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Old June 20th, 2013, 08:39 PM   #5661
quashlo
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Miyazaki bus card to join nationwide IC card interoperability
全国の鉄道、バスをカバー 宮交バスカ相互利用へ

http://www.the-miyanichi.co.jp/conte...54250&catid=74

As mentioned previously, Miyazaki Prefecture is now the only one of the seven prefectures in Kyūshū to not have any SUGOCA coverage. To help alleviate the issue and to increase transit convenience for locals and visitors, private bus operator Miyazaki Kōtsū has decided to join the nationwide IC card interoperability program. They already have their own IC card, busca (バスカ), so it won’t require a full rollout of a new IC card system. The details have yet to be sorted out with the MLIT and other stakeholders, but this is good news.



A ride on Miyazaki’s version of the tourist shuttle bus. I strongly considered visiting Miyazaki my last trip, but the rail service is incredibly sparse.

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Old June 20th, 2013, 08:41 PM   #5662
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Sendai Subway 1000 series last run on 2013.06.28
仙台市地下鉄南北線の車両改造が完了へ…1000系ラストランは6月28日

http://response.jp/article/2013/06/20/200488.html

On 2013.06.20, the Sendai City Transportation Bureau announced that they have completed refurbishment of the Namboku Line 1000 series fleet, and that the last official “1000 series” set will make its final run later this month on 2013.06.28.

The 1000 series began operation with the opening of the Namboku Line in 1987, starting with 76 cars total (19 4-car sets), with an additional two sets two being added by 1996 to increase capacity and serve new extensions. Since 2003, the Bureau has been carrying out a rehab plan, including conversion from chopper controls to VVVF inverters, replacement of destination signs and passenger information displays to LED units, installation of AC units, and other measures. Sets have been rehabbed at the pace of several trains a year, and have designated “1000N series”, but work on the entire fleet has now been completed marking the official end of the “1000 series” designation. Of course, visually, there’s not really much difference.

Scenes from the Namboku Line:

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Old June 20th, 2013, 08:44 PM   #5663
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Coordination with Asakusa Line bypass would reduce costs for Tsukuba Express extension
TX・都心直結線の新東京駅 同時着工なら費用圧縮

http://ibarakinews.jp/news/news.php?...13716516047761

On 2013.06.19, it was revealed that a cost analysis by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) indicates that coordination between the Tsukuba Express extension to Tōkyō Station and the new Asakusa Line bypass (i.e., Central Tōkyō Link 都心直通線) connecting Haneda and Narita Airports—by constructing the new platforms at Tōkyō Station (what they are calling “Shin-Tōkyō Station” 新東京駅) for both lines simultaneously at the same location—could keep station construction costs down to ¥180 billion, a savings of ¥20 billion to ¥90 billion when compared to constructing the two stations separately.

Specifically, constructing the TX and Central Tōkyō Link stations separately would cost anywhere from ¥200 billion to ¥270 billion, while simultaneous, coordinated construction would bring the costs down to ¥180 billion and the schedule down to 10 years, maximizing cost and schedule savings.

As we already know, the planned Tōkyō Station platforms for the Central Tōkyō Link will be located 40 m under Marunouchi Naka-dōri (丸の内仲通り), in close proximity to JR Tōkyō Station, the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line’s Nijūbashi Station, and adjacent towers including the Marunouchi Building. The proposed location is the same place identified as the preferred location for the TX platforms.

The MLIT has estimated that a TX extension, with a station underneath Marunouchi Naka-dōri, would pencil out as long as daily ridership on the TX breaks 270,000 passengers (which it already has). Ibaraki and Chiba Prefectures are pushing for the proposal, but the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government has been more cautious.

This would not be a first for the area around Tōkyō Station... If I remember correctly, the infrastructure for the Toei Mita Line and Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line was similarly built simultaneously.

Mt. Fuji at sunset from TX Moriya Station:

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Old June 21st, 2013, 05:42 PM   #5664
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That raises all sorts of questions in my mind.

Naka Dori is not that wide, perhaps 25m? Short of buying up some of the most expensive real estate in the world, that's all they will have to work with. I really wonder what sort of configuration they will end up with. Throw in the TX and this is shaping up to be a complicated station, at least a double decker configuration. If the Asakusa line bypass will need more than a single island platform it could be bigger still since this could grow into a three-level behemoth. Who would get "top billing" closest to the surface, TX or Asakusa Bypass? Any possibility of further south extention of TX? Is there any logical destination through connection? (Rinkai? Tokyu Ikegami?)
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Old June 21st, 2013, 05:54 PM   #5665
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
That raises all sorts of questions in my mind.

Is there any logical destination through connection? (Rinkai? Tokyu Ikegami?)
Tokyu Ikegami operates with 18m 3 door stock in 3 car trains and has numerous grade crossings at stations.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 07:41 PM   #5666
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Speaking of Rinkai, why not connect TX into the proposed Tokyo Freight Terminal-Haneda line?

Have the portal be somewhere around Tamachi, and connect the tracks into the Northern yard leads, the ones next to the Shinkansen. (do those tracks actually connect to anything, or do they just peter out?)

Combining this with the Keihin Rinkai project to Yokohama and the Tokyo Rinkai-Keiyo-Sobu connector, you can have a balanced service with two northern termini and two southern termini.

btw-has anyone heard anything about the Keio Sagamihara Line extension?

Is it to be surface or what?
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Old June 21st, 2013, 08:01 PM   #5667
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bill937ca View Post
Tokyu Ikegami operates with 18m 3 door stock in 3 car trains and has numerous grade crossings at stations.
Guess that one's out! Lol.
The Oimachi line would be a better match from that perspective, but at any rate, almost certainly there is not enough demand for a southward TX extension. Not for now anyway.

However with the Chuo Shinkansen planned to terminate at Shinagawa, perhaps extensions such as the TX would begin to make sense, at least as far as Shinagawa. Or perhaps even through-running for the Tohoku and Tokaido Shinkansen, so passengers coming from Tohoku, Nagano(Hokuriku), or Joetsu Shinkansen can gain a transfer directly to the Chuo Shinkansen.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 08:23 PM   #5668
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
If the Asakusa line bypass will need more than a single island platform it could be bigger still since this could grow into a three-level behemoth.
It would appear that they are only looking at a single island platform. Given that they are only aiming for 10 tph peak on the bypass, this will probably be sufficient, if maybe not 100% ideal.


Source

The study mentioned in the article doesn't appear to be have been published online (at least not yet), so I don't think we have any more details about their assumptions regarding the combined station. Based on ridership, I think we can expect the TX station to serve more passengers, so it may make more sense to have the bypass at the lower platform level.

I think any further extensions of TX past Shin-Tōkyō are probably beyond "pie-in-the-sky" at the moment... If we ignore all that, though, I personally like the idea of bringing it west and having it tie into the proposed deep tunnels that would bring the Keiyō Line underneath central Tōkyō and connect into the Chūō Rapid Line at Mitaka. It creates a new regional cross-Tōkyō link that doesn't already exist (there's so many lines running north-south via the east side of the Yamanote Loop already, not to mention the Tōhoku Through Line) and it won't require much new construction.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 08:24 PM   #5669
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JR West publishes details on Nara Line double-tracking

A bit more news on this after JR West’s president announced the project at his June regular press conference:
http://www.westjr.co.jp/press/articl...page_3962.html

First, a bit of background… Ridership on the Nara Line in 1990 was a mere 20,900 boardings daily, but the number has now grown to almost twice (52,000 boardings), and three times what it was when JNR was dissolved and JR West formed, bolstered by gradual capacity and service improvements including the launch of rapid services, the opening of Rokujizō Station and JR Fujimori Station, partial double-tracking and establishment of the Miyako-ji rapid service, and the addition of Tōfukuji Station as a rapid stop.



As part of the proposed conversion of 14.0 km of the line to new double-track, they will also be carrying out several other key improvements, including platform improvements at Kyōto and Rokujizō.

At Kyōto, they will widen Platforms 8 / 9 from the current 5.5 m to as much as 9.5 m and install new escalators in both directions and a stairwell connecting into the existing platform bridge / elevated concourse at the station, making it easier to change trains and alleviating platform congestion at the west end. Currently, there is no direct connection to the platform bridge, so it can take about 130 seconds for passengers to get from Platforms 8 / 9 to the platform bridge—this will now be reduced to half (70 seconds).



At Rokujizō, the current platforms are located on a curve, resulting in a large gap between the platform and the train floor and necessitating a sloped platform. The double-tracking will mean that they can now shift the platform west towards Kyōto, eliminating the slope and reducing the gap with the train floor.



In terms of other improvements, they will also modify the track layout at Tanakura Station to provide one through track and implement grade crossing safety improvements, specifically installing new 3D laser radar obstruction detection devices and new signaling systems that will modify the gate closure time based on the type of train (stopping or passing).

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Old June 21st, 2013, 08:35 PM   #5670
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Regarding the diagram, on the right we have regular Tokyo Station, followed by the Yokosuka line platforms, followed by the Marunouchi line, the deep Bypass route, and the Chiyoda line on the far left?

Why are there so many tracks for the Chiyoda line? It looks like five there.

Wait a minute-that's the Chiyoda and Mita lines running parallel. Holy shit. Still doesn't explain the fifth track-space, though.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 09:47 PM   #5671
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"Arbitrary" empty space. As I said previously, the Mita Line and Chiyoda Line were constructed simultaneously:

Chiyoda Line: Ōtemachi ‒ Kasumigaseki section opened 1971.03.20
Mita Line: Hibiya ‒ Sugamo section opened 1972.06.30

Part of the reason all those stations underneath Hibiya-dōri look so messy (Ōtemachi / Nijūbashi-mae / Hibiya) is probably because they had to shift the Chiyoda Line and Mita Line platforms to stay within the ROW underneath the street:



So it's likely just an arbitrary representation of the dead space between the Chiyoda Line tracks north of Nijūbashi-mae, where the northbound track has to shift east to create space for the Mita Line platforms at Ōtemachi.

Of course, these were constructed such a long time ago that there's nothing about it online, but I would be very surprised if this was not the case.
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 07:22 PM   #5672
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Astram Line extension will require steep grades
アストラム延伸は軌道急勾配

http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201306220033.html

Some additional details regarding the planned extension of the Astram Line from its current terminus at Kōiki Kōen-mae (広域公園前) (Asa Minami Ward, Hiroshima City) to JR Nishi-Hiroshima Station (西広島) (Nishi Ward, Hiroshima City) were revealed at an open Q&A session held during a general meeting of the City Council on 2013.06.21. There are three alignments are consideration, but all will pass through mountainous terrain, and the city’s Transportation Bureau has already consulted with the railcar manufacturer regarding track grades.

Potential extension options beyond JR Nishi-Hiroshima Station include the Industrial Center (商工センター) in Nishi Ward and Itsukaichi in Saeki Ward. According to the Transportation Bureau, all options would require steep grades if designed as straight-line alignments. Adding distance on these segments would reduce the grades, but also increase project cost.

Currently, the two steepest sections on the line are at 4.5% grade, including the section between Tomo (伴) and Chōrakuji (長楽寺). Expanding scope to all of Japan’s AGT systems, the Saitama New Shuttle has a location with 5.9% grade. Hiroshima City has consulted with the railcar manufacturer to determine if it’s possible to increase power and brake efficiency to allow the line to negotiate even steeper grades.



4x time lapse of the Astram Line (2013.06.06):



As for the New Shuttle, I suspect the steep grades are probably in / out of Ōmiya Station, where the line dives underneath the JR viaduct:

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Old June 22nd, 2013, 07:24 PM   #5673
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Nagoya City Council to study potential LRT between Nagoya Sakation and Sakae
名古屋市議会が路面電車導入検討へ

http://www.chunichi.co.jp/article/ai...202000044.html

At a Nagoya City Council Q&A session on 2013.06.21, the chief of the city’s Bureau of Housing and Urban Planning (住宅都市局) indicated that the city intends to evaluate the potential for introducing a modern, low-floor streetcar (i.e., LRT) as a possible means of strengthening connections between the Nagoya Station area and the Sakae district, taking advantage of the city’s wide streets (this connection is already provided on the subway by the Higashiyama Line).

Also mentioned separately in the same article, the city’s Transportation Bureau said that it will consider adding extending out the schedule for the last trains to provide more late-night service on some of its lines, including the Higashiyama Line. One of the council members had asked about extending service on the Higashiyama Line to 12:30 AM on high-ridership days (Friday and Saturday), citing efforts to initiate 24-hour service in Tōkyō. While the Transportation Bureau chief said a wholesale extension across the whole network would be difficult, a limited extension for certain days of the week and on certain lines may be possible.

Currently, the schedule is designed so that the last trains of the day reach their terminal by 12:30 AM. The last Higashiyama Line departures from Sakae are at 12:16 AM, bound for Iwatsuka (inbound) and Hoshigaoka (outbound).
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 07:25 PM   #5674
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According to this article, JR East has indicated interest in becoming the private operator of Sendai Airport, which is scheduled to become the first airport in Japan with privatized operations (followed by the likes of Hiroshima, Takamatsu, and Shizuoka Airports). An interesting development, but they do have some stiff competition, including Mitsubishi Corporation (三菱商事) and Mitsui Fudōsan (三井不動産), as well as distribution firms and banks. Currently, JR East has a 5.04% share in the airport’s third-sector railway link, Sendai Airport Transit (仙台空港鉄道). As far as I can tell, this would be a first for JR East and the Japanese railway industry, if JR East is selected.
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 07:27 PM   #5675
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SAPICA now accepted on Sapporo trams, buses
札幌市電とバスもサピカで楽々 キタカも利用拡大

http://www.hokkaido-np.co.jp/news/topic/475155.html

Coverage of the Sapporo Municipal Subway’s IC card system, SAPICA, was expanded to Sapporo’s trams and buses starting yesterday (2013.06.22). Usage appeared to be good, especially given that passengers can now get the same discounts when transferring between the tram and subway enjoyed by passengers paying with cash. Kitaca and the other 9 card systems participating in the nationwide interoperability program can also now be used on Sapporo’s subways, trams, and buses, although this is only a one-way interoperability at the moment—SAPICA won’t be accepted outside of its “home territory”, and doesn’t have interoperability with Kitaca within Sapporo.

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Old June 22nd, 2013, 09:08 PM   #5676
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Straightning the Mita/Chiyoda corridor out the is actually one of the first major projects that would start as quickly as possible if Toei and Tokyo Metro merged.
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 09:23 PM   #5677
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
Straightning the Mita/Chiyoda corridor out the is actually one of the first major projects that would start as quickly as possible if Toei and Tokyo Metro merged.
What would that entail?

Configuring for express/local?

skip-stop?
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 08:03 PM   #5678
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I would be very surprised if they did anything... The setup currently, while not ideal, isn't really that bad either. The public passages underground are all interconnected, so there isn't even a need to allow Tōkyō Metro passengers access to Toei paid areas (or vice versa) like they did at Kōrakuen / Kasuga.
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Old June 25th, 2013, 07:57 PM   #5679
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Kita-Kyūshū City announces plan for new soccer stadium at Kokura Station
小倉駅北に競技場建設表明、J2北九州新本拠地に

http://kyushu.yomiuri.co.jp/news/nat...OYS1T00713.htm

There were some mumblings about this previously, but this proposal finally has some steam behind it after the city formally expressed their intention to build a new 15,000-seat soccer stadium near the North Exit of Kokura Station, the city’s main train station, to serve as the home arena of the city’s J2 League franchise (Giravanz Kita-Kyūshū). Target completion date is FY2016. They originally envisioned a 20,000-seat stadium, with seats jutting out over the water, but they have since downsized the project to save on costs. Still, this should be a huge boon for Kokura Station, one of the most important stations in Fukuoka.

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Old June 25th, 2013, 07:58 PM   #5680
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Public passage and elevated concourse at Hatsukaichi Station to be completed in 2016
廿日市駅自由通路が16年完成

http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201306250026.html

Hatsukaichi City will sign an MOU with JR West’s Hiroshima office to construct a north-south public passage at JR Hatsukaichi Station starting next fiscal year. Construction-level design will be finished before the end of this fiscal year, with completion in late March 2016. The 80 m long, 6 m wide public passage will span the San’yō Main Line tracks, and will come with accessibility improvements (an elevator at each end), plus restrooms at the north end. Project cost is approx. ¥631 million.

In conjunction with the new public passage, JR West will construct an elevated concourse at the station, requiring them to construct a temporary headhouse with faregates at the south side of the station while they work to build the new station building. The city will also fund approx. ¥700 million for these improvements.

The area around the station is experiencing a bit of a resurgence thanks to redevelopment, with construction already underway on a land readjustment project on 16.2 ha at the north side of the station to create a new residential neighborhood. The North Exit is planned to have a 3,300 sq m station plaza, including an accessible pick-up / drop-off zone and a bus terminal. Meanwhile, the city will also expand the existing station plaza at the South Exit to three times its current size, relocating the city-operated bike parking facility to a site formerly used as for auto parking. The North Exit and South Exit station plazas are scheduled for completion in FY2016.



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