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Old August 10th, 2013, 02:55 PM   #5881
Blackraven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Platform door installation on Yūrakuchō Line nearing completion
That's great news

Quote:
The other big news related to platform doors is that testing will begin soon for the first of three experimental platform door designs devised in an effort to combat some of the logistics and cost issues related to the standard platform door installations. In particular, the need for platform reinforcement and other work can cause the cost to increase substantially to several hundred million or several billion yen. Current designs are also not suited to the flexibility in rolling stock design and layout that is needed in most of Japan’s urban rail operations, nor to the narrow widths of legacy platforms.

The first testing will begin late this month at Shin-Tokorozawa Station on the Seibu Railway, involving a “smart” platform door that can adapt to door positions based on the type of rolling stock used—perfect for Seibu, which has perhaps the most fleet variety of any major private railway in Tōkyō, including 3- and 4-door stock. This will be followed by a wire-type design at Tsukimino Station on the Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line to begin testing in September, and a bar-type design at Yayoidai Station on the Sagami Railway in October. Testing of all three types will last one year, after which the MLIT will evaluate their impact on train operations.
Quote:
Currently, about 564 of Japan’s approximately 9,500 stations nationwide are outfitted with platform doors as of the end of March 2013.
9,500 divided by 564 puts it at around 15-16 percent

A long way to go indeed BUT AT LEAST they're getting there.

I hope that I'll still be alive when the day comes where ALL train stations in Japan will have these doors and gates.

P.S.
With that said, I think MLIT can implement the scheme with regards to AIRPORT RAIL TRAIN STATIONS.

Tokyo Monorail was a start......hopefully other Airport Rail stations in the country will install those doors and gates as well.

Question: How many airport rail stations are there in Japan? And out of that number, how many already have doors and gates?
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Old August 10th, 2013, 05:07 PM   #5882
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Higashi-Murayama grade-separation to break ground in FY2014
14年度着工へ準備進む/東京都・西武鉄道の東村山駅付近連立

http://www.kensetsunews.com/?p=17925

The Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and Seibu Railway are aiming to obtain urban planning approvals for the Seibu Railway Shinjuku Line / Kokubunji Line / Seibu-en Line (Higashi-Murayama Station) Continuous Grade-Separation Project in FY2013. This project involves grade-separating about 4.5 km across these three Seibu lines surrounding Higashi-Murayama Station in Higashi-Murayama City in western Tōkyō. Detailed design and engineering has been contracted out to Seibu Railway and was awarded to Fukken Engineering (復建エンジニヤリング), Tōnichi Consultants (トーニチコンサルタント), and Tōkyū Architects & Engineers (東急設計コンサルタント). Seibu Railway will also be awarding the contracts for construction, with groundbreaking starting as early as FY2014 if land acquisition proceeds apace.

In terms of schedule, preparatory construction work will take place first, lasting about one year, with construction of temporary tracks and the new viaducts beginning in the second year. Construction of the temporary tracks will last about seven years, with the viaduct taking about 11, for a total of about 12 years (FY2024 completion). Total project cost is ¥61 billion.

Specifically, the TMG will serve as the lead agency for the project, which will elevate about 2.3 km of the Shinjuku Line, 0.8 km of the Kokubunji Line, and 1.4 km of the Seibu-En Line, eliminating five grade crossings including Fuchū Kaidō (府中街道), alleviating traffic congestion, reconnecting neighborhoods separated by the rail lines, and constructing new roads. The new elevated structures will be 7 m wide and 5-12 m tall for the Seibu-en Line, and 10 m wide and 5-15 m tall for the Shinjuku Line. The approaches will be about 10 m wide for the Shinjuku Line and about 7 m wide for the Kokubunji Line and Seibu-en Line. The new elevated Higashi-Murayama Station will be 31-43 m wide and 17 m tall, with two island platforms and four tracks stretching approx. 210 m in length.

The current construction plan envisions three phases for the Shinjuku Line, with the first stage involving construction of temporary (ground-level) tracks to the north, switching first the inbound, then the outbound track. The second phase will involve demolition of the original (ground-level) outbound track and construction of the new (elevated) outbound track, while the third phase will be the same process for the inbound track. A two-stage process is envisioned for the Kokubunji Line and Seibu-en Line, with the first phase involving construction of temporary (ground-level) tracks to the west for the Kokubunji Line and to the north for the Seibu-en Line. The second phase will then construct the permanent elevated tracks for both lines and execute the switchout. The station will be completed in six phases, with the first three involving elevation of the outbound tracks and platforms for the Shinjuku Line, followed by the elevation of the Kokubunji Line and Seibu-en Line (fourth phase), elevation of the inbound tracks and platforms for the Shinjuku Line (fifth phase), and demolition of existing infrastructure and structural groundwork (sixth phase).





===

Seibu 3000 series departing Higashi-Murayama Station:

Regarding the station: There are currently six tracks, with four devoted to the Shinjuku line, a separate island platform (1/2) for the Kokobunji line, and the Seibuen line sharing track three to branch off of the Shinjuku line. These are being reduced to four tracks. Where is the capacity going to be reduced? Is this related to the plans to close the various lines in this area by Cerberus?
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Old August 10th, 2013, 08:04 PM   #5883
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
That's great news
9,500 divided by 564 puts it at around 15-16 percent
It's less than that... It's not really "stations" but "platforms" that matter.
The counting methodology isn't sophisticated enough to distinguish between those two, as I believe the 9,500 is likely stations with unique names. So even if one platform gets platform doors, it gets counted for the entire station.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Question: How many airport rail stations are there in Japan? And out of that number, how many already have doors and gates?
Around half. I only listed the ones directly serving the airport, but there are also airports where the closest station is less than 2 km away, although most, if not all, of them wouldn't have platform doors.

Code:
Shin-Chitose Airport       JR Chitose Line                   No

Sendai Airport             Sendai Airport Transit            No

Narita Airport
  Terminal 1               JR Narita Line / Sōbu Rapid Line  No
                           Keisei Narita Sky Access Line     No
                           Keisei Main Line                  No
  Terminal 2               JR Narita Line / Sōbu Rapid Line  No
                           Keisei Narita Sky Access Line     No
                           Keisei Main Line                  No

Haneda Airport
  International Terminal   Keikyū Airport Line               Yes
                           Tōkyō Monorail                    Yes
  Domestic Terminal        Keikyū Airport Line               Yes
  Domestic Terminal 1      Tōkyō Monorail                    Yes
  Domestic Terminal 2      Tōkyō Monorail                    Yes

Chūbu Centrair             Meitetsu Airport Line             Yes

Ōsaka Airport              Ōsaka Monorail                    Fence only

Kansai Airport             Nankai Airport Line               No
                           JR Kansai Airport Line            No

Kōbe Airport               Kōbe New Transit Port Liner       Yes

Yonago Airport             JR Sakai Line                     No

Fukuoka Airport            Fukuoka City Subway Airport Line  Yes

Miyazaki Airport           JR Miyazaki Airport Line          No

Naha Airport               Okinawa Urban Monorail (YuiRail)  Yes
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Old August 10th, 2013, 08:13 PM   #5884
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
Is this related to the plans to close the various lines in this area by Cerberus?
No.

Seibu-en Line is only 3 tph off-peak, 4 tph peak.
Kokubunji Line is 6 tph off-peak, 8 tph peak.

Some simple optimization of the schedule and capacity shouldn't be an issue. If it is, the obvious solution would be to just interline the Seibu-en Line and Kokubunji Line since they have similar rolling stock formation (4 or 6 cars).
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Old August 11th, 2013, 07:55 AM   #5885
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Testing of 10490F, the new 10-300 series unit for the Toei Shinjuku Line that basically looks like a Jōban Local Line E233 series, was conducted on 2013.08.07 and 2013.08.08. On the first day, the itinerary was Ōshima ‒ Shinjuku ‒ Ōshima. Here's some scenes from the second day, when the train did Ōshima ‒ Shinjuku ‒ Moto-Yawata ‒ Ōshima.

At Ōshima Station, with a peek inside the operator cab and passenger sections:



At Higashi-Ōshima Station:

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Old August 11th, 2013, 10:04 PM   #5886
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There’s a post on The Atlantic Cities that questions the utility of Tōkyō’s axonometric station diagrams:
http://www.theatlanticcities.com/com...y-system/6485/

A somewhat silly question to ask… Of course, some people aren’t good at visualizing things in 3D, so they won’t find this useful, but that doesn’t mean the diagrams lack value. For the rest of us, these layouts are convenient ways of finding the correct exits and passages to take, as well as identifying accessible routes.

The stations cited, basically a collection of Tōkyō Metro and Toei Subway’s largest interchanges. Click for larger size.

Ōtemachi



Akasaka Mitsuke / Nagatachō



Ginza



Ikebukuro



Kasumigaseki



Iidabashi



Tameike–Sannō / Kokkai Gijidō-mae



Shibuya



Shinjuku Sanchōme

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Old August 11th, 2013, 10:05 PM   #5887
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One thing that hasn’t been done (perhaps my next project when things quiet down a bit?) is consolidated station maps that combine all the operators into one graphic… Most of the time, the operators only produce these types of maps for their parts of the stations—in some ways, that’s a good thing, as it keeps things simple… If you’re transferring to another operator, for example, you only need to find the callouts in the graphic for that operator. However, it’d still be interesting to see a scale 3D model of some of the more complex stations… Jorudan has some consolidated maps drawn out, but they’re very rudimentary. They also didn’t do ones for Nanba or Ōsaka / Umeda, both of which should among the largest in Japan.

Tōkyō



Shinjuku



Shibuya



Ikebukuro



Ueno



Shinagawa



Shinbashi



Nagoya



Kyōto



Sannomiya

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Old August 11th, 2013, 10:16 PM   #5888
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Absolutely fascinating. I really love the Tokyo metro diagrams myself, found them invaluable in the larger stations when I was there.
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Old August 12th, 2013, 01:49 AM   #5889
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
It's less than that... It's not really "stations" but "platforms" that matter.
The counting methodology isn't sophisticated enough to distinguish between those two, as I believe the 9,500 is likely stations with unique names. So even if one platform gets platform doors, it gets counted for the entire station.
Hmm......interesting.

So in that case, should we assume a higher or a lower number? (for the actual total I mean)

Quote:
Around half. I only listed the ones directly serving the airport, but there are also airports where the closest station is less than 2 km away, although most, if not all, of them wouldn't have platform doors.

Code:
Shin-Chitose Airport       JR Chitose Line                   No

Sendai Airport             Sendai Airport Transit            No

Narita Airport
  Terminal 1               JR Narita Line / Sōbu Rapid Line  No
                           Keisei Narita Sky Access Line     No
                           Keisei Main Line                  No
  Terminal 2               JR Narita Line / Sōbu Rapid Line  No
                           Keisei Narita Sky Access Line     No
                           Keisei Main Line                  No

Haneda Airport
  International Terminal   Keikyū Airport Line               Yes
                           Tōkyō Monorail                    Yes
  Domestic Terminal        Keikyū Airport Line               Yes
  Domestic Terminal 1      Tōkyō Monorail                    Yes
  Domestic Terminal 2      Tōkyō Monorail                    Yes

Chūbu Centrair             Meitetsu Airport Line             Yes

Ōsaka Airport              Ōsaka Monorail                    Fence only

Kansai Airport             Nankai Airport Line               No
                           JR Kansai Airport Line            No

Kōbe Airport               Kōbe New Transit Port Liner       Yes

Yonago Airport             JR Sakai Line                     No

Fukuoka Airport            Fukuoka City Subway Airport Line  Yes

Miyazaki Airport           JR Miyazaki Airport Line          No

Naha Airport               Okinawa Urban Monorail (YuiRail)  Yes
50% is not bad. That's a great start

With that said, with technology and economies of scale, the implementation for the rest of those lines should not have as much as problem (well compared to a decade ago at least)

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Old August 12th, 2013, 02:15 PM   #5890
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the most high-tech public transportation in the world = its Japan.
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Old August 12th, 2013, 05:15 PM   #5891
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I like the GranRoof a lot. The membrane material is definitely better than glass as it does not heat up the pedestrian sidewalk and it is lighter. The only possible problem may be it is too high to shelter the people walking on the sidewalk on the ground level from the rain.

I find no problem reading those layout maps. Probably people bad at maps and direction would find them difficult to read but no matter how they draw it does not help.
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Old August 12th, 2013, 06:07 PM   #5892
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Yūrakuchō Line extension to Sumiyoshi could pay itself off within 30 years
豊洲~住吉間の地下鉄新線「30年以内に黒字化」

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNAS...00C13A8MM0000/

In regards to a proposed new subway extension running north-south through Kōtō Ward between Toyosu and Sumiyoshi, a study by Kōtō Ward indicates that the project could completely pay for itself 29 years after opening assuming a ¥70 fare surcharge. In order to be eligible for funding from the national government under the Act on Improving the Convenience of Urban Railways (都市鉄道等利便増進法), the project must be able to pay for itself within 30 years, so this latest study marks a big step forward for the proposed extension. Kōtō Ward hopes to finalize project details this fiscal year and begin work in FY2015, with completion in FY2025.

Specifically, this project involves a new 5.2 km subway line between Toyosu on the Yūrakuchō Line and Sumiyoshi on the Hanzōmon Line via Tōyōchō Station on the Tōzai Line, to be constructed as “Tōkyō Subway Line 8” (the planning name for what has been mostly built today as the Yūrakuchō Line). Two new intermediate stations would be constructed, one between Toyosu and Tōyōchō and another between Tōyōchō and Sumiyoshi. The project would be constructed by a third-sector railway receiving funding from Kōtō Ward and other sources, with Tōkyō Metro responsible for operating the line. The subway will improve access to Tōkyō’s booming waterfront district while relieving overcrowding on the Tōzai Line.

Thus far, Kōtō Ward has been discussing how to move the project forward, bringing in representatives from the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and national government. In addition to round-trip runs between Toyosu and Sumiyoshi, it’s expected that a portion of trips will also through-service with the Yūrakuchō Line. Forecasted daily ridership is 290,000 passengers, and a fare surcharge of ¥70 on top of Tōkyō Metro’s fare would be sufficient to pay off all debt incurred in the construction of the project 29 years after opening.

Estimated project cost is ¥126 billion. Under the Act on Improving the Convenience of Urban Railways, Kōtō Ward would be responsible for one-third of the project’s cost, the TMG and national government another third, and the final third covered by infrastructure lease fees paid by the third-sector railway.

The next steps involve hammering out the details of the project, including the exact location of intermediate stations and the infrastructure necessary to collect the fare surcharge. Kōtō Ward will then sign agreements with both the national government and the TMG and file for project approvals with the national government, beginning land acquisition in FY2015.



===

Pretty big news… I had no idea this project was so far along, but it looks like they are literally within steps of breaking ground and have decided to move forward on their own, without help from Tōkyō Metro, which said that it has no plans to open new lines after opening the Fukutoshin Line in 2008.

Specifically, the study mentioned in the article is available here:
http://www.city.koto.lg.jp/seikatsu/...4summeryA1.pdf
http://www.city.koto.lg.jp/seikatsu/...24summeryB.pdf

In particular, some interesting details about the project:

Major trackside developments
Toyosu / Harumi Development Plan (豊洲・晴海開発整備計画): 44,000 residents, 83,000 jobs, completion FY2015
Toyosu 1-3-chōme Urban Planning Policy (豊洲1~3丁目地区まちづくり方針): 22,000 residents, 33,000 jobs, completion FY2021
Waterfront Subcenter Urban Planning Implementation Plan (臨海副都心まちづくり推進計画): 47,000 residents, 90,000 jobs, completion FY2015
Shiomi District Urban Planning Policy (潮見地区まちづくり方針): 11,000 residents, 8,000 jobs, completion FY2018
Toyosu New Market / Tsukiji Market Relocation (provisional name) (豊洲新市場): 6 million annual visitors, completion FY2015
Tōkyō Sky Tree Town (東京スカイツリータウン): 30 million annual visitors, completion FY2012

So clearly, there’s a lot of potential… The population explosion in the waterfront areas (Toyosu / Harumi) is amazing, and should generate some of the steady ridership demand needed to make the line viable.

Conceptual service plan
Sumiyoshi ↔ Toyosu: 8 tph peak, 4 tph off-peak
Sumiyoshi ↔ Ichigaya: 4 tph peak, 4 tph off-peak

Peak-hour trains:



The plan envisions all trains to be 10-car formations, operated as one-man trains (i.e., operator only, no conductor). Due to track capacity issues on the Hanzōmon Line and the limited capacity to turn back trains at Oshiage Station, the plan does not consider through-service with the Hanzōmon Line. Ichigaya was selected as the turnback for the Yūrakuchō Line through-services because most of the ridership for this new line will be heading to and from the central three wards (都心3区) of Tōkyō (Chiyoda, Chūō, and Minato). Other potential turnback locations would be Ikebukuro and Wakō-shi, but they envision Ichigaya for now because it’s the closest to the central three wards.

Two new stations will be constructed (in addition to new platforms at Tōyōchō):

ST1 will be located 1.4 km from Toyosu and 1.8 km from Tōyōchō. Based on the distances and map provided, it appears to be in Edagawa 3-chōme (枝川3丁目).
ST3 will be located 1.0 km from Tōyōchō and 1.0 km from Sumiyoshi. Looks like this one will be in Sengoku 2-chōme (千石2丁目).

The cost for the project also includes railyard (I assume they will just be leasing space at an existing Tōkyō Metro yard or similar arrangement), plus the cost to make the necessary upgrades to existing stations at Toyosu and Sumiyoshi. Also included are platform doors and flood gates. Construction will be cut-and-cover for stations, double-track or single-track bored tunnels for everything else (except for parts of the line between Toyosu and the first station to be constructed as cut and cover). A crossover will also be constructed just north of ST3 to allow them to turn trains back at Sumiyoshi.
It seems that with regards to frequency on these two branches of the Yurakucho line, they are prioritizing existing service to Shin-Kiba instead of the new extension to Sumiyoshi. I suppose this makes sense: Shin-Kiba is an important connection to the Keiyo line.

At Sumiyoshi it seems that there a space unused space to add center tracks to accommodate this extension. But, at Toyosu, a couple years ago they filled in the spot where the Yurakucho line tracks were supposed to go. Are they just going to open that space back up? Or are there other plans?

On a related subject regarding Metro Seven/Eight Liner: this might make sense or also might be completely stupid. If the technology used by Metro Seven is compatible with the Yurakucho Line, how about filling the 3km gap between Shin-Kiba and Kasai Rinkai Koen, and linking the lines together? This would also open the door for a connection from Metro Seven to the Rinkai Line.

By the way your PDF map is fantastic. That must have taken a long time - I especailly like that it is drawn to scale. Back to Metro Seven/Eight Liner, if plans become more concrete, it will be interesting to see how they will connect it with existing lines. It seems that on your map, you have chosen to "squiggle" the line to cross beneath existing stations on the radial lines, but the other possibilities would be: (1) build new stations on the radial lines, where the gap is large like the Tobu Tojo line or Tsukuba Express, (2) make the connection with a walkway where the gap is small like Hachimanyama or Aoto, (3) don't make a direct connection at all, where ridership or transfer potential is low (your map suggests skipping a connection with the Nanboku line.)

Last edited by orulz; August 12th, 2013 at 11:16 PM.
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Old August 14th, 2013, 12:07 AM   #5893
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Old August 14th, 2013, 09:40 AM   #5894
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
It seems that with regards to frequency on these two branches of the Yurakucho line, they are prioritizing existing service to Shin-Kiba instead of the new extension to Sumiyoshi. I suppose this makes sense: Shin-Kiba is an important connection to the Keiyo line.

At Sumiyoshi it seems that there a space unused space to add center tracks to accommodate this extension. But, at Toyosu, a couple years ago they filled in the spot where the Yurakucho line tracks were supposed to go. Are they just going to open that space back up? Or are there other plans?
Yes, I think the idea is they would tear it up again... The Japanese Wiki says it's designed to be easily demolished in the future. I think the growth in Toyosu, Ariake, Odaiba, etc. just overwhelmed the station, so they needed to do some quick-and-dirty solutions to increase circulation area for passengers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
On a related subject regarding Metro Seven/Eight Liner: this might make sense or also might be completely stupid. If the technology used by Metro Seven is compatible with the Yurakucho Line, how about filling the 3km gap between Shin-Kiba and Kasai Rinkai Koen, and linking the lines together? This would also open the door for a connection from Metro Seven to the Rinkai Line.
Actually, I think the Metro Seven folks are envisioning mini-subway like the Toei Ōedo Line or Yokohama Municipal Subway Green Line. If it were compatible, though, you could even try and connect with the other end of Metro Eight for a true circular line via the Rinkai Line, the Tōkaidō Freight Line connection into Tōkyō Teleport, then to Haneda Airport, the Keikyū Airport Line, the proposed Kamakama Line, and the Tōkyū Tamagawa Line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
It seems that on your map, you have chosen to "squiggle" the line to cross beneath existing stations on the radial lines, but the other possibilities would be: (1) build new stations on the radial lines, where the gap is large like the Tobu Tojo line or Tsukuba Express, (2) make the connection with a walkway where the gap is small like Hachimanyama or Aoto, (3) don't make a direct connection at all, where ridership or transfer potential is low (your map suggests skipping a connection with the Nanboku line.)
Yeah, it's not all that serious... Just a connect-the-dots exercise. The one I drew in Google Maps does quite a bit of squiggling, but I was definitely more conservative (realistic?) in the PDF map. Sometimes I'm a bit more "visionary", though... Just depends on my mood.

Here's a third look at the potential interchanges on this line...

Aoto (Keisei Main Line / Keisei Oshiage Line):
Agreed. A moving walkway would probably be sufficient. They probably have to avoid disturbing the existing road bridge, so they can bring it in a bit closer to the existing station anyways.

Kameari (Jōban Local Line):
Walkway.

Kita-Ayase (Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line):
Station is already on the ring road.

Nishi-Kahei (Tsukuba Express):
New station on Tsukuba Express underneath ring road.

Nishi-Arai (Tōbu Sky Tree Line):
Station is already on the ring road.

Daishi-mae (Tōbu Daishi Line):
New station on road. Potential for transfer with Daishi Line is negligible.

Kōhoku Chūō (Nippori‒Toneri Liner):
New station on Nippori‒Toneri Liner.

Tōkyō Metro Namboku Line:
Not sure... New shared station? Or maybe just a separate station on Shinden (the small river "island" just east of the Namboku Line).

Akabane (JR Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, Keihin‒Tōhoku Line, Saikyō Line, Eight Liner):
At site of existing station

Shimura Sanchōme (Toei Mita Line):
New station under road, one block away from existing station, connected by underground passage.

Nerima Kitamachi (Tōbu Tōjō Line):
New station on both Eight Liner and Tōjō Line underneath road. But there's already a road tunnel there, so I dunno...

Heiwadai (Tōkyō Metro Yūrakuchō Line, Fukutoshin Line):
Station is already under road.

Nerima Kasugachō (Toei Ōedo Line):
Station is already under road,

Seibu Ikebukuro Line:
Not sure what a good solution here would be...

Iogi (Seibu Shinjuku Line):
Station is already at road.

Ogikubo (JR Chūō Local Line, Chūō Rapid Line, Tōkyō Metro Marunouchi Line):
Moving walkway?

Takaido (Keiō Inokashira Line):
Already at road.

Hachiman'yama (Keiō Line):
East of road, in between road and existing station. Regular connecting passage.

Kinuta (Odakyū Odawara Line):
New station on both lines at road.

Futako‒Tamagawa (Tōkyū Den'en Toshi Line, Ōimachi Line):
Optimum for passengers would be to serve the existing station... Just not sure how you get over there while preserving the possibility for future extension south.

Den'en Chōfu (Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, Meguro Line, Tamagawa Line):
Same deal as Futako‒Tamagawa, as the ideal would be to allow for interlining with the Tamagawa Line, Kamakama Line, and Keikyū Airport Line to Haneda Airport.
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Old August 14th, 2013, 12:20 PM   #5895
mkill
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Last time I was at Yurakucho Line Toyosu Station (a few month ago) the station was already heavily under construction. I thought that this was for the extension to Sumiyoshi already. Does anybody know more?
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Old August 14th, 2013, 05:16 PM   #5896
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It appears that the construction is to lay the inside tracks at Toyosu... Had forgotten about this project, but it's intended to allow Tōkyō Metro to turn back trains at Toyosu. Test trains on one of the new tracks:
http://freepass-nikki.blog.so-net.ne.jp/2013-03-08

So it looks like some of the "hard work" is already being done for the extension. I suspect this is, in reality, precisely to facilitate the extension, although Tōkyō Metro just says it's to "turn back trains at Toyosu", perhaps implying that it's intended to better cope with the high passenger demand due to all the development in the area.
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Old August 15th, 2013, 05:45 AM   #5897
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Seibu-Ikebukuro line trains at Nerima station:
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Old August 15th, 2013, 07:20 PM   #5898
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Would anybody happen to have timetables for Wide View Tokai and Moonlight Nagara?

My google-fu is failing me.
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Old August 16th, 2013, 07:57 AM   #5899
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NJ Transit trials longer LRVs
http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=535

Quote:
New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) has unveiled a prototype light rail vehicle which it says will offer 50% more seating capacity on its Hudson – Bergen line at minimal cost.

Ridership has grown steadily on the 33km line since the first phase opened in 2000, and over the last seven years passenger numbers have doubled to more than 45,000 per day.

Under the joint project by LRV supplier Kinkisharyo International, NJ Transit, and the line's operator Twenty-First Century Rail Corporation, one of the existing vehicles has been lengthened by 11m to 39m, increasing seating capacity from 68 to 102 seats and providing a significant increase in standing room.

Sounds similar to the work they were doing for DART in Dallas:
http://www.kinkisharyo-usa.com/successstories-dart.html
http://www.kinkisharyo-usa.com/media/pdf/dallas.pdf‎

Hopefully this will pan out and mean more work for them… I think their LRV production for the U.S. has slowed lately, but should kick back into gear with the LA Metro order for 78 cars.

Some recent videos of Kinki Sharyō stock operating overseas…

The newly-extended NJ Transit LRV on the Hudson–Bergen Line:



Hong Kong MTR (ex-KCR) SP 1950 on the Ma On Shan Line:



And some of their newest stock domestically, the 1500 series DMU for JR Shikoku, which began operating on the Tokushima Line on 2013.03.15:

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Old August 16th, 2013, 07:59 AM   #5900
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New rotary opens at Himeji Station
JR姫路駅前に「マイカー乗降場」新設-北駅前広場整備で

http://himeji.keizai.biz/headline/986/

This is a new rotary that opened at JR Himeji Station on 2013.08.12 to serve passenger pick-up and drop-off activities for private automobiles, located at the east side of the station’s North Exit. It’s just one part of the slew of improvements that are nearing completion at the station, aimed at redesigning the North Exit area as a transit mall and open space in the heart of the city.

In particular, this new rotary includes a dedicated entrance to the Grand Festa (グランフェスタ) underground mall at the station. The opening follows on the heels of Grand Festa (opened March), the new Piole Himeji station tenant building (April) and the sunken garden (opened in April), and the Himeji Castle observation deck and new pedestrian deck connecting the bus terminal and San’yō Himeji Station (June). A similar rotary is also under construction at the west side of the North Exit and will open by March 2014.

The view from the observation deck and the new pedestrian bridge, sky garden, and other parts under construction (2013.07.09):



Tilt shift of Himeji Station bus terminal activity:

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