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Old February 25th, 2014, 01:39 AM   #6741
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Speaking of platform doors, here are the newly-erected units at Gakugei Daigaku Station on the Tōyoko Line. You can see how the units one carlength from the platform ends have been shifted away from the platform edge to provide standing space on the platform for conductors on 8-car formations.

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Old February 25th, 2014, 05:35 PM   #6742
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Great videos you have here.

I recently came across some video on Youtube about a new through service on the Joban Line, with E531 5 cars sets running between Tsuchiura and Kawagoe via the Musashino line and Omiya.

It was kind special to see such a short trainset run this new service.

Do you have any news about this? And was this service created in order to allow better connection between the joban line and the northern part of tokyo?
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Old February 25th, 2014, 07:37 PM   #6743
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I assume you are talking about this?



This is a special service (臨時), basically a charter but put on by the railway (JR East) as part of a campaign to bring visitors to Saitama and Kawagoe. In addition to Tsuchiura, they also operated trips out of Shin-Narashino on the Keiyō Line. It’s not part of the regular schedule, but just one of the many seasonal services that the railways typically do to cater to leisure travelers. Apparently, this was the first time an E531 series trainset was operated on the Kawagoe Line.
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Old February 25th, 2014, 10:35 PM   #6744
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Thanks for the clarification, I don't know the Tokyo train network well, but I remembered E531 rarely operate outside of the Joban line.
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Old February 26th, 2014, 12:58 AM   #6745
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Yes, trains running through Toride require dual voltage AC/DC stock as the Jōban Line switches from 1500 V DC (standard in most of Tōkyō area) to 20,000 V AC. The E531 series is specifically designed for the mid- and long-distance runs on the Jōban Line... JR East's other commuter EMUs like E231 and E233 cannot operate these services, and are only restricted to the sections west of Toride. So basically, it's not only rare to see E531 operating outside of the Jōban Line, it's also basically impossible to see other commuter EMUs east of Toride.
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Old February 26th, 2014, 11:31 PM   #6746
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Penta-Ocean, Taisei win Singapore MRT Thomson Line station contracts
http://www.todayonline.com/singapore...k-thomson-line

Quote:
SINGAPORE — The Land Transport Authority (LTA) said yesterday that it had awarded three contracts worth a total of S$1.09 billion for the construction of three stations on the Thomson Line.

Construction work for these stations is expected to start by March. Sin Ming station is scheduled to be completed in 2020, while Havelock and Marina Bay stations are scheduled to be completed in 2021.

Penta-Ocean Construction Co won the S$454 million contract to design and construct Sin Ming station and its associated tunnels.

The Japanese contractor is currently involved in the construction of the Downtown Line 3’s Bendemeer station and Woodlands North station on the Thomson Line.

The Singapore branch of Gammon Construction was awarded a S$210 million contract for the construction of Havelock station.

Previously involved in the construction of the Downtown Line 1’s Chinatown station, the Hong Kong company is currently engaged in the construction of the Thomson Line’s Mayflower station.

The third contract, worth S$425 million, was awarded to Taisei Corporation and is for the construction of Marina Bay station as well as its associated tunnels.

The LTA said Marina Bay station would become an interchange station connecting three rail lines, linking the current North-South and Circle Lines with the future Thomson Line.

Comprising 22 stations, the 30km-long and fully underground Thomson Line will be completed in phases from 2019 to 2021.

It will improve connectivity between neighbourhoods in the north, the Central Business District and Marina Bay areas, said the LTA.
Marina Bay Station:
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Old February 26th, 2014, 11:32 PM   #6747
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Urban planning underway for new JR Dazaifu Station
JR太宰府駅新設:まちづくり委、高層案など3案を議論

http://mainichi.jp/area/fukuoka/news...10203000c.html

The Dazaifu City Sano-Higashi District Urban Planning Working Group (太宰府市佐野東地区まちづくり検討委員会), responsible for devising an urban plan for the area around the future JR Dazaifu Station on the Kagoshima Main Line in Fukuoka Prefecture, held its fourth meeting, discussing three potential development options provided by the city: a high-rise plan, a mid-rise plan, and a rural plan.

The high-rise plan would focus on ground-floor commercial and retail space with residential uses above, including high-rise buildings on the east side of the site, housing about 3,000 people total. The mid-rise plan would house 2,600 people, and the rural plan 2,400 people. In terms of new road infrastructure, an alignment would be constructed parallel to the expressway and leading towards the ruins of the Mizuki (水城跡) defense perimeter, securing an east-west transport axis.

The working group submitted recommendations to create a transport vision for the site that incorporates future tourism demand, coordinate with development in adjacent areas of Chikushino City (筑紫野市), and devise a fourth development option that relocates the high-rises away from the front of the station. Working group representatives from JR Kyūshū stressed the need to secure an adequate population increase for the area around the station, while local neighborhood representatives requested that access be secured from both the east and west sides of the station, with adequate accommodations for the west side, including parking facilities. The committee will finalize a conceptual plan this year.

The new station is planned for the Dazaifu sidings (太宰府信号場) between Mizuki and Tofurō-Minami (都府楼南) Stations.

===

The passing sidings at Dazaifu:

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Old February 26th, 2014, 11:33 PM   #6748
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Takaoka City publishes study on Man’yō Line extensions
万葉線延伸「実現へ検討」 高岡市交通戦略協 9路線案で試算

http://www.chunichi.co.jp/article/to...002000037.html

On 2014.02.19, the Takaoka City Comprehensive Transport Strategy Council (高岡市総合交通戦略策定協議会) compiled its five-year transport strategy for the city to be in effect from FY2014 through FY2019. The strategy recommends ongoing study of the proposed extension of the Man’yō Line tramway and provides conceptual cost estimates for nine extension route options.

The cost estimates include three route alignments towards Takaoka Commercial High School (高岡商業高校) and six route options to the future Shin-Takaoka Station (新高岡駅) on the Hokuriku Shinkansen, and do not include the cost of road widening or infrastructure improvements to allow for through-running onto JR tracks.

An 2.2 km extension from the Kataharamachi (片原町) intersection to Takaoka Commercial High School would cost ¥7.6 billion, serving 318,000 passengers a year and generating ¥8 million in profits annually. Meanwhile, the route options to Shin-Takaoka Station include alternatives to share JR tracks from Takaoka Station onto the JR Jōhana Line (城端線). A 3.5 km extension via National Route 156 (国道156号) would cost ¥10.7 billion, serving 379,000 passengers a year and generating ¥10 million in profits annually. The remaining seven route options would operate in the red.

The council’s chairman commented that the economic benefits of an extension would be largest if routes to both Shin-Takaoka Station and Takaoka Commercial High School were secured. An extension to Shin-Takaoka Station only would be the next most desirable option, followed by an extension to the high school only. Citizen support is critical to getting the extension built, and the city has invited academic experts and representatives from national and prefectural governments and transit operators to participate in the council, hoping to generate public support for the project.

The five-year transport strategy included a total of 41 projects, including introduction of an IC card system for local public transit and improvements to the bus operating environment between JR Takaoka Station and the future Shin-Takaoka Station.



===

Ride on the Jōhana Line from Jōhana to Takoka (2013.08.15). This will be the main connection to the new Shin-Takaoka Station on the Hokuriku Shinkansen.

=
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Old February 26th, 2014, 11:36 PM   #6749
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There was a repeat of an incident a while ago with a door failure on the Musashino Line. Similar to the last incident, they cordoned off the door with burlap and stationed staff there for three stations.
http://www.asahi.com/articles/ASG2T142FG2SUUPI003.html

The door failure happened at 22:03 on 2014.02.24 to a train stopped at Funabashi Hōten Station (船橋法典駅), bound for Fuchū Honmachi. Given that the incident occurred during the late evening commute, JR East decided to keep the train in service. The train was delayed 17 minutes at Funabashi Hōten, but eventually departed with station staff guarding the open door. Three stations down the line at Shin-Yabashira (新八柱駅), passengers were directed to other cars on the train. A total of 4,000 passengers were affected by the service disruption.

A bit curious why they didn’t just move the passengers at Funabashi Hōten... Theoretically, crowding may have been an issue (probably a lot of people transferring at Nishi-Funabashi).

I’m still hoping they will get new rolling stock for the Musashino Line to replace the old 205 series, but it seems that JR East may hold out a bit longer, as they are now replacing the rollsigns on these trains with LED units, perhaps second-hand from the decommissioned Saikyō Line trains.

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Old February 27th, 2014, 12:51 AM   #6750
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Would be nice to see replacements there. I remember riding the 205 series when I took the line myself. Whilst they appear outwardly to age well, failures of doors like this do show that replacement is necessary. I like the Musashino line myself. It connects a lot of nice neighbourhoods (and some useful shopping areas to the north east of Tokyo).

That being said, when a door failure occurs in Stockholm (and they do frequently). They either wedge the doors closed, or have to take the whole train out of service. At least Japan is a bit more pragmatic.
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Old February 27th, 2014, 03:23 AM   #6751
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Question: Which is steeper? The Ueno-Tokyo Line, or Usui Pass?

I seem to remember that there was a design to build the 187-series which would have been able to cross Usui without pushers. Would the same be true for the newest stock? And if so, might they re-open Usui as suburbia pushes outwards?
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Old February 27th, 2014, 06:25 AM   #6752
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
Question: Which is steeper? The Ueno-Tokyo Line, or Usui Pass?

I seem to remember that there was a design to build the 187-series which would have been able to cross Usui without pushers. Would the same be true for the newest stock? And if so, might they re-open Usui as suburbia pushes outwards?
The Usui Pass had a grade of 66.7 permils, while the Tokyo Ueno Line is 33 permils. Later rolling stock (E231 onwards) can handle the latter grade, given the right combination of motor and trailer units. As for the Usui Pass, that is history. JR-E wants everyone to take the shinkansen. Besides Nagano Pref. and Gunma Pref. for that matter are not gaining population that warrants expensive re-opening for commuter services, that would surely lose money.
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Old February 27th, 2014, 06:30 AM   #6753
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Speaking of which, nice photo essay of the Tohoku Junkan Line (Tokyo-Ueno Line) by the Asahi Shimbun Digital edition:
http://www.asahi.com/and_M/gallery/2...iref=com_rnavi

This line will open in spring of next year.

This shorter article has a nice overhead shot of the line around the Kanda Area. Note the kink in the line to avoid the JR Kanda Station platforms:
http://www.asahi.com/articles/ASG1X6HWDG1XUJHB018.html

*The print version of this article was in the evening edition of the Asahi yesterday.
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Old February 27th, 2014, 07:45 AM   #6754
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For the language-impaired, here are translated captions from the Asahi Shimbun photo series posted by k.k.jetcar:

After dumping its passengers at Ueno terminal, a train heads to the layover tracks (留置線). Utsunomiya Line, Takasaki Line, and Jōban Line trains that currently terminate at Ueno will be able to reach Tōkyō Station directly and continue onto the Tōkaidō Line in spring 2015



Looking in the Tōkyō direction from Track 9 at Ueno Station.



Takasaki Line and Jōban Line trains (left and right, respectively).



Tracks 7 through 9 at Ueno. A total of five of the elevated tracks at Ueno will be connected with the new Tōhoku Through Line (“Ueno–Tōkyō Line”).



As part of construction, several departures from Ueno (7 trains on weekdays and 2 trains on weekends and holidays) were relocated to other platforms starting on 2014.02.02.



A Jōban Line Hitachi limited express stopped at Ueno. These trains will also be able to directly serve Tōkyō Station once the new line opens.



Platforms 7 and 8 at Ueno. The new line will have no intermediate stations—the next stop for trains departing Ueno southbound will be Tōkyō.

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Old February 27th, 2014, 07:46 AM   #6755
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Looking south from the Keihin–Tōhoku Line platforms at Ueno. The fresh white sleepers indicate the new tracks that will lead to Tōkyō Station.



Bystanders can get a clear view of the work from Track 1 at Okachimachi Station. The workers will occasionally halt work temporarily to allow trains to safely pass.



This E531 series set is passing on track that connects Ueno to the layover tracks located near Akihabara Station. The two adjacent tracks will become the new double-track Tōhoku Through Line.



The view from Okachimachi Station in October 2012.



Now, there are three tracks, plus one turnout:



View from the south end of Okachimachi, April 2012. Work was proceeding on the center track.



Now, all tracks have been completed, and a soundwall has been erected. The leftmost track is already in use for trains heading to and from the layover tracks at Akihabara.

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Old February 27th, 2014, 07:47 AM   #6756
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New turnouts have been constructed to allow trains stored in the layover tracks to easily access the new line to reach Ueno.



Workers plug away on the new line, adjacent to the layover tracks. The tracks in the foreground are for the Keihin–Tōhoku Line and Yamanote Line.



The view from the northern end of Akihabara Station’s Track 4, where freshly laid track for the new line is visible. Work is now proceeding on stringing the catenary.



The view from the platform bridge at Akihabara Station. The center two tracks are the new line, which ramps up to a newly-erected viaduct that will take the new line directly above the Tōhoku Shinkansen elevated tracks near Kanda.



The approaches are 35 permil grades. Older rolling stock are unable to cope with these grades when carrying crush loads, and JR East is currently phasing in new trains on lines that will be using the new tracks.



The view from Izumi Bridge (和泉橋) over Shōwa-dōri (昭和通り). The new tracks will rise in elevation as they proceed south (left in this picture) towards Tōkyō Station.



The 350 m approach begins near Yasukuni-dōri.

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Old February 27th, 2014, 07:48 AM   #6757
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Where the new line crosses Yasukuni-dōri (靖国通り). Unlike the Yamanote Line and Keihin–Tōhoku Line bridges to the left and the Tōhoku Shinkansen bridge to the right, the new line crosses on a prestressed concrete structure.



Near the midpoint between Yasukuni-dōri and the North Exit of Kanda Station. The new line occupies space originally used for service tracks for the Tōhoku Main Line.



View from the Kanda Station North Exit intersection (神田駅北口交差点) of the stacked viaduct. The new line continues for 600 m above the Tōhoku Shinkansen tracks.



View from the East Exit of Kanda Station. Track laying is complete, but the catenary still remains to be strung.



New soundwalls were constructed for the section of stacked viaduct. Work is also proceeding on upgrades to Kanda Station.



View from the north end of Track 3 at Kanda Station. The prestressed concrete girders were lifted into place by a special crane, which completed its work in April 2013.

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Old February 27th, 2014, 07:51 AM   #6758
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The view from Kanda Station, June 2013.



Current view, where the soundwalls are now visible.



After the section of stacked viaduct, the new line begins its approach back down as it heads toward Tōkyō Station.



There were already plans to bring the zairaisen on a new alignment above the Shinkansen tracks when the Shinkansen was under construction. The Shinkansen tracks only opened in 1991, and were designed to allow for a second level to be added on top for zairaisen.



The new line passes underneath the Shuto Expressway Central Tōkyō Loop Route (首都高速都心環状線) at the midpoint between Kanda and Tōkyō Stations.



It’s another 900 m from the Shuto Expressway to Tōkyō Station. This space originally housed layover tracks for the Tōkaidō Line, but that space has been repurposed for the new line.



The opening of the new line is expected to substantially relieve overcrowding on the Yamanote Line and Keihin–Tōhoku Line.



The view from the north end of Tōkyō Station’s Track 8. All four of the Tōkaidō Line’s tracks at Tōkyō Station will connect into the new line, allowing for through-service with the three lines currently terminating at Ueno. The number of Tōkaidō Line trains terminating at Tōkyō is expected to substantially drop once the new line opens.



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Old February 27th, 2014, 07:52 AM   #6759
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Passengers disembark a Hitachi limited express terminating at Ueno on their way to transfers with other lines.

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Old February 27th, 2014, 08:02 AM   #6760
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The two photos I found most interesting were the cross-sectional view down Yasukuni-dōri (that's a ridiculously steep grade!) and the soundwall with windows at Kanda... Opposition from the local residents and business owners in the Kanda area on the basis of quality of life impacts (shadow, vibration, and noise, both during and construction and operation of the line) was part of the reason the Tōhoku Through Line was delayed by one year. I wonder if this soundwall was a bone thrown to the opposition, as I'm not sure if adding a second zairaisen level would drastically change the noise generated by Shinkansen trains, although perhaps there may be some reflection effects since the noise would no longer be able to dissipate upwards.
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