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Old September 2nd, 2013, 05:19 PM   #6001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
I think they're more concerned about finishing the elevation of Awaji Station to eliminate the flat junctions there. Juso is operationally fine the way it is.
Is that the elevated tracks now under construction geographically southwest of Awaji Station I've seen in a couple of videos?

My issue with Jūsō Station is that it looks a tad too "utilitarian" for such a busy junction station. I still hope that Hankyu eventually rebuilds the station buildings to make it more attractive to commuters and shoppers some time in the near future.
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 06:34 PM   #6002
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Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
Is that the elevated tracks now under construction geographically southwest of Awaji Station I've seen in a couple of videos?

My issue with Jūsō Station is that it looks a tad too "utilitarian" for such a busy junction station. I still hope that Hankyu eventually rebuilds the station buildings to make it more attractive to commuters and shoppers some time in the near future.
Have you ever been to the Juso neighborhood? It's not exactly Beverly Hills (or Den'en Chofu for that matter). A railway like Hankyu is going to renovate a station only if there is an issue with capacity or safety, or a neighborhood like Juso suddenly decides to kick out the fuzoku businesses and try to draw in rich madams from Toyonaka with "dog cafes", hot yoga studios, and organic food restaurants that only serve kokusan yasai
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 07:12 PM   #6003
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Well, if they ever decided to move forward with the Nishi-Umeda ‒ Jūsō Link (西梅田・十三連絡線) or a grade-sep of the station, it would be the perfect opportunity for a huge redevelopment and redesign of the station.
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 09:43 PM   #6004
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I still think Hankyu will eventually rebuild Jūsō Station--after all, JR West just recently finished a massive renovation of Osaka Station and are in the process of renovating a number of other stations in the urban Osaka area. If Osakans want to "gentrify" the neighborhood around Jūsō Station, they can start by a complete renovation of the station buildings. Mind you, Hankyu has to be careful about this given the fiasco of what happened to Odakyu when they moved the Odawara Line underground in the Shimo-Kitazawa neighborhood as part of a massive urban renewal project in the area.
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 06:45 AM   #6005
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Keikyu effect

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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
”Smart” platform doors to begin testing on 2013.08.31
東大など、鉄道駅向け乗降位置可変型ホーム柵の実地試験を8月末より開始

http://news.mynavi.jp/news/2013/08/28/057/

A next-generation “smart” platform door system that realigns itself to match train door configurations, developed jointly by Tōkyō University’s Manufacturing Technology Research Center (生産技術研究所センター) and Kobelco (神戸製鋼), will begin a half-year field test at Shin-Tokorozawa Station on the Seibu Shinjuku Line on 2013.08.31.

The system moves both the door leaves and door pockets to the proper position on the platform to align with the door configuration of the arriving train, overcoming one of the biggest obstacles to platform door installation on lines with a high degree of rolling stock variety. The doors can also adapt to variance in stopping location by the train operator, and do not require installation of special equipment to stop the train at the appropriate locations on the platform.

The platform doors are designed as individual units consisting of a 1.4 m long door pocket and 1.1 m long door leaves at either end. The units would be lined up along the platform edge at specific locations identified based on the train formations serving the station. The doors would move slowly while the train is approaching the station to reduce any time loss.

The test will be conducted at the rear end (one carlength) of Platform 1 (outbound platform) at the station to confirm the system’s functionality, as well as passenger response to door movement speed. Seibu operates commuter EMUs with three and four doors per side, making it a good location to test the new system. The tests were initially supposed to begin in June 2013, but were delayed two months.

===

Already installed and (unofficial) testing with 4-door Seibu 3000 series (2013.08.16):

A better angle showing the door movement. Normally, it only needs to move once, prior to train arrival, but it looks like they were testing the system’s performance to correct for train operator error (i.e., over- or under-shooting the stop marker).

Tōkyō MX exclusive report about the MLIT’s trials of new platform door solutions:
Could this be of use were, for example, Keikyu's 2100 series two-door cars allowed to operate north of Sengakuji on the Toei Asakusa line?

Last edited by pudgym29; September 3rd, 2013 at 06:49 AM. Reason: Excessive Youtube videos snipped
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 06:53 AM   #6006
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How was Shimo-Kitazawa a fiasco?

Also, how will the variable doors deal with end-door limited-express stock?
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 07:01 AM   #6007
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I believe the door positions on a Keikyū 2100 series are the same as on 3-door Keikyū trains, just with the middle door removed. At the very least, the positions are probably close enough that they could get by without this type of system. They would just use standard platform doors (with slightly longer door leaves at the #1 and #3 positions, if needed), and just not open the #2 pair. The problem with 3- and 4-door sets is that they don't line up at all.
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 07:39 AM   #6008
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Prosperity

Quashlo's response noted.
Could Keikyū get away with charging extra for its direct trains from its home area [Kanagawa | Yokohama] to Narita Airport - via these 2100 series consists? I espy because eyebrows raised | jaws dropped.
I ask because I caught a lot of #Chicago jaw-dropping #trains people cheaping it out on a route I might use were I there.

Last edited by pudgym29; September 3rd, 2013 at 07:41 AM. Reason: Damn it! Drop my last character - will you? X=(
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 08:41 AM   #6009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pudgym29 View Post
Quashlo's response noted.
Could Keikyū get away with charging extra for its direct trains from its home area [Kanagawa | Yokohama] to Narita Airport - via these 2100 series consists? I espy because eyebrows raised | jaws dropped.
I ask because I caught a lot of #Chicago jaw-dropping #trains people cheaping it out on a route I might use were I there.
Keikyu doesn't have a history of running extra-fare trains (excepting the "Wing-go" which does have a 200 yen seat charge). Should they ever decide to provide a limited stops service with a premium fare, I think they would order dedicated stock like the AE units Keisei uses, given that they would be competing with the service levels of JR-E's Narita Express.
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:47 AM   #6010
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I think the biggest obstacle in extending the 2100 series onto the Asakusa Line is probably Toei... They never really liked the Keikyū 600 series, which was designed for through-services with the Asakusa Line but originally featured all transverse seating—an effort by Keikyū to place passenger comfort first, but pretty much unheard of for subway services in Japan and grossly unsuited for such in terms of both capacity and passenger flow. Those cars have since been redesigned to remove all the transverse seating (save at the ends of each car), and the newer Keikyū 1000 series have all adopted this modified seating configuration. So I think we can expect Toei to throw another similar fit if Keikyū again tried to repeat the process, but this time worse, since there's fewer doors per car (previously 3, now 2).

That being said, there's certainly precedents for this type of thing, perhaps the most famous being the Odakyū limited expresses running directly onto the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line. Maybe a bit hard to imagine, but this only started in 2008, and thus far appears to be working just fine despite the inevitably slower speeds in the Chiyoda Line segments. While some of these services are designed to connect central Tōkyō passengers with the tourism resources in Hakone, the other (perhaps bigger) draw is providing reserved-seat "liner" (ライナー) services for commuters willing to pay a little more. A Keikyū Wing service extended onto the Asakusa Line could be quite similar to this operationally, perhaps stopping at only a few stations (e.g., Asakusa, Nihonbashi, Higashi-Ginza, Shinbashi)

Of course, this may be somewhat moot if they construct the Asakusa Line bypass, since then you will have the new AE series (or whatever next-generation stock replaces it) running through to Tōkyō Station and the Keikyū Line via the bypass. While the plan appears to be focused mostly on connecting Haneda and Narita, you could theoretically run the stock further out on the Keikyū network (Yokohama, Yokosuka, Misakiguchi, etc.) to try and steal passengers from JR's Narita Express service, or even attract new riders (I understand that a lot of Kanagawa-area folks prefer catching airport express buses from the nearest station).
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:03 PM   #6011
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Japan holds monorail seminar in New Delhi
インドでモノレールを売り込み

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2013...261121000.html

The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) sponsored a seminar in New Delhi on 2013.09.03 to market Japan’s monorail technology as a transport solution for India’s urbanization. The country’s urbanized population is expected to grow from the current 400 million people to 600 million people in 10 years, and there is a growing push for railway infrastructure such as subways and monorails. Representatives from Tōkyō Monorail and Hitachi attended.

The Japanese side noted Japan’s extensive experience with monorail technology, highlighting its safety record, on-time performance, and low construction cost compared to subways. About 100 people including government representatives attended from the Indian side, with India’s Minister of Urban Development and Parliamentary Affairs, Kamal Nath, saying that monorails a key potential area of cooperation between the two countries. Foreign competition for contracts is growing, with a ¥30 billion monorail system planned for Delhi state and a Malaysian firm winning a separate contract for a system in Mumbai.

===

English articles:
http://indiaeducationdiary.in/Shownews.asp?newsid=25246
http://news.oneindia.in/2013/09/03/d...7-1298085.html
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:05 PM   #6012
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Looks like the former Kiha 181 series used on the Hamakaze limited express are enjoying a second life on the Myanmar Railways. MR recently began testing them on the Yangon Circular Railway, a circular loop around the country’s capital:
http://www.elevenmyanmar.com/nationa...oned-carriages

Perhaps a future Yamanote Line in the making?

Some pictures of a TV report on the refurb work to prep them for use in Myanmar. Apparently, they had to lower the AC units, so the car roof is actually shorter now:
http://tetudouga.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-47.html

This TV program aired a few days ago on BS NTV on 2013.08.30:
http://www.bs4.jp/guide/document/2nd_life_train2/
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:06 PM   #6013
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Kajima Construction develops pedestrian simulation software for aid in station design
鹿島/駅改良などで円滑な歩行者通行支援/再現システムで安全確保

http://www.kensetsunews.com/?p=19336

Kajima Construction (鹿島) has developed a new software program called SimWalker (シム・ウォーカー) to simulate pedestrian flow for use in station design projects. In particular, the program is expected to aid in the development of construction implementation plans for station upgrades that often require major changes to pedestrian circulation with the station, and will help ensure safety and streamlined flow for station users. The software has already been used on six station upgrade projects, and the firm plans to expand its use beyond stations into urban development and construction, as well as evacuation planning and other fields where pedestrian circulation are critical.

Currently, most major station projects require temporarily converting circulation space within the station into staging yards for the construction. Construction plans must balance the safety and financial feasibility of projects with the need to secure the safety and comfort of station users, including adequate capacity in station passages and concourse areas. In some cases, this requires construction of entirely new passages to temporarily serve as detour routes.

In the past, evaluation of pedestrian flow was based on established standards regarding passenger flow and density, a mostly static analysis that compared circulation space (e.g., the width of station passages) and passenger volumes under a specific set of circumstances. However, this method was unable to assess the dynamic properties of station circulation, including the layout of colums and passages within stations, the temporal fluctuations in passenger flow associated with the arrival and departure of trains, and the distribution of passenger density across three-dimensional space.

This new software evaluates pedestrian flow at a microscopic level by simulating individual characteristics such as walking speed and “tailgating” distance and distributing it into a recreated model of the station space.

Heat maps produced by the simulation software:





===

These appear to be a more and more popular choice among high-capacity transit systems… I’ve worked with these types of simulations before, and they can be useful for visualizing circulation within the station, although like most “micro”-simulation models, they can require some heavy-duty calibration to the unique characteristics of the station before they can actually produce usable outputs.
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:08 PM   #6014
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Mazda, Tōkyō University, Hiroden test world’s first wireless tram collision prevention system
車と路面電車、衝突を防げ…マツダ、世界初の実証実験へ 無線機を搭載、死角でも位置把握

http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...2139008-n1.htm

On 2013.09.03, automobile manufacturer Mazda joined forces with Tōkyō University, Hiroshima Electric Railway (Hiroden), and the National Traffic Safety and Environment Laboratory (独立行政法人交通安全環境研究所) to conduct tests of a new technology designed to prevent side-swipe collisions between turning vehicles and median-running light rail vehicles (LRVs). The system takes advantage of GPS sensors and wireless communications devices affixed to both the LRV and automobile. The system emits a warning siren in both the LRV and car when turning vehicles are detected in close proximity to the train. Live video feeds are then displayed on the front windshield of the car and in the train operator’s cab to allow both the driver and operator to visually confirm their positions relative to each other.

The tests will be conducted starting this month through to March of next year on the Eba – Funairi Saiwaichō section of the Eba Line using a new low-floor LRV, marking the first time this type of technology has been tested on trams. The technology will be announced at a world ITS conference to be held in Tōkyō in October.

The system detects the position of both the tram and the automobile to help prevent collisions caused by blind spots. The system’s developers are also turning their eye towards technologies to prevent collisions between automobiles and pedestrians using GPS systems inside smartphones.

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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:10 PM   #6015
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JR East to begin upgrades to Ochanomizu Station
JR東日本、中央線御茶ノ水駅の本格的な改良工事に着手 - 聖橋口駅舎も移設

http://news.mynavi.jp/news/2013/09/03/232/

Official press release:
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2013/20130902.pdf

On 2013.09.03, JR East announced that it would break ground on barrier-free improvements, a new station plaza at the Hijiribashi Exit, and other upgrades to Ochanomizu Station on the Chūō Line. The barrier-free improvements will be completed in FY2018, followed by the station plaza in FY2020.

The station is currently a major transfer point between Chūō Rapid Line and Chūō–Sōbu Local Line trains, as well as subway trains. Average daily entries at the JR station are about 100,000 passengers. Despite its importance, however, barrier-free upgrades had stalled due to the station’s constrained location, hemmed in by the Kanda River on the north, Hijiribashi (Hijiri Bridge) and Ochanomizubashi (Ochanomizu Bridge) on the sides, and Meikei-dōri (茗渓通り) on the south.

Given the large scope of the required work, JR East started preparatory work back in FY2010, including building demolition. This fiscal year, the railway began work on constructing a temporary pier to serve as a staging yard for the project. A construction plan for the rest of the project has since been developed, and JR East will begin work on the actual upgrades starting this autumn.

In particular, the barrier-free improvements include constructing an elevated deck (approx. 2,900 sq m) above the tracks to connect the Ochanomizubashi and Hijiribashi Exits. One elevator and two escalators would be provided for each platform, securing two separate barrier-free access routes, one serving each station exit. In coordination with Chiyoda Ward, a new 500 sq m station plaza will also be constructed at the Hijiribashi Exit, and the station building will be relocated from its current location fronting Meikei-dōri to a new location on the elevated deck. The railway will also begin work on seismic reinforcement works to prepare the station for an earthquake directly underneath the capital, including reinforcing the embankments facing the Kanda River and the landside retaining walls.

===

Future view from Ochanomizu Bridge:



Current:



Hijiribashi Exit after improvements:

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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:11 PM   #6016
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Friday evening rush hour clips at Kintetsu Tsuruhashi Station, 17:10 – 19:00 (2013.08.30). I almost think they should have chosen a station on the Kintetsu–Hanshin through-services to test out that new platform door system, since Kintetsu and Hanshin stock are fundamentally different (20 m 4-door vs. 18 m 3-door). Seibu has 3- and 4-door cars, but the cars are still all 20 m.

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Old September 4th, 2013, 03:24 AM   #6017
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Are the upgrades to JR East Ochanomizu Station include better passenger connections with the Tokyo Metro Marunouchi Line station nearby?
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Old September 4th, 2013, 09:04 AM   #6018
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No, this is strictly for the JR station. Any sort of new connection would have to span the Kanda River, which means a lot of ¥. Probably the most cost-effective solution would be to redesign Exit 1 of the Marunouchi Line station to accommodate escalators and then build a canopy stretching from the exit, along the east side of Ochanomizu Bridge, and into the JR station. Are there are lot of cross-company transfers, though? I imagine the majority of transfers are cross-platform within JR, between rapid and local trains. I think a canopy and some escalators would have very tangible benefits, though, given all the foot traffic in that area.

As an aside, it's difficult to tell from the press release, but I believe the vertical offset on the outbound platform will still remain, although perhaps they will get rid of the "munchkin" arches... Not an issue 80 years ago, but definitely non-standard now. Given the poor design of the station, it's somewhat difficult to imagine how they manage 100,000 entries (+100,000 exits), together with the cross-platform passenger flows.

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Old September 4th, 2013, 11:27 AM   #6019
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Quote:
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I still think Hankyu will eventually rebuild Jūsō Station--after all, JR West just recently finished a massive renovation of Osaka Station and are in the process of renovating a number of other stations in the urban Osaka area. If Osakans want to "gentrify" the neighborhood around Jūsō Station, they can start by a complete renovation of the station buildings. Mind you, Hankyu has to be careful about this given the fiasco of what happened to Odakyu when they moved the Odawara Line underground in the Shimo-Kitazawa neighborhood as part of a massive urban renewal project in the area.
The quarrel with Shimo-Kitazawa had more to do with the Tokyo Metropolitan Government wanting to run a 4 lane boulevard through there once Odakyu undergrounds all the tracks. The neighborhood association has wanted those tracks underground for years so the neighborhood could be rejoined and the rail crossings that stay closed during rush hours could go away.

As for Hankyu Juso station, when I first moved to Japan, I worked not too far from there and knew people in the area who told me the same thing--the first step is getting that station rebuilt. The Juso Shopkeeper's Association was for Hankyu's idea of making a "triple-stack" station that would have placed the platforms vertically on top of each other and made the station area take up less ground space. I only saw the proposed plan once in the Mainichi Shinbun back in 2001, but it would have had the Takatsuki line elevated and the Kobe along with Kyoto lines underground through the current station area. I imagine the station would have looked something like the current Tokyu Tamagawa Station which does the same thing in reverse-- Toyoko and Meguro lines up top, Tamagawa line below grade, and a street level mezzanine and concourse.

Needless to say, that was all I heard about it after that. It would be cool though if they ever resurrected that idea...
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Old September 4th, 2013, 11:45 AM   #6020
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Quote:
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I forget the name but is it /those guys/ who make the ridiculous mock up vids for really small news stories?
Yeah. those guys. And they're bigger than you think (and I thought!)
They also make news animations for Reuters, ESPN and a few more.

I took the job, so I'll be moving to Taipei soon. But don't worry; I'll be traveling back and forth between the Tokyo office so I'll still be a part of this group!

...now I guess I'd better subscribe to the Taiwan rail forums too...
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