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Old August 11th, 2014, 09:41 AM   #7041
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
Sorry to disturb, then, but why is the 185 stock seen here switching over to the center track:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBW-H8I9qxc

(at about 1:00)


They seem to be using various tracks as they please into Ueno.

Also, to paraphrase Johnny Cash: There are few things that stir the heart more than the site of a long rake of Limited Express stock rushing past the local platforms.
It may all depend on to which platform they are going to end up at Ueno, but it can also be one part of the test to see that all points and such are working. You really can't base anything yet until they go in to full traffic mode, as far as I know then they are still testing. This time they may even be doing a quick turnaround before even going as far as Ueno.

Do we know how it looks in the ueno end? The middle track may just be a siding for the trains that is coming from the south of Tokyo to turn around on, such as the Odoriko service where the 185 series in the video originate from. Is it going to be extended just to tokyo or eve further up north.
Then you may ask why won't they change over at Tokyo instead? Well in my view then if they are going to do a changing of the platforms at Tokyo station going from one with local and one with limited express to one north and one southbound instead once the link is complete, then by using this siding then they don't need to cross over at Tokyo station, which will increase the throughrunning at that point. It's just a matter of waiting until this new bit is in traffic.
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Old August 11th, 2014, 12:43 PM   #7042
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Old August 11th, 2014, 05:31 PM   #7043
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sr.Horn View Post
Spotted in Tokyo the first test in Ueno-Tokyo Line on August 1st. JR East uses for it trains of series E233 and 185.
I like. Isn't it a fairly limited list of rolling stock that can negotiate the ~3.5% grades under full load? I find it interesting that an old train from the early 1980s like the 185 is evidently on that list.

Last edited by orulz; August 11th, 2014 at 05:38 PM.
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Old August 12th, 2014, 02:52 AM   #7044
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By the way, the JR Kyushu 305 Series EMU's are VERY unique on that island because it uses 1500 V DC overhead power, given that most JR Kyushu electrified lines use 20,000 V AC overhead power. This is due to the fact the 305's run on the Kūkō Line on the Fukuoka subway system, which is powered by 1500 V DC.
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Old August 12th, 2014, 04:27 AM   #7045
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Old August 13th, 2014, 10:56 AM   #7046
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To update my post above, based on the latest images on Google Earth, then the track closest to the Okachimachi station leads into track 5 at Ueno station, where as the middle track leads into track 6 and the outermost one is going to tracks 7-9. There is also another set of points closer to Ueno, from the middle track to the outer track (for trans going towards Ueno). But we still have to see what they will do once the services begin. I feel that there is going to be a reshuffle between where the trains ends up at Ueno, for this throughservice to work properly without to many crossing overs tracks to keep it smooth flowing.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 11:47 AM   #7047
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JR West announces changes on denomination for Kansai and Hiroshima area lines.

http://www.westjr.co.jp/press/articl...page_5993.html

They say is for help tourist who are confused by the japanese system of lines.

Every line or group of lines will receive a letter. For example JR Kyoto and Kobe Line wil give the "A" while Osaka Loop Line the "O".




In Hiroshima, the commuter lines will receive the letter according the color. B means "Blue line" (Kabe Line)




JR West will change the thermometers inside trains.




And some changes on information signals in the stations.




Here the design for the indicatives on trains.

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Old August 13th, 2014, 06:39 PM   #7048
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As for Hiroshima, I do support color coding the lines on the map, but boo to JR West for basically naming Hiroshima lines after colors. There is nothing more sterile and boring than naming transit lines after colors, a practice which is decriably nearly universal in the US. Adding to the confusion is that most Sanyo line trains do NOT terminate at Hiroshima - they usually go through from Itozaki to Iwakuni or some such. So a train will have to switch from "R" to "G" at Hiroshima.

Besides, the typical tourist itinerary in Hiroshima is: (1) Peace memorial (2) Miyajima (3) Kintaikyo so the only line that really matters to foreign tourists is the kudari Sanyo main line, and the only stops on that line that matter are Hiroshima, Miyajimaguchi and Iwakuni. Post arrow signs saying "THIS WAY FOR TRAINS TO MIYAJIMA AND KINTAIKYO" and put "THIS TRAIN GOES TO MIYAJIMA AND KINTAIKYO" on the departure boards. Boom, no more confused tourists. No need for R, B, Y, G, P.
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Old August 18th, 2014, 09:23 PM   #7049
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Speaking of Hiroshima, what's the train station that is closest to the Mazda HQ building?

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Old August 18th, 2014, 10:01 PM   #7050
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That would be the Mukainada Station (two stops east of the Hiroshima station) on the Sanyo main line: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mukainada_Station
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Old August 19th, 2014, 10:59 PM   #7051
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Quote:
JR East eyes new, faster access to Haneda airport from central Tokyo

East Japan Railway Co. is considering opening a new line to Haneda airport from the center of the capital, a project that would halve travel time to roughly 20 minutes from Tokyo and Shinjuku stations, company officials said Tuesday.

JR East hopes to have the new line partially operational in time for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and complete the roughly ¥320 billion project in the mid-2020s. To accomplish this, the regional train operator plans to consult with the national and Tokyo Metropolitan governments about how to pay for the project, according to company officials.

JR East is considering extending a freight line that now runs southward to the bay from near Tamachi Station on the Yamanote Line and connecting it to Haneda through a 5.7-km underwater tunnel, according to the officials.

On Tuesday, a JR East official briefed a meeting of a transport ministry panel studying the nation’s future railway networks on the plan.
The Japan Times


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Old August 20th, 2014, 09:18 PM   #7052
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Okay, okay....




According some mass media, the new JR Haneda Airport Line will be partially completed by 2020.

The 5.7km tunnel between Tokyo Freight Terminal and the Airport but with a temporary station and shuttle bus to the terminals.

The only connexion in 2020 will be via the Rinkai Line to Odaiba. Perfect for the athletes who stay in the Olympic Village.

In the video you can watch the final plan and all the times between Haneda and Shinjuku, Tokyo and Shin-Kiba.




But, more news, more?

Quote:
Haneda monorail to extend to Tokyo Station

Tokyo Monorail Co. plans to extend its monorail line between Tokyo International Airport at Haneda and East Japan Railway Co.’s Hamamatsucho Station to Tokyo Station, informed sources said on Wednesday.

The ¥109.5-billion project to connect the monorail line to the terminal station for Shinkansen bullet train services will be completed in 10 years, the sources said.

The Hamamatsucho Station building, which houses the monorail station, will also be rebuilt. Barrier-free improvement work will finish before the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games, the sources added.

No new station will be built on the 3-kilometer extension between Hamamatsucho and Tokyo stations. The section will be built on an elevated line beside the JR Keihintohoku Line. At Tokyo Station, monorail platforms will be established above the platforms of the JR Tokaido Line.

The Hamamatsucho building work will be part of a local redevelopment project that will also cover the adjacent World Trade Center Building. The project is expected to take 12 years.

East Japan Railway, or JR East, the parent of Tokyo Monorail, is also considering launching new train lines that would connect the airport to Tokyo and Shinjuku stations. Such a project could lead to competition between the parent company and the subsidiary.

A Tokyo Monorail official said: “We will remain able to play an important role if the number of Haneda airport users continues to increase.”
The Japan Times




Maybe a new station on the right side in Hamatsucho and the Tokyo Monorail tracks over the Shinkansen tracks? There is not too much space to construct until Tokyo Station.
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Old August 21st, 2014, 10:55 AM   #7053
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More. Now, including de Tokyu Tamagawa link to Keikyu Kamata and Haneda.

Quote:
3 new rail lines to link Haneda, Olympic venues



The Yomiuri Shimbun
Three new train lines to directly connect Haneda Airport to stations in central Tokyo are to be constructed in about 10 years, with one of them shortening the current 28 minutes between Tokyo Station and the airport to 18 minutes.

The Oshio Tanraku line is to connect the airport directly to Tokyo Station, while the Higashi-Shinagawa Tanraku line will go to Shinjuku Station and the Rinkai Kaiso line will serve Shin-Kiba Station. Passengers currently need to change trains at least once to reach the airport from those stations. The current 46 minutes from Shinjuku Station to the airport—the longest distance in the project—will be cut to about 23 minutes.

The East Japan Railway Co., which announced the project on Tuesday, said that before the start of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics it aims to begin operating parts of the routes that will connect the airport to the Games venues. The line to Shin-Kiba Station will include the Rinkai waterfront area where venues are set to be built.

The total construction cost is expected to be about ¥320 billion.

The railway company plans to run a new Access Shinsen line starting from the airport with the aim of improving access from major stations in central Tokyo, by connecting the current Rinkai Line, Yamanote Line and a freight line to the new lines.

The Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Ministry is considering a plan to construct a new station about 40 meters below the current Tokyo Station area to drastically shorten time needed to reach both Haneda and Narita airports.

Tokyo Metro Co. plans to move up the scheduled extension of the Yurakucho subway line beyond its Toyosu Station terminus, to reach Sumiyoshi Station on the Hanzomon Line.

Also being considered is setting up a new line to connect Keikyu Kamata Station on the Keikyu Line and Kamata Station on the Tokyu Tamagawa Line via a potential route dubbed the “Kama-Kama line.”

The government aims to double the number of tourists from overseas to 20 million in 2020, along with increasing the number of departure and arrival slots for international flights at Haneda Airport from the current 90,000 to 130,000.
The Japan News
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Old August 28th, 2014, 10:28 AM   #7054
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Quote:
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Shin-Keisei Electric Railway will change the livery of the 8000 series, 162 cars in total.





http://response.jp/



Two first trains with the new "gentle pink" livery.


8800 series on a test run on the Main Line:


8900 running in the Kunugiyama depot:


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Old September 1st, 2014, 08:01 AM   #7055
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Wow, that's some construction announcements and huge.

The planning and coordination that is needed is substantial.

Nevertheless, I do hope that they can implement all these in time for the Olympics in 2020.

Ganbare
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Old September 7th, 2014, 08:51 AM   #7056
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I have no idea how they want to complete any of the Haneda projects in 6 years. The large Japanese construction companies are currently swarmed with Olympics (hotels, stadiums), Tohoku reconstruction and Linear Shinkansen. Even if they can somehow come up with the money (despite Abenomics, Japan still has a giant pile of national debt, and with the intended inflation new debt will get expensive) they simply won't have enough people.
Plus, land acquisition is a giant headache in Japan. The MacArthur road took 60 years because of that. If they manage to start construction on any of these before 2025 it would be a miracle.

ANY plan to build a new line into Tokyo Station will be tough. The Ueno-Tokyo re-link was already a huge stretch. Now they want the Tokyo Monorail, the Tsukuba Express, the New Haneda link, the Asakusa bypass... Maybe one of them is going to happen. But that one will block out all others.

Frankly, Tokyo Station isn't even that important from a pure traffic function. It's purely a prestige thing. For most lines, it's perfectly fine to have a connection to the Yamanote and 2-3 major subways.
Sure, Tokyo has the Shinkansen, but depending whether you're going north or south, Ueno or Shinagawa will do the trick. How many travellers really come from Haneda/Narita and then head for the Shinkansen vs. the Tokyo commuter network? The commuter network serves 30 million people, 1/4 of the population. The Shink goes to Osaka and regional cities in the North, but if you're headed there, you fly into Kansai or Sendai, or transfer at Narita/Haneda to a regional jet.

The only proposal that makes any sort of sense here is the Saikyo Line - Haneda Link that will be a huge improvement for the West side of Tokyo. Is it worth te huge costs? Probably not.

If they want to improve airport access in a way that can be implemented until 2020, do the following:
- Express Elevators from Rinkai Line up to Monorai at Tennozu Aisle, without fare gates.
There's your Haneda-Odaiba Link, with one transfer but at maybe of 1% the cost
- Haneda - Olympic Village FERRY. It's just straight across Tokyo Bay.
- Improve the Skyliner schedule to Narita. You can have a train every 20 minutes all day if you really want. Double-track the remaining single-track parts. Remove the stupid 10 minute wait of the local, tell the taxi companies to shut up and deal with it.

Slightly more expensive:
- Kama-Kama Line. That's what, a 700 meter tunnel? The only reason this is not pushed harder is that JR won't see a benefit, and could even lose commuters to Keikyu (and the tunnel goes below their track, so they can block it). If the Transport Ministry is smart, they'll tell JR that nothing will happen unless they allow Tokyu to tunnel at Kamata.
- New Rinkai-sen - Keikyu transfer station, between Shinagawa Seaside and Oimachi on Rinkai Line and Aomono-yokochou and Samezu on Keikyu (replacing both - they're merely 500 meters apart)
But again, this will shift commuters from JR to Keikyu, and Rinkai Line is controlled by JR, so it's not gonna happen.
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Last edited by mkill; September 7th, 2014 at 09:13 AM.
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Old September 7th, 2014, 09:32 AM   #7057
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Just a point on the economic side of things;
Inflation actually makes the old debt cheaper, as the nominal amount stays the same while the true value decreases.
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Old September 7th, 2014, 11:54 AM   #7058
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Keihan Electric Railway put in service last September 5, first refurbished units of 6000 series.



This 8 cars 6000 series train is used since 1983, and now receive a second life with new Keihan colors and interiors based in 13000 series trains, last to be incorporated into the Keihan park.






At each end of car there is a space for wheelchairs and adjacent seating space reserved for older people etc.


Emergency Intercom situated at the level of the disabled.


Refurbished trains also incorporate LCD screens to provide more information.


Have also been renewed warning lights on the doors.


Fluorescent lights have been changed to LED tubes as usual on any train since 2011.


And of course the external indicators are also LED.

Source: http://response.jp/ and http://www.keihan.co.jp/info/upload/...00_renewal.pdf



In this video you can see well the details of the refurbished unit:





Two photos of the old Keihan 6000 Series unit:




Wikipedia
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Old September 19th, 2014, 11:54 AM   #7060
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^Cool stuff =)
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