project would be difficult. In regards to the potential prospects for the extension project, the mayor said that he would make a decision sometime in the first half of FY2012.

The city will now move forward with focused urban planning efforts at the current Line 7 terminus at Urawa Misono Station, the proposed extension terminus at Iwatsuki Station, and in neighborhoods along the proposed extension. Mayor Shimizu emphasized that this is a “move away from investigating the feasibility of the extension, and towards implementing regional growth and development.” In the Urawa Misono – Iwatsuki Regional Growth and Development Plan published concurrently, the mayor expressed his intention to execute specific policies for trackside development in preparation for realizing the proposed extension.

The plan enumerates 43 strategies in eight different topics, for the period between FY2012 and FY2020. Of these, four would be all-new projects, requiring an investment of approximately ₯600 million over the next five years. The plan includes sponsoring events, running express buses, creating a new administrative structure with the mayor at the top, and establishing a new liaison framework with the prefectural and national governments. In addition to holding open houses for firms looking to relocate in the area, the city will also launch a “production strategy” to strengthen the dissemination of information.

With the new target start date for work on the project set for “approximately five years”, the plan establishes specific numerical growth targets for this five-year timeframe, including doubling the resident population in the Urawa Misono area to over 4,000 people and establishing a tourism hub in the Iwatsuki area attracting approx. over 70,000 people annually.

In order to realize the project, the framework provided by the Act on Enhancement of Convenience of Urban Railways, etc., whereby the national government provides one-third of the project costs, is absolutely critical. It remains to be seen whether or not Saitama City has the resolve within the next five years to overcome the hurdle of ensuring that the project can completely pay itself off within 30 years, a prerequisite for receiving funding under the act.
Wow, I just wish I can really be that mayor and focus on urban planning first of communities along the proposed line before extending a railway line because it allows future development of more homes and businesses once the railway extension is built. I just feel like I want to have a discussion with Mayor Hayato about his vision for the City of Saitama because he really understands his city and how he wants to grow it. It's amazing... Despite the fact that the line extension being delayed, the mayor wants to focus on future city growth first.
__________________
Anthony or FOD the MOD • Urban Studies & Planning, SF State, UC Berkeley, and San Jose State
Philippine Forums • SF Bay Area Forums • Bay Area Transit • NEW! SF Bay Area and NorCal in Pictures
Photo Albums: Flickr • Photobucket • Instagram

San Carlos • San Bruno • San Mateo • Saint Helena • Ross
fieldsofdreams no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:13 AM   #4042
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
I call BS, what authority do the police have to stop this project anyway? Not really sure why they decided to stick their noses in. I bet some higher-up at the prefectural police frequently drives through there and is worried that his commute might take a few minutes longer.

I would think that by possibly putting a bunch of streetcars underground near the station, congestion would get BETTER not worse.
Not sure if you can read the Japanese or not, but the objections have to do with the realignment needed for the Hiroden Hijiyama Line connecting Hiroshima Station with Hiroshima-kō Station. In order to work with the proposed general realignment of Hiroden services onto Ekimae-dōri, the Hijiyama Line needs some specific treatments in order to be able to access the new alignment. The Prefectural Police object to the proposal by the city, which calls for extending the Hijiyama Line along Hijiyama-dōri, on the south bank of the Enkō River, citing that particular segment as critical in terms of daily traffic volume. Instead, they propose having the line connect into Ekimae-dōri much earlier, down near Inarimachi Station.

Regarding why the Prefectural Police should have any grounds in this issue, if you've ever done work in public policy, urban planning, etc. (I'm assuming you have), jurisdiction has everything to do with these type of "turf" issues. I'm assuming the Prefectural Government has some jurisdiction over this segment of the Hijiyama-dōri, which appears to be designated as a prefectural route for at least some of its length. Not sure what actual ability they have to prevent that particular alignment from being selected, though.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 08:45 AM   #4043
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Google Maps Japan: Providing directions for a nation that hates to use addresses
http://www.siliconbeat.com/2012/09/1...use-addresses/

Quote:
TOKYO, Japan — In Japan, an icon is worth a thousand addresses.

Invited to a party? Don’t expect to receive an invitation with an address. Instead, residents in this metropolis of 8.7 million give directions based on subway station exits and landmarks.

Google’s map search results — like Japan’s mapping system — use subway stations and simple directives such as “cross the road in 50 meters,” to help locals figure out how to get where. And its maps are populated with popular landmarks.

“It’s way ahead of what we are doing in the United States,” said Ken Tokusei, product management director for Google Japan.

There really aren’t street signs in Tokyo. There are, however, ad signs, such as McDonalds, 50 meters away.

“Even though you’re walking down a street, you have no idea what street you are on in Japan and you probably don’t care,” said Sakura Tominaga, a Google public relations manager in the company’s Tokyo headquarters.

In the United States, people provide directions by giving specific addresses first; Japanese prefer to drill down on a location by providing city, district and block — in that order.

“It turns the world on its head,” said Tokusei, a former Los Altos resident. “Everyone knows this bookstore or this Starbucks. It’s much easier to describe that” than a street address, he added. In Japan, direction givers “go from large to small.”

“We are the weird ones,” Tokusei said of address-crazed Americans. “That’s my claim.”

And unlike in the U.S., Google Japan map services default directions are geared toward Japan’s intricate grid of subway and train lines, not roadways.

“Subway and train routing is a big deal — which train to take, which route to take, which station is the closest,” Tokusei said. “In Japan, a train leaves every two minutes. The optimisation isn’t about when the train leaves, but which one to take. Japanese who grow up here take it for granted this is how addresses work.”
Slightly off-topic, but I thought it was a quick, diverting read… The article is primarily focused a bit more on the streets vs. blocks thing with addresses in Japan, but the final notes about train directions are spot on. Directions here are always about an x-minute drive on this or that road, and even if there are transit directions, you really need to time it with a precise schedule for this or that bus / train. It’s bit refreshing to see that it doesn’t need to be like this … Most ads for stores, real estate properties, etc. in Japan are given as “y minutes walk to z station”, usually accompanied by a little stylized map. There’s often this concept of a “city of neighborhoods”, but with Tōkyō being as massive as it is, with a chaotic, completely unintuitive street grid, I sometimes like to think of it as a city of train stations… If people ask you where you live, you just say I live near such and such station on such and such line—most people will know the general area and have at least some idea how to get there, no further clarification needed.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

Last edited by quashlo; October 16th, 2012 at 08:50 AM.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 08:47 AM   #4044
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

SUGOCA coverage area will expand into 124 new stations in Nagasaki, Kumamoto, Ōita, and Kagoshima
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news...2080000-n1.htm

Quote:
 JR九州は、ICカード乗車券「SUGOCA(スゴカ)」を鉄道利用エリアを12月1日から長崎、熊本、大分、鹿児島の各市と周辺に拡大する。現在使用できるのは福岡、佐賀などの北部九州148駅だが、エリア拡大により、JR九州の全駅のほぼ半分にあたる272駅で利用可能となる。

 スゴカの発行枚数は8月末現在で約74万5千枚。同じ交通系ICカード、西日本鉄道の「nimoca(ニモカ)」の約176万枚に大きく差をつけられている。JR九州はエリア拡大など利便性向上で、この差を縮めたい考えだ。

 12月から新たにスゴカが使えるようになるのは長崎、諌早、熊本、八代、大分、鹿児島中央、川内などの計124駅で、スゴカ対応の改札機を導入していく。JR九州カード企画室は「列車利用の多い駅から導入計画を立てた」としており、普通列車利用客数としては90%が利用できることになる。新規エリアでは5年間で27万枚の発行を見込んでいる。

 エリア拡大に加えてJR九州は来春、同社のクレジットカードと一体となった「JQスゴカ(仮称)」も発行する。スゴカの残高が少なくなった場合、改札機にタッチするだけで、クレジット機能で自動的に入金する「オートチャージ」サービスも開始する。西日本シティ銀行やビックカメラなどとも提携する。

 一方、西鉄のニモカは福岡銀行と提携しており、オートチャージや銀行キャッシュカードとの一体化サービスでは先行している。
Very, very interesting news, as this means SUGOCA will now cover JR services in most of the major metropolitan areas on Kyūshū, and about half of JR Kyūshū’s total stations, come December 1.

Map:
http://www13.jrkyushu.co.jp/newsreleaseweb.nsf/9dd28b8cb8f46cee49256a7d0030d2e6/850ea6201a3798d949257a7e00384307/$FILE/%E3%80%90%E5%88%A5%E7%B4%99%E3%80%91SUGOCA%E3%81%94%E5%88%A9%E7%94%A8%E5%8F%AF%E8%83%BD%E3%82%A8%E3%83%AA%E3%82%A2%EF%BC%8812%E6%9C%881%E6%97%A5%E4%BB%A5%E9%99%8D%EF%BC%89.pdf

Specifically, the coverage area will expand as follows:

Nagasaki area
Total: 19 stations
Nagasaki Main Line: Nagasaki – Isahaya (both via Nagayo and via Ichinuno)
Ōmura Line: Isahaya – Takematsu

Kumamoto area
Total: 32 stations
Kagoshima Main Line: Arao – Yatsushiro
Hōhi Main Line: Kumamoto – Higo Ōtsu

Kagoshima area
Total: 32 stations
Kagoshima Main Line: Sendai – Kagoshima Chūō
Nippō Main Line: Kagoshima Chūō – Kokubu
Ibusuki–Makurazaki Line: Kagoshima Chūō – Kiire

Ōita area
Total: 36 stations
Nippō Main Line: Nakatsu – Kōzaki
Kyūdai Main Line: Mukainoharu – Ōita
Hōhi Main Line: Naka-Handa – Ōita

Kurume area
Total: 5 stations
Kyūdai Main Line: Kurume – Zendōji

The Kumamoto and Ōita expansions are especially interesting, as they’re extensions of SUGOCA's existing “Fukuoka–Saga” coverage area, so you will now be able to use SUGOCA to go all the way from Ōita to Kumamoto the long way around via Kita-Kyūshū and Fukuoka.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 08:49 AM   #4045
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Toyama University student ID cards to come with IC card functionality
http://www.toyama.hokkoku.co.jp/subp...0120922411.htm

Quote:
 富大は来年4月、富山地方鉄道(富山市)の路面電車やバスの運賃支払いができるIC 乗車券「ecomyca(えこまいか)」の機能が付いたICカード式の学生証を導入す る。富大によると、地方大学で運賃支払い機能が付いた学生証は珍しい。初年度は新入生 約2500人の学生証を対象とし、学生生活の向上や地域公共交通の活性化につなげる。

 富山市中心部と路面電車、路線バスでつながる五福、路線バスでつながる杉谷の両キャ ンパス、富山市を訪れる高岡キャンパスの学生が、地鉄の交通機関を利用しやすくなる。 富大によると、公共交通機関の運賃支払い機能が付いた学生証は首都圏では多いが、地方 では香川大のみ。

 セキュリティー機能向上を目的とする学生証のICカード化で、「えこまいか」のほか 大学生協食堂・売店の料金支払い機能も付ける。ICカードは毎年の新入生を対象に導入 を進め、4~6年で、職員を含め全1万3千人分を移行させる。希望する在学生の学生証 についても検討する。

 導入に向け21日、五福キャンパスで遠藤俊郎学長と地鉄の川岸宏社長が、「地域交通 振興に関する連携協定書」と「IC身分証に関する覚書」を交わした。遠藤氏は「地域振 興につなげたい」、川岸氏は「公共交通への若者の注目を集める機会にしたい」と話した 。

 富大側は講義や附属病院の開業時間に合わせた路面電車やバスのダイヤ調整、病院への カード料金積み増し機の設置を要望した。

 川岸氏は席上、7月に立山町職員256人のIDカードに「えこまいか」機能が付いた と紹介した。3月に職員4340人を対象に導入した富山市に続いて県内自治体2例目。
A bit more news on this item…
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 08:50 AM   #4046
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New CMs

Tōkyō Metro’s new CM, “Tōkyō Gourmet”:



New Lotte Fit’s CM for Ōsaka → Kyōto via Keihan Electric Railway, starting from Ōsaka Castle (Tenmabashi) to Gion Shirakawa (Gion Shijō).



And somewhat related, Ke$ha on the Tōkyō subway… Looks to be Hanzōmon Line and / or Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line. Hm…

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 08:52 AM   #4047
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keiō undergrounding near Chōfu

Some very belated videos…

The day of the switchout (2012.08.19):

Part 1:


Part 2:


Full-height platform doors at Fuda Station. Kokuryō and Chōfu are half-height doors.

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 11:48 AM   #4048
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 769
Likes (Received): 460

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo
Ōta Ward establishes fund for Kamakama Line between Kamata and Haneda
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...302000081.html
If I read this correctly, they want to make this an extension of the Tamagawa line then... but possibly have some trains come off the Toyoko line as through routes? Its doable since Tamagawa station is a two-level station and just before Den'en Chofu, there's are slip tracks that are used to move out of service trains to/from Okusawa yard on the Meguro line. Indeed, some trains start/end there now even.
Would be nice if they dual-gauged the run to Haneda though. Would Keikyu go for that? Also the Tamagawa line is an upgraded streetcar line meaning trains are short due to station lengths. I'd imagine trains off the Meguro and Toyoko lines would only be Ltd. Expresses with no intermediate stops until Kamata station.
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 11:57 AM   #4049
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 769
Likes (Received): 460

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar

I doubt it. The Sotetsu link may siphon off a portion of riders who formerly transferred from Sotetsu to Tokyu at Yokohama (which requires a bit of a walk with many stairs/escalators), but there is still a large customer base on the Toyoko Line/Minato Mirai Line past Hiyoshi and Kikuna, with the Minato Mirai Line essentially an extension of the Toyoko Line trunk. Of course once the run-throughs begin, a reshuffling of schedules will have to occur in order to accomodate the pathings of the trains off the Sotetsu connection.
Agreed. Minato Mirai line *is* just the end of the Toyoko line that was financed by the Yokohama government.

Also current Meguro line (along with Namboku, Saitama Rail and Mita lines) run 6 cars now, but stations can accommodate 8. Sotetsu trains are all 10 cars now AFAIK. I'm thinking they may make the shin-yokohama or Hazawa station be able to accommodate "short runs" for trains that come off the Toyoko/Meguro line and need to turn back... like Kikuna is now.
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 01:32 PM   #4050
Northridge
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oslo
Posts: 640
Likes (Received): 72

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Google Maps Japan: Providing directions for a nation that hates to use addresses
http://www.siliconbeat.com/2012/09/1...use-addresses/
But they have decided to disable pre-downloading of maps for Tokyo.
Northridge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 04:08 PM   #4051
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 769
Likes (Received): 460

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Keiō undergrounding near Chōfu
Why are there full height doors here and half-height everywhere else?

Also did you notice how they lifted the temporary deck UP to allow access to the lower level tunnel portals? Neat!

I still have no idea what method they'll use for the Toyoko line when the switch is made in March 2013. Daikanyama station is literally in the middle of all of that too...

Last edited by starrwulfe; October 16th, 2012 at 07:07 PM.
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 06:47 PM   #4052
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 769
Likes (Received): 460

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Google Maps Japan: Providing directions for a nation that hates to use addresses
http://www.siliconbeat.com/2012/09/1...use-addresses/



Slightly off-topic, but I thought it was a quick, diverting read… The article is primarily focused a bit more on the streets vs. blocks thing with addresses in Japan, but the final notes about train directions are spot on. Directions here are always about an x-minute drive on this or that road, and even if there are transit directions, you really need to time it with a precise schedule for this or that bus / train. It’s bit refreshing to see that it doesn’t need to be like this … Most ads for stores, real estate properties, etc. in Japan are given as “y minutes walk to z station”, usually accompanied by a little stylized map. There’s often this concept of a “city of neighborhoods”, but with Tōkyō being as massive as it is, with a chaotic, completely unintuitive street grid, I sometimes like to think of it as a city of train stations… If people ask you where you live, you just say I live near such and such station on such and such line—most people will know the general area and have at least some idea how to get there, no further clarification needed.
...Just watch out for when people don't give you the proper Kanji or Romanji of the station, or muddle it down somehow.

Back in 2000 when I first got here, I was told to go to Kayabachō on the Hibiya line and meet someone at a McDonald's near Exit 2 of the station. I went there and waited, and finally called after 20 minutes past the time... "I'm sorry-- maybe I didn't speak clearly enough-- It's Kamiyacho station" ...and wouldn't you know it, there was a McDonald's right in front of Exit 2 there too!! Ever since then, I make it a point to get the exact kanji of station names and neighborhoods/districts from Japanese speakers, and the station numbers (if they have them) or intersecting lines from non-natives.

But this was the age before smartphones and GPS everywhere. Now I just Google it. LOL
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 06:59 PM   #4053
fieldsofdreams
PH + SF Super Moderator
 
fieldsofdreams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Manila • San Francisco
Posts: 18,804
Likes (Received): 11243

Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
...Just watch out for when people don't give you the proper Kanji or Romanji of the station, or muddle it down somehow.

Back in 2000 when I first got here, I was told to go to Kayabachō on the Hibiya line and meet someone at a McDonald's near Exit 2 of the station. I went there and waited, and finally called after 20 minutes past the time... "I'm sorry-- maybe I didn't speak clearly enough-- It's Kamiyacho station" ...and wouldn't you know it, there was a McDonald's right in front of Exit 2 there too!! Ever since then, I make it a point to get the exact kanji of station names and neighborhoods/districts from Japanese speakers, and the station numbers (if they have them) or intersecting lines from non-natives.

But this was the age before smartphones and GPS everywhere. Now I just Google it. LOL
Ouch. That's like seven stations apart from where you went to where you actually met your friend!

I recall the time when I went to Tokyo, where my uncle met with his brother again after a long time being apart in Meguro, and I had to remember Naka-Meguro Station (for the Hibiya Line) to get to nearly everywhere in Tokyo -- and transfer to/from the Yamanote Line at Ebisu. The last night I was there, I forgot to tell my uncle that we had to get off at Ebisu (because we were coming back from Ginza at the time) and transfer to the Hibiya Line back to Naka-Meguro... we got off at Meguro Station, and we were completely lost! Fortunately, my uncle had uncle's brother's phone number (or Japanese address) in Meguro, handed it to a taxi driver, and he brought us back home. Instead of staying at a hotel, we stayed at a rental place, completely furnished with a TV, kitchen, and the like (western standards!), and I slept on a blanket over a carpeted floor.
__________________
Anthony or FOD the MOD • Urban Studies & Planning, SF State, UC Berkeley, and San Jose State
Philippine Forums • SF Bay Area Forums • Bay Area Transit • NEW! SF Bay Area and NorCal in Pictures
Photo Albums: Flickr • Photobucket • Instagram

San Carlos • San Bruno • San Mateo • Saint Helena • Ross
fieldsofdreams no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:10 PM   #4054
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
If I read this correctly, they want to make this an extension of the Tamagawa line then... but possibly have some trains come off the Toyoko line as through routes? Its doable since Tamagawa station is a two-level station and just before Den'en Chofu, there's are slip tracks that are used to move out of service trains to/from Okusawa yard on the Meguro line. Indeed, some trains start/end there now even.
Would be nice if they dual-gauged the run to Haneda though. Would Keikyu go for that? Also the Tamagawa line is an upgraded streetcar line meaning trains are short due to station lengths. I'd imagine trains off the Meguro and Toyoko lines would only be Ltd. Expresses with no intermediate stops until Kamata station.
I had posted some previous articles before... I don't think they are looking for actual through-service between Tōkyū and Keikyū due to the gauge difference... Only a cross-platform transfer at Tōkyū Kamata Station.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:14 PM   #4055
orulz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 314
Likes (Received): 47

My Japanese is rusty but reading between the lines, I read it as the prefectural police wanting Hiroshima to keep the Hijiyama line on its current (crooked, slow) alignment that will prevent it from joining the new route approaching Hiroshima Station. Of course they'll just say "We have concerns with your current proposal" but basically they mean "Stay out of the way of the cars."

These days Hiroshima is going crazy with building expressways and roads and not doing much at all in terms of transit. I'm not at all plugged in with the political machine over there but such a pervasive mode bias (especially by Japanese standards) has to come from the very top. In fact there has been basically no expansion of transit in Hiroshima since 1994. And even then, a big part of how the Astram Line was sold was that it included widening and construction of a nice four lane road underneath it.

Since then, there was Tenjingawa station added in 2004, Then this project, and Hakushima Shin Eki on the horizon, and that's really about it, other than some minor station reconstructions.

It would be nice to see Hiroshima do something that de-prioritizes cars and prioritizes transit for once. For example. They could install modern signal priority on the lines through the central city - allowing them to operate more like light rail and drastically speeding travel times, but they haven't. Given the hugely advantageous cost-benefit ratio, the only possible explanation for why this hasn't been done, is that they're worried about the impacts to traffic.

They could also run more modern LRVs. They are faster, smoother, larger, have bigger (and more) doors, and have low floors. And they're not THAT expensive - Hiroden could get great bang for their buck upgrading some of their oldest clunkers. But they haven't. They're too busy building expressways.

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Not sure if you can read the Japanese or not, but the objections have to do with the realignment needed for the Hiroden Hijiyama Line connecting Hiroshima Station with Hiroshima-kō Station. In order to work with the proposed general realignment of Hiroden services onto Ekimae-dōri, the Hijiyama Line needs some specific treatments in order to be able to access the new alignment. The Prefectural Police object to the proposal by the city, which calls for extending the Hijiyama Line along Hijiyama-dōri, on the south bank of the Enkō River, citing that particular segment as critical in terms of daily traffic volume. Instead, they propose having the line connect into Ekimae-dōri much earlier, down near Inarimachi Station.

Regarding why the Prefectural Police should have any grounds in this issue, if you've ever done work in public policy, urban planning, etc. (I'm assuming you have), jurisdiction has everything to do with these type of "turf" issues. I'm assuming the Prefectural Government has some jurisdiction over this segment of the Hijiyama-dōri, which appears to be designated as a prefectural route for at least some of its length. Not sure what actual ability they have to prevent that particular alignment from being selected, though.

Last edited by orulz; October 16th, 2012 at 08:10 PM.
orulz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:25 PM   #4056
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
Why are there full height doors here and half-height everywhere else?
Probably ventilation-related.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:28 PM   #4057
fieldsofdreams
PH + SF Super Moderator
 
fieldsofdreams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Manila • San Francisco
Posts: 18,804
Likes (Received): 11243

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Probably ventilation-related.
Full-height doors are usually found on underground stations, while half-height doors may be found at both overground and underground stations... probably due to ventilation and it's much easier to maintain.
__________________
Anthony or FOD the MOD • Urban Studies & Planning, SF State, UC Berkeley, and San Jose State
Philippine Forums • SF Bay Area Forums • Bay Area Transit • NEW! SF Bay Area and NorCal in Pictures
Photo Albums: Flickr • Photobucket • Instagram

San Carlos • San Bruno • San Mateo • Saint Helena • Ross
fieldsofdreams no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:51 PM   #4058
orulz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 314
Likes (Received): 47

Regarding the Sotetsu-Tokyu link. I guess I did not realize about the extension of the Meguro line (effectively four-tracking of the Toyoko line) as far as Hiyoshi. You are right, it all really makes sense once you look at the whole picture.

The one service that will probably see significant cuts is the current Sotetsu line between Yokohama and Nishiya. But there's really no need for Sotetsu riders who are bound for Tokyo to have to go through Yokohama.
orulz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 07:52 PM   #4059
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Platform doors begin operation at Odakyū Shinjuku Station

I’ve been out of it for a while, so I missed out on quite a bit of interesting news like this…

The platform door installations on ground-level Platforms 4 / 5 at Odakyū Shinjuku (express services) entered service on 2012.09.30. The door channels appear to be wider than in typical installations to handle wide-door rolling stock like the Odakyū 1000 series.

It was just a while ago that they were talking about introducing these, and they’re already in service now. Very good to see progress being made on these, although the more difficult problems still remain.

Videos:



__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 16th, 2012, 08:30 PM   #4060
starrwulfe
ご乗車頂いてありがとうございます。
 
starrwulfe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 769
Likes (Received): 460

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I had posted some previous articles before... I don't think they are looking for actual through-service between Tōkyū and Keikyū due to the gauge difference... Only a cross-platform transfer at Tōkyū Kamata Station.
I remember that article before-- the thing is, this latest article doesn't read that way at all.

This article talks about Ōta Ward's plan is for building a tunnel starting just after Yaguchi-no-watashi station on the Tamagawa line and ending just before Ōtorii station on the Keikyu-Kuko line. Then it goes into how trains can make the trip from the northwestern Saitama 'burbs via the Fukutoshin line via Jyūgaoka and get to Haneda in much less time-- sounding like they may go directly to Haneda--no transfers anywhere.

I'm more inclined to believe the article posted before with the cross platform transfer--But then again, Why wouldn't Tokyū simply underground the current station at JR Kamata, and just build their own station underneath Keikyu Kamata or Ōtorii themselves? Then have a high speed escalator to connect the platforms... That makes more sense to me...
starrwulfe no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium