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Old November 1st, 2012, 03:50 PM   #4141
mkill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
Next is probably going to be the Asakusa Bypass line that will connect Keikyu and Keisei/Hokuso together, allowing for express trains and direct access to the CBD near Tokyo Station.
I don't get this whole Asakusa Bypass idea. Keikyu and Keisei, who are the main beneficiaries, aren't fond of it either, and that should be a huge warning sign.

What do you get for all that money?

Tokyo Station is already connected to the airport via Narita Express. If you walk a few meters, you can take a Sky Access direct train from Nihonbashi Station. You can take the Yamanote up to Nippori to take the Skyliner. How many people land at Narita and then need to go to Tokyo Station to take the Shinkansen? Why not go to Ueno or Shinagawa instead?

If you want to improve connections to Narita, help out West Tokyo. Going to Narita from Shinjuku is a PITA.
Oedo Line to Ueno-Okachimachi? Very long walk to Keisei Ueno.
Narita Express? Takes a huge detour and isn't cheap.
Yamanote to Nippori? Slow.
Usually, I now skip Shinjuku and take the Tozai Line to Nihonbashi, and get the Sky Access from there.

But what's up with the Sky Access trains? First, they wait for 5 mins in Narita-Yukawa, and then they wait for another 5 mins on the track!? Why are they doing this? Force people on the express? Appease taxi drivers? Drive broke-ass exchange students insane? If they'd just stop that, they'd save a lot of people a lot of time at zero investment. Unless they're dual-tracking more of that part.

The other thing I don't get is why they can't just speed up the Asakusa Line. The Shinjuku Line carries roughly the same amount of passengers, it also interlines with a big private railway, and it can do express trains just fine.
Upgrade any of the stations to two platforms so that express trains can overtake. Kura-mae would be a good candidate, built the station a few meters to the north to make changing to Oedo-Line easier. Or if you want to make east-west access easier, upgrade Asakusabashi (Chuo-Line).

Last edited by mkill; November 1st, 2012 at 03:58 PM.
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Old November 1st, 2012, 08:25 PM   #4142
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What makes you think Keikyū and Keisei are not fond of it?

Anyways, the waits on the Sky Access trains are due to a number of factors, including the need to allow the faster Skyliner trains to pass or to allow opposite-direction trains to pass (Keisei only has a single track into the Airport, the other track is for JR services).

Putting in passing tracks on the Asakusa Line isn’t really a "quick fix" like you're making it out to be… It might have made sense if there were actually some four-track stations already between Oshiage and Sengakuji, but there are none. In fact, they’ve already analyzed four-tracking some of the stations, and the actual time savings are marginal, if I remember correctly, as there’s simply too many local services on the line. At some point, you’d need to do it to every other station, in which case building an entirely separate set of tracks starts to look like a better investment.

And while the Shinjuku Line may have express services, these are only during the midday, when there is actually enough capacity to do so without impacting the other services.

This is the rationale behind building the bypass.
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Old November 1st, 2012, 08:52 PM   #4143
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New bus-only lanes likely for Yamanashi maglev station
http://news24.jp/nnn/news8882318.html

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リニア駅とJR甲府駅を結ぶ新しい交通手段について県は荒川堤防沿いにバス専用レーンを整備する案が適当だとする考えを明らかにした。1日開かれたリニア活用推進懇話会で県が示した。荒川を利用するルートはJR甲府駅と甲府市大津町に建設が予定されるリニア駅を結ぶため、荒川堤防沿いにバス専用レーンを整備するもの。区間距離は7・5キロで初期投資額は15億円、所要時間は19分と試算している。これに対し、懇話会の出席者からは賛成する意見もあった一方、「費用がかかりすぎる」といった否定的な意見も相次いだ。県は新たな交通手段について今年中にまとめる「基本構想」の中で1つに絞る方針。
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Old November 1st, 2012, 08:54 PM   #4144
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Departure melodies at stations become new advertising medium
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...0501003-n1.htm

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 電車の発車メロディーを広告に利用する動きが目立ってきた。車内の中づりや液晶ディスプレーの映像など視覚に訴える広告とは異なり、音声で多くの人々に商品やサービスの魅力を伝えられ、話題づくりにもなると企業に注目されている。

 西武新宿線の高田馬場駅(東京)のホーム。発車を知らせるのは、みそメーカーのマルコメが30年以上、テレビなどで流しているCMソング「マルコメ、マルコメ~」のメロディーだ。駅にいた主婦(60)は「自然に耳に入ってくる。きょうは孫におみそ汁を作ってあげます」と話していた。

 高田馬場駅近くに東京支社を置いて約20年のマルコメが、周辺地域との交流を深める一環として西武鉄道に提案し、10月から始まった。

 地域振興を目的に複数の駅で人気アニメの主題歌などのメロディーを流している西武鉄道だが、広告は今回が初めてという。

発車メロディーの広告利用が話題を呼んだのは、2010年夏にサントリー酒類がJR新橋駅(東京)を中心に展開した「角ハイボール」キャンペーンだ。低迷するウイスキー消費のてこ入れが狙いだった。多くの飲食店を抱える新橋駅周辺を「ハイボールの聖地」と位置付け、駅構内の看板広告などを同社のもので“占拠”。1990年から使われてきたCMソング「ウイスキーが、お好きでしょ」を発車メロディーで流した。

当時のキャンペーンを推進した塚原大輔ウイスキー部課長は「瓶からグラスに注がれる音など、ウイスキーの広告で音声は昔から使われてきた手法。ウイスキーへの郷愁を呼び覚ます効果も狙った」と振り返る。ウイスキー市場の回復とともに話題を呼んだメロディー広告はその後、都内のJR渋谷駅や原宿駅にも広がった。西武鉄道以外の私鉄も利用を検討している。

鉄道広告に詳しい電通の交通メディア部の藤井春樹さんは「音声による広告は刷り込みなどの効果が高い。鉄道会社にとっても資産を有効活用できるため、将来性がある手法だ」と期待する。

ただ、駅は公共交通機関の施設としての制約もあり、利用拡大へのハードルは高い。安全が最優先されるため、駆け込み乗車などを助長しないようメロディーや音の制限は必要。メロディーを流すのにふさわしい企業かどうかなど公共性のチェックも不可欠だ。駅の広告事業を手がけるJR東日本企画は「発車メロディーの広告利用は、駅で広告キャンペーンを展開する大手企業の要望に基づく付随的なもの」と強調。個別の広告商品として無制限に開放することには慎重な姿勢をみせている。
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Old November 1st, 2012, 09:28 PM   #4145
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Remember when I was wondering what would happen if a major accident happened along the new Fukutoshin/Toyoko/Tojo/Seibu Ikebukuro route? How would they be able to prevent the whole line and other participating train companies from becoming off schedule? I think I found out Tuesday evening.

There was a major train accident involving a person (人民事故) somewere on the Toyoko line between Jiyuu-ga-oka and Den'en-Toshi stations that shut down service on the entire line in both directions. I happened to be aboard a Limited Express that was set to leave Shibuya outbound at 3:15 pm. The doors closed and we proceeded to leave the station and traveled to Daikanyama station and stopped. The conductor alerted us to the incident and said we were going to reverse direction and go back to Shibuya station to make sure everyone could take alternate transport. Once back at Shibuya, the PA system and signboards were saying to use the Yamanote line to Meguro station then change to the Tokyu Meguro line and head for Musashi-Kosugi and points south; that part of the Toyoko line was still in operation.

So what this probably means is that if this had happpened after next year, then trains would terminate at Shibuya on the Fukutoshin line and Musashi-Kosugi on the Toyoko line temporarily. We were given white-backed tickets to use on the JR line though so no worries in having to pay in detour situations like that.


BTW you just gotta love the Navitime app here in Japan for smartphones. It sent me the alert right after it happened because I registered my commute pattern. Google Now also works as well with auto-loading of schedules, but no incident info...yet.
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Old November 1st, 2012, 11:48 PM   #4146
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Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
accident involving a person (人民事故)
I think you mean 人身事故...
人民事故 sounds like what happens to "the people" when they go against the will of the government in China and North Korea... Although I suppose 人身事故 also works in that situation.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 05:42 AM   #4147
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FY2011 ridership numbers for major Tōkyō area operators

Train-Media.net recently released its compiled FY2011 daily ridership report for the major railway operators in the Tōkyō area.

Ridership was generally down due to the effects of the earthquake and tsunami.

Code:
Line                       Total  Change
Keihin Electric Express Railway     
  Main Line            1,111,531  (1.6%)
  Airport Line           151,318  (2.2%)
  Daishi Line             67,788   0.2%
  Zushi Line              42,416  (0.9%)
  Kurihama Line          121,327  (1.8%)
  ALL LINES            1,188,739  (1.6%)
    (excluding duplicate ridership)

Tōkyō Metro 
  Ginza Line             996,244  (1.0%)
  Marunouchi Line      1,081,798  (0.7%)
  Hibiya Line          1,051,761  (2.1%)
  Tōzai Line           1,302,459  (1.5%)
  Chiyoda Line         1,104,473  (2.4%)
  Yūrakuchō Line         925,031  (0.2%)
  Hanzōmon Line          850,591  (1.0%)
  Namboku Line           447,756  (0.3%)
  Fukutoshin Line        334,172   1.2%
  ALL LINES            6,222,939  (1.3%)
    (excluding duplicate ridership)

Keisei Electric Railway
  Main Line              490,809  (1.9%)
  Higashi-Narita Line        924 (16.8%)
  Oshiage Line           128,555  (2.7%)
  Kanamachi Line          16,506  (3.7%)
  Chiba Line              39,678  (1.8%)
  Chihara Line            10,037   1.6%
  Narita Airport Line     11,812   1.6%
  ALL LINES              698,321  (2.0%)

Tōbu Railway
  Isesaki Line           832,072  (1.4%)
  Kameido Line            23,182  (1.8%)
  Daishi Line              6,622  (8.5%)
  Sano Line                3,852  (1.6%)
  Koizumi Line             2,640  (2.0%)
  Ōta Line                   169   2.7%
  Kiryū Line               3,460   2.6%
  Nikkō Line              42,202  (1.1%)
  Utsunomiya Line         11,718  (1.9%)
  Kinugawa Line            2,433 (14.4%)
  Noda Line              446,621  (0.4%)
  Tōjō Line              943,893  (1.1%)
  Ogose Line              19,170  (1.5%)
  ALL LINES            2,338,031  (1.1%)

Seibu Railway
  Ikebukuro Line         884,830  (0.8%)
  Shinjuku Line          933,056  (1.3%)
  ALL LINES            1,672,124  (1.2%)

Keiō Corporation
  Keiō Line            1,334,268  (1.1%)
  Inokashira Line        544,728  (0.6%)
  ALL LINES            1,709,703  (1.0%)

Odakyū Electric Railway
  Odawara Line         1,484,400  (0.6%)
  Enoshima Line          374,483  (0.2%)
  Tama Line               77,413  (0.4%)
  ALL LINES            1,936,296  (0.5%)

Tōkyū Corporation
  Tōyoko Line          1,114,571 (0.4%)
  Meguro Line            324,052  0.7%
  Den'en Toshi Line    1,162,575  0.0%
  Ōimachi Line           438,979  1.0%
  Ikegami Line           216,844 (0.4%)
  Tamagawa Line          141,311 (0.0%)
  Kodomo-no-Kuni Line     11,573  1.1%
  ALL LINES            2,857,321  0.0%
    (excluding duplicate ridership)

East Japan Railway Company (FY2008)      Section
  Tōkaidō Line         4,056,564  0.3%   Tōkyō - Hiratsuka
  Nambu Line             742,293  1.5%   ALL
  Tsurumi Line            44,477  0.6%   ALL
  Yokohama Line          823,389  1.0%   Higashi-Kanagawa - Hachiōji
  Negishi Line           563,893 (0.9%)  Yokohama - Ōfuna
  Yokosuka Line          186,811 (0.5%)  Ōfuna - Kurihama
  Sagami Line             93,581 (0.6%)  ALL
  Chūō Line            3,145,907 (1.1%)  Tōkyō - Takao
  Musashino Line         866,603  0.8%   ALL
  Ōme Line               286,666 (0.8%)  Tachikawa - Okutama
  Itsukaichi Line         46,600 (1.5%)  Haijima - Musashi Itsukaichi
  Hachikō Line            62,507  0.9%   Hachiōji - Ogose
  Tōhoku Line          3,423,321 (0.8%)  Tōkyō - Kurihashi
  Takasaki Line          389,162 (0.6%)  Ōmiya - Fukiage
  Kawagoe Line           146,427 (0.3%)  Ōmiya - Komagawa
  Saikyō Line            401,258  1.0%   Akabane - Ōmiya
  Jōban Line           1,131,285 (1.1%)  Nippori - Ushiku
  Narita Line             85,518 (3.2%)  Abiko - Sakura
  Narita Branch Line       9,814 (2.1%)  Narita - Kusumi
  Narita Airport Line     20,885 (1.4%)  Narita - Narita Airport
  Sōbu Line            1,725,841 (0.5%)  Tōkyō - Yachimata
  Sotobō Line            263,255 (1.0%)  Chiba - Honda
  Uchibō Line            116,373 (2.3%)  Soga - Hamano
  Keiyō Line             598,915 (0.7%)  ALL
  Yamanote Line        3,685,726 (1.1%)  Tabata - Shinagawa
  Akabane Line           766,071  0.2%   Ikebukuro - Akabane
  Sōbu Branch Line     1,141,542 (1.2%)  Kinshichō - Ochanomizu
  ALL LINES           15,220,271 (0.4%)

Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation
  Asakusa Line           605,990 (2.8%)
  Mita Line              553,538 (1.9%)
  Shinjuku Line          654,030 (1.6%)
  Ōedo Line              780,715 (1.9%)
  ALL LINES            2,279,349 (2.0%)

Sagami Railway
  Main Line              592,308 (1.3%)
  Izumino Line            96,645 (2.0%)
TOTAL                  614,236 (1.2%)
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 06:38 AM   #4148
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Hmm, looks like passenger figures are heading slightly down for most lines. But what's interesting is that the Tōbu Kinagawa Line has experienced a sharp decrease in ridership, at over 14%, while Keisei Higashi-Narita Line saw a deeper drop, at over 16% and a ridership below 1,000. How come those two had a dramatic drop? And the Tobu Ōta Line has the smallest ridership, at 169: what makes that ridership so small compared to the thousands served on nearly all other lines?
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:27 AM   #4149
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人民事故 sounds like what happens to "the people" when they go against the will of the government in China and North Korea... Although I suppose 人身事故 also works in that situation.
Haha. Yeah, that looks like a euphemism such regimes would use to describe popular uprisings.

Quote:
So what this probably means is that if this had happpened after next year, then trains would terminate at Shibuya on the Fukutoshin line and Musashi-Kosugi on the Toyoko line temporarily.
Yes, the few times this happened on the Den'en Toshi Line when I was riding it, the procedure was to terminate through interline services, isolate the affected section, and run the remaining services on the truncated portions, typically with abbreviated schedules (some expresses downgraded to locals, cancelled or consolidate runs, etc.) This seemed to last for at least 2 or 3 hours, until the incident was cleaned up and the "dia" could be restored.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:46 AM   #4150
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Originally Posted by fieldsofdreams View Post
Hmm, looks like passenger figures are heading slightly down for most lines. But what's interesting is that the Tōbu Kinagawa Line has experienced a sharp decrease in ridership, at over 14%, while Keisei Higashi-Narita Line saw a deeper drop, at over 16% and a ridership below 1,000. How come those two had a dramatic drop? And the Tobu Ōta Line has the smallest ridership, at 169: what makes that ridership so small compared to the thousands served on nearly all other lines?
The lines with the drops are all branch lines. The Kinugawa Line is dependent on tourist traffic to the Kinugawa Onsen area, and was likely affected by the earthquake last year. The Higashi Narita Line is a very short line serving a airport-related industrial zone- essentially a line to transport workers like the JR West Wadamisaki Line- ridership may drop depending on the employment situation in that area.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:50 AM   #4151
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Ah interesting. That's like the lines I've never heard of or seen before in a typical map... Plus tourists have no idea what those lines are unless you are really into exploring each and every line. What's interesting is that the figure for the Tokyo Monorail is not shown, nor the Rinkai or the Yurikamome Lines,
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 09:03 AM   #4152
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo

I think you mean 人身事故...
人民事故 sounds like what happens to "the people" when they go against the will of the government in China and North Korea... Although I suppose 人身事故 also works in that situation.
Oops! Yeah, 人身 not 人民.
It's campaign season over here so I think I'm too used to seeing it in hearing it that way!
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 09:06 AM   #4153
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oh, so you have election campaigning there too in Yokohama, eh? Hmmm... I wonder which rail or subway line is the most crowded in there.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 02:10 PM   #4154
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I wonder which rail or subway line is the most crowded in there.
That's a good question. The data quashlo provided includes operators which have lines in the Yokohama area, including ones that have substantial traffic. Looking at just numbers for Yokohama Station, Sotetsu (which operates only in Kanagawa Pref.) appears to have the greatest number of passenger boardings, with 420,000/day, or roughly 10 times the weekday passenger numbers for the whole Caltrain system, and 40,000 more than BART weekdays. The grand total for the Sotetsu system, both the main line and Izumino Branch Line, is 614,000.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 06:32 PM   #4155
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
What makes you think Keikyū and Keisei are not fond of it?
Their statements on the whole thing. It's expected to be a massive 350bn Yen project, and of course they'll be asked to foot some of the bill. There are very polite ways to say "not on our money" in Japanese.

I don't see how the bypass massively increases their passenger numbers. Their main money is in commuters, not Narita airport passengers. I don't have the exact numbers but it should be around 20,000 vs. over 200,000 daily.

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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Anyways, the waits on the Sky Access trains are due to a number of factors, including the need to allow the faster Skyliner trains to pass or to allow opposite-direction trains to pass (Keisei only has a single track into the Airport, the other track is for JR services).
i could understand one 5 minute stop to let an express pass, but two? Within a few hundred meters distance? I understand that the lane is single track between Yuzawa and the airport, but I still feel that this is bad planning or deliberate slow-down of the limited express.

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Putting in passing tracks on the Asakusa Line isn’t really a "quick fix" like you're making it out to be… It might have made sense if there were actually some four-track stations already between Oshiage and Sengakuji, but there are none. In fact, they’ve already analyzed four-tracking some of the stations, and the actual time savings are marginal, if I remember correctly, as there’s simply too many local services on the line. At some point, you’d need to do it to every other station, in which case building an entirely separate set of tracks starts to look like a better investment.
But 350bn? What would it cost to quadruple-track 2-3 stations? The Inokashira Line is roughly the same length as Sengakuji - Oshiage (13km) and they manage with one quadruple station (Eifukucho).

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And while the Shinjuku Line may have express services, these are only during the midday, when there is actually enough capacity to do so without impacting the other services.
An express service outside of rush hour (say, after 9am) would be fine for a big chunk of airport passengers.

Here is an even more radical idea:
Cut the Asakusa line between Sengakuji and Takanawadai. Sell the Sengakuji - Oshiage part to Keikyu and Keisei (50% each). With only two operators, things should run smoother.
For the Takanawadai - Nishi-Magome part, extend the Mita/Nanboku line about a km south from Shirokane-Takanawa (it's a terminus for half their trains snyway). Regauge the Ex-Asakusa Line parts. Create a through-service with the Ikegami Line.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 07:00 PM   #4156
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That's a good question. The data quashlo provided includes operators which have lines in the Yokohama area, including ones that have substantial traffic. Looking at just numbers for Yokohama Station, Sotetsu (which operates only in Kanagawa Pref.) appears to have the greatest number of passenger boardings, with 420,000/day, or roughly 10 times the weekday passenger numbers for the whole Caltrain system, and 40,000 more than BART weekdays. The grand total for the Sotetsu system, both the main line and Izumino Branch Line, is 614,000.
So the Sotetsu rail network must be the most crowded set of lines in Yokohama... What about the Tokyu or the Minato-Mirai 21 Lines? Are they as crowded as the Sotetsu too?
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 07:51 PM   #4157
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quashlo, I don't suppose you have statistics on ridership density do you? (riders/km) for all of these lines?

All those Tobu branches with small ridership are fascinating. What exactly is the Ota line? I don't see it on a map.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:25 PM   #4158
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Their statements on the whole thing
What statements? Would be best if you could cite something. Sure, there are polite ways to say "not on our money" in Japanese, but these are private businesses... Even if the project did benefit them, do you think they would necessarily go out and openly admit that? They'd be interested in getting as much public money behind the project as possible. It’s always a game of cat-and-mouse when the public and private sectors need to come together.

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I don't see how the bypass massively increases their passenger numbers. Their main money is in commuters, not Narita airport passengers. I don't have the exact numbers but it should be around 20,000 vs. over 200,000 daily.
The forecasted ridership for the bypass is about 220,000 passengers / day. Yes, only some of that will be airport passengers, but the remainder will be the commuters—in your words, the "main money" for Keisei and Keikyū. Anyways, in so much as airport passenger numbers at Narita and Haneda will increase in the future from increased tourism and expansion of flight slots, then it stands that both Keisei and Keikyū will want to capture as much of this demand as possible relative to their competitors (JR and Tōkyō Monorail, respectively).

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i could understand one 5 minute stop to let an express pass, but two? Within a few hundred meters distance? I understand that the lane is single track between Yuzawa and the airport, but I still feel that this is bad planning or deliberate slow-down of the limited express.
Yes, it's entirely feasible that you stop once at Narita Yuzawa to let a Skyliner train heading in the same direction to pass, and then stop another time closer to the airport to allow a train in the opposing direction to pass. I'm not going to make the stringlines for you, but you could easily examine the Keisei / Sky Access schedules yourself.

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But 350bn? What would it cost to quadruple-track 2-3 stations? The Inokashira Line is roughly the same length as Sengakuji - Oshiage (13km) and they manage with one quadruple station (Eifukucho).
The goal was to get the travel times between Haneda and Narita below the 60-minute mark. Quadruple-tracking a few stations on the Asakusa Line didn't meet that goal. Unfortunately, I don't have much time to scrounge around the Web for the data, but it should be around somewhere.

Anyways, if you have reservations about the project, I suggest you read this report, first:
http://www.mlit.go.jp/common/000042654.pdf

It explains some of the rationale behind the project in fairly excruciating detail.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:27 PM   #4159
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So the Sotetsu rail network must be the most crowded set of lines in Yokohama... What about the Tokyu or the Minato-Mirai 21 Lines? Are they as crowded as the Sotetsu too?
Yes, I suspect Sōtetsu is probably the most crowded. The Den'en Toshi Line and Tōyoko Line are much more crowded overall, but they generally reach their highest levels of loading after they've already left Yokohama City limits.
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Old November 2nd, 2012, 08:30 PM   #4160
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quashlo, I don't suppose you have statistics on ridership density do you? (riders/km) for all of these lines?

All those Tobu branches with small ridership are fascinating. What exactly is the Ota line? I don't see it on a map.
You should be able to calculate it yourself... The ridership is a daily average, so you can approximate to annual easily. The Ōta Line is way up in the northern extents of the Tōbu network... Tōbu's got a lot of rural lines up in Gunma and Tochigi, a nice contrast to their main lines (Tōjō and Isesaki) that are high-volume commuter / urban lines.
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