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Old September 28th, 2013, 07:12 AM   #6161
quashlo
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Well, I should probably disclose the stuff that is supposed to break ground by FY2015, which is the orange / brown stuff in the maps… I only focused on the projects that were supposed to be completed by FY2015, so there’s actually quite a few more projects where not much progress has been made, but what they have built in ~15 years is still pretty impressive, especially considering it was already the largest urban rail network in the world. I would expect some, if not most, of these to be carried over and become “red” lines in the next report (i.e., to be completed by FY2030).

Yokohama Line 3 (Yokohama Municipal Subway Blue Line) extension: Susukino – Azamino
Construction of new Yokohama Loop Railway (Yokohama Municipal Subway Green Line): Motomachi – Negishi – Kami-Ōoka – Higashi-Totsuka – Futamatagawa – Nakayama
New Tōkyō Line 1 (Toei Asakusa Line) branch to Tōkyō Station and new passing tracks near Asakusabashi to permit limited express services
Extension of Tōkyō Line 8 (Tōkyō Metro Yūrakuchō Line): Toyosu – Tōyōchō – Sumiyoshi – Oshiage – Yotsugi – Kameari – Noda City
Extension of Tōkyō Line 11 (Tōkyō Metro Hanzōmon Line): Oshiage – Yotsugi – Matsudo
Construction of new connector between Keikyū Airport Line and Tōkyū Mekama Line (Kamakama Line): Ōtorii – Keikyū Kamata – Kamata; through-service with Keikyū Airport Line at Ōtorii Station and with Tōkyū Mekama Line (Tamagawa Line) at Kamata Station
Extension of JR Keiyō Line to JR Chūō Line: Tōkyō – Shinjuku – Mitaka; through-service with Chūō Line at Mitaka Station
Construction of new JR Sōbu Line – Keiyō Line Connector: Tsudanuma – Funabashi – Shin-Urayasu – Shin-Kiba; through-service with Sōbu Line at Tsudanuma Station and with Rinkai Line at Shin-Kiba Station
Quadruple-tracking of JR Chūō Line: Mitaka – Tachikawa
Extension of Tōkyō Waterfront New Transit Rinkai Line (Yurikamome): Toyosu – Kachidoki
Extension of Tama Urban Monorail: Kamikitadai – Hakonegasaki
Extension of Chiba Urban Monorail: Chūō Hakubutsukan / Shiritsu Byōin-mae – Hoshikuki Terminal

In particular, the policy objective related to airport access is interesting... Obviously, the Asakusa Line bypass will benefit from this, but I wonder if they'll also accelerate the Kamakama Line, given that rail access to Haneda from the west side of the Yamanote Line currently requires at least one transfer. Could be a similar deal for conversion of the Tōkaidō Freight Line to passenger service and connection with the Rinkai Line.

I'm also curious to see what proposals they envision to accomodate the Chūō Shinkansen maglev... Could definitely see double-tracking of the JR Sagami Line, and maybe conversion of the Yokohama Line to 10-car formations, perhaps even some new stuff, like grade-separation of the Keikyū Line near Shinagawa.
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Old September 28th, 2013, 09:07 AM   #6162
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
Living in the US, to me it's absolutely astounding how many of these planned improvements they were able to follow through with, mostly on schedule.

This further reinforces my notion of Japan as being dominated by the bureaucracy. The planning agencies set their plans, and they stick to them, TO THE LETTER.

Here in the US, transit plans are torn up or shelved on an almost daily basis due to lack of available funds or a shift in the political winds.
The hyperpolitical environment where infrastructure projects and the election year cycle are intermixed is a big stumbling block in getting anything done, as infrastructure is by definition something done in the long term- while politicians are merely looking to what will get them re-elected, which is their job, when all is said and done. This is one of the arguments given in pushing for a national or state infrastructure bank scheme, though I don't know if that idea will get anywhere.
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Old September 28th, 2013, 09:19 AM   #6163
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Quote:
The city has contacted a total of 9 construction and housing development firms in Greater Tōkyō, Kansai, and Hiroshima about their potential interest in land development at the station, with six declined, saying that the risks were too high.
I reckon a place like Yonago doesn't have the rail passenger traffic, especially peak commuter traffic by salaried workers (i.e. not just high school students and the elderly), who retailers covet. Most people in the 20~50 yrs. old bracket likely drive, and thus retail development would be centered on ring road and national highway sites on the fringes of the city, where there is plenty of free parking.
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Old September 28th, 2013, 06:22 PM   #6164
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I thought it might be interesting to also post the data on peak-hour, peak-direction train crowding on the main lines. The original data is from 1998, and the latest data is from FY2013, so it's about 15 years and roughly corresponds with the timeframe of the 2000 plan. The FY2011 data is only for the lines above 180% loading.

Loading is pretty much down across the board, indicating that improvmements and upgrades in the last 15 years have substantially eased overcrowding. Interesting that the Jōban lines, which were some of the most crowded, don't even show up among the top anymore, likely a result of introduction of new rolling stock and the opening of the Tsukuba Express.

Kanagawa area lines:

Code:
                                                                           1998             FY2011
                                                               --------------------------- -------
Line                        Load Point                            Demand  Capacity Loading Loading
==========================  =================================  ========= ========= ======= =======
* JR Tōkaidō Line           Kawasaki → Shinagawa                  73,990    35,320    209%    186%
* JR Yokosuka Line          Nishi-Ōi → Shinagawa                  39,550    20,460    193%    195%
  JR Keihin-Tōhoku Line     Ōimachi → Shinagawa                   78,700    33,600    234%    183%
  JR Yokohama Line          Kozukue → Shin-Yokohama               38,400    19,040    202%    184%
  JR Nambu Line             Musashi Nakahara → Musashi Kosugi     40,150    17,640    228%    193%
* Odakyū Odawara Line       Setagaya Daita → Shimo-Kitazawa       73,758    38,612    191%    186%
* Tōkyū Tōyoko Line         Yūtenji → Naka-Meguro                 56,067    29,776    188%
* Tōkyū Shin-Tamagawa Line  Ikejiri Ōhashi → Shibuya              77,751    39,872    195%    181%
* Keikyū Main Line          Tobe → Yokohama                       51,473    33,792    152%
  Sōtetsu Main Line         Nishi-Yokohama → Hiranumabashi        61,845    40,880    151%
  TOTAL                                                          591,684   308,992    191%
Tama area lines:

Code:
                                                                           1998             FY2011
                                                               --------------------------- -------
Line                        Load Point                            Demand  Capacity Loading Loading
==========================  =================================  ========= ========= ======= =======

* JR Chūō Rapid Line        Nakano → Shinjuku                     93,650    42,000    223%    193%
  JR Ōme Line               Nishi-Tachikawa → Tachikawa           37,920    20,720    183%
* Seibu Shinjuku Line       Shimo-Ochiai → Takadanobaba           56,907    33,600    169%
* Keiō Line                 Shimo-Takaido → Meidai-mae            70,398    42,000    168%
* Keiō Inokashira Line      Shinsen → Shibuya                     29,934    19,980    150%
  TOTAL                                                          288,809   158,300    182%
Saitama area lines:

Code:
                                                                           1998             FY2011
                                                               --------------------------- -------
Line                        Load Point                            Demand  Capacity Loading Loading
==========================  =================================  ========= ========= ======= =======

  JR Saikyō Line            Ikebukuro → Shinjuku                  59,300    28,000    212%
                            Itabashi → Ikebukuro                                              198%
  JR Utsunomiya Line        Toro → Ōmiya                          45,000    23,380    192%
  JR Takasaki Line          Miyahara → Ōmiya                      51,300    24,500    209%    191%
* Tōbu Tōjō Line            Kita-Ikebukuro → Ikebukuro            56,357    37,260    151%
* Seibu Ikebukuro Line      Shiinamachi → Ikebukuro               63,812    35,840    178%
* Tōbu Isesaki Line         Kosuge → Kita-Senju                   78,854    49,056    161%
* Eidan Hibiya Line         Minowa → Iriya                        49,939    28,224    177%
* Toei Mita Line            Nishi-Sugamo → Sugamo                 24,870    14,280    174%
  TOTAL                                                          429,432   240,540    179%
Jōban area lines:

Code:
                                                                           1998             FY2011
                                                               --------------------------- -------
Line                        Load Point                            Demand  Capacity Loading Loading
==========================  =================================  ========= ========= ======= =======

* JR Jōban Rapid Line       Matsudo → Kita-Senju                  82,940    41,160    202%
* JR Jōban Local Line       Kameari → Ayase                       72,760    32,200    226%
* Eidan Chiyoda Line        Machiya → Nishi-Nippori               81,470    38,448    212%
  TOTAL                                                          237,170   111,808    212%
Chiba area lines:

Code:
                                                                           1998             FY2011
                                                               --------------------------- -------
Line                        Load Point                            Demand  Capacity Loading Loading
==========================  =================================  ========= ========= ======= =======
* JR Sōbu Rapid Line        Shin-Koiwa → Kinshichō                63,490    34,740    183%
* JR Sōbu Local Line        Kinshichō → Ryōgoku                   84,000    36,400    231%    201%
  JR Keiyō Line             Kasai Rinkai Kōen → Shin-Kiba         44,430    24,080    185%    175%
* Keisei Main Line          Daijingū-shita → Keisei Funabashi     27,355    16,764    163%
* Keisei Oshiage Line       Yotsugi → Yahiro                      32,416    19,304    168%
* Eidan Tōzai Line          Monzen Nakachō → Kayabachō            77,407    38,448    201%
                            Kiba → Monzen Nakachō                                             199%
* Toei Asakusa Line         Oshiage → Honjo Azumabashi            32,087    23,040    139%
  TOTAL                                                          361,185   192,776    187%
Other lines:

Code:
                                                                           1998             FY2011
                                                               --------------------------- -------
Line                        Load Point                            Demand  Capacity Loading Loading
==========================  =================================  ========= ========= ======= =======
* JR Keihin-Tōhoku Line     Ueno → Okachimachi                    79,050    33,600    235%    194%
  JR Yamanote Line          Ueno → Okachimachi                    87,530    36,960    237%    200%
  JR Yamanote Line          Yoyogi → Harajuku                     73,820    36,960    200%
* JR Chūō Local LIne        Yoyogi → Sendagaya                    31,300    32,200     97%
* Eidan Ginza Line          Akasaka Mitsuke → Tameike-Sannō       32,451    18,240    178%
* Eidan Marunouchi Line     Shin-Ōtsuka → Myōgadani               40,170    23,731    169%
* Eidan Yūrakuchō Line      Higashi-Ikebukuro → Gokokuji          61,437    34,176    180%
* Eidan Hanzōmon Line       Shibuya → Omotesandō                  67,453    38,448    175%
* Toei Shinjuku Line        Shinjuku → Shinjuku Sanchōme          28,950    19,320    150%
  TOTAL                                                          502,161   273,635    184%
Total:

Code:
                                                                           1998
                                                               ---------------------------
Line                        Load Point                            Demand  Capacity Loading
==========================  =================================  ========= ========= =======
* Select 31 lines                                                1,792,046   980,291    183%
  All 42 lines                                                 2,410,441 1,286,051    187%
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Old September 29th, 2013, 06:11 AM   #6165
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Question: has anyone done an estimate of what will happen to ridership patterns once the Tōhoku Jūkan Line opens in March 2014? Does this mean that the Yamanote Line between Shinagawa and Ueno stations and the Keihin-Tōhoku Line between Omiya and Shinagawa stations will experience a lot less crowding, since trains coming in from Takasaki and Utsunomiya can now directly go to at least Shinagawa Station?
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Old September 29th, 2013, 06:41 AM   #6166
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The intent of the project is to bring them below 180%, as this is the target maximum crowding for all major lines in Greater Tōkyō.

One interesting tidbit related to the Tōhoku Through Line is that they began testing 211 series on the Jōban Rapid Line starting earlier this year, not for passenger service, but for deadheading. The thought is that some of the trains will need to deadhead between the yard at Tabata (田畑操車場) and Ueno Station, and it seems that they intend to do this via the Ueno ‒ Kanamachi ‒ Tabata Yard ‒ Kanamachi ‒ Ueno route:

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Old September 29th, 2013, 06:51 AM   #6167
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I'm a little confused. Which train sets will be capable of making the trip over the steep grades of the Jukan line and which ones won't? Will the 211, 215, and their contemporaries be able to make it? What about the limited express sets, such as JR Central's 373 (in case they ever decide to revive the Tokai and extend it north) and JR East's trains from Izumo? I guess it's unlikely that the sleeper trains such as Hokutosei and Cassiopeia will make the journey.

Also, I was under the impression that the 211s had fazed out all of the single deck green-class cars-and that set also looks to have a double-deck cab car? I wasn't aware of any double deck cab cars other than the Marine Liner and the 215. Also, is the 215 (that's the one that's all double-deck, right?) all-seating? It seems to have both Green and Regular class seats, but I can't get a good description. Do they offer standing room on those liners?
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Old September 29th, 2013, 08:11 AM   #6168
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JR East trains will be using the Tohoku Junkan Line exclusively. As the Junkan Line has 33 permil grades, 211 series cannot run on the line, except perhaps deadheading. The Tokai is history, and will not be revived- JR Tokai wants you to take the Tokaido Shinkansen.
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Old September 29th, 2013, 07:53 PM   #6169
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Some vids:

Construction work at Nishiya Station for the Sōtetsu–Tōkyū Link (2013.09):



Some clips of the 205 series on the Saikyō Line, which will soon be taken off the line with the introduction of the wider-body E233 series.



A better video of the newly-installed color-coded LED lighting at Higashi-Kanagawa Station (2013.09.15):



Tōbu Isesaki Line trains and the Tōkyō Sky Tree on a mid-autumn full moon (中秋の名月) (2013.09.19):

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Old September 30th, 2013, 07:21 AM   #6170
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Groundbreaking soon for Urasoe Yui Rail extension
支柱工事着手へ モノレールの浦添延長

http://ryukyushimpo.jp/news/storyid-...rytopic-3.html

On 2013.09.27, Okinawa Prefecture signed a ¥68.72 million contract with the general contractor selected to construct the columns to support the monorail viaduct for the Yui Rail extension into Urasoe City. Work will begin sometime around the groundbreaking ceremony scheduled for 2013.11.02. Two 20 m tall columns will be completed along Kokusai Center Road (国際センター線) in Urasoe City by February 2014. The 4.1 km extension will construct 4 new stations on the line at Ishimine, Kyōzuka, Maeda, and Uranishi. Construction will be completed in 2018, with an opening in spring 2019 following testing.

===

Good to see this going forward…

Early morning roundtrip cab view on the Yui Rail, uncut:

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Old September 30th, 2013, 07:22 AM   #6171
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Plan for Exit Exit station plaza at Kumamoto Station would realign trams into station
市電、熊本駅舎乗り入れ 東口駅前広場の整備案

http://kumanichi.com/news/local/main/20130927002.shtml

On 2013.09.26, Kumamoto City unveiled a layout plan for the new East Exit station plaza at JR Kumamoto Station (Kasuga, Nishi Ward, Kumamoto City) scheduled to open in FY2019 with the completion of the elevation of the zairaisen (conventional line) tracks. The layout would bring the city’s trams directly into the station building, as well as consolidate the bus terminals to improve user friendliness.

The master plan for improvements to the East Exit station plaza was published in 2005. The implementation was broken into two phases—the first for the opening of the full length of the Kyūshū Shinkansen and the second for the completion of elevation of the zairaisen tracks at the station. The current layout is only a temporary design following completion of the Phase 1 improvements. Plans to bring the trams directly into the station were originally proposed by the mayor in 2006 in a meeting with the governor of Kumamoto Prefecture and executives from JR Kyūshū, and work on revising the final design.

According the plan, a wye would be constructed leading into the station, but the track would be designed for unrestricted pedestrian access, without fencing. There is no precedent for this type of design in Japan, and in order to resolve the safety-related issues, a decision will be made next fiscal year on whether the tram realignment can be completed in time with the rest of the station plaza improvements.

The plan would consolidate the two bus terminals at the East Exit into a single location on the left of the station building. Kumamoto Station was designated as a bus sub-terminal in the Public Transit Grand Design (公共交通グランドデザイン) plan published in March of last year by the city. A taxi zone would also be constructed nearby. The central section of the plaza would be an “environmental zone” (環境空間) with greening and other treatments, while the right section would feature the primary taxi zone and a pickup / dropoff zone for private autos. The approx. 3 ha of land originally for Platform 0 at the station will be developed with active uses by JR Kyūshū.



===

The current layout at the East Exit (after the first phase of improvements):

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Old September 30th, 2013, 07:23 AM   #6172
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desuka to expand transfer discounts
高知のIC乗車券「ですか」乗り継ぎ割引 利用拡大狙う

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNZO...20C13A9LA0000/

desuka, the IC farecard for Tosa Electric Railroad (土佐電気鉄道) and Kōchi Prefecture Transport (高知県交通), will rollout a special transfer discount for transferring between trains and buses starting October 1. Passengers transferring at the designated bus stop or train station can reduce their total fare by ¥30 to ¥100. The program is designed to encourage acceptance of desuka and increase ridership.

The discount program will be in effect for 9 locations in Kōchi Prefecture including Kōchi Station and Harimaya-bashi (やはりまや橋). For destinations within Kōchi, the discount is ¥30, increasing to ¥100 for destinations in Tosa City and Ino Town (いの町). For Aki City (安芸市), the discount is ¥50 plus 10% off the fare on the connecting mode. The discounts will take effect for transfers within 60 minutes, and will be valid on Tosa Electric Railroad and Kōchi Prefecture Transport, as well as the Tosaden Dream Service (土佐電ドリームサービス), Kōchi Prefecture Noreth Transport (県交北部交通), and Kōchi East Transport (高知東部交通), even if the connecting services are operated by different transit operators. The discounts will be calculated automatically when passengers touch their IC card to card readers.

There are currently 88,000 desuka cards in circulation as of August.

===

Morning rush hour at Harimayabashi, the main junction in the Tosaden network:



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Old September 30th, 2013, 07:24 AM   #6173
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Hitachi to provide realtime data system for Toyota City bus services
日立、豊田市でバス向け運行最適化支援システムの運用実証を開始

http://response.jp/article/2013/09/27/207268.html

Hitachi (日立製作所) will begin a field trial to test a prototype system to optimize public transit operations in Aichi Prefecture’s Toyota City in response to actual passenger demand starting October 1.

The project is part of a “low-carbon city” effort and will Introduce a system to provide bus operators and passengers with realtime bus status. Meitetsu Bus vehicles will be equipped with on-board equipment to relay the information, which will also be coordinated with bus data for municipally-operated community bus services. The system continually collects data on bus status within the city, transmitting it to bus operators and passengers.

Hitachi will also introduce a bus service plan simulator that can simulate operating plans in response to passenger demand based on empirical data on bus operations and ridership demand. Information to passengers will be provided through Toyota Motor’s Ha:mo (ハーモ) public transit information system, which will also maintain data on the ridership demand.

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Old September 30th, 2013, 07:25 AM   #6174
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New 703 series to enter service on Aoi Mori Railway in March 2014
新型車両2編成、14年3月導入へ 青森・青い森鉄道

http://www.asahi.com/area/aomori/art...309260346.html

Third-sector operator Aoi Mori Railway in Aomori Prefecture announced that it will introduce two new trainsets (4 cars total) with the opening of the new Tsutsui Station (筒井駅) between Aomori and Higashi-Aomori in March of next year. The new trains will feature lower car floors for barrier-free access and a capacity of 270 passengers per train, as much as 5% more passenger capacity than existing trains.

In particular, the new trains eliminate the 16 cm gap between car floor and platform, increasing floor area, and feature 15 cm of additional width (295 cm total). Passengers in wheelchairs can easily pass in the aisles and use the restrooms inside the train. The operator’s cab will be designed of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) to prevent snow accumulation. These are the first new trains on the line since 2002, and the two sets will cost ¥840 million, entering service with the schedule changes to accommodate the new Tsutsui Station in March of next year after testing and burn-in.

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Old September 30th, 2013, 11:17 AM   #6175
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Toei Ōedo Line passengers at Roppongi Station can now pass through the Hibiya Line station for free.
Tōkyō MX news report (2013.09.27):

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Old September 30th, 2013, 09:49 PM   #6176
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Question: What are good examples of Park-and-Ride facilities in Japan?

I.e. Let's say you're driving from your home in the suburbs or in a more rural area then when you want to travel to urban city area but you don't want to go by car within the city center due to severe shortage of parking spaces.

Something like that.

I ask that because searching for "park and ride Japan" on Google was useless as all it gave me were videos and links to "Jurassic Park the Ride @ Universal Studios Japan"

There, that's pretty much my question
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Old October 1st, 2013, 02:35 AM   #6177
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Park-and-rides are (thankfully) fairly rare in Japan…

Sapporo Municipal Subway might be the best example. There’s a list of the parking facilities in the PDF here:
http://www.city.sapporo.jp/sogokotsu...rkandride.html

Tsukuba Express also has some, including these in Tsukuba City:
http://www.city.tsukuba.ibaraki.jp/1...52/000777.html

None of them are all that big, though, and in some cases, the parking is shared—in other words, it’s just one structure serving a variety of uses like office, retail, etc., not exclusively just for train passengers.
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Old October 1st, 2013, 05:09 AM   #6178
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Speaking of commuter train service, I believe that JR West is about to take delivery of the first 225 Series commuter trains based out of Hiroshima--I believe the first trainsets are being completed at KHI near Kobe as I type this. They are intended to eventually replace all the aging 115 Series trainsets now running west of Himeji Station.
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Old October 1st, 2013, 06:56 AM   #6179
quashlo
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MHI to supply additional trains for Miami International Airport APM
http://www.mhi.co.jp/en/news/story/1309261716.html

Quote:
Tokyo, September 26, 2013 – Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has received an order for capacity expansion work, including the provision of four additional railway cars, for the automated people mover (APM) system in operation at Miami International Airport (MIA) in Miami, Florida. MHI will manufacture the cars in-house, with delivery scheduled for 2016.



The order was placed by the Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) through Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc. (MHIA), a wholly owned MHI subsidiary. The APM system currently in operation at MIA, dubbed the MIA Mover, was ordered in 2008 and completed in 2011. It connects the airport with the Miami Intermodal Center (MIC), a multi-modal transportation hub, a distance of approximately 2 kilometers. MHIA is presently providing system operation and maintenance services under a five-year contract. The four new cars on order are identical to those now in operation.

Since shortly after its inauguration the MIA Mover has consistently attracted more passengers than initially projected, raising calls for necessary capacity expansion. The newly ordered expansion work will increase the number of cars from eight to twelve, significantly helping to relieve onboard congestion and thereby boosting passenger comfort and convenience.

The APM is a driverless, fully automated passenger transport system. Cars are equipped with rubber tires, resulting in smooth and quiet – and therefore eco-friendly – operation.

MHI today enjoys a leading position in the global APM market. In the United States, to date the company has delivered a total of four systems: besides the MIA Mover, it has also delivered APM systems for MIA’s North Terminal, Washington Dulles International Airport and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. It also boasts an abundant track record in Asia and the Middle East, having completed systems in Hong Kong, Singapore (Changi), Korea (Incheon) and the UAE (Dubai). In 2010 MHI received an order for 108 new cars for the Yurikamome Waterfront Line in Tokyo, followed in 2011 by a comprehensive order for the Macau Light Rapid Transit (LRT) system. MHI believes that this robust record in APM deliveries and operation, coupled with the outstanding reliability the systems have demonstrated, led to the company's winning of the latest order from MDAD.

This year MHI also received an order for capacity expansion work on the Sengkang and Punggol LRT lines in Singapore, including conversion to a two-car system. Leveraging that order as well as the latest order from MDAD, going forward MHI intends to become increasingly proactive in undertaking marketing activities targeting not only new APM systems but also extension and expansion work on existing systems worldwide.
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Old October 1st, 2013, 06:58 AM   #6180
quashlo
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Keihan Keishin Line service restored after two-week hiatus
京阪京津線 地下鉄乗り入れ再開 2週間で2209本運休 滋賀

http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news...2080001-n1.htm

The Keihan Keishin Line connecting Ōtsu City and Yamashina Ward, Kyōto City has resumed through-running with the Kyōto Municipal Subway Tōzai Line around 5:20 pm on 2013.09.30 after torrential downpours and flooding from Typhoon #18 left the line out of commission since 2013.09.16. From the start of service on 2013.09.16 until 5:00 pm on 2013.09.29, a total of 2,209 trains on the Keishin Line were cancelled, affecting about 12,000 passengers on average each day and a total of 163,000 passengers for the entire two-week hiatus.

In terms of damage, the section between Kami-Sakaemachi and Ōtani required the most time to repair after 4,000 cu m of mud washed into the right-of-way from the adjacent Agatsuma River (吾妻川). Work to repair the line lasted up until 2013.09.28. The Misasagi (御陵) – Keihan Yamashina section of the line in Yamashina Ward, Kyōto City was flooded out, and work to pump out the water and dispose of mud and other debris lasted until 2013.09.27.

The Keishin Line celebrated its 100th anniversary last year, but this was the first time a natural disaster has wreaked severe damage to the line. The line had never been closed for more than two days as a result of water damage.

===

While the Keishin Line is fairly well-utilized, it’s hard not to get a little anxious when a line stays closed for an extended period of time, as this often means abandonment for a lot of rural lines in Japan.

Clips at Hama-Ōtsu on the first day of service. Trains operated a special schedule.



Testing on the repaired section of the line:



Testing on the street-running section near Kami-Sakaemachi:

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