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Old January 26th, 2013, 06:34 AM   #4621
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Demolition of Kurashiki Station tenant building to begin soon
Good riddance. I hope the elevated walkway in front is demolished too- the ground floor is dark and dank due to it.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 08:30 AM   #4622
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With platform doors being installed as we speak at Keiō Shinjuku Station, I found this interesting set of vids on the doors already in service at Odakyū Shinjuku Station…

Nice video summarizing the installation process. Platform doors are usually transported to the site by regular trains, and this installation was no different. Taken the late evening of 2012.08.25 and early morning of 2012.08.26:



Entering Track 2 after placement is complete (2012.08.26). Can see the large LED marker to the side of the buffer stop to notify the driver that he has stopped the train in alignment with the doors.



As usual, it’s the conductors that actually control the doors, and they also have a similar marker embedded into the platform surface right where they usually step out of the rear cab:



The view from the boarding side:



And in service (2012.09.30):



This is the first time I’ve seen these specific types of markers in use. Keikyū (Haneda Airport International Terminal) and Keiō (Chōfu, Fuda, and Kokuryō), as well as Tōkyū (Ōimachi) should have somewhat similar setups because they’re all in the same boat without ATO, but I don’t recall their setups being this elaborate or “visible”.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 08:31 AM   #4623
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On the subject of more platform doors, here’s the Yamanote Line platforms at Ikebukuro, in place but not yet operational (2013.01.12):



Operational doors at Ōsaki Station (2012.12.23). These began service on 2012.12.22. We can see they didn’t install them on Tracks 2 and 4, which are used by trains heading directly to or from the yard at Tōkyō General Rolling Stock Center.

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Old January 26th, 2013, 09:11 AM   #4624
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Yup the number of platform door and platform gate placements in train stations all over Japan are increasing. =)

Indeed, that new MLIT directive was a brilliant decision. =)

Hopefully, all airport rail stations will have platform door and platform gates as soon as possible (and hopefully before year 2020) =)
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Old January 26th, 2013, 09:28 AM   #4625
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Hopefully, all airport rail stations will have platform door and platform gates as soon as possible (and hopefully before year 2020) =)
Although not entirely impossible, there are some difficulties placing platform doors at the airport stations like Narita where the local trains have four doors and the express trains only have two doors at the end of each cart.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 08:13 PM   #4626
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Although not entirely impossible, there are some difficulties placing platform doors at the airport stations like Narita where the local trains have four doors and the express trains only have two doors at the end of each cart.
I kinda see that as well.

In those cases, one solution would either be for uniformity of train specifications (at least with regards to train door positions and specifications).

Or make platform doors/gates that adhere to different train sizes and their respective door positions..............though I don't know if that's possible and if so, I don't know exactly how they can implement it.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 10:04 PM   #4627
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A JR West 223 series unit has been out for testing and driver training in the Hiroshima… A likely prelude to their introduction to Hiroshima-area services.

JR West used a modified two-car Unit MA21 (normally four cars, but the two intermediate cars were removed).

At Hiroshima Station (2012.12):



At Miyajima-guchi Station next to a 115 series (2012.12):

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Old January 26th, 2013, 10:06 PM   #4628
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Inose: Unified fare structure is first step to subway consolidation
http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNZO...20C13A1L83000/

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 東京都の猪瀬直樹知事は25日の定例記者会見で、東京メトロと都営地下鉄の一元化議論について「分かりやすいのは運賃体系を共通化すること。第一歩の段階ができないと、次には進めない」と述べ、運賃体系の一本化に先行的に取り組む姿勢を示した。

 メトロと都営の一元化を巡っては、太田昭宏国土交通相が25日の記者会見で、国の持つメトロ株の売却に否定的な見方を述べている。猪瀬知事は「(一元化を議論する国と都などの)協議会で議論を深めれば、認識も深まる」として、中断している協議会が再開すれば、国交相との歩み寄りは可能との見方を示した。
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Old January 27th, 2013, 01:09 AM   #4629
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From my C.E.R.A. show.

I shared these images on another forum.
I won't paste in all the text I typed with them. If you want more information, please ask me here.
Escalator from Odakyu Shinjuku station to Odakyu store.
Three pictures of the then-southern end (May 2009) of the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Shibuya station.
Two images from December 2012 of a 10-car Tobu consist testing clearances and stop points at the Minato Mirai line Motomachi-Chukagai terminus.
Twelve pictures mostly of the Odakyu line, from May 2009.
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Old January 27th, 2013, 04:25 AM   #4630
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
A JR West 223 series unit has been out for testing and driver training in the Hiroshima… A likely prelude to their introduction to Hiroshima-area services.

JR West used a modified two-car Unit MA21 (normally four cars, but the two intermediate cars were removed).

At Hiroshima Station (2012.12):



At Miyajima-guchi Station next to a 115 series (2012.12):

That train model looks much different indeed from the East JR train models I've been accustomed to see here. What company manufactures those train sets, and is that train type only available in the West JR district?
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Old January 27th, 2013, 05:34 AM   #4631
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What company manufactures those train sets, and is that train type only available in the West JR district?
They (the 223 series) are a JR West design, and as such are used only on JR West rails, as far as I know. As JR West doesn't have it's own rolling stock manufacturing facility, work is contracted out to the factories of Kawasaki Heavy, Kinki Sharyo, and Hitachi, which all happen to be in JR West territory, with the first two located in the Kansai region.
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Old January 27th, 2013, 01:40 PM   #4632
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Originally Posted by fieldsofdreams View Post
That's a very interesting perspective you've brought up. So, if the big concern is to merge the two subway companies, the first question is this: with Tokyo Metro's massive profits versus Toei's massive debts, how can Tokyo Metro contribute to pay off Toei Subway's debts? It's like, sure, government-owned companies do not necessarily have to turn in profits like private corporations, but it has to give service to the people it serves... But if the merged company will be privately-owned (but majority of its stocks owned by the government), then Tokyo Metro should need to find ways to clean up Toei's debts which could finally balance the two budgets into one.
Interestingly, Tokyo Metro is owned 53.42% by the Finance Ministry and 46.58% by Tokyo Prefecture (if the Japanese WP is up to date) and is organized as a stock-owned company (the trypical Japanese kabushiki gaisha).
Toei is a local public enterprise and fully owned and run by Tokyo Prefecture. So in the end, it's Tokyo Prefecture and the Finance Ministry who'll have to figure out how to solve this. So it's a question of (1) who'll end up with more than 50% of the joined company and (2) who'll end up with how much of the debt.
It's not that Tokyo Metro can't provide the cash to reduce Toei's debt, it's the question whether the Finance Ministry wants to.

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Originally Posted by fieldsofdreams View Post
The second question would be, with a unified system, how will the merged company manage its vehicles and station identities, especially that the two systems at the moment are operated differently of each other? Tokyo Metro, I sense, operates a lot of newer vehicles and much more interlining services than Toei. On the other hand, there are some stations that have Tokyo Metro and Toei close to each other, but have different entrances, different markings, and even closed-off platforms that require commuters who want to transfer to go through one set of ticket barriers in order to get to the other set of ticket barriers and platforms. It can be a hassle, especially if someone is in a hurry... I imagine with a unified network, the number of stations might remain the same, if not some stations will be consolidated, and that transferring between the two will be as easy as stepping out of one train and heading to the other platform.
You can already change between Tokyo Metro and Toei at many stations without crossing fare gates, especially newer ones. With Suica/Pasmo, it's not a big deal anymore anyway. With the Namboku and Mita Line, there is even combined interlining with the Tokyo Meguro Line.

Of course, there are some really badly planned stations, like most of the northern Oedo Line (Kuramae, Hongo Sanchome, Ueno-Okachimachi...). In most other stations, it's historic reasons or space constraints. Or, in the case of Iwamotocho / Akihabara, there is a river in the way.

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Originally Posted by fieldsofdreams View Post
And Tokyo Metro will end up having much more commercial space, especially with the Oedo Line that have a lot of stations in a loop!
Oedo Line doesn't have any commercial space at all, it was planned that way. However, a for-profit company would probably start working on that right away.
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Old January 27th, 2013, 03:33 PM   #4633
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did someone say platform doors?

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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
...but I don’t recall their [platform door] setups being this elaborate or “visible”.
Here are some other platform door signals that are in use around Tokyo.
Of course the Fukutoshin line is "one-man" operated (no conductor) but they still need these signal boxes above the platform in case it needs to be manually overridden.


Interestingly, the Yurakucho line (and the last 6 stops on the Fukutoshin line between Kotake-Mukaihara and Wako-shi) is operated with conductors and they must manually open/close the platform doors and the train's doors at the same time. (a side note, know that we know the final service diagram, perhaps a few of those trips starting and ending at Shibuya station will be the old Tokyu 9000 series trains after all, since the crews can manually line up the doors and operate them outside the cab?)

The Tokyu Oimachi line had it's doors brought in by train too.


And don't forget this elaborate system to help Keio motormen line their train's doors up in the new underground Chofu station.

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Old January 27th, 2013, 03:55 PM   #4634
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
A JR West 223 series unit has been out for testing and driver training in the Hiroshima… A likely prelude to their introduction to Hiroshima-area services.

JR West used a modified two-car Unit MA21 (normally four cars, but the two intermediate cars were removed).

At Hiroshima Station (2012.12):



At Miyajima-guchi Station next to a 115 series (2012.12):

Hah! Hahahah! AHahahahah! Finally new trains for Hiroshima! It will be nice to have trains from the 1990s (or newer!)

Those 223's are nice. If I recall, one of the places they run is on the Tokaido Main Line in the Kansai area. I rode one of these while I was using a Seishun 18 ticket to go from Hiroshima to Wakkanai. The train I rode was a Shin Kaisoku and I was startled that a train that skipped so many stops and traveled such a long distance did not require a special fare.
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Old January 27th, 2013, 04:26 PM   #4635
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I had a friend once go from Kumamoto to Nagoya in a day on his Seishun 18 kippu. Must be some awesome scenery in your neck of the woods along the Sanyo line.

I usually use it to go from Yokohama back to Osaka and Nara to visit family and friends there, and I'm also really impressed with JR West's part of the Tokaido line, but not to be outdone is JR Tokai's Shin-Kaisoku (新快速) services on their part of the line from Toyohashi to Ogaki and Maibara. The speeds and station stops approach that of the lowest level Kodama Shinkansen service but at half the price. ...Getting a seat at 青春18 time is so difficult to do though... :LOL:
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Old January 27th, 2013, 07:28 PM   #4636
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Shibuya Connection Update: Shibuya Track Layout Plan

I found a really good track layout map on a blog called Reports from the Future posted a few days ago located here; it's the most detailed yet, and pretty much lines up what I've been noticing going on around me whenever I'm down there myself.


I've gone ahead and translated everything I could on the diagram into English, but I forgot one thing... Going left = towards Shinjuku 3-chome/Ikebukuro; going right = towards Yokohama/Motomachi-Chukagai.

1. I said before that the middle platforms looked to be shorter than the outside ones. That was before they knocked the temporary wall down and revealed another 50 meters of platform! After setting up the platform doors, and placing the signals, we can see that the entire platform space will shift 50 meters toward Yokohama, along with a new set of stairs heading up to the B4 concourse, which also isn't open yet.

2. The middle tracks (4 & 5) will be set up with Tokyu specific signals and controls leading us to believe that they will be the tracks allowing for "short-trip" services--the trips that will start and end at Shibuya station and not traverse the Fukutoshin line. Since the platform doors can be operated manually here by the conductors, perhaps 9000 series trains will be used for these trips? They don't have the necessary ATO/ATSC equipment for one-man operation in the subway installed like the other, newer train sets, but the door placement and car length is no problem for the platform doors here. A similar arrangement is in place with the Tokyu Oimachi line at Oimachi station using 9000, 8000, and 7000 series cars now. (EDIT: Nope... The Tokyu 9000 series are off the Toyoko line after 13 March.)

3. With this arrangement, there would be no need to have a "short tripper" train alight its passengers at one platform, then move ahead to the crossover beyond to switch tracks, then pick up passengers at the opposite platform. Of course passengers would need to be wary of what platform their train is on; Tracks 3 & 4 are heading to Yokohama, but there may be a train on track 5 leaving outbound earlier; most times that track is used for trains inbound along with track 6.

4. This also solves the big problem with the "Shuttle Operation" issue. This is the term given whenever there is a problem or special condition that prevents the normal interlining operations to happen. It's normal that this happens in the first and last few trips of the day to get trains in and out of the system, but also happens whenever there is an accident as well. Recently there was a substation issue with the Tokyo Metro lines at Wako-shi and trains could not run past Chikatetsu-Narimasu, nor could trains enter the tunnel after interlining on the Tojo line.
Yurakucho line trains ran the entire route up to Chikatetsu-Narimasu. Fukutoshin trains ran their route and ended at Kotake-Mukaihara. All Tobu Tojo line trains that were supposed to run into the tunnel, became locals bound for Tobu-Ikebukuro, and passengers were told to either change at Narimasu or Ikebukuro for free. Seibu Yurakucho line trains ran as local only shuttles between Kotake-Mukaihara and Nerima station--just 3 stations. Had the Toyoko line been involved, I'm sure all operations would have stopped and started at Shibuya station.
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Old January 27th, 2013, 07:34 PM   #4637
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That station diagram looks really interesting indeed. And that's all underground, correct? So when I want to board a Fukutoshin train for Shinjuku from Shibuya, will I end up boarding it on Platform 5 or 6? And do those platforms have like specific trains that stop there (e.g. Locals on Platform 6, Rapid Express & Commuter Express on Platform 5), or will the electronic signboards direct passengers to the proper trains?
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Old January 28th, 2013, 12:33 AM   #4638
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Not sure if there will be a specific stopping pattern or not; There's no specific timetable to read from that shows the actual trains interacting with each other yet; I'm going to ask the staff when that will come out later today. They've invested a lot in electronic signage all over the station, so that's always the best bet anyway.

I checked the Tokyu website as well, and they're calling out 4 specific patterns to show what trains on the Toyoko line turn into trains on the Fukutoshin line and vice-versa.

Tokyoko <-> Fukutoshin
a. Ltd Express/commuter Ltd Express. Express/commuter express
b. Express. Express/commuter express
c. Express. Local
d. Local. Local

Of course once the actual timetable schedules are printed, then we'll know exactly what train turns into what service, what runs begin and end at Shibuya and Kikuna, and what trains pass or wait at Shibuya and Higashi Waseda.
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Old January 28th, 2013, 06:20 AM   #4639
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Quote:
I found a really good track layout map on a blog called Reports from the Future
That's a good blog- another recent report covers the platform lengthening for 10 car trains. I saw the work in-person at Naka-Meguro earlier this month, being done on the down side of the platforms.
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Old January 28th, 2013, 07:50 AM   #4640
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Hiroden Hakushima Line platform uprades

Hiroden appears to be implementing various improvements to platforms on the Hakushima Line in conjunction with the upcoming introduction of modern low-floor LRVs to the line.

Some pictures:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/greatjonasan/

Hatchōbori
Part of the platform has been widened, and the stop bar has also been moved. Looks like they are also installing truncated dome tiles for the visually impaired.



Jogakuin-mae
Platform for Hatchōbori is being widened its full length, plus an extension.



Same deal for the platform for Hakushima.



Shukkeien-mae
Platform for Hakushima. Not much progress other than removal of the cobbles.



Platform for Hatchōbori is the same deal.



Katei Saibansho-mae
Platform for Hatchōbori is being extended.



Hakushima

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