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Old February 19th, 2014, 10:17 PM   #6721
quashlo
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An interesting online poll of where passengers choose to stand on the train:
http://news.ameba.jp/20140218-136/

1. Near the doors, off to the side: 391 (56.9%)
2. Near the center of the seats: 141 (20.5%)
3. Near the ends of the seats: 128 (18.6%)
4. In the center of the doors: 10 (1.5%)
5. Other: 17 (2.5%)

Some quotes from the respondents.

Reasons for 1:
Easy to stay out of the way of passengers getting on and off and easy to get off yourself.
Even during crush load, you don’t feel too much body pressure from other passengers.
You can lean on the wall or partitions, so it’s comfortable.
You feel like you have your own little private space.

Reasons for 2:
Air from outside doesn’t reach you when the doors open and close, so you can stay cool with the AC during summer and warm with the heaters during the winter.
The doors get really crowded because of all the people getting on, so I move towards the center where it’s less crowded.
Even when it gets crowded, you can maintain your posture a bit. Plus, when a seat opens up, you have a better chance of getting it than when standing at the ends of the benches, near the doors.

Reasons for 3:
It’s near the doors, but you can avoid some of the wind rushing in.
The poles are easy to grab here.
So I can sit in the seats at the ends.

Reasons for 4:
It’s crowded, and I can’t get any further into the car.
Easy to get off.

Obviously, a lot simply depends on how crowded the train is during your commute and where you plan to get off. Location 1 is my personal preferred spot if it’s crowded and I’m not sure there will be a lot of people getting off at my station, meaning it could be difficult to get out if you are coming from further inside the train. I actually wish other train manufacturers outside of Japan would catch onto this and designed their seating with partitions so that you can stand there and lean, without feeling like you are sticking your butt in someone’s face. It’s also good for the person sitting there, as the partition helps them maintain their seated posture on that side, they can lean their head there if they want to take a nap, there’s a little bit more privacy, etc.
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Old February 20th, 2014, 02:20 AM   #6722
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Quote:
I actually wish other train manufacturers outside of Japan would catch onto this
I'm afraid that commuter culture hasn't advanced that far enough, for example, in the U.S., where things like longitudinal seating are unpopular because "you have to sit and stare at someone's belly button" (case from Chicago's CTA)
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Old February 20th, 2014, 04:21 AM   #6723
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Yeah, pretty trivial reason... How many of us sit down on transit and stare straight ahead? The majority of regular riders are smarter and take advantage of their time on transit to do things that don't require staring straight ahead.

The only legitimate concern when going to longitudinal should be a loss of seats, but it comes with the territory that if you need to handle more total passengers, one of the easiest ways to do this is to change the interior layout. Eventually, some systems will have to come to grips with this. Perhaps Chicago will be one of them... They've got some ridiculously tiny cars.
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Old February 20th, 2014, 07:18 PM   #6724
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Tōkyō Metro has signed a cooperative agreement with the Hanoi Metropolitan Railway Management Board (ハノイ市都市鉄道管理委員会) to provide assistance in rail operations, maintenance, and administration, part of a contract with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The agreement lays out the framework of the arrangement, where Tōkyō Metro will cooperate on the technical side of railway operations, providing best practices and recommendations, conduct bi-lateral staff exchanges, and share information.

Press release:
http://www.tokyometro.jp/news/2014/p...imetro0218.pdf

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Old February 20th, 2014, 07:22 PM   #6725
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Apparently, JR West has been doing a week-long test (2014.02.17 to 2014.02.21) on the Ōsaka Loop Line to help determine the optimal door configuration for the new rolling stock planned for the line. Currently, the line is operated with a mix of four-car trains operating local services and three-car trains operating rapid services (basically, through-servicing trains from the Yamatoji Line and Hanwa Line / Kansai Airport Line).
http://bylines.news.yahoo.co.jp/ihar...0217-00032714/

As part of the test, they are operating morning commute services during the test period entirely with three-door cars, evaluating the resulting crowding levels inside the trains and on the platforms. Will be interesting to see what solution they come up with, but it would seem that they are debating whether the new cars can be designed with only three doors per side so that they can make the stopping positions all uniform.

Scene at Tenma Station (2014.02.18). The four-door runs normally operated by 103 series and 201 series have been replaced with three-door trains.

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Old February 20th, 2014, 07:24 PM   #6726
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The ex-Keihan 3000 series trainset operated by Ōigawa Railway held its last run on 2014.02.14 and has now been retired. This leaves Toyama Chihō Railroad as the last remaining operator of this rolling stock series, and they only have a re-arranged formation of 3 of the cars (not an actual original set).



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Old February 20th, 2014, 11:50 PM   #6727
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LRT gets attention as eco-friendly transport
http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001041242

Quote:
The government is supporting efforts to spread light rail transit (LRT) as a convenient means of public transportation with low carbon dioxide emissions. The move comes amid renewed interest in using tram cars as an eco-friendly mass transit system, particularly at a time when widespread use of private cars had been edging light rail toward extinction.

At sunset on an ordinary day beside the north gate of JR Toyama Station, passengers have formed long lines at a Toyama Light Rail stop, a local LRT tram line. From high school students to company employees and housewives with shopping bags, they are all waiting to head home.

With lower floors than those of conventional trams, LRT cars are attractive for having no height gaps between the floor and the surface of platforms. As an increasingly popular public transport system in the United States and Europe, they are easier to use for the disabled and the elderly with reduced vibration and noise as well as safer floor access.

According to the Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Ministry, Hiroshima, Kagoshima and other Japanese cities have introduced LRT, but it is only in Toyama that an LRT system has become a full-fledged operation.

Existing rails from the now defunct JR Toyamako Line were converted for LRT use, which commenced services in 2006. During the day, LRT cars arrive every 15 minutes. The line connects its terminal stations, where shopping malls and other facilities are located, with northern residential areas of the city. The line runs through 13 stations on a 7.6-kilometer distance to reach a northern area facing Toyama Bay.

Hiroshi Taniguchi, a counselor of the Toyama city government’s urban development department, said, “We dramatically increased service frequency compared with the JR line era years ago. The number of passengers has also rapidly increased.”

The former Toyamako Line was originally a core mode of public transportation in the city’s northern area. But the number of passengers declined partly due to the increase in privately owned cars. Passengers numbered more than 6,000 a day in the 1980s, only to decline to about 3,000 a day in 2004.

The number of trains in service was also reduced from 35 a day during peak times to 19. Questions began to arise as to whether the train line would be able to continue operation.

Therefore, the city government set up a third-sector company—jointly established by the public and private sectors—with rails provided by the Japan Railway group company, and introduced the LRT system to revive public transportation.

Various services were improved under the new company. For example, in addition to increasing the number of LRT cars in service, passes with integrated circuits were introduced to shorten passenger waiting times.

Public bus routes in areas without LRT stops were also connected with LRT line services to encourage more frequent use. As a result, the number of passengers on weekdays recovered to about 4,800 a day on average.

Some citizens switched from using their own cars to riding the LRT line when they head into the city center, leading to a drop in CO2 emissions from cars. The LRT contributed to cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 436 tons a year.

The city government aims to convert itself into a compact city in which urban functions will be concentrated in the central part of the city with the LRT system at its core. Bicycle rental stations were set up near LRT line stops, with plans to connect the LRT line with an existing tram line which runs south of JR Toyama Station.

Additional plans are in the works to rebuild public transportation systems so that residents will not need to rely on private cars. An official of the city government said, “We wish to prevent the city center from being hollowed out.”

In the wake of the success seen in Toyama, the central government has started paying attention to LRT as a measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in provincial cities where high percentages of residents rely on private cars.

The Environment Ministry and the transport ministry plan to establish a new system to provide subsidies to local governments, aiming to introduce public transportation systems with lower CO2 emissions using LRT as the core. As such, the ministries earmarked ¥650 million in next fiscal year’s budget for related work.

An Environment Ministry official in charge of the issue said, “By encouraging people to drive private cars less often, which will result in easing traffic congestion, we hope the measure will lead to large-scale cuts in CO2 emission quantities.”

Currently, some other city governments, including Utsunomiya, Shizuoka and Fukuoka, are considering introducing LRT systems.

But in Utsunomiya, some residents voiced opposition, saying that the introduction of LRT cars, which run on roads, will cause traffic congestion. Residents opposing the plan aim to make the city government hold a referendum, which is expected to turn the issue into a political conflict.

To introduce LRT systems, it is also necessary to form a consensus with other parties affected by the decision. For example, excessive competition with bus and taxi companies needs to be avoided.

Prof. Hirotaka Koike of Utsunomiya Kyowa University, an urban planning expert, said, “It’s important to clarify role-sharing with other public transportation systems and to present the economic and environmental merits [of LRT] to residents in an easy-to-understand manner.”

Passengers line up at a Toyama Light Rail line stop beside the north gate of JR Toyama Station in Toyama.


Toyama Chihō Railroad, the private railway that operates Toyama’s legacy tram network (as opposed to the Toyama Light Rail, a modern line converted from an ex-JR line), recently completed a refurbishment of one of their 7000 series trams into historic colors to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the railway’s tram operations. The “retro” tram went into service on 2014.01.27:

Local news report:



Railfan clips:

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Old February 21st, 2014, 12:22 AM   #6728
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It's kind of a shame that provincial cities have closed so much of their public transport down and that they are so car dependent now. When you compare it to the transport meccas of the larger metropolises it seems like such a dichotomy.

Still, let's hope there will be a renaissance.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 08:33 AM   #6729
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Disney Resort Line in the blizzard:

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Old February 22nd, 2014, 04:46 PM   #6730
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Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
It's kind of a shame that provincial cities have closed so much of their public transport down and that they are so car dependent now. When you compare it to the transport meccas of the larger metropolises it seems like such a dichotomy.

Still, let's hope there will be a renaissance.
The reason why many trolley systems were dismantled in the USA was they couldn't keep up with the dramatically changing demographics of cities--especially with people moving out to the suburbs.

In Japan, most trolley systems were dismantled because modern subway systems, improved commuter railroads (JNR/JR Group and private) and buses pretty much made most trolley lines obsolete. The places where trolley lines exist in Japan today either couldn't justify the cost of a subway system or the soil condition of the city made it impossible to build a subway system (e.g., Hiroshima, where the Hiroden system still exists because the soil quality is too soft to build underground subways).

At where I live (Sacramento, CA), the Regional Transit light rail system has pretty long-distance lines, and it runs more like a private commuter railroad in Japan than a true trolley system.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 10:25 PM   #6731
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The reason why many trolley systems were dismantled in the USA was they couldn't keep up with the dramatically changing demographics of cities--especially with people moving out to the suburbs.

In Japan, most trolley systems were dismantled because modern subway systems, improved commuter railroads (JNR/JR Group and private) and buses pretty much made most trolley lines obsolete. The places where trolley lines exist in Japan today either couldn't justify the cost of a subway system or the soil condition of the city made it impossible to build a subway system (e.g., Hiroshima, where the Hiroden system still exists because the soil quality is too soft to build underground subways).

At where I live (Sacramento, CA), the Regional Transit light rail system has pretty long-distance lines, and it runs more like a private commuter railroad in Japan than a true trolley system.
It's the same across the world - Australasia dismantled their tram systems because of increased motorisation (the argument was that trams got in the way of cars), Sweden and many other places did the same. Yet where they were preserved, in many German cities (to use a highly developed country as an exemplar), the tram cities managed to maintain patronage levels better than those with "bustitution". Even better was upgrading these systems to full LRT as seen in cities like Stuttgart, Hannover, Köln et al. These systems now have pretty impressive riderships for such small cities.

I'm quite interested to know what the ridership is like of the Hiroshima system given that is the most extensive LRT in Japan (IIRC).
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 01:44 AM   #6732
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It's the same across the world - Australasia dismantled their tram systems because of increased motorisation (the argument was that trams got in the way of cars), Sweden and many other places did the same. Yet where they were preserved, in many German cities (to use a highly developed country as an exemplar), the tram cities managed to maintain patronage levels better than those with "bustitution". Even better was upgrading these systems to full LRT as seen in cities like Stuttgart, Hannover, Köln et al. These systems now have pretty impressive riderships for such small cities.

I'm quite interested to know what the ridership is like of the Hiroshima system given that is the most extensive LRT in Japan (IIRC).
I believe that most German cities--at least in what was West Germany before the 1990 reunification--kept their trolley systems because the old urban city designs made it more practical to keep the trolley lines. After all, even after the World War II bombings, German cities more or less kept their old layouts.

Japan dismantled most of their trolley systems because especially after World War II, the expansion of subway systems, improvements to commuter rail lines, and introduction of modern city buses made many trolley lines obsolete. A number of Japanese cities kept a small portion of their old trolley lines still active, as witnessed by the systems in Sapporo, Toyama, Toyohashi, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Nagasaki and Kumamoto. I believe Hiroshima completely rebuilt the Hiroden system after atomic bombing because since Hiroshima is built on the Ōta River delta, the ground beneath the city is too soft to safely construct a subway system.
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 02:36 AM   #6733
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Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
I believe that most German cities--at least in what was West Germany before the 1990 reunification--kept their trolley systems because the old urban city designs made it more practical to keep the trolley lines. After all, even after the World War II bombings, German cities more or less kept their old layouts.
Just for a bit more off-topic, but still pertinent, German cities most definitely remodelled their city centres following the bombings. Many are characterised with an urban form not so dissimilar to those in Japan with large arterials in the centre. One such city is Kassel. Take a look at it on Google Maps and look where the trams run - largely on arterial roads that are largely 2+2 lanes wide or more in a city with 450,000 in the metro area (195,000 city proper). Many German cities have quite significant road infrastructure and good provision of arterial roads in the centre of their cities.

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Japan dismantled most of their trolley systems because especially after World War II, the expansion of subway systems, improvements to commuter rail lines, and introduction of modern city buses made many trolley lines obsolete. A number of Japanese cities kept a small portion of their old trolley lines still active, as witnessed by the systems in Sapporo, Toyama, Toyohashi, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Nagasaki and Kumamoto. I believe Hiroshima completely rebuilt the Hiroden system after atomic bombing because since Hiroshima is built on the Ōta River delta, the ground beneath the city is too soft to safely construct a subway system.
Yeah I read that from Quashlo above about Hiroshima and that makes sense - the same is true in Gothenburg here in Sweden where tunnelling is very difficult due to unsuitable soil conditions (and as such the tram network was maintained, and it's quite extensive if you're interested in looking it up despite Gothenburg possessing extensive road networks that could have had buses instead of trams). Were there not other tram cities in Japan that had no subway construction but instead completely removed them? I'd imagine there were a fair few smaller cities that did just that. Out of interest, in these smaller cities that they talk about in the article above - is public transport actually an effective way to get around at all or do you have to own a car?

I guess I always feel a bit bad when I hear about the extensive tram networks that were ripped up around the world rather than being modernised and upgraded - Auckland had a massive system yet none of it remains. Sydney had one of the largest networks in the world and boom, all gone as repeated nearly everywhere I can think of.
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Old February 23rd, 2014, 01:49 PM   #6734
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This popped up in my subscription list on youtube


"The out-of-service train was crashed into Road-rail vehicle on last midnight at Kawasaki Station"
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Old February 24th, 2014, 05:47 PM   #6735
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Hiroshima's soil being too soft or too wet to build a subway is only partially true. The center of town is built on a silty river delta so tunnel boring machines (except for very deep ones) are probably out, as are mining and blasting, but cut-and-cover is still possible: you only have to look at the Astram Line and the Shareo mall built on top of it to see that. The perfect route for a cut-and-cover subway exists: Heiwa Odori. It's so wide that you could dig out for a subway without really disrupting anything. It's even been planned and studied off and on for decades, since the 1960s even, it's just never been built. Not because it is impossible per se, but because the expense wasn't justified.

As for the Hiroden, it wasn't really rebuilt after the atomic bomb, it actually wasn't destroyed in the first place. They had trains up and running on part of the network three days after the explosion. The route today runs pretty much exactly where it did back in 1945. I wouldn't be too surprised if some of the steel rails in the street are still original as well given how rough the condition is in places. The Green Movers have a good suspension and can roll over them comfortably enough, but some of the old vehicles have a surprisingly jarring ride.

Current ridership is pretty good, but I am not really sure if it is increasing or decreasing. Living in central Hiroshima back in 2003-2004, rush hour trains were pretty packed, but I found it is usually faster to get around by bicycle. Central Hiroshima is an excellent bicycle city. The river delta is very flat, and many streets were widened after the atomic bomb, so sidewalks tend to be generous with dedicated space for bicycles. Finally, there are paths built alongside the rivers that make convenient diagonal shortcuts, free of traffic and with few intersections, and with excellent scenery. The suburbs are very mountainous so cycling there is another matter, but Hiroden doesn't serve those areas either.

Hiroden's tracks use an antiquated signal system, so with the exception of the Miyajima line (which is in its own right-of way and is pretty fast) I think it overall needs modernization with signal priority in many locations and realignments in others to speed it up. As a result of the slow speeds, I rode the Hiroden mostly when traveling with a group of people, or if the weather was bad, or if I had a very long way to travel.

Hiroden does seem to be planning for the future, though. By 2003, they had rebuilt Nishi Hiroshima station, and were rolling out the nice new vehicles (Green Movers) by then. They improved the connection to Yokogawa Station while I was living there in 2004. A realignment of the meandering route near Hiroshima Station is currently planned, and I have to imagine that the zig-zagging approach to Nishi Hiroshima Station through Kanonmachi, Tenmacho, and Koamicho is probably next on the list.
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Old February 25th, 2014, 01:34 AM   #6736
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Ex-Nagoya subway trains find second life in Argentina
名古屋地下鉄車両、南米アルゼンチンへ

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNZO...20C14A2L91000/

Aging trains being decommissioned from revenue service on the Nagoya Municipal Subway Higashiyama Line will find second lives on the subway system in the Argentinian capital of Buenos Aires thanks to efforts by Marubeni. The firm already has experience working on infrastructure projects in Argentina, and hopes this latest project will expand its business chances in the South American country.

Marubeni received an order for 30 subway cars from Subterráneos de Buenos Aires S.E. The firm placed a winning bid in 2013 for ex-Higashiyama Line trains, which it will now refurbish and deliver to Buenos Aires. The total value of the contract has not been released.

Factors including the strong quality and durability of Japanese products, together with matching subway gauges and compact car designs that can easily operate on the Subte’s curvy tunnels, all contributed to the win. Marubeni will now work on the necessary refurbishments, including replacing electrical and braking equipment and modifying the cars for Subte standards. The cars will then be delivered by boat to Argentina in late 2014, entering service on the Subte in spring 2015. Marubeni will handle management of the entire contract, with Ōsaka Rolling Stock Industries (大阪車両工業) handling the car refurbishment, Tōyō Electric (東洋電機製造) supplying the electrical equipment, and Nabtesco (ナブテスコ) providing the brakes and other air controls (空制品).

Marubeni has performed similar work to purchase retired Japanese trains and refurbish them for overseas clients as part of two other contracts, both for Argentina. The first came in 1994-96 and involved 131 cars used on the Marunouchi Line, then operated by the Teito Rapid Transit Authority (TRTA), now the Tōkyō Metro. The following contract came in 1998-2002 and involved 78 ex-Higashiyama Line cars.

As part of its three-year interim business plan in effect through March 2016, Marubeni has been increasing efforts to expand into the South American market, focusing on business in natural resources, infrastructure, and domestic demand. Ridership is increasing on subways in Argentina in conjunction with economic growth, and there is an ever-pressing need for new rolling stock. Marubeni hopes to take advantage of potential future contracts by building a stronger portfolio of rolling stock contracts.

===

Cars being delivered to Ōsaka Rolling Stock Industries (2013.07.12 – 2013.07.13):

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Old February 25th, 2014, 01:35 AM   #6737
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Tokuyama Station upgrades to open starting this fall
山口県周南市、JR徳山駅で建設中の橋上駅舎と自由通路が今秋から供用開始へ

http://news.mynavi.jp/news/2014/02/20/012/

JR West announced that it expects to complete upgrades to Tokuyama Station (Shūnan City, Yamaguchi Prefecture) this autumn. The upgrades are part of access improvements for the area around the station, Shūnan City’s central train station, and include a platform bridge, elevated station concourse, and north-south public passage.

The public passage will measure about 130 m long and 8 m wide, connecting the North Exit and South Exit station plazas with barrier-free access. The station concourse and ticketing hall will be relocated to new space above the zairaisen tracks on Level 2 of the station, immediately fronting the new public passage. New elevators and escalators will also be installed to serve each of the zairaisen platforms.

Render:


===

Press release:
http://www.westjr.co.jp/press/articl...page_5193.html
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Old February 25th, 2014, 01:36 AM   #6738
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Nagaura Station upgrades complete
長浦駅新駅舎が完成 都市機能向上に期待 きょうから利用開始

http://www.chibanippo.co.jp/news/local/180763

A new station building has been completed at JR Nagaura Station (長浦駅) in Kuranami, Sodegaura City (袖ケ浦市蔵波) on the Uchibō Line and will make its debut to passengers on 2014.02.23. The new station building includes a public passage connecting residential neighborhoods at the station’s South Exit and waterfront areas at the station’s North Exit, improving barrier-free station access.

The city began a ¥2.5595 billion program of renovation works and barrier-free upgrades at the station in July 2012, with the city funding ¥2.5 billion of the total cost. The original station building featured many elevation changes, but the new public passage comes equipped with escalators and elevators. Minor additional work at the North Exit will be completed by March 2013, together with demolition of the old station building.

The opening of the new station building also means the closure of the station’s Midori no Madoguchi (みどりの窓口) staffed ticketing office, and the city has filed a petition with JR East’s Chiba office to retain the office.



===

View of the construction (2013.10.09):



Early morning on the day of completion:

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Old February 25th, 2014, 01:37 AM   #6739
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Tōbu announces new logo, upgrades for Noda Line
東武鉄道アーバンパークラインのロゴマーク制定 青と緑で虹表現

http://www.saitama-np.co.jp/news/2014/02/20/09.html

A new logo has been selected for the Tōbu Noda Line, which has been given a new name (“Tōbu Urban Park Line”). The logo is a two-tone rainbow of the Tōbu Group’s corporate color, “future blue” (フューチャーブルー), and bright green, drawing from the many parks located along the line.

The railway also announced an ongoing series of improvements for the 62.7 km, 35-station line that connects Ōmiya in Saitama with Funabashi in Chiba. In particular, Tōbu will manufacture an additional 6 sets (36 cars) of its new 60000 series for the Noda Line this fiscal year, following the introduction of the first set in June of last year. The modern trainsets feature lighter-weight aluminum alloy bodies and LED lighting to reduce electricity consumption by about 40% compared to the 8000 series they will be replacing, and come with other amenities including LCD screens for passenger information and Tōbu’s first free Wi-Fi service.

The railway will also continue work on grade-separating (elevating) the Noda Line between Shimizu Kōen (清水公園) and Umesato (梅郷), an urban planning project being led by Chiba Prefecture. This year, they will construct temporary tracks between Shimizu Kōen and Atago (愛宕) and at Noda-shi (野田市) Station in preparation for project completion in FY2017.

In concert with the national and local governments, Tōbu will also install platform doors at Funabashi Station (spring 2014) and Kashiwa Station (spring 2015). LED lighting will also be introduced to platforms at both stations, and the concourse at Funabashi Station will undergo a simultaneous renovation.

The railway will also continue work on creating platform bridges at stations to improve access, with assistance from local governments. Works at Unga (運河) Station were completed in late December 2013, while the works at Iwatsuki (岩槻) Station are scheduled for completion sometime in FY2014. Local governments are coordinating their efforts with these projects by constructing station plazas and improving station access through the construction of barrier-free routes at station facilities.

Tōbu will also improve late-night service starting in mid-May of this year by extending the 00:26 departure from Kashiwa, bound for Noda-shi, to Nanakōdai (七光台).

Lastly, the railway will complete work on a 500-lot residential development, called Soraie Shimizu Kōen Urban Park Town (ソライエ清水公園 アーバンパークタウン), at Shimizu Kōen Station, and will open a sales office in June.

===

Press release:
http://www.tobu.co.jp/file/pdf/5d971...20140213105718

New logo:

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Old February 25th, 2014, 01:38 AM   #6740
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Regarding the new platform doors at Funabashi Station, Tōbu also published a press release with a few more details:
http://www.tobu.co.jp/file/pdf/c062e...20140219181019

The doors have already been installed on Track 1 (2014.02.01) and Track 2 (2014.02.03), and will begin operating with the start of service on 2014.03.22.

Already installed doors on Track 1 (2014.02.02):

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: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

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