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Old September 25th, 2013, 01:47 AM   #6141
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Tokyu Corp has installed these barrier fences on Track 1 (Yokohama-bound) side of Hiyoshi station. It's only at this section of the platform as well, so I'm not so sure what could be the safety reasoning behind this; doesn't seem close enough to the train to do any good...

Anyone wanna elaborate on this one?
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Old September 25th, 2013, 03:18 AM   #6142
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Could it be a preliminary installation before committing to a full platform door setup? Or to alleviate a problem point at that particular location (choke point)? Tokyu has been using these fixed barriers (固定式ホーム柵) at certain stations as precursors to full installations of automatic platform barriers.

http://hot.tokyu.co.jp/archives/1584
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Old September 25th, 2013, 06:45 AM   #6143
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Yes, very curious indeed... However, I believe it's the full length of the platform, per the photo of the construction notice here. They probably just chose to start installation at those locations.
http://ameblo.jp/sasurai-museum/entry-11613163367.html

I suspect the generous clearance from platform edge is just to keep passengers away from the trains, since there are Tōyoko Line services (namely, 特急) that skip the station. Still doesn't answer why they went with a fenced design (?) and not an automated, open-and-close design like the adjacent inside tracks for the Meguro Line (Tracks 2 / 3). Even more odd considering that they're supposed to be installing automated designs at both Naka-Meguro and Gakugei Daigaku. It may have something to do with Sōtetsu‒Tōkyū Link, but I still can't make sense of it.

It may just be a cost thing... In terms of ROM costs, simple fencing is in the thousands of dollars, but automated doors are in the millions. Given that the station was rebuilt fairly recently with fairly wide platforms and that most trains stop at the station, Hiyoshi may just be low-priority for Tōkyū, which I imagine can only afford to do automated installations at maybe 2-3 stations a year.
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Old September 25th, 2013, 10:57 AM   #6144
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Quote:

Those must just be props for display
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Old September 25th, 2013, 01:35 PM   #6145
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Considering that the Olympic venues are right on the waterfront, why don't they just set up a ferry taxi? It works for Venice. I'm also sure it will be quite popular with tourists. For them, a nice view (on the water) is more important than speed, like a subway tunnel (unlike commuters, who'll disagree)
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Old September 25th, 2013, 01:42 PM   #6146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkill View Post
Considering that the Olympic venues are right on the waterfront, why don't they just set up a ferry taxi? It works for Venice. I'm also sure it will be quite popular with tourists. For them, a nice view (on the water) is more important than speed, like a subway tunnel (unlike commuters, who'll disagree)
Yup that is one consideration (such as the one that travels along the Sumida River)



There will obviously numerous transportation modes that will operate at the venue (ranging from trains, to dedicated buses to taxi cabs to boats and whatnot)
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Old September 25th, 2013, 06:10 PM   #6147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Yes, very curious indeed... However, I believe it's the full length of the platform, per the photo of the construction notice here. They probably just chose to start installation at those locations.
http://ameblo.jp/sasurai-museum/entry-11613163367.html
Looks like I jumped the gun a little bit-- Today when I arrived home from work, those gate things now span the total length of the platform. I suspect they'll be doing Track 4 (Shibuya-bound) soon. Also note that the fences are not installed at the south end of the platform which is made of wood and temporary steel girder for the eventual reconfigurations for the Sotetsu Link. Only 10-car trains use that part of the platform anyway.

They will eventually need automatic gates here I'm sure; Hiyoshi can be a madhouse during the AM rush (believe me, I know ) but they probably won't deal with that until 2018 or so when the connection is made with Sotetsu here.
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Old September 26th, 2013, 04:08 AM   #6148
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Well, that's what's so strange about it... The construction notice only shows Platform 1. Now maybe the construction notice was only intended for Platform 1 and they intend to make a separate notice for Platform 4, but then why show March 2014 as the completion date. Fencing shouldn't take that long, and apparently thy've already erected almost everything, although perhaps they will carry out some other work simultaneously on the plarform extensions at the south end of the station.
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Old September 26th, 2013, 06:30 AM   #6149
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Some new CMs:

Keiō:



Fukuoka Film Commission, shot on the Nanakuma Line:



Keihan:

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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:16 PM   #6150
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Japanese firms hesitant about prospects for Indian construction contracts despite ODA
インド都市鉄道計画続々だが…「ひも付き」禁止で日本企業及び腰

http://sankei.jp.msn.com/world/news/...6350000-n1.htm

Construction of subways and other urban railway systems is proceeding in India’s major cities, with systems already operating in three regions including the capital, New Delhi, in addition to another 13 cities where systems are under construction or in planning stages. While Japanese official development assistance (ODA) is funding a substantial portion of the subway construction and many other regions have requested funding assistance from Japan, several officials on the Japanese side have expressed opposition to continuing the program as a result of restrictions that make it difficult for Japanese firms to win any contracts.

About five hours by car from New Delhi in Jaipur—the capital of Rajasthan State, known as the “Pink City” the unique color of its buildings—the population has grown by 50% in just a little over 10 years to 3.5 million as rural workers come to the city in search of jobs. As the roads overflow with cars and motorbikes, the sound of hammers can be heard as construction continues on a new metro system. Two lines are planned for Jaipur, and the city is currently rushing to complete the daylight portions of the first line. While the first line can be built with financial assistance from the Asian Development Bank (ADB), there is no official word on how funding for the second line will be secured, and Jaipur Metro is hoping that the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) can provide support.

Currently, urban railway systems are operating in the Delhi National Capital Region (New Delhi and surrounds, opened 2002), Kolkata in eastern India (opened 1984), and Bengaluru in southern India (opened 2011). The systems in Delhi NCR and Kolkata also include sections of subway, while work on subways is proceeding in Bengaluru and Chennai. Japan is providing a total of about ¥1 trillion in funding for subway construction in these four regions through JICA, and recently signed an agreement to provide yen loans for new construction in Mumbai in western India. Plans are also underway in mid-sized cities such as Kochi and Hyderabad in southern India and Ahmedabad in western India, with hopes high that Japan will help on the funding side.

The construction rush comes as urbanization is accelerating in India and cities face the effects of higher population densities and poorer air quality as a result of roadway congestion. In 2011, population in the Delhi NCR stood at 16.75 million, having doubled in 20 years, and the Indian government is recommending urban railway systems for cities with at least 2 million people.

In the Delhi NCR, work on Phase 3 of the subway is underway, with a target completion date in 2016. The expansion will bring the system to 296 km, about equivalent to Tōkyō Metro and Toei Subway combined, and Delhi Metro is hoping that JICA will also be on board to provide assistance in Phase 4 of the subway’s expansion. But because the Indian government does not allow funding from Japan to be tied to contracts for Japanese firms, the economic benefit to Japanese firms is limited, leading some from the Japanese side to question the merits of continuing the ODA program. According to officials, Japanese firms bidding on their own have only succeeded in winning about 10% of the total value of contracts for urban railway construction, and only 30% when including joint ventures with firms from other countries.

The Indian government’s focus on minimizing cost is giving pause to Japanese firms. Even in the case of additional work after awarding the contract, the government typically requires the cost to be borne by the firm awarded the contract. While some Japanese firms are more optimistic with regards to railcar contracts, general contractors are instead focusing their attention on domestic rebuilding projects in Japan after the earthquake and tsunami.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:19 PM   #6151
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Railway suicides linked to rainy days
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/201.../#.UkRCm3-wWKE

Quote:
Railway suicides tend to spike after a series of cloudy and rainy days, a team of researchers from two Japanese universities said Wednesday in an international academic journal.

As a countermeasure, researchers from Kyoto University and Shiga University of Medical Science suggest installing high-intensity lights for treating depression on train platforms and cars, and patrolling stations and rail crossings after poor weather.

The study, published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, examined how much daylight there was on days before peaks in suicide-related train disruptions of over 30 minutes during a five-year period from 2002. The data came from Tokyo, Kanagawa and Osaka, the three prefectures with the most rail suicides.

In general, there were more cancellations and delays after three days of rainy and cloudy weather than if at least one of the days had been clear, the study said. Suicides also rose after seven days of poor weather, they said, adding the weather on the day of a suicide or an attempt apparently made no difference.

“Rather than the weather on the day (of the suicides), having not been exposed to sunlight during the preceding days may have a greater influence on the symptoms of depression and decline in mood,” said Hiroshi Kadotani, a professor at Shiga University of Medical Science.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:21 PM   #6152
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Fate of Yonago Station upgrades uncertain
事業着手 見込み薄? 米子駅の南北一体化

http://www.nnn.co.jp/news/130926/20130926006.html

The September session of the Yonago City Council will come to a close on 2013.09.27, without much headway made on the fate of the proposed upgrades to JR Yonago Station to enhance north-south connectivity. The mayor held steadfast to his position that trackside development at the station must take priority, leading some councilmembers to question the mayor’s commitment to the project. Meanwhile, JR West is beginning to show anxiety, and is asking that the city stay true to the original arrangement to break ground in 2018.

The city has contacted a total of 9 construction and housing development firms in Greater Tōkyō, Kansai, and Hiroshima about their potential interest in land development at the station, with six declined, saying that the risks were too high. While the mayor says he will be able to make a determination on the station upgrades by the end of the year, the majority of the City Council is less optimistic, saying the likelihood of private-sector participation in the project is low. The station upgrades involve constructing a 100 m long north-south public passage, an elevated concourse and platform bridge, and a new South Exit station plaza, but the hefty pricetag for the work is proving to be an obstacle to realization.



===

I had the opportunity to visit this station for a few hours at night on my last trip, and while it is a bit quiet, there is some activity at the North Exit, including a decent amount of small-scale retail along the main road leading from the station. Yonago is one of the main stops on the San’in Main Line between Matsue and Tottori, and also serves the people transferring from the Sakai Line and Yonago Airport (six daily roundtrips to Tōkyō Haneda and a few flights a week to Seoul Incheon). Securing some sort of development at the station itself—maybe anchored by an electronics retailer, some office and hotel space, and a public-use facility like a performance hall or something—could be a big plus for the area.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:22 PM   #6153
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Kyōto City debuts improved bus stops
「バスの駅」は待ち時間も快適、無線LANも

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T01419.htm

Kyōto City has rolled out a series of upgrades at three bus stops designed to improve passenger safety and convenience. The upgrades debuted at the Kiyomizu-michi southbound stop (清水道南行バス停) in Higashiyama Ward, frequently used by tourists heading to and from Kiyomizu Temple and adjacent sights, and the Minami-Uzumasa southbound stop (南太秦南行バス停) and Uzumasa Elementary School northbound bus stop (太秦小学校前北行バス停) in Ukyō Ward, primarily used by local residents.

As the sidewalks are too narrow, the city negotiated with adjacent landowners (Kyōto Bank (京都銀行), Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (三菱重工), and Uzumasa Elementary School) to lease additional space at no cost to provide canopies and benches constructed with locally-produced lumber. A wide-screen LCD unit provides information on bus location, with a public Wi-Fi system provided for passengers. The city plans to roll out the upgrades at another 2 stations this fiscal year. The project cost is ¥20 million, and the city is looking to target another five stations for next fiscal year.

According to the city’s Transportation Bureau, there are 1,579 bus stops in the city, only 780 of which have seating and 462 of which have canopies. The city has been working to improve passenger convenience for municipally-operated bus services through schedule improvements and other changes, and average daily ridership increased by 7,000 in FY2012 to approx. 320,000 passengers. While the city’s bus operations were flagged by the national government for poor financial performance, the city was able to “graduate” from special assistance programs three years ahead of schedule in FY2012.



===

Sankei News video report on the 13th Bus Festival (バスまつり), held at Intex Ōsaka (インテックス大阪) and featuring 25 buses from 27 operators participating in the Surutto Kansai farecard system. Kyōto’s city bus services are represented at 2:19.

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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:24 PM   #6154
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Citizens largely approve of keeping provisional station names for Sendai Subway Tōzai Line
仙台市地下鉄東西線「仮称駅名のまま」76% 意見募集結果

http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2013/09/20130926t11031.htm

On 2013.09.25, Sendai City announced the results of the station naming contest for the stations on the Sendai Subway Tōzai Line scheduled to open in 2015. Of the 11,584 responses received, 76% (8,853) called for retaining the provisional station names. In particular, the provisional names received high approval among the responses at Rokuchō no Me (六丁の目) (93%), Nishi Kōen (西公) (86%), and Ichibanchō (一番町) (82%).

At some stations, there was some support behind names other than the provisional names, with 43% of respondents for Dōbutsu Kōen (動物公園) calling for a different station name, primarily including “Mt. Yagi” (八木山). At Renbō (連坊), 39% of respondents called for a different name, with many recommending including the name of the adjacent Sendai #1 High School (仙台一高). For Shintera (新寺), some respondents suggested “Miyagino-dōri (宮城野通), “Shintera-kōji” (新寺小路), and “Sendai Station East Exit” (仙台駅東口). For Kokusai Center (“International Center” 国際センター), other suggested names included “Sendai Castle Ruins” (仙台城跡) and “Aoba Castle” (青葉城下), as well as names incorporated the adjacent Sendai City Museum or Hirose River (広瀬川). For Yakushidō (薬師堂), other names included “Seiwa Gakuen-mae” (聖和学園前) and “Mutsu Kokubunji” (陸奥国分寺). For Arai (荒井), located near areas damaged by the tsunami, other names included “Rebuilding” (復興) and “Hope” (希望).





===

Hopefully they’ll avoid long station names… I think the “secondary name” strategy used by Tōkyō Metro, as it’s a compromise solution.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:25 PM   #6155
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Yokohama considers pedestrian bridge at problem crossing in Tsurumi
跨線橋設置を市と検討、鶴見踏切事故受けJR東横浜支社長

http://news.kanaloco.jp/localnews/article/1309250019/

After the death of a an 88-year-old man with a walking cane who was struck by a train while attempting to cross the Umio (生見尾) crossing in Namamugi, Tsurumi Ward, Yokohama City on 2013.08.23, on 2013.09.25 JR East said it was hoping to negotiate with Yokohama City on the potential for a new barrier-free (fully-accessible) pedestrian bridge at the location.

The crossing distance at this grade crossing is particularly long, and the arms frequently stay down for extended periods of time. The nearby pedestrian bridge wasn’t designed for full accessibility, and securing enough land for a new bridge may be a problem. A full grade-separation through an underpass would be desirable, but is not realistic, so the railway hopes to discuss the possibility of a new pedestrian bridge in more detail with the city.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:26 PM   #6156
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JR East to construct six-story tenant building at Urawa Station
JR浦和駅 駅ビルは6階建て 高架下に商業施設や保育所

http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/sa...602000155.html

JR East has finalized the development program for Urawa Station (Urawa Ward, Saitama City), where work was completed in March of this year on a major grade-separation that has now elevated the tracks and platforms and improved east-west connectivity through the station. The program would include constructing a 6-story station tenant building at the stations’ West Exit, along with restaurants, stand-alone shops, a mall, and a nursery school underneath the railway viaduct. Completion of the facilities underneath the viaduct could be completed as early as sometime next fiscal year, and both the retail facilities and the new tenant building will be operated by JR East group company Atre.

Work on the elevation of Urawa Station began in 1999 and involved grade-separating the Keihin–Tōhoku Line and Utsunomiya Line / Takasaki Line at the station, as well as constructing new platforms for the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line and a new 25 m wide east-west connecting passage through the station.

JR East will divide the land stretching 765 m underneath the newly elevated tracks into three zones (north, central, and south). The North Zone (3,300 sq m GFA) will feature restaurants, shops, and a nursery school, with a new ticketing entrance for the station located inside the retail facility, accessible to passengers during the mall’s business hours. The Central Zone (4,000 sq m GFA) will feature more restaurants and shops, while the South Zone will house bike and automobile parking.

The proposed 7,600 sq m tenant building at the West Exit of the station would include restaurants and shops on 1F through 3F and a JR East group-operated fitness club on 4F through 6F. The timeline for the opening of the tenant building has not yet been decided.

Meanwhile, Saitama City plans to construct new roads to allow pedestrians and bicyclists to pass underneath the elevated tracks, one each in the North and South Zones. While the recently-completed east-west connecting passage is only open while trains are in service, people will be able to use three new roads to get across the tracks, 24 hours a day.

There is currently an underground passage in the North Zone, but because of stairs, the passage is not convenient for bicyclists. Instead, the city will remove this passage to construct a flat, surface-level road accessible to bicyclists. A new passage in the North Zone will be exclusively for pedestrians, while the one in the South Zone will be for pedestrians and bicyclists.

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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:28 PM   #6157
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MLIT unveils policy goals for urban rail network in Greater Tōkyō
東京圏鉄道整備へ6つの方向性/空港・都心の速達性向上/国交省

http://www.kensetsunews.com/?p=20469

The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) has revealed the results of a study compiling future policy objectives for the urban rail network serving Greater Tōkyō. A total of six objectives were identified, including establishing a rail network that is resilient against disaster risk and can contribute to the global competitiveness of Japan. In terms of issues that need to be resolved, the MLIT identified the need to improve rail access and convenience between the capital’s international airports and the high-density office and retail zones in central Tōkyō. Based on the results of the study, the MLIT will now investigate specific strategies to resolve these issues in preparation for the next Transport Policy Council (運輸政策審議会) report on future upgrades to the Tōkyō rail network. The last report, #18, was compiled in 2000 but only forecasted out to FY2015.

The study results are intended to frame the issues facing Tōkyō’s urban rail network, as well as a vision for an improved future network in 2030 that addresses these issues, covering about a 50 km radius from central Tōkyō. The study also considers the effects of other fundamental changes such as the new Chūō Shinkansen maglev, as well as how to deal with the next big quake underneath the capital.

In particular, the MLIT identified the following six policy objectives:
  • An urban rail network that is resilient against risks from large-scale natural disasters and other situations.
  • An urban rail network that provides stable operations and services.
  • An urban rail network that is safe, convenient, and inviting for passengers.
  • An urban rail network that contributes to improving Tōkyō’s global competitiveness.
  • An urban rail network that contributes to the vitality of local economy and industry.
  • An urban rail network that minimizes environmental impact through energy conservation.
In terms of issues that need to be tackled, the MLIT identified the need to improve access between international airports and central Tōkyō, in order to compete against other urban centers in Asia and secure the development of Tōkyō as an international hub city for Asia. The study also identified the need for improved convenience within central Tōkyō through introduction of light rail transit (LRT) and bus rapid transit (BRT), with easy transfers to the rail network, in order to facilitate environmentally-friendly urban development. The study also called for strengthening the functions of railway station facilities in strategic urban revitalization zones (特定都市再生緊急整備地域) through coordinated urban development and participation of railway companies in leading roles in urban planning. The study also recommended improvements to the rail network and upgrades to station facilities in response to the opening of the Chūō Shinkansen maglev and three new loop roads in the National Capital Region.

The issues and objectives identified in the study will be studied in more detail this fiscal year before being reflected in the mid- to long-range railway plan for Greater Tōkyō issued by the Transport Policy Council.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:29 PM   #6158
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Will be interesting to see how the next plan will be different from the last.

These are the plans from the last Transport Policy Council report in 2000… I did a quick run-through to see what's been completed since 2000:

Black = Completed
Red = Not yet completed
Green = Under construction / implementation
Blue = In advanced planning
Gray = Abandoned / shelved

Upgrades to existing lines

Through-services
Tōbu Tōjō Line / Seibu Ikebukuro Line ↔ Eidan Line 13 (Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line) ↔ Tōkyū Tōyoko Line ↔ Yokohama Rapid Railway Minato Mirai Line
JR Keiyō Line ↔ Tōkyō Waterfront Area Rapid Transit Rinkai Line
JR Musashino Line ↔ JR Keiyō Line (Minami-Funabashi – Kaihin Makuhari)

Station upgrades
New passenger platforms at Urawa Station on Tōhoku Freight Line
New platform bridge and elevated concourse at Tobitakyū Station on Keiō Line
New platforms at Yokohama Station on Keikyū Main Line
Passenger flow improvements at Kashiwadai Station on Sōtetsu Main Line
New platform bridge and elevated concourse at Kibōgaoka Station on Sōtetsu Main Line
Transfer improvements at Nippori Station between JR and Keisei Main Line
New platforms and other improvements at Tōyōchō Station on Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Tōzai Line
Passenger flow improvements at JR Tamachi Station
Passenger flow improvements at Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Roppongi Station
Transfer improvements at JR Ōimachi Station

Infrastructure upgrades
Double-tracking of Tōbu Noda Line (Kasukabe – Iwatsuki)
Capacity improvements to JR Narita Line
Double tracking of Tōbu Noda Line (Sakasai – Mutsumi)
Double tracking of Tōbu Noda Line (Shin-Kamagaya – Magomezawa)
Signal / train protection and other improvements to JR Keihin–Tōhoku Line (Urawa – Shin-Koyasu)
Removal of flat junction, signal / train protection improvements, and conversion to same-direction cross-platform transfers (Saikyō Line and Yamanote Freight Line) at JR Ikebukuro Station
Continuous grade-separation and other improvements around Chōfu Station on the Keiō Line
Capacity improvements to JR Itsukaichi Line
Capacity improvements to JR Sagami Line
Signal / train protection and other improvements to JR Yamanote Line
Signal / train protection and other improvements to Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Hibiya Line
Construction of passing tracks at Yahiro Station on Keisei Oshiage Line
Signal / train protection and other improvements to JR Sōbu Line / Yokosuka Line (Kinshichō – Shinagawa)
Signal / train protection and other improvements to Toei Shinjuku Line
Signal / train protection and other improvements to Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Tōzai Line
Signal / train protection and other improvements to Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Hanzōmon Line (Shibuya – Jinbōchō)
Signal / train protection and other improvements to Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Yūrakuchō Line (Ikebukuro – Shintomichō)
Improvements to turnback facilities at Kudanshita Station on Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Tōzai Line
Double-tracking and station improvements at Hamamatsuchō station on Tōkyō Monorail
Institution of express service and station improvements to Tōkyū Ōimachi Line (Hatanodai, Ōimachi Stations)
Continuous grade-separation and other improvements around Keikyū Kamata Station on Keikyū Main Line

Rolling stock upgrades
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Saikyō Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to Tōhoku Line (Utsunomiya Line)
Introduction of wide-body stock to Takasaki Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Jōban Rapid Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Sōbu Rapid Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Sōbu Local Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Keiyō Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Yamanote Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Keihin–Tōhoku Line
Introduction of larger stock to Keiō Inokashira Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Chūō Rapid Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Chūō Local Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Ōme Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Tōkaidō Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Yokohama Line
Introduction of wide-body stock to JR Nambu Line
Extension of formation lengths on Sagami Railway
Extension of formation lengths on Toei Mita Line

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Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

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Last edited by quashlo; September 28th, 2013 at 05:20 PM.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 10:30 PM   #6159
quashlo
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Extensions, new lines, and quadruple-tracking
A lot of progress has been made... Really, only a handful of projects are left, plus only a few that were shelved.

Extension of Yokohama Municipal Subway Line 3 (Blue Line): Azamino – Susukino
Completion of Minato Mirai 21 Line: Yokohama – Minato Mirai – Motomachi; through-service with Tōkyū Tōyoko Line at Yokohama Station
Construction of new Yokohama Loop Railway (Yokohama Municipal Subway Green Line): Nakayama – Hiyoshi
Construction of new Kanagawa East Line (Sōtetsu–Tōkyū Link): Futamatagawa – Shin-Yokohama – Ōkurayama; through-service with Tōkyū Tōyoko Line at Ōkurayama Station
Tōkyū Tōyoko Line quadruple-tracking: Tamagawa-en – Hiyoshi – Ōkurayama; Mekama Line (Meguro Line) improvements: Meguro – Ōokayama – Den’en Chōfu; through-service with Tōkyō Line 6 (Toei Mita Line) and Tōkyō Line 7 (Tōkyō Metro Namboku Line) at Meguro Station
Construction of new Kanagawa Rapd Railway (Kawasaki Municipal Subway): Shin-Yurigaoka – Miyamae-daira – Moto-Sumiyoshi – Kawasaki); through-service with Keikyū Daishi Line at Kawasaki Station
Extension of Keikyū Kurihama Line: Misaki-guchi – Aburatsubo
Completion of Tōkyō Line 6 (Toei Mita Line): Meguro – Shirokane–Takanawa – Mita; through-service with Tōkyū Mekama Line (Meguro Line) at Meguro Station
Completion of Tōkyō Line 7 (Tōkyō Metro Namboku Line): Meguro – Shirokane–Takanawa - Tameike–Sannō; through-service with Tōkyū Mekama Line (Meguro Line) at Meguro Station
Extension of Tōkyō Line 7 (Tōkyō Metro Namboku Line): Akabane Iwabuchi – Urawa Misono – Iwatsuki – Hasuda
Quadruple-tracking of Tōkyō Line 8 (Seibu Ikebukuro Line): Shakujii Kōen – Nerima
Quadruple-tracking of Tōkyō Line 9 (Odakyū Odawara Line): Higashi-Kitazawa – Kitami
Extension of Tōkyō Line 11 (Tōkyō Metro Hanzōmon Line): Suitengū-mae – Sumiyoshi – Oshiage
Quadruple-tracking of Tōkyū Den’en Toshi Line (Futako–Tamagawa-en – Mizonokuchi)
Improvements to Tōkyū Ōimachi Line: Ōimachi – Ōokayama – Futako–Tamagawa-en
Quadruple-tracking of Tōbu Isesaki Line: Narihirabashi (Oshiage) – Hikifune; through-service with Tōkyō Line 11 (Tōkyō Metro Hanzōmon Line) at Oshiage Station
Quadruple-tracking of Tōbu Isesaki Line: Koshigaya – Kita-Koshigaya
Completion of Tōkyō Line 12 (Toei Ōedo Line): Tochō-mae – Shinjuku Nishi-guchi – Iidabashi – Monzen-Nakachō – Aoyama Itchōme – Shinjuku
Extension of Tōkyō Line 13 (Tōkyō Metro Fukutoshin Line): Ikebukuro – Shinjuku Sanchōme – Shibuya; through-service with Eidan (Tōkyō Metro) Yūrakuchō Line, Tōbu Tōjō Line, and Seibu Ikebukuro Line west of Ikebukuro Station and with Tōkyū Tōyoko Line at Shibuya Station
Completion of Tōkyō Waterfront Rapid Railway Rinkai Fukutoshin Line (Tōkyō Waterfront Area Rapid Transit Rinkai Line): Tōkyō Teleport – Tennōzu – Ōsaki
Extension of JR Tōhoku Line (Utsunomiya Line), Takasaki Line,and Jōban Line: Ueno – Tōkyō
Construction of New Jōban Line (Metropolitan Intercity Railway Tsukuba Express): Akihabara – Kita-Senju – Moriya – Tsukuba
Extension of Hokusō Railway Hokusō Line and construction of new line to New Tōkyō International Airport (Narita Airport): Inzai Makinohara – Inba Nihon Idai – Tsuchiya – New Tōkyō International Airport
Extension of Tōkyō Monorail Haneda Line: Haneda Airport West Terminal (Domestic Terminal 1) – New East Terminal (Domestic Terminal 2)
Completion of Tōkyō Waterfront New Transit Rinkai Line (Yurikamome): Ariake – Toyosu
Completion of Nippori – Toneri Liner: Nippori – Minumadai Shinsui Kōen
Extension of Chiba Urban Monorail (Kenchōmae – Chūō Hakubutsukan / Shiritsu Byōin-mae



__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

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Last edited by quashlo; September 28th, 2013 at 05:17 AM.
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Old September 27th, 2013, 11:28 PM   #6160
orulz
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Living in the US, to me it's absolutely astounding how many of these planned improvements they were able to follow through with, mostly on schedule.

This further reinforces my notion of Japan as being dominated by the bureaucracy. The planning agencies set their plans, and they stick to them, TO THE LETTER.

Here in the US, transit plans are torn up or shelved on an almost daily basis due to lack of available funds or a shift in the political winds.
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