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Old October 2nd, 2013, 09:12 AM   #6141
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I would question how good that is with regards to health and safety compared to normal platform doors. Have you seen it in action?
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Old October 2nd, 2013, 06:04 PM   #6142
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And why did somebody invet that? Is it better, cheaper, more effective?
For sure it looks weird.
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Old October 2nd, 2013, 07:22 PM   #6143
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Well, it's actually a fairly ingenious solution... Standard platform doors, even waist-high, can be quite expensive, especially if you are working with older stations where you end up having to retrofit / rebuild the platform edge to handle the added weight. The vast majority of platform doors in service today are for new-builds, as it's difficult to install them on legacy systems. The rope type doors are cheaper and lighter than the standard type, and suited to the multitude of door configurations typically present in Japanese urban rail systems.

As for safety compared to other types of platform protection systems, I don’t think there’s really enough data to make any conclusions… After all, this is the only such system in Japan, and it’s only a prototype that hasn’t even begun official testing. The only two other installations anywhere in the world are in Korea—Munyang (문양) Station in Daegu and Nokdong (녹동) Station in Gwangju.
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Old October 2nd, 2013, 07:34 PM   #6144
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Sure, I agree it's ingenious and will be a great solution if it presents with no problems, but I was just more wondering about the possible health and safety implications. I am assuming (from watching the guard manually moving the "ropes") that the motor powering them is not powerful enough to harm a child if one was playing with the "ropes" for example?
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Old October 3rd, 2013, 06:20 AM   #6145
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I doubt it will be much of an issue. Even standard platform doors have sensors to detect obstructions, although they're placed on the inside of the platform door leaves to check for obstructions before closing the doors. You can basically use the same concept to detect obstructions before opening the doors (in this case, pulling the ropes up), and I imagine that's what they do here—if an obstruction is detected, the ropes won't rise.
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Old October 3rd, 2013, 06:21 AM   #6146
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There’s a Newsweek blog editorial about potential transit improvements for Tōkyō in preparation for the 2020 Games with some good ideas.
http://www.newsweekjapan.jp/reizei/2013/10/2020-2.php

Here’s the list of his suggestions:

Rationalizing English translations of landmark-based station names
The example he gives is for Kokkai Gijidō-mae (国会議事堂前), which he argues should be fully translated into English as “National Diet House” instead of just using the Rōmaji (ローマ字) transliteration of the Japanese. I’ve always liked this idea, as it’s much more intuitive for non-speakers of Japanese. “Tochō-mae” on the Toei Ōedo Line would become “Tōkyō Metropolitan Government Office” or “Tōkyō City Hall”, “Kokusai Tenjijō Seimon” on the Yurikamome would become “Tōkyō Big Sight”, “Motomachi–Chūkagai” on the Minato Mirai Line would become “Motomachi–Chinatown”, etc.

Rationalizing station names between distinct operators
Tōkyō Metro’s “Meiji Jingū-mae” and JR’s “Harajuku”, JR’s “Ochanomizu” and Tōkyō Metro’s “Shin-Ochanomizu”, etc. I would also support this, as it makes it easier to see these stations as interchanges. Obviously, in some cases, it makes sense to keep them separate (e.g., “Shinjuku” and “Seibu Shinjuku”), but in others, it doesn’t.

Providing better information to orient transferring passengers.
The example he gives is the PA announcement on the Yamanote Line approaching Shinjuku Station, where he thinks just listing the names of connecting lines (“Please change here for the Chūō Line, the Saikyō Line, the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line, the Odakyū Line, the Keiō Line, the Marunouchi Subway Line, the Shinjuku Subway Line, and the Ōedo Subway Line”) isn’t really all that helpful for people visiting Tōkyō for the first time:



He suggests providing a little bit more information, such as how the Saikyō Line / Shōnan–Shinjuku Line are express services on the west side of the Yamanote Line loop, that the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line is a cross-regional service, or that there are separate short- and long-distance services for the Chūō Line. Possible solutions he recommends are better line-based color-coding coordination between companies—while each company tends to have its own color-coding scheme, there is no uniform color-coding scheme across the subway, JR, and private railways. He also suggests better schemes to distinguish between short- and long-distance services, as well as unified nomenclature for service types—e.g., Keikyū has its own “rapid limited express” (kaitoku 快特), while some operators have special “section” (kukan 区間) services.

I like a little better color-coding, but the effectiveness of it will be limited… There’s simply too many lines, and no one is in a position to tell a private operator what color they can paint their trains. I think providing a unified map of the entire metropolitan rail network and distributing it in all trains, regardless of operator, with some simple color-coding by company (JR East lines are all green, Keikyū lines are all blue, Tōkyū lines are all red, etc.) is probably a good compromise. There are already existing precedents for this, like Suica / PASMO coverage maps:
http://www.pasmo.co.jp/about_pasmo/p...O_area_all.pdf
http://www.pasmo.co.jp/en/pdf/pasmo_area_foreignmap.pdf

Regarding better transfer information, perhaps they should start taking advantage of on-board Wi-Fi to provide a unified portal for transit information. That way, anyone with a smartphone, even foreigners, can just connect to the portal via Wi-Fi and get information on how to get where they want to go, regardless of who is operating the trains they need to take. It would seem trivial to design it so that it can activate the smartphone’s vibration when you approach your transfer station or destination station, etc.

Simplifying complex fare structures
He specifically points to cross-company transfers, where passengers are usually assessed separate fares for each company and end up paying the base fare twice, which becomes especially problematic given how many lines through-service across two or three companies. He suggests providing special tickets for Games spectators for sale at HND, NRT, and KIX that are basically flat fares covering the entire 23 wards. This seems trivial enough, although I would just make it an all-venues thing that can be coded for specific stations serving the venues, since some of the venues will actually be outside the boundaries of the 23 wards.

Considering other alternatives to the Asakusa Line bypass / Central Tōkyō Link (都心直結線)
He argues for considering alternatives for airport access to the Games that don’t require the investment of the new subway line being pushed by the MLIT. In particular, he proposes an “express shuttle” train from Narita to Kinshichō via JR, with a huge bus terminal there to take passengers to various hotels and Games venues, or a similar deal at Oshiage for Keisei. From Haneda, it would be a bus terminal at Hamamatsuchō or Shinagawa. He also suggests reducing the $300 cab fare from Narita to central Tōkyō by encouraging passengers to take the train to the city-side terminals at Kinshichō or Oshiage and transferring there to special “airport taxis”, charging only $100 or so.
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Old October 3rd, 2013, 01:32 PM   #6147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
Sure, I agree it's ingenious and will be a great solution if it presents with no problems, but I was just more wondering about the possible health and safety implications. I am assuming (from watching the guard manually moving the "ropes") that the motor powering them is not powerful enough to harm a child if one was playing with the "ropes" for example?
Just like Quashlo says, they're looking at light, easier to install alternatives for platform gates. A normal installation takes 2 months at it's quickest, and involves platform strengthening and moderate reconstruction of the platform (read: also expensive)

This method will also provide for different car lengths and door configurations as well. The Tokyu 5000 series consists on the Den'en-Toshi line run 2 six-door cars for example, so it's impossible to have normal platform door set up on that line (and the Tokyo Metro Hanzomon and Tobu SkyTree lines as well)

As for the safety aspects-- There's always at least one platform attendant present during rush hours, usually more. It'll probably be the conductor's job to raise and lower the gantries while checking their monitors at other times. And even the Tokyu Tamagawa line's "platform fences" include obstruction sensors.
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Old October 3rd, 2013, 02:21 PM   #6148
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
There’s a Newsweek blog editorial about potential transit improvements for Tōkyō in preparation for the 2020 Games with some good ideas.
http://www.newsweekjapan.jp/reizei/2013/10/2020-2.php
Rationalizing English translations of landmark-based station names
I've often wondered whether this is a good idea or not myself. When I visit other Asian cities and ride the trains there, like Hong Kong, Taipei and Seoul, they do exactly this. But sometimes it can be troublesome when trying to ask for directions from staff in basic English. I can totally see someone asking "how do I get to the Diet House from here" at say, Asakusa station and being met with teeth-sucking and a blank stare. By being able to at least slowly say "Kokaigijido Mae" at leas the natives here will have a handle on it. I'm all for keeping the official Japanese name of the station in romaji, but sticking the translation in parenthesis...

Quote:
Rationalizing station names between distinct operators
Tōkyō Metro’s “Meiji Jingū-mae” and JR’s “Harajuku”, JR’s “Ochanomizu” and Tōkyō Metro’s “Shin-Ochanomizu”, etc. I would also support this, as it makes it easier to see these stations as interchanges. Obviously, in some cases, it makes sense to keep them separate (e.g., “Shinjuku” and “Seibu Shinjuku”), but in others, it doesn’t.
I agree...but it's already done to a point by some operators. Tokyo Metro calls it "Meiji Jingu-mae (Harujuku)" officially. This was changed back in 2010 right as the Fukutoshin line started doing weekend express stops here.
I would prefer less ambiguity in those areas where 2 separate stations serve the same but distant parts of a neighborhood. For example Kamata and Keikyu Kamata. I think JR and Tokyu need to rename their station Kamata-chuo or something, while Keikyu should name theirs Kamata Higashi. Of course provide the English transliterations there for those that don't know, so names like Kamata Central and Kamata East can be said. Another really good example is the mess that is Kawagoe. I've gotten confused there simply because I didn't know I was supposed to walk from Kawagoe to Hon-Kawagoe to transfer from the Tobu to the Seibu line. Nevermind the fact that there's also a Kawagoe-shi station one stop up the line too... Uggghhh.

Quote:
Providing better information to orient transferring passengers.
The advent of the LCD passenger information screens along with automated announcements in Japanese and English onboard the trains help a whole lot. I can remember the old Yamanote line 205s and Osaka Loop 105s that have nothing more than a muffled conductor's voice telling the next stops and connection info. Even Japanese folks have a hard time understanding them. By 2020, all rail stock in Metro Tokyo should have been upgraded to LCD passenger info screens. Hopefully they would have also retrofitted on-board wifi as well, as seen on certain Yamanote Line and even some Tokyu Toyoko line trains now. This, coupled with some sort of smartphone app, would help a lot for navigation around the city. A great example of this though is Google Now, which I use on my smartphone. It knows where I am, and where I'm possibly going based on time of day or a maps app search. It then keeps tabs on my navigation of the train system and alerts me to junction points and even if a line is running late. It will also alert me for the last train possible to get home!
One other thing -- station numbering has helped the situation a little, but now I think it's high time they actually use them across companies.

Quote:
Simplifying complex fare structures
He specifically points to cross-company transfers, where passengers are usually assessed separate fares for each company and end up paying the base fare twice, which becomes especially problematic given how many lines through-service across two or three companies.
Not only that, but on lines like the Tojo/Ikebukuto/Fukutoshin/Yurakucho/Toyoko/Minato-Mirai thru-running combo, it's IMPOSSIBLE for the Ticket Vending Machines to calculate an end-to-end journey. One day, I left my train pass at home and didn't realize it until I was at Hiyoshi station. I needed to buy a ticket to Shiki station on the Tojo line, but our TVMs can only make them as far as Wako-shi--meaning I needed to then use the fare adjustment machine at Shiki Station to calculate the rest of the fare.
Also, make the machines easier to use!! It's a touch-screen, so why not just have a map mode in the system where I can just touch the station for my endpoint and get the journey cost that way instead of wading through text? That just seems so obvious to me!

Quote:
Considering other alternatives to the Asakusa Line bypass / Central Tōkyō Link (都心直結線)
I still don't understand why a whole new subway needs to be built at all. JR can make improvements to the current Narita Express service by double tracking their section of rail into Narita Airport and also upgrade some of the freight tracks around Haneda to carry NEX trains into the airport there.

Keisei can do some track upgrades at Narita too, along with Toei adding a passing track or two in the Asakusa line to upgrade it for higher throughput express operations.
All told, this would be way less money spent I would think.

The idea of creating multi-modal transit centers for airport passengers arriving/departing from central Tokyo at Oshiage/Skytree and Hamamatsucho or even Kamata is interesting. I've seen some very perplexed tourists at Narita trying to figure out how they should go into the city, then freak out at the costs... I personally jump on the Keisei/Toei/Keikyu Airport Express then change to something going to Yokohama station myself.
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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:48 AM   #6149
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Nippon Signal wins contract for Delhi Metro Line 8 CBTC signalling system

Press releases:
Japanese: http://www.signal.co.jp/uploads/130927delhi-metro81.pdf
English: http://www.signal.co.jp/english/uplo...MetroLine8.pdf

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Nippon Signal has announced today that it signed a contract with Delhi Metro Rail Corporation Limited (Hereinafter “DMRC”) for the complete Delhi Metro Line 8 signaling system, which is worth approximately 3.7 billion JPY. Nippon Signal is the first Japanese company to receive an order for an Indian metro signaling system.

Delhi Metro is an urban railway system, and Line 8 will run approximately 37 km between Janakpuri West station and Botanical Garden station in Delhi. The new Line 8 is a much-anticipated solution for traffic congestion that is becoming serious due to the rapid increase of population and vehicle registrations. Both the Indian and Japanese governments value this yen-loan-financed project as being a symbol of cooperation between the two countries.

Overview of Delhi Metro Line 8
Total distance: Approximately 37 km
Number of stations: 25
Train operation: Driverless automatic operation
Service start date: Operation starts sequentially from June 2015

DMRC accepted our proposal for the use of SPARCS (Note 1) which is our uniquely developed CBTC (Note 2). SPARCS is a system that has been used in Beijing Metro Line 15 in China since December 2011. This project will be the second project where SPARCS will be used. Nippon Signal plans to accelerate its overseas business expansion by recommending the use of SPARCS in urban railway system projects that are expected to increase in the future.

Note 1: SPARCS stands for our product “Simple-structure and high Performance ATC by Radio Communication System”.
Note 2: CBTC stands for “Communications-Based Train Control,” which is the latest train control system using radio communications.
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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:50 AM   #6150
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Nippon Signal wins contract for Gimpo Urban Railway CBTC signaling system

Press releases:
Japanese: http://www.signal.co.jp/uploads/1310...shitetudou.pdf
English: http://www.signal.co.jp/english/uplo...banRailway.pdf

Quote:
Nippon Signal has signed a contract of signaling system for Gimpo Urban Railway that is worth approximately 1.7 billion JPY with Hyundai Rotem Company (Hereinafter “Rotem”) which is a group company of Hyundai Automotive Group in Korea. Rotem and Korean company jointly had signed a contract with Gimpo city which is a package of Rolling Stock and Signaling system, and Nippon Signal receives an order of CBTC (Note 1) and Digital Axle Counter for Signaling system from Rotem.

Note 1: CBTC stands for “Communications-Based Train Control,” which is the latest train control system using radio communications.

Gimpo Urban Railway will run approximately 23.61 km between Gimpo Airport and Yeoncheon Depot, and all stations will be constructed underground not to spoil the sight. The Gimpo Urban Railway is a much-anticipated improvement of convenience for the people by connection with other metro lines and well accessibility for Gimpo Airport.

Overview of Gimpo Urban Railway
Total distance: Approximately 23.61 km
Number of stations: 11 Stations + 1 Depot
Train operation: Driverless automatic operation
Service start date: Operation starts sequentially from November 2018

Gimpo city and Hyundai Rotem accepted our proposal for the use of SPARCS (Note 2) which is our uniquely developed CBTC. This project will be the third project using SPARCS succeed after Beijing Metro Line 15 in China operated since December 2011 and Delhi Metro Line 8 awarded September this year. Nippon Signal plans to accelerate its overseas business expansion by recommending the use of SPARCS in urban railway system projects that are expected to increase in the future.

Note 2: SPARCS stands for our product “Simple-structure and high Performance ATC by Radio Communication System”.
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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:50 AM   #6151
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Details of Naha Bus Terminal redevelopment revealed
11階建てビル想定 旭橋再開発バスターミナル

http://article.okinawatimes.co.jp/ar...13-10-01_54749

On 2013.09.30, Asahibashi Urban Development (旭橋都市再開発) held a pre-bid session for contractors interested in the mixed-use redevelopment for the Naha Bus Terminal located around Asahibashi Station on the the Yui Rail monorail in Naha City.

The parcels involved cover approx. 18,000 sq m and will be redeveloped with an 11-story building that will include a new central bus terminal for the city. The anchors for the building are also envisioned to include a public library, retail facilities, and an employment center. The bus terminal would be spread across two floors (B1F and 1F), while retail space and an employment assistance facility (Good Job Okinawa グッジョブセンター) would occupy 2F and 3F of the building. The Okinawa Prefectural Library, which has been looking to relocate due to the age of its current building, would move into 4F through 6F of the building, while offices and education-related tenants would occupy 7F through 11F. An elevated pedestrian deck would connect 2F of the building with Asahibashi Station and the Kafuna Asahibashi (カフーナ旭橋) mixed-use development located across National Route 330.

While the redevelopment would slightly decrease the capacity of the bus terminal to store buses, the project manager says it is negotiating with bus operators to minimize the impact to bus services, and hopes to finalize the details of the bus terminal by year’s end.

Construction would break ground in the first half of FY2015, with the building opening in spring 2018. The Prefectural Government’s ¥22.6 billion plan for redevelopment around Asahibashi Station were approved in 2003, covering 45,000 sq m in 5 development blocks. Redevelopment of the four other blocks has already been completed, and the bus terminal block is the final piece of the project.

The Bus Terminal redevelopment is the upper left block in this rendering:



===

As a refresher, this is the site. It’s the main bus terminal for Naha City, the capital of Okinawa and the most urban part of the island:

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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:52 AM   #6152
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Iwakuni City, JR West agree on Iwakuni Station improvements
岩国駅整備でJR西と合意

http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201310020009.html

On 2013.10.01, Iwakuni City announced that it had signed an MOU with JR West on 2013.09.25 regarding splitting the cost of upgrades to JR Iwakuni Station, including construction of an east-west public passage (自由通路), elevated station concourse, platform bridge, an East Exit station plaza, entrances to a new underground passage, and a connecting passage to the West Exit bike parking facility. According to the city, the project will cost between ¥8 billion and ¥9 billion. The city will now finalize the construction timeline and cost details for the project, signing a construction agreement with JR West this fiscal year. Completion is targeted for FY2017.

The city would be responsible for the East Exit station plaza, east-west public passage, underground passage entrances, and West Exit bike parking passage, while both JR and the city would bear the costs of the new station building and West Exit station plaza. The exact funding split will be negotiated as part of the final agreements.

The new station building would be a two-story structure (design and floor area TBD). The 6 m wide, 110 m long public passage would connect the station’s West Exit and East Exit and include elevators and escalators at both ends for accessibility. Elevators would also be provided on all three platforms at the station. The West Exit and East Exit station plazas would feature kiss-and-ride zones and event spaces.



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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:54 AM   #6153
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Ridership grows on Fukui Railway
福井鉄道乗客増、黒字転換期待も 新型低床車両導入など奏功

http://www.fukuishimbun.co.jp/localn...way/46030.html

On 2013.10.02, it was revealed that ridership on the Fukui Railway Fukubu Line from April through August of this year increased 8.7% from the same period last year, on pace to beat the railway’s ridership in FY2010, when recorded growth of 5% or more for the first time in 47 years. It’s believed that the railway’s efforts to capture regular commuters, as well as the introduction of modern LRVs, helped contribute to the ridership growth.

In particular, ridership for the five-month period was 790,000, on-pace to beat the 5.6% year-over-year growth growth recorded in FY2010 and possibly marking the railway’s fifth straight year of ridership growth since the national, prefectural, and municipal governments began providing funding to help get the railway back on its feet. Marketing efforts to capture commuters at companies and high schools located along the line, as well as the introduction of a new low-floor LRV dubbed the Fukuram, have contributed to 10% growth in the commuter pass sector. In fact, the railway may actually record a surplus this year if the growth keeps pace.

According to the Prefectural Government, the railway recorded approx. 1.778 million passengers last fiscal year, and the latest news means the railway may eventually reach its target of 2 million annual passengers for FY2017.



===

Clips of Fukui Railway’s new LRV:



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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:55 AM   #6154
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Sendai Airport Transit records highest ridership month
仙台空港鉄道 8月の利用客、30.4万人で最多に

http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2013/10/20131001t12016.htm

On 2013.09.30, Miyagi Prefecture published ridership data for the Sendai Airport Transit that indicates the railway carried 304,965 passengers in August 2013 (a 27.8% year-over-year increase), the highest ridership month for the line since opening in 2007. Airport-related usage has risen as a result of increased air traffic at Sendai Airport, which is now serving 61 domestic flights a day, its highest flight volume ever.

In particular, Sendai Airport Station recorded 153,258 passengers (29.4% increase), followed by 114,103 passengers for Mori Sekinoshita (18.2% increase) and 37,604 passengers for Mitazono (58.9% increase). It’s believed that events at the Aeon Mall performance stage near Mori Sekinoshita Station also helped to fuel the ridership growth, although much of the growth is the result of increased airport passengers. Passenger volume at Sendai Airport in August reached 308,737, the first time the airport broke 300,000 passengers a month since November 2007.

===

Good to see the line doing well.
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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:56 AM   #6155
quashlo
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New station on Ōu Line in Tendō City near proposed soccer stadium
天童にJR新駅 芳賀地区、モンテ本拠近く

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/yam...OYT8T01348.htm

On 2013.10.04, Tendō City announced that it has finalized plans to construct a new station between Tendō and Takadama (高擶) Stations on the JR Ōu Line. According to JR East’s Yamagata division, this would be the first new JR station to be constructed in Yamagata Prefecture since the privatization of JNR. Large-scale redevelopment is currently underway at the proposed station site in the city’s Haga (芳賀) district. Tendō City had been petitioning for a new station at the location since 2010, but an agreement has now been signed with the railway to formally construct the station.

The new station would be located 2.1 km from Tendō Station and 1.3 km north of Takadama Station, and would feature one 130 m long platform capable of handling six-car formations. The station would be unstaffed. A formal name has not yet been decided, but the project would cost about ¥600 million, of which the city would bear the full share. The design work will be completed by fiscal year close, and after JR East formally receives approval for the new station from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, construction will begin. The station would open several years after that.

Land redevelopment for up to 1,300 households and 4,000 residents is underway around the station. The proposed Aeon Mall Tendō (イオンモール天童) is scheduled to open next spring at a location northwest of the station. A 4,000 sq m plaza would also be constructed west of the station, improving convenience for local residents, as well as shoppers and commuters from within and outside of the city.

The Yamagata Prefectural Sports Park (県総合運動公園), which house ND Soft Stadium Yamagata, the home stadium of J2 soccer franchise Montedio Yamagata, would be about 11-minutes walking distance from the new station—a 16-minute decrease from the current closest station to the stadium. Takadama.

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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:57 AM   #6156
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Ōfunado Line BRT extension opens
大船渡線BRTの専用道延長 碁石海岸口駅も新設

http://www.iwate-np.co.jp/cgi-bin/to...cgi?20130929_2

New segments of the Ōfunado Line BRT, a BRT replacement for the Ōfunado Line damaged in the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, increasing the length of the exclusive right-of-way from 3.2 km to 13.7 km and reducing travel times between Rikuzen Takata (陸前高田) and Sakari (盛) Stations by 9 minutes. The new Goishi Kaigan-guchi (碁石海岸口) Station also opened in Massakichō, Ōfunado City (大船渡市末崎町) near the Massaki grade crossing, where public housing for residents displaced the disaster is planned.

The newly-opened sections of exclusive BRT ROW include about 10 km between Ōfunado Station and Otomo (小友) Station in Rikuzen Takata City, as well as 0.5 km near Takekoma (竹駒) Station, resulting in 13.2 km of continuous exclusive ROW between Sakari and Otomo.

FNN local news video report:

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Old October 5th, 2013, 04:58 AM   #6157
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New Tōkyō Metro CM

Tōkyō Metro released a new CM with Horikita Maki called “大人を愉しむ篇” (“Enjoying a Grown-up’s Tōkyō”) this month. 60 s CM spot + 60 s “making of” video:



New posters.
Click for large size.

August 2013
Toyosu Station
距離が縮まる篇 (Getting to Know Each Other a Little Better)



September 2013
Roppongi Itchōme Station
フレッシュになれる篇 (A Fresh Start)



October 2013
Higashi-Ginza Station
大人を愉しむ篇 (Enjoying a Grown-up’s Tōkyō)

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Old October 5th, 2013, 09:58 PM   #6158
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Sendai Airport Transit records highest ridership month
仙台空港鉄道 8月の利用客、30.4万人で最多に

http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2013/10/20131001t12016.htm

On 2013.09.30, Miyagi Prefecture published ridership data for the Sendai Airport Transit that indicates the railway carried 304,965 passengers in August 2013 (a 27.8% year-over-year increase), the highest ridership month for the line since opening in 2007. Airport-related usage has risen as a result of increased air traffic at Sendai Airport, which is now serving 61 domestic flights a day, its highest flight volume ever.

In particular, Sendai Airport Station recorded 153,258 passengers (29.4% increase), followed by 114,103 passengers for Mori Sekinoshita (18.2% increase) and 37,604 passengers for Mitazono (58.9% increase). It’s believed that events at the Aeon Mall performance stage near Mori Sekinoshita Station also helped to fuel the ridership growth, although much of the growth is the result of increased airport passengers. Passenger volume at Sendai Airport in August reached 308,737, the first time the airport broke 300,000 passengers a month since November 2007.

===

Good to see the line doing well.
This is the kind of good news that they need.................especially after the massive earthquake two years ago
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Old October 7th, 2013, 04:10 PM   #6159
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6 months after the work to link the Toyoko line with the Fukutoshin line at Shibuya, demolition work continues slowly along the old line.

Here's a selection of 36 of some of the 400 plus photos I've taken in the past couple of years of this stretch of track.

https://plus.google.com/photos/11170...68903938066641

I am not sure of the best way to organise them. Would strictly date order be more obvious? rather than trying to link shots of the same place side by side over different time periods ?

I also have even more photos from the Odakyu line Shimokitawa project and I hope to get round to organising them later on.
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Old October 7th, 2013, 04:39 PM   #6160
starrwulfe
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Date order is best for me-- I live along the line myself and use it everyday from Yokohama to Saitama.

It would help me compare my own shots I have taken over the past 3 years too.
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