daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:23 PM   #721
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Governor proposes new funding structure for Naniwasuji Line
Kensetsu Tsūshin Shimbun

Quote:
In regards to the proposed Naniwasuji Line, Ōsaka Prefecture governor Hashimoto Tōru has submitted a proposal for funding structure to the national government whereby the national government would be responsible for constructing trackside infrastructure, while the national government and local jurisdictions would share responsibility for constructing the station infrastructure. The estimated total project cost is ¥301.0 billion.

The Naniwasuji Line proposes constructing a new line approx. 10.2 km long connecting Shin-Ōsaka with JR Namba and Shiomibashi Stations. The line is proposed to travel beneath Naniwasuji, cutting north-south through Ōsaka City. If realized, Shin-Ōsaka Station and Kansai International Airport (KIX) would be directly connected via JR West and Nankai Electric Railway, substantially reducing travel times.

In urban railway projects up until now, the national government and local governments have each borne one-third of the total cost, with the remaining one-third assembled by loans that are paid back with user fees from railway operators and other revenue sources. In Governor Hashimoto’s latest proposal for funding structure, the project costs related to the trackside infrastructure (core improvements)—approx. ¥157.1 billion—would be borne by the national government as a “national project.” The national government would also be the lead government entity for the trackside infrastructure, which would also include the sections of existing track infrastructure impacted by the undergrounding of Nankai Namba Station. The station infrastructure, including Namba Station, would make use of the existing funding structure, with local jurisdictions contributing to the project costs related to these improvements (approx. ¥144.0 billion).

In the governor’s newest funding structure, the national government would fund approx. ¥2.050 billion, the local governments approx. ¥48.0 billion, and approx. ¥48.0 billion would be covered by loans. Compared to existing funding structures under the Act on Enhancement of Convenience of Urban Railways, which would split the costs evenly approx. ¥100.0 billion each among the three funding sources, the funding burden on local jurisdictions would be substantially alleviated.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:24 PM   #722
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Nankai Main Line elevation: Izumi Ōtsu City

This involves elevation of 2.4 km of the Nankai Main Line in Izumi Ōtsu City, between Izumi Ōtsu and Matsunohama Stations.

Construction photos (2009.12.26)
Source: http://blog.goo.ne.jp/so-long7/e/c49...584a288d4f6acb

Some pictures of the work at Izumi Ōtsu Station. Platforms 3 and 4 for Nankai Namba were elevated in June 2009, while Platforms 1 and 2 for Kishiwada, Izumi Sano and Wakayama-shi are scheduled to be switched in 2010.



Columns for the outbound tracks.



Beneath the elevated half of the station.





Concourse level.



Platforms 3 and 4 for Namba.





Redevelopment towers near the station.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:25 PM   #723
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Hankyū Imazu Line: Nishinomiya Kitaguchi Station elevation

This project involves the elevation of the Imazu Line near Nishinomiya Kitaguchi Station.

Construction photos (2009.12.25)
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com...1225-b32c.html

The new platform is being built directly adjacent to the existing ground-level platform (Platform 5).





The approach into the station from the south. The Imazu Line used to operate as a single line, but is now split in half at Nishinomiya Station, with each half operating separately. The platforms for the north half remain at ground level.





The pedestrian bridge connecting the station to Hankyū Nishinomiya Gardens, a large shopping center that opened in 2008 on the site of the former Hankyū Nishinomiya Stadium, the former home stadium for the Hankyū Braves baseball team (now the Orix Buffaloes).



This major crossing on the south side of the station will disappear with the completion of the project. Hankyū Nishinomiya Gardens is just outside of view. There’s a lot of other redevelopment going on in the area, as well.


Source: mukodono24038 on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:25 PM   #724
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Hankyū Kyōto Line: Rakusaiguchi Station elevation

This project involves elevation of 2.0 km of the Kyōto Main Line surrounding Rakusaiguchi Station in Kyōto City. The current station has only basic facilities, as it opened in 2003 when they were already doing planning to elevate the line in this area. Construction for the elevation began in 2008.

Construction photos (2009.10.29)
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/l53_fmkr/8855415.html

From the south side of Katsura Station, facing in the direction of Umeda in Ōsaka. The station after this is Rakusaiguchi. The storage track at right bows out to make room for construction.



Preparing the temporary track on the left.



Looking in the direction of Kawaramachi in Kyōto.



Looking in the other direction, they have planted the supports for the temporary catenary.



Extending an underground pedestrian tunnel beneath what will be the temporary tracks.



Temporary track and other materials assembled on site.





Rakusaiguchi Station is at right. They have relocated the bicycle parking at the station which was in the path of the temporary tracks.



From the south side of the station, looking north.



Looking south.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:26 PM   #725
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keihan Main Line: Yodo Station elevation

Another elevation project in the Kansai area, involving the elevation of 2 km of the Keihan Main Lane near Yodo Station. With the elevation, the station is also being converted from a two-track station with side platforms to a four-track station with two island platforms. As the station is next to a horse track, foot traffic has been a big problem on race days, but as part of the elevation, the station is being moved closer to the racetrack and a new entrance leading directly to the track will be constructed. The Japan Racing Association is actually paying for 60 percent of the construction cost for the project. In addition, three grade crossings will also be removed, and a station plaza and frontage road constructed.

The outbound track (bound for Ōsaka) was recently shifted to the elevated structure in September, with the inbound track (bound for Kyōto) to be switched in May 2011. Completion for all construction related to the project is scheduled for July 2013.

Construction photos (2009.12.25)
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com...1225-32a7.html



Southwest end of the outbound platform, looking towards Ōsaka.









Waiting lounge.



Two special stairwells for race days only.





The special stairwells lead to a special station exit, connected to this pedestrian bridge that leads straight to Kyōto Racecourse.



Looking towards Kyōto.



Kyōto Racecourse.





Inbound track, towards Kyōto.



The outbound track has already been removed.



quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:26 PM   #726
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Kintetsu Kyōto Station renovation and redevelopment

This project involves major improvements to Kintetsu’s terminal at Kyōto Station, including construction of an additional platform, expansion and renovation of station retail, redesign of station exits, and construction of a 368-room hotel above the new track.

Construction photos (2009.12)
Source: http://blog.goo.ne.jp/so-long7/e/bc7...bafda0dce9fd50

The hotel is starting to take shape. Immediately below us is are the JR West platforms for non-Shinkansen lines (Kyōto Line, Biwako Line, Sagano Line, Nara Line, and Kosei Line).



Kintetsu train stopped at the station. The new track and hotel are being constructed in between the existing tracks and the JR West non-Shinkansen tracks. Behind and above the Kintetsu platforms are the platforms for the Tōkaidō Shinkansen.





Renderings
Source: Kintetsu Corporation

The new hotel and track from the JR side of the station. The hotel is being shoehorned in to a very narrow strip between the existing Kintetsu and JR tracks, and directly atop the new Kintetsu track and platform.



Consolidated station exit.



Renovated station retail.



quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:27 PM   #727
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Elevation of JR Nara Station

This project involves the elevation of JR’s main terminal in Nara City in preparation for the 1300th Anniversary of Heijō-kyō Capital in 2010. The old historic station building has been converted into a tourism office and the area around the station is undergroung redevelopment.

Construction photos (2009.12)
Source: http://blog.goo.ne.jp/so-long7/e/e42...08524abfd9cf8a

Concourse is starting to take shape, making use of wood elements reminiscent of traditional architecture.





Part of the station is designed with a more contemporary theme.



Retail shop







Putting the finishing touches on the Sakurai Line platform.





Platforms 2 and 3 for the Kansai Main Line (Yamatoji Line) and Nara Line, which are already elevated.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:28 PM   #728
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Hanshin Sannomiya Station improvements

Sannomiya Station is Kōbe’s largest urban rail station and is served by Hankyū, Hanshin, JR West, the Kōbe Municipal Subway, and the Port Island Line. This project involves several improvements to the design of Hanshin’s underground terminal at the station, including construction of a new East Exit, reconstruction of the West Exit, changes to track layout (switching out the location of the stub track), platform widening and extension to accommodate full-length 10-car Kintetsu trains, and other improvements.

Construction photos (2009.12.04)
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com...1204-023f.html
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com...1204-5445.html

A large portion of the median of National Route 2 on the south side of the station has been cordoned off for the construction.



Heading down to the construction site underground…



The east end of the construction site. Trains on the Hanshin Main Line pass behind the concrete wall on the right.



The people on the left are standing on top of the subway tunnel. The tunnel wall will be opened and combined with the new space, and then a new tunnel wall constructed further to the right.



Soil-cement piles keep the space from caving in as construction proceeds.



Walking on top of the tunnel.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:29 PM   #729
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Hankai Tramway urges for reconsideration of LRT plan
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/osa...OYT8T00031.htm

Quote:
In response to Sakai City mayor Takeyama Osami’s proclamation for an end to the city’s light rail transit (LRT) plan and the subsequent shelving of the plan to modernize the Hankai Tramway, Hankai president Yamamoto Takurō issued an emergency request on December 28 to Mayor Takeyama to go ahead with the LRT plan. Without maintenance and modernization of infrastructure by the city and the introduction of low-floor vehicles to the system, Yamamoto says, “The route within Sakai City cannot remain.”

Yamamoto discussed the issue with Mayor Takeyama behind closed doors at Sakai City Hall. In the formal request, Yamamoto emphasized, “(The LRT plan) is the best way to bring the Hankai Line back to life. If the plan is abandoned, our path to a stable financial situation will be cut off.”

While the two agreed to begin discussions of ways to support the line, Mayor Takeyama remarked after the meeting, “I don’t know about converting the line to LRT, but I’d definitely like to discuss ways to support the line immediately.” Yamamoto said, “I’d like to develop an action plan in FY2010. Without any support, we will have to consider abandoning service (inside Sakai City).”
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:30 PM   #730
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New Hakata Station Building tops out
http://mytown.asahi.com/fukuoka/news...00620912240001

Quote:
The steel frame of JR’s New Hakata Station Building, which will become the face of Fukuoka when the full length of the Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima Route opens for service, is largely complete. The complex construction has been continuing day and night while maintaining service on the 1,000 daily trains at the station. At the December 22 topping-out ceremony, JR Kyūshū President Karaike Kōji expressed his relief, saying, “We’ve made it thus far without a single accident.”

The New Hakata Station Building began construction in April 2006. At the current stage, with the steel frame of the structure largely finished, construction is approx. 70 percent complete. Work on the exterior panels will now begin, with a mostly-finished exterior expected to make an appearance around May of next year. Total construction cost is expected to be between ¥60 billion and ¥70 billion.

The new building consists of ten stories aboveground and three stories belowground, with a gross floor area of approx. 200,000 sq m. The railway’s public relations office calls the scale of construction, which requires the maintenance of train operations adjacent to the construction site, a “first for JR Kyūshū.” After train service ends at night, workers drill piles into the ground to support the tracks and then dig out the earth from below, using the freed-up space to construct the steel frame for the new building.

At the topping-out ceremony, attended by 130 people including JR Kyūshū executives, representatives familiar with the construction work, Governor Asō Wataru, and Fukuoka City mayor Yoshida Hiroshi, JR Kyūshū President Karaike greeted the crowd by stressing the difficulty of the construction. “Looking across the history of the Japanese National Railways (JNR) and JR, the difficulty of the work for this project is among the top three or four projects. We’ve also made it thus far without a single accident. In the remaining year and several months of the construction schedule, I hope we can continue the work safely.” In response to press reporters, Karaike confided, “We will make sure everything down to the last screw is perfect in order to make this a station building that our customers will truly enjoy.”

In addition, in regards to the appearance of the building after opening, Karaike responded, “The building alone isn’t the conclusion, but we are looking to develop a center for excursion, where users inside the building will also want to go outside.” Karaike expressed his goal to lure the Hakata Gion Yamakasa and Hakata Dontaku festivals to the new station plaza to be constructed at the station’s Hakata Exit.

In addition to a Hankyū Department Store, the New Hakata Station Building will feature big-name lifestyle goods retailer Tōkyū Hands and a cinema complex inside specialty retail center Amu Plaza Hakata. In regards to the tenant situation, Karaike says, “We will finalize the tenants in mid-January. Starting next autumn, we will devote all of our experience and effort into sales promotion.”
Renderings of the new station building:
Source: JR Kyūshū



quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:32 PM   #731
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New platform bridge opens at Takaoka Station
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/toy...OYT8T00076.htm

Quote:
The platform bridge constructed as part of the partial elevation of JR Takaoka Station has been completed, and will open to the public on December 12.

The elevation of the councourse level of Takaoka Station is being carried out by Takaoka City in collaboration with JR West and other entities in an attempt to completely renovate the station, transforming it into the “gateway” to central Takaoka City in preparation for the opening of the Hokuriku Shinkansen scheduled for 2014.

Most recently, the platform bridge (approx. 100 m long and 6 m wide) running north-south through the station was completed. The bridge features escalators and elevators to all four island platforms at the station (no escalator is installed on the Jōhana Line platforms), improving accessibility for users with physical disabilities.

In the following construction work, a public passage (approx. 100 m long and 6-20 m wide) allowing pedestrians to pass through the station’s North Exit and South Exit will be constructed east of the platform bridge, in addition to station administrative offices and a ticket gate area. Completion is scheduled for FY2012, with a total construction cost of approx. ¥3.9 billion. In addition, Takaoka City has plans to extend and relocate the third-sector Man’yō Line Takaoka Station tram stop to the location of the current Takaoka Station Building.
New platform bridge that connects all the tracks / platforms.


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/sandaba_681/30712639.html

The Himi Line platforms will be relocated here once the construction is complete.


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/sandaba_681/30712639.html

Rendering of the station once work is complete.


Source: Takaoka City
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:32 PM   #732
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Toyama City transitions from “ring road” to “tram loop”
http://mytown.asahi.com/toyama/news....00000912230002

Quote:
The Master Plan Kusajima East and Kusajima West Roads running on both sides of the Jinzū River and encompassing all of central Toyama City comprise a “giant ring road” serving as a bypass to the city’s main arteries, National Route 8 and National Route 41. The total length of the Master Plan road is approx. 26 km, and its route is dotted with supermarkets and family restaurants with large parking lots.

Looking down at the bypass road drawn on a map, a top member of the city’s Urban Policy Division remarked, “The plan was to have people live inside the ring road, but the result was that people just moved outwards.”

The roadway was approved for construction in 1966, which just happened to be the year that Toyota Motors unveiled its car for the masses, the Corolla. Private automobiles become more and more common, and coinciding with completion of the ring road, whose main purpose was to relieve congestion, residents living in the central areas of the city moved out to the suburbs. The geographical scope of so-called “population-concentrated areas,” where population density is high, grew to twice what it was in 1970. As a result, population density in the city’s central areas dropped to rock-bottom among all of Japan’s prefectural capitals.

=====================

With an aging population, the share of medical expenses and other obligatory expenses in the total city budget reached 48 percent in FY2009. If these expenses continue to rise, funds devoted to public facilities and services throughout the city will be forced to take cuts. “We can no longer continue to provide an equal level of infrastructure over such a wide area,” pointed out several members of the city’s Urban Improvement Division, which is in charge of city planning.

The time has come to switch from the “large city” to the “small city.”

=====================

How can we shrink this expanded “lifestyle zone”? Faced with an increasingly aging population, the city has strengthened its public transport network to allow residents to live comfortably even without a car, while at the same time encouraging people to move into areas near public transportation. The city has provided funding for the Toyama Light Rail and increased the number of trains on the JR Takayama Line. The Centram loop line opening on December 23 is the centerpiece of the plan. In all projects, the city has launched strategies to advance “urban living,” providing financial assistance to people who move to locations along the lines.

“When I thought to myself, ‘Where could I live 20 years down the road?’ This was the place,” says a male office worker (55yo), who moved with his wife to a condominium near City Hall from a detached single-family home in the city’s northern districts four years ago.

The critical factor in the decision to move was when their eldest son, who went to university outside of Toyama Prefecture, also found a job outside of the prefecture. “Tending to the garden or taking the snow down from the roof would have been difficult. If one day, we can’t drive anymore, we can’t even go shopping.” The city had already been looking to revitalize its central area, and they relocated to their current place believing that it would only become more and more convenient. Daily shopping needs can be satisfied by walking or taking the city trams, and they are renting out their home in the suburbs to a young couple.

In the past few years, the flow of people from suburbs to city center has been gradually establishing itself. Social population flux, which is the difference between the number of people entering and leaving the central city, had been showing several hundred people leaving annually during the 1990s. In 2008, however, the figure showed an influx of 16 residents, up to 70 residents by September 2009. “Even in Toyama, we are starting to see a resurgence of urban living, especially among the baby boomers. Instead, it’s the suburbs that are having trouble keeping people,” remarked one project manager for a residential developer.

At a November press conference before the opening of the Centram streetcar line, Mayor Mori Masashi, in response to an urban planning scheme that had moved libraries, hospitals, and other facilities and services to the suburbs, emphasized, “Now, we will be focusing those facilities in the area enclosed by the tram loop.”
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:33 PM   #733
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Drivers asked to pay attention to avoid collisions with Centram
http://mytown.asahi.com/toyama/news....00000912190003

Quote:
The frequency of collisions between right-turning vehicles and trams coming from behind has seen no end as of yet in Toyama Prefecture. The primary cause is a lack of driver awareness of surroundings. Toyama City’s Centram loop line opening on December 23 uses new low-noise rolling stock, and are even more difficult than the current trams to detect when approaching. As a result, the prefectural police department is calling on drivers to pay special attention to the tram tracks.

Drivers required not to obstruct trams
On December 7, multiple accidents occurred in succession inside Toyama City. In all accidents, a right-turning vehicle entered the track right-of-way for Toyama Chihō Railroad (Chitetsu; HQ: Toyama City) trams, colliding with trains approaching from behind. While there were no injuries, train service was disrupted. A lack of awareness on the part of car drivers is perceived to be the main cause.

According to the Road Traffic Act, cars are allowed to enter the track right-of-way to make right, left, or U-turns, but drivers are obligated to make sure they do not obstruct tram operations.

According to a study by Chitetsu, there have 38 collisions between trams and cars or other objects between FY2007 and FY2009 (until December 16). Collisions with right-turning vehicles account for virtually all of the cases. According to the prefectural police department, among accidents between cars and trams occurring in 2004 and later, there have been two minor injuries. While accidents without injuries are all the better for citizens, as the collisions are classified as property damage, the prefectural police department does not keep accurate data on the number of cases.

In the past five years, there have been no deaths, and the lack of serious incidents is likely due to the fact that the trams only run at 30 kph.

According to representatives from the Man’yō Line in Takaoka City, on the other hand, collisions with vehicles numbered only one in FY2006, but increased to eight incidents in FY2007 and six incidents in FY2008.

The increased number of incidents corresponds with the introduction of new low-noise trains. Officials say, “The new trains are extremely quiet, and some car drivers say they don’t sense them coming. However, there is no concrete connection between the level of noise generated by the trains and the increase in incidents.” The Toyama Light Rail, which opened in 2006, has had a similar frequency of collisions, at about three to six incidents per year.

The Light Rail is completely operated using new rolling stock and uses “vibration-absorptive” tracks which are fastened to the trackbed using resin, meaning the trams generate much less noise and vibration than other systems. As a result, at the Eirakuchō Intersection in northern Toyama City, which sees a high frequency of incidents, four warning signs have been installed to warn drivers of approaching trams.

The Centram set to open soon features the same design as the Light Rail. As virtually all of the track is vibration-absorptive and the trams are much quieter than older rolling stock, it’s possible that drivers will not sense approaching trams and enter the track right-of-way.

Representatives from the prefectural police department’s Traffic Campaign Section say, “When making right turns, drivers should be aware of and visually check their surroundings, and especially to see whether or not a tram is coming from behind.”
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:34 PM   #734
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Retailers both hopeful and skeptical of Centram’s impact
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/toy...OYT8T00970.htm

Quote:
With the December 23 opening of the Toyama City’s tram loop, retailers and other representatives from the city’s central area, which in the past has been faced with gradual decay as people left for the suburbs, held special sales and events, hoping that the launch of the new tram line was the perfect chance to get some publicity. Hopes are riding high that the new Centram trains will attract visitors to the area, but some warn that drastic redevelopment is what is really needed to turn around the decay of the area.

At Ōte Mall in Toyama City’s central district, two new tram stops—Kokusai Kaigijō-mae (International Conference Center) and Ōte Mall—opened for service. Akiyoshi Mitsuo (73yo), chairman of the Ōte Mall Promotion Association formed of shops in the surrounding area, confided, “We haven’t seen this many people in the area in a long time. We’d like to maintain even a fraction of this level of activity.” On December 23, the Association teamed up with a local non-profit organization to install 830 bamboo lanterns for approximately 300 meters along the new tramway. The candles inside provided light and a bit of flare to the launch of the new tram line.

The ANA Crowne Plaza Hotel Toyama made a special concession and opened its 19th floor bar to the public for one day only, allowing a busy stream of families with their children a chance to look down at the new Centram line from high above. In addition, the Toyama International Conference Center and Daiwa’s Toyama store held concerts and handed out coupons.

Meanwhile, Director Ishiguro Shunji (52yo) of the Sōgawa-dōri Commercial Association said, “I’m definitely hopeful, but it will be difficult to attract visitors if it isn’t somehow connected to the Light Rail on the north side of Toyama Station,” skeptical of the ultimate impact of the Centram line. Director Ogawa Hirotsune (61yo) of Chūō-dōri Commercial Association, which failed in a bid to get a stop on the tram line, was worried, saying, “The central district of the city is still decaying, with the empty buildings housing the former Daiwa and Seibu department stores still with us. We don’t want to be left behind.” Ogawa warned, “Let’s hope that they don’t forget the need for redevelopment, such as luring a shopping mall to the area.”
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:35 PM   #735
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Centram is first split management-operations scheme for tram line in Japan
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/toy...OYT8T00250.htm

Quote:
The total construction cost for the tram loop is approx. ¥3 billion. The new line is operated as a public-private partnership, with Toyama City maintaining ownership of the new Centram rolling stock, tracks, and other infrastructure, while Toyama Chihō Railroad is responsible for the actual day-to-day operations. This is the first example of such a management system for tram lines in Japan.

The Centram trains were manufactured by rolling stock manufacturer Niigata Transys (HQ: Chūō Ward, Tōkyō) at a factory in Seirō Town, Niigata Prefecture. The train runs on electric motors with a maximum design speed of 70 kph, but the actual maximum operating speed is 40 kph. The trains weigh 25 tons and are articulated units consisting of two sections. The trains feature 28 seats and a capacity for 80 passengers, with a maximum estimated load at 200 percent, or 160 passengers. The height of the car floor is 30 to 36 cm shorter than older rolling stock, making the trains easy to board or alight.

The loop is 3.4 km long and the route was completed by joining tracks for an existing line through the city’s central district with 0.9 km of new track between Marunouchi and Nishichō. The Centram will run in a counterclockwise loop, making a full loop in approx. 20 min. Hours of service will run from the first departure from outside Toyama Station at 6:10 am until the last departure at 10:10 pm. For the midday period from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm, the line will operate at ten-minute headways, increasing to 20-minute headways in the early morning and evening periods.

The fare is the same as for existing lines—¥200 for adults and ¥100 for children. Tickets from existing lines are honered as is. As long as passengers make sure to receive a transfer ticket inside the first tram, an additional fare will not be charged when transferring between existing lines and the loop line.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:35 PM   #736
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Centram opens in Toyama City

The first day of service.
I am quite fond of the branding efforts, having three distinct trains with different colors and giving the line a unique name. Looks like they also put special large stickers covering the sides of the trams to publicize the launch.


Source: cattram on YouTube

Some pictures of opening day.


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/hnd_ken/31731479.html


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/hnd_ken/31731479.html


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/hnd_ken/31731479.html

The bulges above the doors contain cameras that are connected to displays inside the operator’s cab.


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/hnd_ken/31731479.html


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/isseidish/23487396.html

Toyama Castle in the background.


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/isseidish/23487396.html

At Kokusai Kaigijō-mae, the stop for the Toyama International Conference Center.


Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/advc373/32075939.html
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:36 PM   #737
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Veteran operator remembers old Toyama Loop Line
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T00025.htm

Quote:
Toyama City’s tram Loop Line returned for the first time in 36 years on December 23.

The trams running on the Loop Line are next-generation trams, light rail transit (LRT) vehicles nicknamed Centram. The three elegant trains, one each in white, black, and silver, are the new face of Toyama City’s central district, which is looking to reestablish its vitality and activity. Veteran tram operators who used to operate trams on the former Loop Line waited with strong anticipation for December 23.

“It was worth waiting for. The trains are quiet and absolutely wonderful,” said Fujino Matsuo (65yo), who has been driving trams for Centram operator Toyama Chihō Railroad (HQ: Toyama City) for 44 years. This month, he had the opportunity to take the vehicles out for test runs, and was left speechless with emotion. He had been pushing back his retirement date by a year, waiting for the day the line would open.

Fujino became a tram operator at the age of 21. Back then, operators on the Loop Line would take the trams out for five complete loops at a time (each loop took 20 minutes), and after a 30-minute break, would return to do another shift. On busy days, operators repeated the cycle four times a day.

“Going round and round the same places, I almost felt like a bear at the zoo,” joked Fujino as he remembered the past, but shifts on the Loop Line back then, when the central district was bustling with people, were nothing short of fun. Normally, passing the same locations over and over gets boring and repetitive, and operators can get careless. But Fujino says, “The flow of people and cars was different every time on the Loop Line, and there was no emotional stress.”

During summer vacation in particular, nighttime stalls would line up outside the Chūkyōin Shrine near Nishichō, and the area stayed active until late into the night. “The last trains were full and something to behold. Everyone stayed out late to enjoy themselves,” reminisced Fujino.

Fujino grew up in the Marunouchi area in Toyama’s central district, and from a young age, the Loop Line was his mode of transport. So when service on the Loop Line was terminated in 1973 as the automobile began to take reign, Fujino was sad to see the trains go.

At the age of 60, he became a part-time employee, and was supposed to have retired in January of this year at the age of 65, putting an end to his long career on the rails. But after hearing of the plans to revive the Loop Line and run new trains on it, Fujino says, “I asked them to keep me on for one more year… After all, I was still healthy.” His part-time contract was extended for another year.

However, after the December 23 opening, Fujino says he doesn’t plan on operating trains in regular service on the Loop Line, leaving the duties to the younger generation of operators he’s trained himself and making a quiet exit. “I’m more than happy to have had the chance to test run the trains. We’ve got the young operators here, and there’s nothing to worry about,” said Fujino.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:37 PM   #738
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Progress on Enshū Railway elevation
Kensetsu Tsūshin Shimbun

Quote:
In the Enshū Railway elevation project between Sukenobu Station and the left bank of the Magome River, Hamamatsu City will issue a public notice in January for the superstructure in Kamijima—which was included in the supplementary budget in November—as well as issue a request for bids in mid-January on Phase 1 of the substructure at the starting point in Sukenobuchō. The level of progress on the project at the end of FY2009 is expected to reach approx. 80 percent.

The Phase 1 work, consisting of six steel-reinforced concrete viaduct columns, marks the completion of procurement of services for the substructure. With the completion of the bidding process for all portions of the substructure, work is scheduled to start in FY2010 on as-yet-unawarded superstructure sections on the north side of Kamijima Station (450 m), the Magome Bridge (64 m), and between the north side of Hikuma Station and Kamijima Elementary School (150 m), as well as on gradual station building installation work at Sukenobu Station, Hikuma Station, and Kamijima Station.

Starting in FY2011, work on the tracks and other rail infrastructure will proceed, opening for service in FY2012. After the start of service on the new tracks, the existing rail infrastructure will be removed, with a project completion target date of FY2013.

The project involves the elevation of approx. 3,300 m of the Enshū Railway between Sukenobu Station and the left bank of the Magome River, and work is currently proceeding on the north side of Hachiman Station.

The section between Hachiman Station and Kamijima Station is being elevated parallel to a roadway, but north of Kamijima Station, the line no longer parallels roadways. Construction work will be performed in a confined area because of the dense housing surrounding the line, and as a result, the original target completion date of FY2010 was pushed back to FY2013.

Shizuoka Prefecture began work on the project in FY2004, but after Hamamatsu City became an ordinance-designated city in FY2007, it become the lead government entity for the project. The project is expected to be approx. 80 percent complete by the end of FY2009.
Enshū Railway is a local private railway serving Hamamatsu, operating rail and bus services in addition to small-scale ventures in related business (supermarkets, department store, tourism, etc.).

Cab view from Hachiman to Sukenobu.
You can see some of the construction starting at 2:31, including the temporary elevated track and ramp down, as well as the new viaduct.

Source: SAKURAZUKASOUKEN on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:38 PM   #739
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Nagoya City reveals financial rehabilitation plan for municipal bus and subway
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/s/article/...490135830.html

Quote:
On December 24, the Transportation Bureau of the City of Nagoya revealed its Municipal Bus and Subway Financial Rehabilitation Plan (FY2009-2016).

The plan includes the following elements:
  • A construction freeze after the opening of the Sakura-dōri Line between Nonami (Tenpaku Ward) and Tokushige (Midori Ward) in March 2011
  • Drastic reductions in labor costs, including a 20 percent cut in lifetime wages
  • Efforts to spread use of the IC farecard system scheduled to be introduced in FY2010
  • Expansion of contracting out of station duties to the private sector
  • A transfer of ¥4 billion from the city’s general fund
According to a financial analysis by the City Transportation Bureau, without implementation of a counterstrategy, the FY2016 accumulated funding deficit would reach ¥30.4 billion for municipal bus operations and ¥291.0 billion for municipal subway operations. If the rehabilitation plan is implemented, however, these would be reduced to ¥26.5 billion and ¥29.9 billion, respectively.

Improvements to the financial state of the agency’s operations have already begun, with both bus and subway operations generating operating surpluses. However, payments on the corporate debt accumulated through infrastructure improvements up until now are scheduled to reach a peak in the near future, but under the Sound Finance Act, the Bureau must draft a new plan and obtain approval from the City Council.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2009, 11:39 PM   #740
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tōkyō IC farecards expand to Izukyū Line
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/lifest...1727005-n1.htm

Quote:
On December 22, private railway Izukyū Corporation, which operates trains in Shizuoka Prefecture’s Izu Peninsula, announced that starting March 13 of next year, IC farecards Suica and PASMO will be accepted at all 16 of its stations between Itō and Izukyū Shimoda. JR East’s Odoriko limited expresses already run through-service onto Izukyū tracks, and the project is intended to improve convenience for leisure travelers from the Greater Tōkyō area.

In addition to Itō Station, the transfer station between the Izukyū Line and JR Itō Line, farecard add-value machines will be provided at nine stations, including Izu Kōgen and Izukyū Shimoda.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium