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Old January 10th, 2014, 06:51 AM   #6581
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Mitsui & Co. participates in launch of all-electric bus service in Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25621426

Quote:
Electric buses which their developers say can run all day are set to begin service.

A fleet of eight new electric vehicles will operate along a busy route in Milton Keynes from late January.

The buses can run for longer by virtue of a wireless booster charge they receive at the start and end of the route from plates in the road.

The buses are the first of their kind to operate in the UK.

Inductive charging
The fleet will run on the Number 7 route, which covers 25km (15 miles) between the Milton Keynes suburbs of Wolverton and Bletchley and carries an estimated 800,000 passengers a year.

After a night charging at the depot, the buses will receive booster charges throughout the day at the start and end of the route.

There, the bus parks over plates buried in the road. The driver then lowers receiver plates on the bottom of the bus to within 4cm of the road surface and the bus is charged for around 10 minutes before resuming service.

The system uses a process called inductive charging. Electricity passes through wire coils in the road plates, generating a magnetic field. This field induces a voltage across coils in the bus plates and the vehicle's batteries are charged.



The new vehicles have been built by UK bus manufacturer Wrightbus and will operate as part of a five-year trial programme led by the European division of Japanese company Mitsui and UK engineering group Arup.

"Electric buses have huge potential and we're exploring how they can help us take better care of the environment without compromising passenger service," said John Bint of Milton Keynes Council.

"With the help of the project collaborators, we'll be monitoring the buses closely over the next five years."

Mr Bint told BBC News that if the buses proved a success, the plan was to roll out the system to all bus routes in the town.

John Miles, an Arup consultant and engineering research professor at Cambridge University, said: "These electric buses will be expected to do everything a diesel bus does.

"They will be operating on a demanding urban route, and that's all part of the trial's aim - to prove that electric buses can be tough as well as green."

Similar systems are already being used in Turin and Genoa in Italy, Utrecht in the Netherlands and in Mannheim in Germany.

Last year, South Korea switched on a 12km (7.5-mile) road which can recharge electric vehicles as they drive over it, without the need for vehicles to stop at all. Two public buses are using the Online Electric Vehicle system, or OLEV, in the South Korean city of Gumi.

The technology means the vehicles can be fitted with smaller, lighter batteries, reducing the amount of power required to drive them.
The BBC article has a video report.
There’s also one here:



A bit more details from a Japanese-language article:
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/politics/ne...1030016-n1.htm

This is the first time that a trading company such as Mitsui has taken the lead in converting main bus route to EV buses, and the company hopes to use the results of the Milton Keynes trial in eventually developing the technology for mass adoption in revenue service. Mitsui says that the technology can easily be adapted to London’s famous double-decker services, as well as for temporary bus service during the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tōkyō.
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Old January 10th, 2014, 06:52 AM   #6582
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Hanshin Electric Railway launches new CM series

Haven’t seen any Hanshin CMs in a while, but they just launched a new series featuring actress Satō Eriko (佐藤江梨子) and comedian duo Hamakan (ハマカーン).

CM (30s version).
Apparently, the old guy giving directions for Mikage Station is the president of the railway. Satō Eriko was born in Tōkyō, but she spent some of her childhood in Kōbe, so her Kansai accent seems pretty natural.



“Making of” video:



Press release:
http://www.hanshin.co.jp/company/pre...140107tvcm.pdf

CM web page:
http://www.hanshin.co.jp/taisetsu/cm/

Posters:



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Old January 10th, 2014, 06:56 AM   #6583
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MLIT to expand late-night bus service from Haneda starting October 2014
五輪に向けアクセス改善 深夜バス実証実験へ

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2014...271471000.html

With Tōkyō gearing up to host the 2020 Summer Olympics, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) will begin rolling out landside transport improvements between Haneda Airport and central Tōkyō. The first major step in the process involves a field trial of expanded late-night bus service out of the airport.

In particular, the need for increased transit capacity and improved convenience during the late evening and early morning hours connecting Haneda Airport with central Tōkyō and the rest of the National Capital Region has become a major topic of debate. As a result, the MLIT decided first to enhance late-night bus service, and will begin operating departures from the airport for central Tōkyō after 1:00 am starting in October.

Currently, some international flights arrive at Haneda during the 00:00 hour, which is usually not enough time to make transfers to the last trains and buses of the day leaving from the airport. As a result, passengers have complained about the poor landside connections. Late-night flight slots at Haneda are still not fully utilized, and in order to promote takeup by international flights, the MLIT believes that further improvements to late-night landside connections is critical.

In terms of improved access to Haneda, the MLIT is also looking at the Central Tōkyō Link (都心直結線), a new rail line which would directly connect Haneda and Narita Airports via Central Tōkyō. In addition, JR East recently announced that it would begin investigation of converting unused freight tracks into a new passenger rail line to Haneda.

===

The source article has a video report.

Since the MLIT is basically taking the lead on the Asakusa Line Bypass / Central Tōkyō Link, I wonder if they’ve ever considered designing it to handle late-night service... Much of the funding for this line would likely come from public sources, so they would likely have some leverage in getting the eventual operator of the line to agree to a 24-hour schedule, if they wanted. A few strategically-placed crossovers would allow them to do late-night single-tracking so that they could still perform maintenance work on half of the line.

Of course, this doesn’t resolve the issue with the Keikyū Main Line and Airport Line sections, where I imagine Keikyū may have some objections, but it would be a start.
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Old January 10th, 2014, 09:03 PM   #6584
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Found on the other forum this excellent picture of Shibuya station, which is planed for renovation in future:

image hosted on flickr

Shibuya by tk21hx, on Flickr

What's the status of the project and when it will be completed?
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Old January 10th, 2014, 09:03 PM   #6585
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JR East president says Ueno–Tōkyō Line would be connected with new line to Haneda Airport
JR東が北関東と羽田空港を直結 冨田社長、新線乗り入れ構想表明

http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/new...8040002-n1.htm

As recently announced, JR East is currently considering the possibility of establishing a new passenger line connecting central Tōkyō with Haneda Airport. On 2014.01.09, the railway revealed additional details regarding the project, including a plan to connect the new line with the Tōhoku Through Line (東北縦貫線)—now commonly known as the Ueno–Tōkyō Line (上野東京ライン)—to allow for direct through-services to Haneda Airport from the major cities in northern Kantō. The railway’s president revealed the news in an interview with Sankei Shimbun.

The Ueno–Tōkyō Line would allow trains from the Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and Jōban Line that currently terminate at Ueno to continue to Tōkyō and beyond via the Tōkaidō Line. The railway’s president went further, however, saying that bringing the Ueno–Tōkyō Line all the way to Haneda Airport would allow for direct service to the airport from major cities in the northern reaches of the Kantō Region, including Utsunomiya, Takasaki, and Mito, dramatically changing travel patterns.

The new line currently being considered between central Tōkyō and Haneda Airport would be created by converting the Tōkaidō Freight Line (東海道貨物線), portions of which are no longer in use. The alignment runs from near JR Tamachi Station and along the Tōkyō Bay waterfront. The project would convert these freight tracks for passenger service, creating a new route for JR East into Haneda. The railway’s president says the route will be critical for the future of Japan’s economy and the growth of Tōkyō, and hopes to convince the national government, Tōkyō Metropolitan Government, and local jurisdictions to participate in the project.

Construction of the new route won’t be easy, however, as it requires a new underground alignment beneath Haneda Airport. The railway hopes to quickly determine the engineering feasibility of the proposal, as well as the associated construction costs and ridership forecasts. The railway’s president also indicated that if the new line were to open, JR East would continue operation of the Tōkyō Monorail (Hamamatsuchō – Haneda Airport), a subsidiary of the railway.



===

Some very interesting details revealed by the railway…

The first point is that JR East doesn’t seem to consider the new line to Haneda as a complete replacement of the Tōkyō Monorail… There was some talk that they might abandon the monorail after opening the new line, although the possibility of abandonment still remains in the far future when ridership on the new passenger line has matured, as it may be attractive enough to steal a substantial number of passengers from the monorail.

The second point indicates that a connection into the Tōkaidō Line seems almost certain if they do decide to move forward with the line. There was talk on 2ch of potentially connecting it into the Yokosuka Line, and while this latest news doesn’t rule that out (they could still build multiple connections), it does at least verify the connection with the Tōkaidō Line.
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Old January 10th, 2014, 09:25 PM   #6586
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So two of my most beloved projects are being combined. This is some of the greatest news EVER!

The NHK news report seemed to imply that they are planning to connect the JR East Haneda Line to Narita (via Ueno/Joban line).

How will this affect the Narita Express? I believe that they should re-instate the Wing Express for Narita-Haneda services, and add the Omiya services, dropping them from the Narita Express. Omiya service might add an additional stop at Akabane and/or Urawa.

Thus, you have two splitting trains Tokyo-Narita providing half-hourly service in mid-day, with 15-minute service at the peaks.
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Old January 10th, 2014, 10:56 PM   #6587
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That's cool... But I'm still holding out hope that Tokyu can dual-gauge with Keikyu somehow and run that Kama-Kama extension straight into Haneda.

Upgrade the tracks along the Tamagawa line to allow for passing so expresses can be run straight off of the Toyoko and Meguro line via the Tamagawa station connections between Den-en-chofu and Tamagawa stations.
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Old January 11th, 2014, 07:47 AM   #6588
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I went ahead and drew out one-seat rail access routes (existing and potential future) to Haneda Airport in Google Maps to show how much better access to Haneda could be getting if some of these projects are realized:
https://mapsengine.google.com/map/ed...o.kQp0RboBhSDE



Right now, there are only three main regional routes (shown in red):
  • One south via the Keikyū Main Line to Kawasaki and Yokohama (these services typically terminate at Shin-Zushi).
  • Two routes north into central Tōkyō via the Asakusa Line subway, one taking the Sky Access Line and another, less frequent route via the Keisei Main Line, both terminating at Narita Airport.
There's also the Tōkyō Monorail (dark blue), but it doesn't really offer regional-scope service.

Basically, if JR decides to move forward with their project to convert the Tōkaidō Freight Line, it will dramatically change access to Haneda by introducing one-seat service to large swaths of Saitama, Ibaraki, and Gunma Prefectures (three lime green routes).

I also added a couple other potential “dream” connections for the new JR line:
  • One for the Sōbu Rapid Line (purple), which could be partially operated as a modified Narita Express service that actually goes between Haneda and Narita.
  • One for the Saikyō Line and Kawagoe (dark green), offering direct connections to the west side of the Yamanote Line loop.
An additional connection into the new JR line is the Rinkai Line / Keiyō Line route (sky blue), which wouldn’t require any major capital since everything is already connected. This would be great, as it would offer direct connections to Tōkyō Disney Resort and Makuhari.

I also threw in the potential Kamakama Line connection mentioned by starrwulfe which would allow direct service from the Tōbu Tōjō Line and Seibu Ikebukuro Line via the Fukutoshin Line. Technically, it would also be possible to do a route via the Meguro Line and Namboku Line / Mita Line, although the benefits of this would be far less than a Fukutoshin Line route.

Obviously, one neglected area should be quite obvious just by looking at the map: all of western Tōkyō. If JR ever decides to operate passenger service on the southern half of the Tōkaidō Freight Line, however, there might be options for through-servicing the Nambu Line via the Hama-Kawasaki branch from Shitte, providing direct service to most of Kawasaki all the way up to Tachikawa.
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Old January 11th, 2014, 08:45 AM   #6589
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dimlys1994 View Post
Found on the other forum this excellent picture of Shibuya station, which is planed for renovation in future:

What's the status of the project and when it will be completed?
Depends on which part you are interested in and how you define the “project”… Shibuya Hikarie and the undergrounding of the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line are technically part of the entire redevelopment project, and they’ve already been completed for some time.

In terms of completion of the remaining direct improvements to the station:
  • The East Exit projects, which include the redesign of the Ginza Line tracks and platforms, should be completed by around 2020 or so.
  • The West Exit projects and the improvements to the JR station (relocation of Saikyō Line / Shōnan–Shinjuku Line platforms and consolidation / widening of Yamanote Line platforms) will be finished quite a bit later, in 2027.
It’s actually helpful to also understand the land development on the five blocks at and surrounding the station, as the construction schedules for some of the projects are closely correlated with the station improvement:
  • #1 (145,000 sq m, 34F+B4F) already opened in April 2012 as Shibuya Hikarie (渋谷ヒカリエ), developed by Tōkyū.
  • #2 is the station block (駅街区) and will include 270,000 sq m total spread across 3 towers built directly atop the JR station. The east tower (46F+B7F) will open first in 2020, followed by the central (10F+B2F) and west (13F+B5F) towers in 2027. This project is being jointly developed by Tōkyū, JR East, and Tōkyō Metro. As you can see, these dates correspond with the East Exit and West Exit improvements… They are basically starting at the east end of the station and gradually working their way west.
  • #3 is the Dōgenzaka block (道玄坂街区) and will include 59,000 sq m (17F+B5F), developed by Tōkyū. Scheduled completion is FY2018.
  • #4 is the South Station block (駅南街区) and will include 118,000 sqm (33F+B5F), developed by Tōkyū. Scheduled completion is FY2017. This block includes the improvements to Shibuya River (渋谷川).
  • #5 is the Sakuragaoka Exit (桜丘口) area, and will be developed by Tōkyū, consisting of two separate blocks to be completed around 2020. Block A will include 175,000 sq m spread across two towers (36F+B5F and 15F+B4F). Block B will include 66,000 sq m in a single tower (32F+B2F).
The five blocks together total about 833,000 sq m gross (!), and Tōkyū has a hand in each project.

Map:

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Old January 11th, 2014, 03:18 PM   #6590
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That's anyway very excellent. And tracks which are now demolishing are for former Toyoku Line?

Last edited by dimlys1994; January 11th, 2014 at 10:17 PM.
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Old January 11th, 2014, 09:17 PM   #6591
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Kind of annoying that there's no direct connection between the Joban line and the airport. Might it be cheaper to put in a wye-connection at Narita than to try merging the Tokaido Freight Line into the Yokosuka Line?

Likewise, is there no connection from the TFL to the Rinkai line heading toward Shibuya?
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Old January 12th, 2014, 10:52 PM   #6592
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If they essentially extend the Ueno-Tokyo Line out to Haneda Airport, maybe they should eventually call the new line the Ueno-Haneda Line (上野羽田線). And this new line would make Haneda Airport very convenient for people coming in from Utsunomiya, Takasaki and Mito.

It'll be very interesting to see what trainset will JR East use going to Haneda Airport. I'm not sure if the current E233 trainsets are a good idea, unless they are rebuilt with all longitudinal seating with Standard and expanded Green class seating.

Last edited by sacto7654; January 12th, 2014 at 11:00 PM. Reason: add information
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Old January 12th, 2014, 11:04 PM   #6593
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Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
If they essentially extend the Ueno-Tokyo Line out to Haneda Airport, maybe they should eventually call the new line the Ueno-Haneda Line (上野羽田線). And this new line would make Haneda Airport very convenient for people coming in from Utsunomiya, Takasaki and Mito.
True. Do you know what the planned service pattern on the Ueno-Tokyo line is? IIRC, they were talking about terminating some trains at Tokyo. Maybe they'll extend these runs to Haneda.

Quote:
It'll be very interesting to see what trainset will JR East use going to Haneda Airport. I'm not sure if the current E233 trainsets are a good idea, unless they are rebuilt with all longitudinal seating with Standard and expanded Green class seating.
Why would that not be a good idea?

I'm thinking that the current E233 and Joban-line equivalent will be used for base service, especially if there are additional stops put in along the TFL (Seibijo, etc.). In addition, there would be extra E259-like sets running a Narita-Express style service.
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Old January 13th, 2014, 07:53 PM   #6594
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Although it's gross oversimplification, counting tracks is one way to identify potential bottlenecks or inefficiencies in the rail network, since turning trains at the platform of a major station takes time and space and forces passengers to transfer.

What you guys are suggesting would turn the Ueno-Tokyo line into a pretty massive bottleneck. There are tracks connecting into it from the north (2x Joban, Takasaki, and Utsunomiya) and this would make four from the south (2x Tokaido and Tokaido Freight/Haneda).

By this measure (again, an oversimplification) one should balance the number of tracks entering a station from each side. The stations to consider here are Tokyo and Ueno.

For Tokyo, extending the Tokaido Freight Line from Tamachi to Tokyo station and connecting it to the Chuo Kaisoku line would be one possible solution. There seems to be a bit of space on the ground to do this between Tamachi and Shinbashi, but there would probably need to be a new elevated viaduct between Shinbashi and Tokyo which, at 3km, is probably similar in scope to the Ueno-Tokyo line itself. Maybe set it up with a cross platform transfer to the Tokaido line perhaps at Shinbashi.

For Ueno, the bottleneck remains; with the Ueno-Tokyo line complete, Ueno actually has 10 tracks entering from the north, but only 6 from the south. It's due to the 6 tracks from the Joban/Takasaki/Utsunomiya lines feeding into the 2 tracks of the Ueno-Tokyo line. This is the reason for the competition among the three northern lines for slots on the new line, but I'm not sure if anything could be done about this at all, so some trains will probably have to keep terminating there, at least at rush hour. Real estate and platform slots aren't at as much of a premium at Ueno compared to Tokyo so it's not as urgent, I suppose.
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Old January 13th, 2014, 08:57 PM   #6595
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That's anyway very excellent. And tracks which are now demolishing are for former Toyoku Line?
Sorry, missed this... The former Tōyoko Line terminal at Shibuya is Block #4 in the map, where you should be able to see the the tracks fan out, as well as the approach into the station comes from the south, parallel to the Shibuya River.
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Old January 13th, 2014, 09:00 PM   #6596
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I personally feel that the best solution would be to deep-bore the Shinkansen from Shinagawa through to Ueno.

Then, by adding a single track south from Ueno through Okachimachi and reconfiguring the ramps through Akihabara, you could maintain a four-track route all the way from Tokyo to Ueno, perhaps adding passing sidings at Akihabara. This might be enough to balance capacity. Then, with the addition of the new viaduct noted above, you would have six tracks south of Tokyo (plus Yamanote/Keihin-Tohoku-Negishi of course). Chuo Kaisoku trains could be routed along the Yokosuka line or the Haneda line, further distributing traffic, or they could be routed back up along the Yamanote Freight tracks to Shinjuku and out the Chuo line again.

The cost of such a project would, of course, be astronomical. But if the traffic demand is sufficient, then it might well be worth implementing.

Other, similarly astronomical "dream" projects involve expanding the Osaki-Shibuya-Ikebukuro-Akabane corridor out to have four tracks paralleling the Yamanote line, so as to enable through service around the loop to have adequate capacity.

I am aware that there are six tracks north from Ueno through Urawa to Omiya. They are the Keihin Tohoku, Tohoku Main, and Tohoku Freight/Shonan-Shinjuku, correct? Can anyone tell me what the configuration between Nippori and Akabane was like prior to the arrival of the Shinkansen? What tracks were taken out to make room for them?
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Old January 14th, 2014, 05:44 PM   #6597
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
I personally feel that the best solution would be to deep-bore the Shinkansen from Shinagawa through to Ueno.

Then, by adding a single track south from Ueno through Okachimachi and reconfiguring the ramps through Akihabara, you could maintain a four-track route all the way from Tokyo to Ueno, perhaps adding passing sidings at Akihabara. This might be enough to balance capacity. Then, with the addition of the new viaduct noted above, you would have six tracks south of Tokyo (plus Yamanote/Keihin-Tohoku-Negishi of course). Chuo Kaisoku trains could be routed along the Yokosuka line or the Haneda line, further distributing traffic, or they could be routed back up along the Yamanote Freight tracks to Shinjuku and out the Chuo line again.

The cost of such a project would, of course, be astronomical. But if the traffic demand is sufficient, then it might well be worth implementing.
A deep bore tunnel is not desirable at the stations. Something closer to the surface, at least in the vicinity of the stations, would be better.

Also, building all those Shinkansen platforms as-is underground at Tokyo (10 tracks, 5 platforms!!) would almost certainly be technically impossible, let alone prohibitively expensive.

The more realistic alternative would be to connect the Tohoku and Tokaido Shinkansen and run trains through from one onto the other. This is a very appealing notion from a customer's point of view. For example, one could reach Shinagawa and Yokohama directly from the Tohoku region without a transfer. Likely you could get by with about six tracks and three platforms, since most trains would no longer need to be turned at the platform anymore. The cost wouldn't be too much greater than the Asakusa Bypass Line, which will be expensive but not impossibly so.

This is also an appealing prospect from a real estate perspective; those above ground Shinkansen platforms take up a HUGE amount of extremely valuable land at Tokyo station - on the order of 50000 square meters. Redevelopment prospects alone might actually make it worthwhile, if civil engineering were the only problem they faced. Figure a very conservative 10 million yen per square meter, which yields 500 billion yen (5 billion dollars) which is probably in the ballpark of what it would cost to build. Land value could be even higher than that.

However, the massive changes in rolling stock and operations (50hz vs 60hz, "Mini" Shinkansen, coupling and decoupling), not to mention the organizational cooperation between JR Central and JR East that this would require, probably put the whole idea out of reach.

Last edited by orulz; January 14th, 2014 at 06:11 PM.
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Old January 14th, 2014, 08:14 PM   #6598
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Toyota to test fuel cell bus in Fukuoka
トヨタ、燃料電池バス走行実験

http://www.saga-s.co.jp/news/saga.0....8.article.html

Toyota Motor Kyūshū (トヨタ自動車九州) is currently conducting a field trial of its under-development fuel cell bus model, targeted for a 2016 market debut, at Kyūshū University’s new Ito Campus (九州大学伊都キャンパス) in Fukuoka City. With cooperation from local bus operator Shōwa Bus (昭和自動車), the trial will examine the carbon dioxide reduction benefits and financial feasibility of the technology.

The trial will operate four roundtrips a day between the campus and JR Kyū-dai Gakken Toshi (九大学研都市) Station on the Chikuhi Line, located about 6 km away, from 2014.01.10 through 2014.01.16. The collected field data will be compared against operating data from Shōwa Bus, which operates on the same route. As part of the trial, the fuel cell bus will be operated by Shōwa Bus and offer free rides for passengers.

Fuel cells are one of several next-generation “green” technologies for automobiles, using the electricity generated by the chemical reaction of hydrogen fuel and oxygen to power the vehicle’s motors. The vehicles do not produce carbon dioxide emissions, and a regular car can travel over 500 km on a single hydrogen charging. Multiple automobile manufacturers are experimenting with the technology, with Toyota hoping to introduce it into personal automobiles in 2015 and buses in 2016.

Field trials began last fiscal year, and this marks the fifth series of trials. Toyota has modified the geography, distance, and other running conditions in each trial to collect the necessary data. The bus will also operate daily roundtrips on a separate trial to test long-distance highway coach operations between Fukuoka and Kumamoto on January 18, 20, and 22.



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Press release:
http://www.toyota-kyushu.com/news/20131213290.html

Cab view on a fuel-cell bus in operation at Kansai International Airport:

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Old January 14th, 2014, 08:15 PM   #6599
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Groundbreaking for Toyama Light Rail double-tracking, new station in FY2017
富山ライトレール 複線化2017年度中に着工

http://www.tulip-tv.co.jp/news/detai...20140107165655

Work on a project to double track 340 m of the Toyama Light Rail (富山ライトレール) from Okuda Chūgakkō-mae (奥田中学校前) to the east end of Hattabashi bridge (八田橋), where a new station—Eirakuchō (永楽町)—will be constructed is set to begin as early as sometime in FY2017. Completion is scheduled for FY2018, when the light rail line will be connected with the “city trams” (市内電車) operated by Toyama Chihō Railroad to form an integrated north-south line. According to the city, the double-tracking will help alleviate schedule disruptions during the morning and evening rush hours.

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Toyama’s city trams:

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Old January 14th, 2014, 08:17 PM   #6600
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Okamato Station improvements to be completed in FY2016
宇都宮市:岡本駅新駅舎、東西自由通路を新設 16年度完成へ

http://mainichi.jp/area/tochigi/news...10294000c.html

Utsunomiya City has announced the details of a series of upgrades to Okamoto Station on the JR Utsunomiya Line. The current station building is beginning to reach the end of its life and only includes a headhouse at the East Exit. Now, the city will replace it with a modern station building that includes a new West Exit station plaza, public passage, and various barrier-free and universal design accessibility improvements.

Work on the new station building will begin this autumn, with completion scheduled for FY2016 at a cost of approx. ¥2.4 billion. With only one ticketing entrance at the East Exit, residents on the west side of the station were forced to take a 10-minute detour and cross the tracks at-grade to access the station. The neighborhoods on either side of the station, separated by the tracks, will now be connected by a 75 m long east-west public passage, vastly improving convenience on foot. The new West Exit station plaza will also feature an 800 sq m bike parking facility. Utility lines will be undergrounded and elevation differences between roadways and sidewalks will be eliminated.

The new station building will be a two-story building with a single ticketing entrance located in the center of the new public passage, with elevators and escalators to provide barrier-free access.

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Images from the press release:
http://www.city.utsunomiya.tochigi.j...okamotoeki.pdf

Plan



West Exit



East Exit

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