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Old November 6th, 2013, 08:19 PM   #6301
Blackraven
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Some questions:

1) 205 series Saikyō Line trains bound for Jakarta

What's the usual procedures involved when Japan sells or donates their old trains to other countries?

I ask that because I always assumed this scenario: "Sell/donate train -> ship to country of destination -> End of story"

2) Marubeni and Tōshiba have also released official English press releases on the recent Bangkok Purple Line win:

So JR (at least JR East) is starting to go into overseas business ventures? At what extent will they operate or what can they do or are allowed to 'in foreign soil'?

and last

3)

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
including a seat layout change from transverse to longitudinal seating
Is it because of increasing usage in Yurikamome service that has led management to go for trains with more passenger capacity? (i.e. supply to meet the demand...or avoid overcongestion?)
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Old November 7th, 2013, 12:56 AM   #6302
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Is it because of increasing usage in Yurikamome service that has led management to go for trains with more passenger capacity? (i.e. supply to meet the demand...or avoid overcongestion?)
Yes. The current design isn't really suited for the level of demand and crowding.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
What's the usual procedures involved when Japan sells or donates their old trains to other countries?

I ask that because I always assumed this scenario: "Sell/donate train -> ship to country of destination -> End of story"
Particularly when providing trains to developing countries, the Japanese side also typically performs the necessary mods. Although this isn't always the case, I suspect it was the case here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
So JR (at least JR East) is starting to go into overseas business ventures? At what extent will they operate or what can they do or are allowed to 'in foreign soil'?
Depends on the type of contract and its provisions / requirements, as well as the local regulations of the country in question.

The standard contract to "operate" a franchise will typically involve only day-to-day service and maintenance, as the infrastructure and rolling stock will still remain under the ownership of the contracting body (usually government entity). You may have leeway in some minor areas, though... In terms of scheduling / timetabling, for example, the contract may stipulate a certain number of trains per hour on certain routes, but how exactly they provide that minimum service level is up to the operator.

Influencing things like the alignment, station locations, etc. usually requires earlier involvement in the project, in the planning or design phases. The Bangkok contract sounds like build and operate only, although I imagine they will have some leeway in the finer details, like rolling stock appearance, station signage, etc. Larger contracts spanning multiple phases of the project, like design-build or design-build-operate, would give them a bit more say in how the system functions... The Hitachi contract for the British Rail Class 395, for example, encompassed design, build, and maintainence, so they were able to provide more input into the project:

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Old November 7th, 2013, 05:46 AM   #6303
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Speaking of urban transport, what's going on with the planned replacement for the 115 Series EMU's in the Hiroshima area on JR West tracks? I've read the first 225's for Hiroshima-based operations was recently under construction, and hopefully the first completed 225 trainset should be unveiled and test running in the Hiroshima area soon.
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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:50 AM   #6304
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The 3rd annual Mass-Trans Innovation Japan event is currently underway (2013.10.06 – 2013.10.08) at Makuhari Messe in Chiba (suburban Tōkyō). This is the largest transit technology conference in Japan, showcasing innovative new products in all fields of transit.

Sankei video report:

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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:51 AM   #6305
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Kinki Sharyō booth:
http://response.jp/article/2013/11/07/210209.html

A full-scale cutaway model of their LRV for Metro (Los Angeles):



HARMO, their model of battery-powered railcar



Model of the 2000 series for the Sendai Subway Tōzai Line



omniTRAM, a battery-powered LRV model



The articulation unit incorporates the train’s high-speed recharging equipment.

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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:52 AM   #6306
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Mitsubishi Heavy Industries booth:
http://response.jp/article/2013/11/07/210174.html

Full-scale Yurikamome 7300 series car. This is not a model, but an actual car.



The seats are a new model called the G-Fit, a semi high-back design up to shoulder height that is designed to stabilize the passenger’s upper body and hold the legs tight and in place.



Yurikamome bogies. The 7300 series features a new bogie design with a special suspension system that helps to absorb horizontal vibrations and improve ride comfort.



A model of their under-construction state-of-the-art rail testing facility, the Mihara Test Center, which will feature dual-gauge test tracks to allow for testing of both standard (1,435 mm) and narrow (1,067 mm) gauge cars, as well as an HSST maglev test track. This is supposed to begin operating in the latter half of 2014. The facility can also test the full rail system, and includes a mock station and control center. They are considering offering the facility to lease to other manufacturers, as well as a potential training facility for local staff when exporting railway technology to other countries.



A simulation of their advanced platform door system capable of handling 2-, 3-, and 4-door cars:

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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:53 AM   #6307
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J-TREC booth:
http://response.jp/article/2013/11/07/210192.html

The J-TREC booth focused on innovations in interior design, as exemplified through its “sustina” model. This is a new stirrup design for standees that allows passengers to maintain their posture with minimal effort. The stirrup is tensioned to fold up when not in use so that seated passengers attempting to stand avoid bumping their heads.





New seat design.



New spiral stanchion pole design. Other features include glass doors with LCDs and large-screen organic electroluminescence displays (OELDs) for the car ceiling.

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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:54 AM   #6308
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Tōkyō Metro booth:
http://response.jp/article/2013/11/07/210159.html

Focus of the Tōkyō Metro booth was the Ginza Line 1000 series:





The new steering bogies designed to allow for smoother running (and less screeching) on the Ginza Line’s tight curves (tightest is 91 m radius). These were developed jointly with Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation (NSSMC新日鉄住金) and allow about 10 mm displacement between the axles.



Demonstration of the steerability…
On straight sections of track, the arrows are aligned.



On curves, the arrows become un-aligned.



The permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) for the 1000 series, developed by Tōshiba:

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Old November 9th, 2013, 04:32 PM   #6309
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I just read that JR East wants to convert the Tokaidō Freight Branch Line to accommodate passenger trains so they could run passenger trains from the Haneda Airport terminals directly to Tokyo Station, essentially a new passenger branch line from Tamachi Station (the first station on the Tokaidō Main Line/Yamanote Line north of Shinagawa Station). If that is approved, they need to start construction around the middle of 2014 at latest.
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Old November 9th, 2013, 07:39 PM   #6310
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Some articles:
http://www.asahi.com/articles/TKY201311090047.html
http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2013...924461000.html

FNN video report. The NHK article also has a video report.



All this is being spurred by higher passenger numbers expected at Haneda as more and more international flights serve the airport.

This is a huge announcement, although I would hesitate to say that they’re committed to anything at this point, as there is no official press release… So far, they are just using words like 検討 (“considering”, “investigating”) and 方針 (“plan”, "policy (objective)"). Another report from Sankei Shimbun says the probability is high that they will be unable to complete the needed tunnel directly into Haneda in time for the Olympics.

However, I believe this is the first time that JR East has specifically mentioned anything about this project, which was proposed back in 2000 as part of the latest Transport Policy Council (交通審議会) report. I guess this is what they meant by access improvements to Haneda Airport, which they incorporated as a major policy objective in their latest business plan.

The NHK report also mentions that they are considering added capacity on the Tōkyō Monorail (already a subsidiary of JR East) through additional rapid (快速) trains, although I’m not really sure how that will work, as I believe the line is already at capacity… The constraint is the one-track terminal at Hamamatsuchō.

A few years ago, they were considering extension of the monorail north from Hamamatsuchō to Tōkyō, but I find this proposal to be a lot more realistic, frankly, as a lot of the JR alignment from the south into Tōkyō Station is surrounded by buildings… It’s unclear how exactly to get the monorail north from Hamamatsuchō without completely redesigning the Hamamatsuchō terminal and taking out buildings. This proposal msotly just requires building a new tunnel on airport land and some other track work, so it seems much more feasible. The track north of Tōkyō Freight Terminal (東京貨物ターミナル) is already inactive, and the section south of the freight terminal only hosts freight traffic.
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Old November 9th, 2013, 07:41 PM   #6311
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A few points deserving mention…

Rinkai Line connection
None of the articles mention this, as the discussion seems mostly focused on access into Tōkyō Station, but hopefully this will include a track connection to the Rinkai Line yard, as this will then facilitate direct trains between Haneda and Odaiba / Ariake… Not quite Harumi and the Olympic Village, but close enough to many of the Olympic venues. The value of this in the long run is quite large, as you can also take advantage of the existing connection at Shin-Kiba to run directly into Chiba via the Keiyō Line, providing direct airport access to Tōkyō Disneyland and Makuhari, plus potentially through onto the Musashino Line, opening up new routes for one-seat airport rides. The Rinkai Line actually repurposed some of the Tōkaidō Freight Line tunnels to get to Odaiba, so this latest news is just the next step.

Connection at Tamachi
It’s not clear how the track connection at the norh end would work, as I believe the Tōkaidō Freight Line tracks are no longer connected to the rest of the JR mainline tracks and the tracks approaching Tamachi are paralleled on the left by the yard leads for the Tōkaidō Shinkansen. While they could try and connect it into the new station on the Yamanote Line loop being planned at the site of Tamachi Yard (I believe this and the surrounding Shiodome-style redevelopment is also planned for 2020), I’m not sure how they could get over or under the Shinkansen tracks without a major rework of the existing approach, which may be difficult given how this alignment basically weaves around buildings. Depending on where they site the new station, an ideal connection would be to have the line fork so that you could also have trains come directly from Ikebukuro, Shinjuku, and Shibuya and round Shinagawa just like the Narita Express and then go straight through to Haneda.

Central Tōkyō Link
It’s also unclear what effect this will have on the “Central Tōkyō Link” (都心直結線) / Asakusa Line Bypass, which is an effort being led by the MLIT. This new project is being entirely led by JR East (probably in negotiations with JR Freight) and could end up duplicating the Tōkyō – Haneda section, although there would still be no fast connection beyond Tōkyō to Narita, which the Central Tōkyō Link would offer (via the Hokusō Line / Narita SkyAccess Line).

Tōkaidō / Keihin Bypass
The 2000 Transport Policy Council report actually called for a full bypass all the way to Takashima in Yokohama by converting the rest of the freight line south of Haneda. It doesn't appear that this is being considered at this point, as the main objective is to capture Haneda traffic, but this would substantially add capacity between Tōkyō and Yokohama, perhaps the most critical multi-track corridor in Greater Tōkyō outside of the Yamanote Line loop. JR East alone has the Tōkaidō Line, Keihin‒Tōhoku Line, and Yokosuka Line / Shōnan‒Shinjuku Line, plus you've got the Keikyū Main Line (and Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, if you want to include that). Extending the trains south of Haneda would allow for a fast connection to the Minato Mirai redevelopment zone (now established as the new waterfront downtown of Yokohama), which is currently only served by the Keihin‒Tōhoku Line at Sakuragichō and Kannai.

Competition
This would be the third distinct rail line serving Haneda, potentially making it one of the best connected airports anywhere in terms of one-seat coverage of the metropolitan area. More importantly, the new line could potentially take a huge chunk out of Keikyū's share of Haneda ridership, relegating them mostly to passengers coming to and from Kawasaki, Yokohama, and the rest of Kanagawa. It'll also be interesting to see what effects this will have on the Tōkyō Monorail, as there are very few trip generators on the monorail outside of the airport other than the Ōi Racecourse (大井競馬場) and some isolated office mega-developments on the waterfront in Tennōzu Isle (天王洲アイル), which now has a separate station on the Rinkai Line, and Shinagawa Seaside (品川シーサイド).
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Old November 10th, 2013, 07:30 PM   #6312
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Progress (as of November 2013) on the Tōhoku Through Line:

Cab view on a Keihin–Tōhoku Line rapid:



Side view:



View at Kanda:

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Old November 10th, 2013, 07:31 PM   #6313
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ANN video report on JR East’s planned roll-out of a new ¥1 fare structure for IC card users:



More clips of the bar-type platform doors in operation at Sōtetsu Yayoidai Station:



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Old November 10th, 2013, 07:32 PM   #6314
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Sunday evening at Akihabara Station, 10× speed. Never heard the station melodies compressed to this length before.

Chūō–Sōbu Local Line platforms:



Yamanote Line / Keihin–Tōhoku Line platforms:



Clips of quad-track action on the Sōbu Line. Unlike the Chūō Line quad tracks, which are paired by direction, the Sōbu Line tracks are paired by line.

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Last edited by quashlo; November 11th, 2013 at 05:50 PM.
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Old November 11th, 2013, 12:54 PM   #6315
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Thanks. You did post the Chūō–Sōbu video twice, so the Yamanote video is missing.
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Old November 11th, 2013, 05:51 PM   #6316
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Oops... Fixed now.
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Old November 11th, 2013, 08:39 PM   #6317
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Wow, looks like everybody is trying to get access to Haneda. This strikes me as somewhat unnecessary, though, since there is already excellent access from Haneda to central Tokyo.

To me, a more important connection might be from somewhere further west?

But supposing JR were to dig a new tunnel with 1067mm tracks to Haneda, maybe they could share it with Tokyu. The Kamakama line is already planned as an extension of the Tamagawa line and connection to the Keikyu airport line. Build the extension about 1.5km further east and connect it into JR's new airport line instead. As a benefit they then get to avoid the gauge incompatibility with Keikyu and ditch the awkward design for the Kamakama line that requires a cross platform transfer at Kamata and instead get a direct one seat ride on a Tokyu train all the way to Haneda.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 05:58 AM   #6318
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The question is whether Tokyu wants to tunnel under a densely populated section of Ota Ward at great expense and whether that is justified for the potential market served. I reckon they would rather work with fellow mintetsu firm Keikyu (whose "territory" lies east of the Tokaido Line), rather than their mutual competitor JR East.

Last edited by k.k.jetcar; November 12th, 2013 at 06:05 AM.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 10:12 AM   #6319
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While there does appear to be a flurry of Haneda projects at the moment, perhaps the one important distinction to note is that this particular proposal was made directly by JR East. While the project has been mentioned in government documents before, JR East now appears to be taking the lead on it independently, and I suspect they may implement, and even finance, the project entirely on their own, similar to what they are doing for the ¥40 billion Tōhoku Through Line.

For that project, we could argue the real impetus internally for JR East is not so much reduced crowding on the Yamanote Line and Keihin‒Tōhoku Line and improved passenger convenience (and customer satisfaction), but instead the benefits in railyard consolidation and urban redevelopment... They will get boatloads of money selling all that land near Tamachi to developers.

Similarly, JR East's pro-active approach regarding access to Haneda should be an indication that there are very tangible business incentives for them to move forward with the project... It's clear they want the lion's share of the growing Haneda market, and as a private enterprise, they wouldn't have any qualms about stealing passengers from competitors like Keikyū or the airport buses. This proposal also ties in really nicely with the Tamachi redevelopment, as the government is actually trying to market that area as a strategic economic district to house major HQs and improve the global competitiveness of Tōkyō (and Japan) by increasing the allowable FAR... What better way for JR East to enhance the attractiveness of this area than with its own quick, direct rail connection to Haneda?

Compare that to the two other major Haneda access projects: The Asakusa Line Bypass is an MLIT project, while the Kamakama Line is an Ōta Ward project. While both are big, in both cases the railways are taking supporting roles in the project, as there are no mechanisms in place for the railways to recoup the total cost of all the new construction. Other than slight increases in ridership (and fare revenues), there is no incentive for them to take independent action.

Meanwhile, for JR East, it'd probably only cost a few tens of billions of yen to build one or two new stations at Haneda and some additional track connections into the Tōkaidō Freight Line, which is nothing for them and will pay off immediately when developers vie to build all those Class A office towers and luxury condos in Tamachi and they start siphoning riders off competing transit services.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 07:43 PM   #6320
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JICA helps Cambodia with feasibility study for Phnom Penh rail line
カンボジアの高速道・鉄道… 日本の支援で整備

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNAS...01C13A1MM0000/

This article is a general article about infrastructure, but has an interesting tidbit about urban rail…

Phnom Penh is considering a 10 km rail line to connect the central city with Phnom Penh International Airport, to begin operations around 2025. The Japanese government is providing assistance through the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), which has already selected 4 Japanese firms as consultants to help prepare the feasibility study. The study will last from October through to June of next year, and will consider the route, rolling stock, operating structure, and other details of the project.
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