daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 3rd, 2009, 10:20 PM   #541
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Wow, nice find. Makes things much easier to understand.

Although it's still 10 (long) years away, I'm curious what Sōtetsu plans to do with their connection to Tōkyū, since technically, they could run all the way out the other end of the Fukutoshin Line to the Seibu and Tōbu networks. Could end up with some really long services on the order of Den'en Toshi Line - Hanzōmon Line - Isesaki Line... Maybe Hannō - Ebina or Shinrin Kōen - Ebina. Once things get that complicated, maybe Tōkyō Metro will simplify the Fukutoshin Line and Yūrakuchō Line through-services to only one each of Seibu and Tōbu. The current setup with each of the subway lines through-servicing with each of the private railways may be too complicated and troublesome for the added convenience.

There's also possibility for Meguro Line through-servicing onto the Mita Line and Namboku Line / Saitama Rapid Railway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nemu View Post
This guy is the CEO of Nankai Electric Railway so you can't expect his opinion to be objective. The Kobe airport is here to stay. KIX should focus on international flights and cargo
True, there's a clear conflict of interest, but in principle, I think he's right... Three airports is probably oversaturated.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 4th, 2009, 10:23 AM   #542
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452

Quote:
True, there's a clear conflict of interest, but in principle, I think he's right... Three airports is probably oversaturated.
Keep Kobe, and close Itami. One positive effect will be to drive airline passengers who like the convenience of Itami over to the Shinkansen.
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2009, 06:22 PM   #543
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

I like the idea of closing Itami, and it's only natural after they built KIX. Governor Hashimoto has some grand visions for reuse of the site, some maybe too ambitious (KIX - Ōsaka maglev?), but the airport land would offer the opportunity to do some pretty incredible stuff.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2009, 03:50 AM   #544
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452

Getting OT, but if Itami is closed, I wonder what will happen to Itami's "Koreatown" (i.e. Nakamura Chiku), which is sandwiched between the runway and the river:

http://www.city.itami.lg.jp/home/SOG...O/0000248.html
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:22 AM   #545
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Additional profit from Nakanoshima Line falls short of initial projections
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...2002017-n1.htm

Quote:
On November 6, Keihan Electric Railway announced that the Nakanoshima Line, which recently celebrated its one-year anniversary, generated ¥400 million in additional profit for the company between April and September of this year. While likely to fall short of the annual ¥900 million in additional profit originally forecasted for the line, Executive Vice-President Sakurai Yoshitsugu said, “Ridership is gradually increasing, now we just have to boost that demand by building out Nakanoshima.”

According to the railway, the operating revenues from the Nakanoshima Line (Tenmabashi – Nakanoshima) for the half-year period ending in September translated to increased profit of ¥400 million, on pace for an annual profit of ¥800 million. Including the farebox revenue of Nakanoshima Line riders for sections north of Tenmabashi, the line is estimated to generate additional annual profit of ¥1.2 billion, a little under 40 percent of the original goal of ¥3.2 billion established at the line’s opening.

First-year ridership for the Nakanoshima Line was approximately 4.30 million. Commuter ridership is struggling somewhat at approximately 1.5 million, but the company says, “The shift in passengers from the Keihan Yodoyabashi Line is one-third of initial projections, while the shift from JR West and the subway is also proceeding slower than expected.” Company representatives say they plan on increasing PR efforts for the line.
Keihan opened a new condominium tower called N4 Tower in Nakanoshima nearby Nakanoshima Station. The project was a joint development with Ōbayashi Corporation and consists of 349 units in a 34-story structure. As Nakanoshima Island builds out, ridership will only increase. Extending the line west has also been proposed, which would capture ridership coming from both ends of the island and create a new east-west corridor. Currently, it's more like a stub.

Pictures of new building:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/



quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:25 AM   #546
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Pictures of new JR Ōsaka Station under construction
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/

The building is really taking shape. The scale of the project is massive, but this is only the new station building. With the rest of the projects in the North Yard area, a lot of new development will come online in this area in the coming years. Combined with the various developments going on elsewhere in Ōsaka in Namba and Tennōji – Abeno, some are afraid that it may result in a glut of space on the market (the so-called “Ōsaka 2011 Problem”).









The pedestrian decks above the platforms. An arching canopy will be built above the pedestrian catwalks and platforms.


After completion, this is what it will look like:
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:27 AM   #547
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Kintetsu and Tōkyū launch PR campaign for Tennōji – Abeno area
http://www.asahi.com/kansai/sumai/ne...911060042.html

Quote:
On November 5, Kintetsu Real Estate and Tōkyū Land Corporation announced that they will launch a joint campaign to boost the image of the Tennōji – Abeno area, which is currently undergoing redevelopment. As the first effort in the campaign, the two companies will hold a walking event on November 23 at Shitennōji Temple and Tennōji Zoo. The two companies will hold other seasonal events such as music festivals and food festivals based on the locally-grown Tennōji turnip.

Kintetsu is currently in the process of constructing the Kintetsu Abenobashi Terminal Building, with a scheduled opening date of Spring 2014. Tōkyū, on the other hand, is in the process of constructing Ōsaka City’s largest retail complex in Abeno, set to open in Spring 2011. The two companies agreed to cooperate in a campaign to advertise the area.

“Despite the historic temples and shrines and the high concentration of parks and open space, many people don’t realize the value of the area. We aren’t just thinking about our own building under construction… We want people to realize the charm of this whole neighborhood,” says Tetsutani Morio, head of Kintetsu’s terminal development business line.
Ōsaka Abenobashi Station is Kintetsu’s secondary Ōsaka terminal (the main one being at Namba), and is the terminal for the Kintetsu Minami-Ōsaka Line. The station sees 175,000 daily entries and exits (2008) and is located adjacent to Tennōji Station:
  • JR Tennōji Station (142,000 daily entries): JR Ōsaka Loop Line, JR Hanwa Line, JR Kansai Main Line (Yamatoji Line)
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway (269,000 daily entries and exits): Midōsuji Line, Tanimachi Line
  • Hankai Tramway
The thread on the Kintetsu Abenobashi Terminal Building under construction is here:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...=781884&page=2

At 300 m, this will be Japan’s tallest building once complete (the Tōkyō Sky Tree under construction in Sumida Ward in Tōkyō will still be the tallest structure), which means that the two largest private railways by trackage are constructing the largest building and largest structure in Japan. For its scale, the project is a bit under the radar, so there’s not much information available other than some blogs that keep track of the construction.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:28 AM   #548
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Naniwasuji Line studies to also evaluate limited-express and Jūsō Link proposals
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1414010-n1.htm

Quote:
On November 6, experts gathered at the Ōsaka Prefectural Residence in Chūō Ward, Ōsaka City for a roundtable discussion concerning the proposed Naniwasuji Line, which would improve access between central Ōsaka and Kansai International Airport (KIX). The meeting marks the start of serious discussion of the project between the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), railway operators, and local government. Panel members agreed to first discuss estimates of KIX’s future passenger demand and the individual roles of Kansai’s three airports before addressing other matters related to the project.

The Naniwasuji Line would run south from JR West’s Shin-Ōsaka Station, through a new station on the north side of Ōsaka Station, connecting to JR Namba Station and Nankai Electric Railway’s Shiomibashi Station. An alternative alignment connecting at Nankai Namba Station is also under consideration. Trains on the Naniwasuji Line would then continue onto the JR Hanwa Line and Nankai Main Line, connecting central Ōsaka and KIX in less than 40 minutes.

The MLIT is currently conducting studies of expected ridership demand and the estimated benefits of the line. In regards to stations, panel members at the meeting agreed to examine both a limited-express only and a local train stopping pattern for Kita-Umeda on the north side of JR Ōsaka Station. The members also agreed to study the synergistic effect of the new line with other new lines currently being constructed, as well as new lines in the planning stages including the Nishi-Umeda – Jūsō Link, which would connect Nishi-Umeda Station on the Ōsaka Municipal Subway Yotsubashi Line and Hankyū Jūsō Station.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:30 AM   #549
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keihan’s umbrella program marks 10th anniversary
http://mytown.asahi.com/shiga/news.p...00000911050003

Quote:
What do you do when you’re riding inside a train and it suddenly starts raining, but you don’t have your umbrella with you? A special program for just those occasions will soon mark its 10th year running. As part of the program, Keihan Electric Railway lends out umbrellas at all of its stations inside Ōtsu City, leading many a passenger to offer their gratitude for the measure.

“Please take one.” Umbrella stands are placed at the exits of all 26 stations on the Keihan Ishiyama – Sakamoto Line and Keishin Line within Ōtsu City. Known as “Umbrella Share,” the service allows passengers to freely take the umbrella home with them.

The umbrellas offered as part of the service were all umbrellas originally left behind on trains. In low months, the number of umbrellas left behind reaches 50 or so, but in high months, such as during the rainy season, the number soars to as much as 120. The railway delivers the umbrellas as lost articles to the local Ōtsu Police Station, but if the owner doesn’t show up after three years, the umbrellas are returned to the railway. As vinyl umbrellas are becoming more popular, the railway finds itself with an increasing number of unclaimed umbrellas.

In the past, the railway had been donating the umbrellas to nursery schools along the line, but one stationmaster suggested lending the umbrellas to passengers who don’t want to get wet during rainy weather. Starting in 2001, the railway set up umbrella stands at station exits and began lending out the umbrellas to passengers.

As many as six umbrellas are provided at each station. While keeping an eye on the clouds, station staff stock the stands with umbrellas, filling them up when they run out. Passengers take the umbrellas home with them, and return them the next time they return to the station. The service is well-known among residents, so much so that some passengers take the time to send postcards expressing their gratitude to the railway.

According to Keihan Electric Railway, the program is only offered at stations within Ōtsu City. “We hope to continue efforts to please our passengers, in ways that are only possible on small local lines,” says Keihan’s Ōtsu Railway Operations Department.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:31 AM   #550
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Sakai City announces halt to LRT project
http://osaka.yomiuri.co.jp/news/20091104-OYO1T00751.htm

Quote:
Sakai City has notified Nankai Electric Railway and Hankai Tramway of its intention to halt the proposed light rail transit (LRT) line through the central area of the city, which would have been operated by the two railway companies. This marks the first time the city has expressed its intention to agencies involved with the plan since the election of Mayor Takeyama Osami, who made a campaign promise to stop the project. If the LRT had been introduced, it would have been the second local jurisdiction in the nation after Toyama City and the first major city in the nation to do so, but it appears likely that the forward-thinking project has returned to a blank slate.

Under the proposed plan, the city would have begun construction within the fiscal year on 1.7 km of new track from Sakai-Higashi Station on the Nankai Kōya Line to Sakai Station on the Nankai Main Line. The city would have also received ownership of the 7.9 km section of the Hankai Line from Hamadera-eki-mae to Abikomichi to be renovated and operated with new low-floor vehicles. Nankai and Hankai were planned to operate the new service, leasing the facilities and vehicles from the city.

Residents along the planned alignment criticized the project, however, partially because the section of new track would have converted a two-lane city route into a one-way, one-lane road.

On October 29, the City met with the two railway companies, announcing the abandonment of the plan. The city will work together with Hankai to evaluate ways to keep the Hankai Line running. The line is currently operating in the red, but the LRT project was part of the financial restructuring for the line.

As far as LRT projects, plans for a separate extension alignment (5.2 km) connecting Sakai Station on the Nankai Main Line and the Sakaihama area on the waterfront are still on the table. Mayor Takeyama plans to reevaluate the line by studying financial feasibility and other issues.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:33 AM   #551
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Hokusō Railway agrees to five-percent fare reduction
http://mytown.asahi.com/chiba/news.p...00000911060003

Quote:
In regards to the fares for the Hokusō Railway, on November 5, Chiba Prefecture Governor Morita Kensaku announced that the Prefectural Government, eight local jurisdictions along the line, and the railway’s parent company Keisei Electric Railway have agreed to reduce regular fares on the railway by close to five percent.

The local jurisdictions and railway operator will each contribute ¥300 million annually, for a total of ¥600 million to be used to cover the fare discounts. Governor Morita says he plans on working to reduce fares further.

According to prefectural officials, Governor Morita asked Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Maehara Seiji directly to carefully consider the fare reduction plan. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) later accepted the fare amendment plan submitted on October 20.

To cover the cost of providing the reduced fares, the Prefectural Government and local governments (six cities and two villages along the line) will each shoulder ¥150 million annually, Keisei ¥250 million annually, and Hokusō Railway ¥50 million annually. The contribution by each of the six cities and two towns will be divided up based on ridership and distance, with Ichikawa City contributing ¥4.5 million, Matsudo City ¥15 million, Kamagaya City ¥9.0 million, Funabashi City ¥6 million, Shiroi City ¥34.5 million, Inzai City ¥67.5 million, Motono Village ¥6 million, and Inba Village ¥7.5 million.

The fare reductions will take effect starting next summer, when the Narita New Rapid Railway—operated by Keisei using Hokusō Railway tracks—opens for service, and will last for five years.

As a result of the program, regular fares will drop between ¥10 and ¥40. For student commuter passes, the 25 percent discount offered to students in four cities and villages including Inzai City will be expanded to students in the other four cities. Adult commuter passes, however, will see reductions in price of only a little over one percent.

In September, the Prefectural Government and the local jurisdictions agreed to each contribute ¥200 million annually, aiming for a reduction of five percent or more in total fares (including commuter passes). The governments requested that Keisei contribute ¥400 million, but the railway company said it could only provide ¥250 million.

“While the agreement doesn’t meet all of our goals, we have to start somewhere, even if it’s only a one percent reduction. It’s a big step towards further fare reduction,” approved Governor Morita, in response to the latest agreement.

Fares for the Hokusō Line start at ¥200 to ¥300 for one-station journeys, around twice the fares of most other private railways. While the railway opened as the main means of transport to and from Chiba New Town, developed by the Prefectural Government, the population in the city is growing little and the accumulated debt is becoming a hindrance to lowering the fare.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:34 AM   #552
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Ōsaka governor calls for closure of Itami, creation of new “urban center”
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...911030092.html

Quote:
Governor Hashimoto Tōru of Ōsaka Prefecture is currently drawing up a vision to close Ōsaka (Itami) International Airport in 2035 and transform the site into “Japan’s newest urban center.” Governor Hashimoto plans on convincing the local population to agree to the airport’s closure and then drafting an urban plan that would give the area the functions needed to act as a backup to Tōkyō. The grand visions in the proposal include concepts such as a maglev to Kansai International Airport (KIX) and an “English Language Special District,” and while it’s uncertain just how realistic they are, they seem certain to have a ripple effect on debates surrounding the fate of Kansai’s three airports.

The proposal was drafted by several departments and bureaus in the Ōsaka Prefectural government based on ideas put forth by the Governor. Starting in mid-November, the governor will meet with leaders of local jurisdictions surrounding Itami, and after receiving their approval, will submit a proposal to the national government to close the airport.

After the closure of the airport, the proposal calls for concentrating metropolitan-area government and administrative functions at the site, serving as a backup in the event that the capital Tōkyō suffers a major disaster. In addition, the site would encompass an “International Residential Zone” featuring an “English Language Special District” and other foreign language educational functions; a “Business and Exchange Zone” featuring an international conference center, medical facilities, and goods distribution facilities; and a “Research and Development Zone” containing research agencies. The proposal would also construct an expansive central park.

In regards to the national government-owned airport site and approximately 500 ha of land surrounding it, Ōsaka Prefecture expects land values to increase after the closure of the airport, to an estimated asset vaue of approx. ¥1.2 trillion. The profits obtained from selling the land would be directed towards the construction of a maglev connecting Kansai International Airport and central Ōsaka City, with the added goal of increasing travelers who use KIX.

In addition, the proposal outlines a schedule that will consolidate management of KIX and Itami in 2011; begin construction of the KIX maglev in 2025; close Itami, open the maglev, and begin construction of the new urban center in 2035; and open the new area to the public in 2045.

“Now is the time to press the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) to close Itami. We have no choice but to keep lobbying,” said Governor Hashimoto in an Asahi Shimbun interview. It’s likely that the Governor explained the proposal to Nagayasu Takashi, Parliamentary Secretary of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism on his trip to the capital on November 2.

Up until now, Governor Hashimoto has been pushing for the development of KIX as a hub airport. The Governor has been calling for the closure of Itami Airport, saying that KIX and Kōbe Airport alone are sufficient and the current configuration with three airports in Kansai is unnecessary. The latest proposal attempts to address local anxieties about the loss of urban vitality with the closure of the airport, but residents have mixed feelings about the project.

“We still have people coming back from the airport who stop by to shop, but if the airport closes, it’s a big dent in my business. The new urban center could be very successful, but I’m concerned that people might instead just leave Hotarugaike and the other areas around the airport for good,” said Miyahara Masaaki (62yo), owner of fish market Uoasa, located outside Hankyū Hotarugaike Station in Toyonaka City, Ōsaka Prefecture, the closest station to Itami Airport. Sakagami Shōichi (60yo), chairman of the Toyonaka City Chamber of Commerce, said, “I’d like to know as soon as possible whether or not this proposal has a vision for the future of the city’s businesses.”
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:34 AM   #553
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Takamatsu City government begins accepting private railway IC card
http://mytown.asahi.com/kagawa/news....00000911050001

Quote:
Starting this month, Takamatsu City is allowing citizens to use Takamatsu – Kotohira Electric Railroad (Kotoden) IC farecard IruCa to make payments for the issuance of certificates of residence and tax payment. Starting next January, city employees will switch over to ID cards that double as IC cards. By improving the convenience of transport IC cards, the city hopes to increase use of Kotoden and revitalize the local economy. On November 4, Mayor Ōnishi Hideto tested out using a card at one of the windows at City Hall, and called for expanding use of the system.

The departments accepting IruCa for payments include City Hall’s Civic Affairs Section and Tax Payment Section and the Citizens’ Service Center on the ninth floor of Takamatsu Tenmaya. The card can be used for payment when requesting documents, such as official copies of one’s family register, certificates of residence, and certificates of seal registration.

“As the region’s card, I hope IruCa will take on as many roles as possible in the development of our communities. We at City Hall are doing our part,” said Mayor Ōnishi as he received his certificate of residence.

Kotoden introduced IruCa in February 2005. The card has electronic money functionality, and currently is accepted at about 150 public facilities and restaurants, as well as approximately 130 vending machines for beverages. According to Kotoden, as of the end of last month, approximately 154,000 cards have been issued. Kagawa University has already introduced IruCa-based ID cards for students and campus employees.
The mascot for IruCa is a dolphin.

Vending machine:

Source: Wikipedia

Simplified card readers (typically used at low-volume stations):

Source: Wikipedia
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:35 AM   #554
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Developments at JR Gifu Station accelerating revitalization
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/gif...OYT8T01296.htm

Quote:
Station-side redevelopment projects at the North Exit of JR Gifu Station in Gifu City are proceeding apace. The Toiyamachi Tower Project (37 stories, 136 m) has been announced for Toiyamachi, a district known for its selection of men’s formal wear and women’s fashion, with the new tower to stand opposite Gifu City Tower 43 (163 m). On the other hand, major retail buildings have closed down in the Yanagase shopping district since August, leading some to argue for a revitalization of the consolidated central city area from JR Gifu Station to Yanagase.

“The completion of the new tower will help establish a new standard for urban living and activity,” said Gifu City mayor Hosoe Shigemitsu at the October 29 press conference announcing the Toiyamachi Westside South Block Urban Redevelopment Project, held at a hotel in Gifu City.

The redevelopment project is the result of a long battle. As many as 176 landowners had rights to portions of the site, and the project has taken 20 years since the start of planning efforts. The ultimate lynchpin in obtaining unanimous agreement on the project was the complete sellout of all 243 condominium units in Gifu City Tower 43, completed in September 2007, on the first-day the units were placed on the market. This was the largest urban redevelopment project in the Chūbu Region and the entire nation to receive unanimous agreement.

Kawashima Kazuhiro, head of the city’s Urban Construction Department, recounts that before construction started on City Tower, large development corporations told him that the area outside Gifu Station was “off their radar screen.” With the convenience of being 18-minutes from Nagoya Station on a rapid train, combined with the pleasure of urban living, development firms have now requested to be involved in the division and sale of the approximately 270 units planned for the Toiyamachi Tower. In addition, the Toiyamachi Tower and the 11-story West Tower, connected by a parking structure, will be constructed using Gifu Prefecture’s first implementation of a preferred project agent system, in which a private-sector firm is responsible for construction and disposal of the space, reducing the risk to the local government and the landowners.

The total project cost of ¥16.5 billion, approx. ¥6.4 billion comes from national, prefectural, and municipal government funding sources, with the Redevelopment Union assuming the remainder of the costs. With the involvement of the private sector, most of the investment costs are now covered, with the exception of the Redevelopment Union’s contribution for stores and tenants.

About 1 km away from Gifu Station in the Yanagase area, Gifu Melsa’s Fashion Hall and Gourmet Hall closed in August, and a redevelopment project to build a 34-story tower on the south side of department store Gifu Takasahimaya is running into difficulties.

A redevelopment union was established in September 2002, and was planning to receive approval for the project within the fiscal year, but agreement among the landowners is still at approx. 80 percent. “We’d like to at least reach 90 percent by the end of the year,” says the city’s Urban Construction Department, but unlike the Toiyamachi project, there is no solid prospects prospects for selling floors in the building, engendering uncertainty among many of the rights-holders and delaying unanimous agreement on the project.

In the past few years, new restaurants have opened in Tamamiyachō, Kandamachi, and other neighborhoods along the route from JR Gifu Station to Yanagase, creating new activity. In September of this year, the North Exit plaza at JR Gifu Station was completed, and all the mechanisms were set in place. In order to entice the flow of people one step further into the Yanagase area, new schemes are needed to transform the shopping district into an attractive area.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:36 AM   #555
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

JR Iwamizawa Station wins Good Design Grand Award
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/hok...OYT8T00072.htm

Quote:
At the November 6 selection meeting in central Tōkyō, Iwamizawa City’s Iwamizawa Station and Mixed-Use Building was selected as the winner of the Good Design Grand Award 2009, awarded by the Japan Industrial Design Promotion Organization.

The multi-use station building was constructed by JR Hokkaidō and Iwamizawa City after the old station building was destroyed by fire, and was completed in March of this year. The exterior wall design, which makes use of old train tracks, was the work of a Tōkyō firm selected in a nationwide bidding process. Panel members also praised the launch of projects encouraging public participation, such as engraving residents’ names in the brick walls of the building.

After winning the award in a heated contest with other strong candidates including a hybrid car, city representatives were ecstatic: “We hope it becomes a new symbol of our city and helps revitalize our community.”
Iwamizawa Station is located on the Hakodate Main Line, approx. 35 km away from Sapporo Station. The station is the central station for Iwamizawa City and is served by the Hakodate Main Line and the Muroran Main Line, with approximately 4,800 daily entries (2006).


Source: Wikipedia


Source: Wikipedia

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:38 AM   #556
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

University students help promote Linimo
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/aic...OYT8T01178.htm

Quote:
In order to promote use of the Tōbu Kyūryō Line (Linimo), students in the Policy Studies Department at Nanzan University in Seireichō, Seto City published a magazine highlighting date spots and trendy restaurants along the line.

Twelve students in Policy Studies Associate Professor Ishikawa Yoshio’s Environment Seminar participated in the project, which kicked off in June with third-year student Tomita Noritaka (22yo) as the project manager. The students worked on accumulating data for the magazine, with Yamamoto Kaname (21yo) and Sugimoto Kumiko (21yo) forsaking their summer break to do the editorial work for the magazine starting in mid-August.

During the 2005 Aichi World Expo, ridership on the Linimo averaged 105,000 passengers daily, but after the closure of the exposition, ridership plummeted to 16,500 daily, substantially lower than the 30,000 average daily passengers originally projected.

To encourage more people to use the Linimo, the students looked towards their fellow university classmates and jumped to work on the magazine, which is based on the theme of “romance” and aims to spread awareness of the charm of the Linimo and the surrounding neighborhoods.
Linimo is Japan’s first in-service maglev, opening in 2005, and is driverless.


Source: Wikipedia

Expo Station.

Source: Wikipedia

At Irigaike Kōen Station.

Source: Wikipedia

Linimo train at Yakusa Station, using the crossover to switch back.

Source: pikarail on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:38 AM   #557
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

History of Hankyū and Tōkyū

Short television program (Japanese only) on the history of the most famous private railways in Kansai and Kantō, Hankyū Railway and Tōkyū Corporation. There is lots of historic footage, as well as much information about business diversification and real estate development—for Hankyū, the terminal department store at Umeda Station, the Takarazuka Revue, etc., and for Tōkyū, the development of the Tama Garden City.
Source: hiyahiyahiyanohiyaki on YouTube



quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:39 AM   #558
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Workers clean Okamato Tarō mural at Shibuya Station
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...911070106.html

Quote:
Early in the morning on November 7, work began on cleaning Okamato Tarō’s large mural Asu no Shinwa (“The Myth of Tomorrow”), located in a transfer passage at Shibuya Station in Shibuya Ward, Tōkyō. The mural is 5.5 m tall and 30 m wide and has been on display at the station since November 2008. Under direction from art restoration expert Yoshimura Emile, approximately 20 volunteers used brushes and vacuum machines to clean the mural over two hours, removing the dust accumulated through the year. The work will continue for five days until November 17.
This is one of the more well-known examples of art installation in stations in Japan, as there was a large campaign by several cities to win permanent display of the mural, including Hiroshima City and Nagasaki City (the theme of the mural is related to the atomic bomb). Display rights were eventually awarded to Shibuya Ward in Tōkyō, and the mural was placed inside the corridor connecting JR Shibuya Station and Keiō Shibuya Station.

Art experts may decry the location, as it is not the ideal exhibition space for preserving art, but it seems to fit in quite nicely in the hyper-urban context of Shibuya, much more accessible and intimate than a static glass display in a museum.


Source: ElevenColors on YouTube

Some other recent examples of station art:

Naniwabashi Station on the Keihan Nakanoshima Line has a special Art Area:

Source: AhiruZuki on YouTube

Art with tickets at Sakuragawa Station on the Hanshin Namba Line:

Source: pikarail on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:40 AM   #559
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New Sōtetsu lines bring worries for Yokohama Station’s West Exit
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/ka...102000060.html

Quote:
Sagami Railway (Sōtetsu; HQ: Nishi Ward, Yokohama City) is proceeding with its plan to build new lines that will allow through-service onto JR and Tōkyū Corporation lines and provide direct service to central Tōkyō. In addition to creating a direct connection between central Kanagawa Prefecture and central Tōkyō, the new lines will pass through JR Shin-Yokohama Station, greatly improving access to the Tōkaidō Shinkansen. But while convenience will increase, it’s also expected that users traveling through Yokohama Station on their trips will decrease, with some worried that the project could lead to the decay of the West Exit area at Yokohama Station, Sōtetsu’s “stronghold and home base.”

According to Sōtetsu, a new 2.7 km line will connect its existing network to JR, from Sōtetsu Nishiya Station (Hodogaya Ward, Yokohama City) to Yokohama Hazawa Station (Kanagawa Ward, Yokohama City) on the JR Tōkaidō Cargo Line. Trains would travel via the Tōkaidō Cargo Line, Yokosuka Line, and Saikyō Line to reach Shinjuku and beyond. The line is scheduled to open in April 2015.

For through-service with Tōkyū, Sōtetsu would construct a new 10 km line from Hazawa, traveling underground below JR Shin-Yokohama Station (Kōhoku Ward, Yokohama City) before reaching Hiyoshi Station (Kōhoku Ward, Yokohama City) on the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line. The line is scheduled to open in April 2019. Both new lines would be constructed underground.

Total construction cost is estimated at ¥270 billion, with ¥70 billion for the JR phase and ¥200 billion for the Tōkyū phase. In accordance with the Act on Enhancement of Convenience of Urban Railways, the improvement lead entity in charge of constructing the line and the operational entity (railway operator) in charge of operating the line will be separated.

Funding for the project will be split equally in thirds between the national government, local jurisdictions (Kanagawa Prefecture and Yokohama City), and the Japan Railway Construction, Transport and Technology Agency (JRTT), an independent administrative agency. Sōtetsu and Tōkyū will pay usage fees to operate on the tracks.

Compared to the current route via Yokohama, travel times to central Tōkyō will be reduced, and it’s likely that many passengers bound for central Tōkyō will shift away from the Yokohama route altogether. According to Sōtetsu, the estimated daily users after completion will reach 270,000 for the Tōkyū route and 70,000 for the JR route.

However, some close to the project are particularly worried that the passenger traffic on the Yokohama route will decrease, which could lead to the decay of the West Exit area at Yokohama Station, home to Sōtetsu’s Yokohama terminal. “I can’t deny that there will definitely be at least a temporary decrease in users on this route,” says Numano Keiichi, Managing Executive Officer of Sōtetsu. In particular, passengers who transfer to JR at Yokohama Station are expected to decrease by over 35,000.

“The Main Line is the cornerstone of our network, and the West Exit area is our stronghold and home base,” says Numano. As a countermeasure against the “hollowing out” of the area, Sōtetsu will establish a new “limited express” service, reducing travel time between Ebina and Yokohama by five minutes.

In addition, Sōtetsu is considering creating a “triangle commuter pass,” meaning that even if passengers use the new Tōkyū or JR routes on their journey into central Tōkyō, they can travel through Yokohama Station via the Tōyoko Line or JR lines on the return journey, stopping to shop or do other activities before taking the Sōtetsu Line home from Yokohama. Sōtetsu Group as a whole is also proceeding with redevelopment of the area surrounding the West Exit of the station, with retail facility Sōtetsu Joinus and underground shopping arcade The Diamond scheduled for complete renovation by 2012 and 2013.

With an increasing number of residents returning to the central city, Sōtetsu ridership has been dropping steadily over the past years after reaching a peak in 1995. While the decrease has been halted, ridership is still 10 percent lower than at its peak. Through-service, with direct service into central Tōkyō, surfaced as the solution to break the downward trend. “With the connection of central Kanagawa Prefecture and central Tōkyō, it’s likely that areas along the Sōtetsu lines will experience a revival and see an increase in residents. The project will benefit all of Sōtetsu Group,” says Numano.


From above Hodogaya Ward, Yokohama City:
(1) Sōtetsu Nishiya Station
(2) Yokohama Hazawa Station on the JR Tōkaidō Cargo Line
(3) Shin-Yokohama direction
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2009, 08:44 AM   #560
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

2008 ridership numbers for JR, subway, and major private railways in Tōkyō

Train Media (Kantō Transport Advertisement Council) has released its consolidated 2008 average daily ridership for JR, Toei Subway, and all major / semi-major private railways in the Tōkyō Area:

PDF report (Japanese only)

The following is the summary by line. The JR numbers are always a little weird, as there are a substantial number of trips where the complexity and redundancy of the network allows for multiple route choices. As a result, the numbers for JR are merely a sum of the station entries at each station on the line, regardless of if the station is served by multiple lines. To supplement the JR numbers, I’ve also provided average daily entries at each of JR East’s stations above 100,000 average daily entries.
  • Keihin Electric Express Railway (Keikyū)
    • Main Line: 1,140,101 (+0.6%)
    • Airport Line: 153,368 (+2.2%)
    • Daishi Line: 66,395 (+4.1%)
    • Zushi Line: 42,927 (-0.5%)
    • Kurihama Line: 125,724 (-0.1%)
      TOTAL: 1,216,869 (+0.9%) (passengers using more than one line are only counted once in the total)
  • Tōkyō Metro
    • Ginza Line: 1,051,507 (-2.0%)
    • Marunouchi Line: 1,102,068 (+0.1%)
    • Hibiya Line: 1,119,595 (-1.3%)
    • Tōzai Line: 1,335,177 (+0.8%)
    • Chiyoda Line: 1,142,080 (+2.3%)
    • Yūrakuchō Line: 903,186 (+2.6%)
    • Hanzōmon Line: 854,457 (+0.4%)
    • Namboku Line: 444,059 (+2.5%)
    • Fukutoshin Line: 259,167 (opened June 14, 2008)
      TOTAL: 6,361,012 (+2.3%) (passengers using more than one line are only counted once in the total)
  • Keisei Electric Railway
    • Main Line: 507,646 (+1.2%)
    • Higashi-Narita Line: 1,225 (+1.0%)
    • Oshiage Line: 132,559 (+1.8%)
    • Kanamachi Line: 17,224 (+0.7%)
    • Chiba Line: 39,802 (+1.6%)
    • Chihara Line: 9,739 (+4.9%)
      TOTAL: 708,195 (+1.3%)
  • Tōbu Railway
    • Isesaki Line: 856,910 (+0.4%)
    • Kameido Line: 23,660 (-0.1%)
    • Daishi Line: 8,117 (-10.0%)
    • Sano Line: 4,350 (-2.3%)
    • Koizumi Line: 2,678 (-4.0%)
    • Ōta Line: 129 (+8.9%)
    • Kiryū Line: 3,338 (+1.0%)
    • Nikkō Line: 44,713 (+0.9%)
    • Utsunomiya Line: 12,781 (-1.7%)
    • Kinugawa Line: 3,101 (-0.7%)
    • Noda Line: 454,690 (+0.7%)
    • Tōjō Line: 970,067 (+0.2%)
    • Ogose Line: 19,991 (+1.2%)
      TOTAL: 2,404,611 (+0.3%)
  • Seibu Railway
    • Ikebukuro Line (and branch lines): 901,889 (+1.1%)
    • Shinjuku Line (and branch lines): 971,119 (+0.9%)
      TOTAL: 1,722,689 (+1.0%)
  • Keiō Electric Railway
    • Keiō Line (and branch lines): 1,374,221 (+0.9%)
    • Inokashira Line: 557,918 (+0.3%)
      TOTAL: 1,722,689 (+1.0%)
  • Odakyū Electric Railway
    • Odawara Line: 1,513,404 (+0.5%)
    • Enoshima Line: 375,990 (+0.7%)
    • Tama Line: 75,572 (+5.1%)
      TOTAL: 1,964,966 (+0.7%)
  • Tōkyū Corporation
    • Tōyoko Line: 1,133,051 (+0.4%)
    • Meguro Line: 310,915 (+10.1%)
    • Den’en Toshi Line: 1,189,993 (-1.4%)
    • Ōimachi Line: 401,458 (+2.2%)
    • Ikegami Line: 218, 021 (+1.6%)
    • Tamagawa Line: 141,558 (+1.3%)
    • Kodomo no Kuni Line: 11,141 (+2.7%)
      TOTAL: 2,862,423 (+1.1%) (passengers using more than one line are only counted once in the total)
  • East Japan Railway Company (JR East)
    • Tōkaidō Line (Tōkyō – Hiratsuka): 3,917,721 (+2.2%)
      *Note: Includes portions of the Tōkaidō Main Line, Keihin-Tōhoku Line, Yokosuka Line, and Shōnan-Shinjuku Line
    • Nambu Line: 698,468 (+2.6%)
    • Tsurumi Line: 41,718 (+1.9%)
    • Yokohama Line (Higashi-Kanagawa – Hachiōji): 786,956 (+1.6%)
      *Note: Other portions included in Negishi Line
    • Negishi Line (Yokohama – Ōfuna): 575,370 (+0.4%)
      *Note: Includes portions of the Yokohama Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line
    • Yokosuka Line (Ōfuna – Kurihama): 182,436 (+1.3%)
      *Note: Other portions included in Tōkaidō Line
    • Sagami Line: 90,830 (+3.3%)
    • Chūō Line (Tōkyō – Takao): 3,155,227 (+1.0%)
      *Note: Includes portions of the Chūō Line (rapid) and Chūō – Sōbu Line (local)
    • Musashino Line: 809,540 (+1.8%)
    • Ōme Line (Tachikawa – Okutama): 290,096 (+1.0%)
    • Itsukaichi Line (Haijima – Musashi Itsukaichi): 48,422 (-0.1%)
    • Hachikō Line (Hachiōji – Ogose): 60,553 (+1.5%)
    • Tōhoku Line (Tōkyō – Kurihashi): 3,364,000 (+1.3%)
      *Note: Includes portions of the Keihin-Tōhoku Line, Utsunomiya Line, and Takasaki Line
    • Takasaki Line (Ōmiya – Fukiage): 388,556 (+1.2%)
      *Note: Other portions included in Tōhoku Line
    • Kawagoe Line (Ōmiya – Komagawa): 141,989 (+1.6%)
    • Saikyō Line (Akabane – Ōmiya): 386,493 (+1.8%)
      *Note: Other portions included in Yamanote Line and Akabane Line
    • Jōban Line (Nippori – Ushiku): 1,151,088 (-2.9%)
      *Note: Includes portions of the Jōban Line (rapid) and Jōban Line (local)
    • Narita Line (Abiko – Sakura): 95,471 (-0.1%)
    • Narita Branch Line (Narita – Kuzumi): 9,934 (-2.4%)
    • Narita Airport Line (Narita – Narita Airport): 24,529 (+3.3%)
    • Sōbu Line (Tōkyō – Yachimata): 1,725,529 (+1.2%)
      *Note: Includes portions of the Sōbu Main Line, Sōbu Line (rapid), and Chūō – Sōbu Line (local)
    • Sotobō Line (Chiba – Honda): 267,937 (+1.5%)
    • Uchibō Line (Soga – Hamano): 123,904 (+0.5%)
    • Keiyō Line: 578,562 (+3.4%)
    • Yamanote Line (Tabata – Shinagawa): 3,682,285 (+1.8%)
      *Note: Includes portions of the Yamanote Line, Saikyō Line, and Shōnan-Shinjuku Line
    • Akabane Line (Ikebukuro – Akabane): 745,934 (+1.9%)
      *Note: Part of the Saikyō Line
    • Sōbu Branch Line (Kinshichō – Ochanomizu): 1,148,110 (+2.5%)
      *Note: Part of the Chūō – Sōbu Line (local)
      TOTAL: 14,982,436 (+1.6%)
  • Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation
    • Asakusa Line: 632,555 (+1.4%)
    • Mita Line: 564,380 (+2.5%)
    • Shinjuku Line: 662,950 (+2.5%)
    • Ōedo Line: 796,257 (+1.9%)
      TOTAL: 2,336,931 (+2.0%)
  • Sagami Railway (Sōtetsu)
    • Main Line: 575,574 (-0.6%)
    • Izumino Line: 57,000 (+1.6%)
      TOTAL: 632,574 (-0.4%)
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium