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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:46 AM   #961
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Narita Sky Access construction updates: Part 4

Now some photos of the Narita Sky Access trackwork, taken from a JR train.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

There are currently two main routes into Narita Airport: via the Keisei Main Line, and via the JR Narita Line. The Narita Sky Access route actually follows the JR Narita Line route before branching off to meet up with the existing Hokusō Line at Inba Nihon Idai Station. The new track at left is for the Narita Sky Access, and is largely finished, with the overhead already strung. This is the east end of the Horinouchi turnout, where trains can pass each other on the single-track JR Narita Line. This is actually a new turnout, as the former Nekoya turnout for the JR Narita Line was decommissioned to allow for construction of the Narita Sky Access line.



West end of the turnout



Approaching the newly-constructed Shin-Nekoya turnout for the Narita Sky Access (the new signals are up ahead just before the tunnel).







Approaching where the Narita Sky Access branches off from the JR Narita Line route. Apparently they left the space in the middle untouched for some proposed new station, but I don't know what that's about...



From here, the Narita Airport branch of the JR Narita Line dives down to meet with the main branch, while the Narita Sky Access continues west to connect with the Hokusō Line.

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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:47 AM   #962
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Keisei Lines construction updates: Part 1

First, some photos on the Keisei Main Line in central Tōkyō, at Nippori Station. They have recently opened the elevated outbound track at this station, so currently they have an outbound track on Level 3 and the inbound track on ground level, with the station concourse at Level 2.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

This is taken from the JR Jōban Line platforms at the station. They've already removed the former ground-level outbound track, but it appears that they won't be using the space to widen the platform. The part sticking out at the east end of the platform (towards Keisei Ueno) is a new stairwell from the station concourse level.



Opposite end closer to Shin-Mikawashima.



Now on the Keisei platforms, looking at the east end. They are constructing a new roof here as this part isn't sheltered by the second-level concourse.



New stairwell. Somewhat narrow, but the platform only serves one direction anyways.



New elevator under construction in the center of the platform. They have also largely finished installing the ceiling panels, which so far seem to do wonders for making the station less gloomy.



At the Shin-Mikawashima end, they are extending the platform. The outbound platforms on the third level are also designed to the length of ten-car trains, so they are extending this to match, although I have no idea what plans, if any, they have for extending trains beyond the current eight-car maximum, and the new Skyliner trains are only eight.



The Keisei Ueno end of the outbound Skyliner platform. They have designed the outbound track with separate platforms on either side, so Airport passengers using the Skyliner get their own special platform. Here, they've installed two platform elevators side-by-side, perhaps to deal with all the luggage passengers have with them.

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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:48 AM   #963
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Keisei Lines construction updates: Part 2

Now we head to the Kanamachi Line to see the work being done on elevation of the tracks between Keisei Takasago Station and Shibamata Station.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

The new ramp down from the elevated platforms at Keisei Takasago Station is at left, although to an untrained eye it still looks the same as the last photo update.



Construction of the new switchover is largely complete.



On the inbound track, they've laid down some wood...



Approaching the ramp again...



Given the space constraints, they probably could have closed off one track, although that probably would have required some scheduling adjustments. According to the blogger, it seems likely the track switchout will just be an overnight deal.

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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:49 AM   #964
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Keisei Lines construction updates: Part 3

Lastly, some pictures of the construction progress on the elevation of the Keisei Oshiage Line near Hikifune Station.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Between Yahiro and Keisei Hikifune, traveling inbound. The outbound track was moved out sometime ago, but they are now constructing the temporary inbound track in the middle (you can see where the new ballast meets the old ballast) and the offset between the old ties and the new ties.



A little further down, they've completely removed the old outbound tracks, although some of old the wooden ties still remain here, too. They've already placed the bags of ballast down so they'll probably start work on the temporary trackbed soon.



Entering Hikifune Station. The remnants of the former outbound platform have been removed, and they will now start construction of the temporary inbound platform and track in the middle. You can still see the old outbound track embedded in the roadway at the grade crossing.



Further down at the Oshiage end of the station, they've already laid the temporary inbound track and ballast, which needs to skew quite far out to accommodate the temporary platform.



Between Hikifune and Oshiage.



The overpass above the Tōbu Kameido Line. From here, the Oshiage Line dives below into Oshiage Station to connect with the Toei Subway Asakusa Line. At right is the Tōbu Isesaki Line. I can't tell exactly what they are trying to do here...

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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:50 AM   #965
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Seibu to open renovated Sayama-shi Station on March 26
http://www.seibu-group.co.jp/railway..._renewal_1.pdf

Quote:
Seibu Railway Co., Ltd. (HQ: Tokorozawa City, Saitama Prefecture; President: Gotō Takashi) has been proceeding with construction works for an elevated concourse and east-west public passage at Sayama-shi Station on the Shinjuku Line in coordination with Sayama City, and with the start of service on Friday, March 26, we will open the elevated concourse and public passage (a portion of these facilities are only temporary). This construction was planned in concert with the Sayama-shi Station West Exit Area Type 1 Urban Redevelopment Project, and will allow for access to the station from the redevelopment project area via a barrier-free pedestrian deck. For the East Exit, passengers are encouraged to use the the temporary stairwell and elevator until December 2010. After March 25, the current east-west connecting underground passage will be closed.

With an overarching concept of a station building, public passage, and retail facility, the project keeps in mind the theme of “Sayama-style design and a bustling urban environment,” and Seibu Railway will develop the station into a bright and open gateway to Sayama City. As a means of encouraging activity at the station, the ceiling and signs in the public passage are designed to hold Tanabata festival decorations during the Sayama-local Iruma River Tanabata Festival. In addition, design sheets featuring images of the four seasons in Sayama City will be placed on glass surfaces in the station concourse, contributing to a station design that builds upon Sayama’s charm.

The elevated station concourse will feature a customer service open counter, slanted overhead fare table, multi-function restrooms, elevators, platform waiting booths, and escalators, and is designed to be easy and convenient to use for elderly passengers and passengers in wheelchairs. In keeping with environmental awareness, Seibu has taken several steps towards green design, including introduction of our first customer toilet system using collected rainwater and a concourse roof design that features a thin membrane allowing natural sunlight to flood the interior.

Starting on the same day that the elevated station concourse opens, Seibu Railway will also open a branch of station convenience store chain Tomony next to the faregates. In addition, to replace the Sayama Station Building tenant building which closed for the construction of these station improvements, Seibu Railway will open a new retail facility in spring 2011. And by constructing a pedestrian deck that connects the station, east-west public passage, and redevelopment project, the new retail facility will develop together with the neighborhood and become a new gathering place connecting the station and local residents. We aim to develop this facility into an image boost towards a new Sayama.
Sayama-shi Station sees 44,600 daily entries and exits (2008) and is a stop on all regular-service trains on the Seibu Shinjuku Line.

Renderings:
Source: Sayama City

West Exit



Pedestrian deck



East Exit

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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:51 AM   #966
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JR Shinjuku Station improvements in the works
Kensetsu Tsūshin Shimbun

Quote:
Discussions over improvements to JR Shinjuku Station and infrastructure works in the surrounding area are set to take off in FY2010. In order to finalize an improvement plan for the area surrounding the station, Shinjuku Ward will conduct studies to look at improvements to the east and west station plazas. In addition, the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government will begin developing a vision for the pedestrian network in the area, and East Japan Railway Company (JR East), which hopes to expedite terminal station development at Shinjuku Station, will proceed with detailed design of an east-west public passage that is staged to become a catalyst for development projects being considered around the station.

JR East is project lead on a plan to develop an east-west public passage at Shinjuku Station. The east-west public passage would involve widening the 100 m long North Passage (Ōme Passage) from 17 m to 25 m. By relocating the station faregates at both ends of the passage and allowing entry for people other than railway passengers, the plan’s goal is to improve accessibility through the station. JR East is aiming for a completion around FY2016 and is scheduled to begin detailed design work starting in FY2010, with a total project cost of approx. ¥11.8 billion. Shinjuku Ward has included ¥340 million in its FY2010 proposed budget as funding towards the railway for detailed design.

In conjunction with the progress being made on the east-west public passage, Shinjuku Ward and the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government will also each begin evaluation of infrastructure improvements.

In order to finalize an infrastructure plan for the area surrounding Shinjuku Station, Shinjuku Ward will commission a study to look at improvements to the East Exit and West Exit station plazas, as well as extension of the Subnade underground passage beneath Yasukuni-dōri. The ward government has secured ¥14 million in its FY2010 budget for this work.

The ward government has already been developing an urban planning vision targeting approx. 2.0 ha of the Shinjuku Station East Exit area since December 2009. With the basic transportation infrastructure improvements including the station plaza reorganization and extension of the Yasukuni-dōri underground passage to be evaluated in FY2010, the ward government also plans to consider redevelopment within the area. The targeted zone is bounded by Yasukuni-dōri, Meiji-dōri, and Kōshū Kaidō (National Route 20).

Meanwhile, the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government is drawing up a vision for the pedestrian network in the area to deal with the expected increase in pedestrian traffic, including ground-level facilities and public passages.
There are various improvements already under construction at JR Shinjuku Station, the largest of which is expansion and development of the South Exit into a new transportation hub. Approximately 430,000 people use the South Exit at Shinjuku Station daily, but the congested National Route 20 (Kōshū Kaidō) overpass above the station is too narrow to handle all the pedestrian traffic and is also in need of seismic retrofitting and replacement due to age.

A new three-level transportation hub and elevated deck will be built on the south side of National Route 20 to serve as a new pedestrian plaza and station entrance and handle vehicular access to and from the station, including by private auto, taxi, and express bus.

JR East will also construct a 180 m (110,000 sq m) mixed-use tower featuring a multi-purpose performance hall, landscaped green space, and other uses. Underground pedestrian passages will also be extended to connect Shinjuku Sanchōme Station on the Fukutoshin Line directly to JR Shinjuku Station. The two are technically already connected, but only at the northern end of Shinjuku Sanchōme, which connects to East Exit of JR Shinjuku Station. The new underground passage would connect the south end of the Shinjuku Sanchōme with the redesigned South Exit of JR Shinjuku underneath National Route 20.

Aerial from spring 2009 of the South Exit area. The site of the new South Exit transportation hub is marked by the upside-down triangle. National Route 20 is the major road running top-to-bottom in this image. JR East HQ is the tower just to the left and up of the construction site.


Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

New South Exit “transportation hub.” The new JR tenant building is delineated by the dotted lines. This is all being built on an artificial deck constructed directly above the JR platforms.


Source: Tōkyō National Highway Office

Second level: Pedestrian plaza and station facilities
Third level: Taxi and private auto zone
Fourth level: Highway express buses and related facilities
The road coming into and out of the hub connects to National Route 20.


Source: Tōkyō National Highway Office
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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:52 AM   #967
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JR East renovates station retail at Tōkyō Station
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2009/20100209.pdf

Quote:
East Japan Railway Company (JR East; President and Representative Director: Seino Satoshi) is proceeding with the Tōkyō Station City development at Tōkyō Station, based on the concept of “stations changing cities, cities becoming stations.” On Sunday, March 28, 2010, JR East will launch a new retail zone known as the South Court on the site of the former Dila Tōkyō Media Court inside the first-floor paid area of Tōkyō Station. Management of the facility is being handled by JR East Station Retailing Co., Ltd. (President and Representative Director: Egoshi Kōichi), which manages ecute facilities in the Greater Tōkyō area.

Development philosophy
JR East Group is proceeding with its Tōkyō Station City project as part of an attempt to increase the value of Tōkyō Station as a whole. In addition, to respond to hard infrastructure improvements including the restoration of the Marunouchi building at Tōkyō Station and the construction of the Tōhoku Through Line, as well as soft changes with diversifying consumer behavior, we have decided to renovate our ekinaka (station retail) facilities.

As a result, Dila Tōkyō Media Court inside the first-floor paid area of Tōkyō Station will be reborn under the concepts of Tōkyō Station City as the “South Court,” with the goal of pursuing new growth.
  • Project area: approx. 1,700 sq m
  • Sales floor area: approx. 1,300 sq m
  • Total tenants: 31
  • Tenant businesses: Sweets, prepared foods, bakeries, cafes, and eat-in restaurants
  • Sales projections: approx. ¥4 billion annually

Yaesu end:



Marunouchi end:

Some updates on the restoration work for the Marunouchi building at Tōkyō Station (2010.02):
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/helicopter/

An aerial of the Marunouchi station building and the elevated platforms at Tōkyō Station. While Tōkyō Station may not feel as active as Shinjuku or Shibuya, the station is still a major commuter hub for workers in Tōkyō’s premier office districts and the Shinkansen gateway to Tōkyō. There are ten elevated JR island platforms (twenty tracks), plus four underground JR island platforms (eight tracks) and one subway island platform (two tracks) on the Tōkyō Metro Marunouchi Line. The station is also part of an interconnected complex spanning from Hibiya Station and Higashi-Ginza Station in the south to Ōtemachi Station in the north, Tōkyō Metro’s largest hub with four subway lines.

Much of the area immediately outside of the building has been cordoned off for construction..



North Dome



Central section



South Dome



Some photos from 2009.11. This is the North Dome.



Central entrance



South Dome

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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:53 AM   #968
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Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation reveals new three-year plan
http://www.kotsu.metro.tokyo.jp/news...1002221_h.html

Quote:
The Tōkyō Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation has recently drafted a new three-year plan—Step Up 2010—to take effect starting in FY2010.

Step Up 2010 builds on the successes of the previous plan (New Challenge 2007, FY2007-2009) and sets operational goals and specific plans for each year, and represents the future path for the Bureau of Transportation.

In 2011, during the plan period, the Bureau of Transportation will celebrate its 100th anniversary. By steadfastly implementing this plan, we will “step up” our services further in an effort to become a transport system that our customers trust and support.

Plan contents
In the face of a changing operational environment for the Bureau of Transportation, including an aging population and a need for improved service levels to ensure safe and stable public transportation, the plan reveals future business strategies for the subway, bus, streetcar, and new transit operations to appropriately deal with these issues.

Under the themes of “Safety and Security,” “High-Quality Service,” “Response to Social Needs,” and “Strengthened Financial Base,” the plan identifies priority projects for implementation.

The plan identifies 91 projects for the three-year plan period (25 of which are new), amounting to a total cost of ¥95.7 billion. In particular, for “safety and security” projects, the plan calls for investment of ¥59.7 billion (approx. 62% of the total investment), prioritizing these projects.

Main projects
  • Safety and Security
    • Lifespan extension of subway structures: We will introduce a “preventative maintenance” management scheme that extends the lifespan of subway structures and standardizes repair costs.
    • Installation of platform doors on the Ōedo Line: By FY2013, we will install platform doors on all 38 stations on the Ōedo Line.
    • Introduction of drive recorders on all buses: To help prevent accidents, we will install drive recorders on all fixed-route buses.
  • High-Quality Service
    • Large-scale improvements to Kachidoki Station on the Ōedo Line: We will proceed with construction of a new platform and expansion of the concourse at the station to accommodate an increase in passengers.
    • Introduction of new information services for passengers: We will strengthen the functions of our operational information service for Toei buses, and launch new services to provide information to passengers.
    • Introduction of a reward-points system using PASMO: We will launch a service that allows users to charge their PASMO cards with points they’ve earned based on their use of the Toei transport system.
  • Response to Social Needs
    • Campaigns to increase Toei system ridership through environmentally-related PR efforts: We will encourage users to shift from private autos to the Toei transport system, contributing to reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.
    • Image enhancement for the Toden Arakawa Line streetcar and Nippori–Toneri Liner, and revitalization of trackside neighborhoods: By coordinating with local jurisdictions, we will contribute to increased activity in areas along the line.
    • Installation of additional automated external defibrillators (AEDs): Currently, each station on the Toei Subway features one AED unit, but we will install AED units at all faregate locations inside our stations.
  • Strengthened Financial Base
    • Improved efficiency: We will completely reevaluate our cost administration by reorganizing into a more simple, more efficient administrative structure.
    • Development of related business: We will actively pursue related business such as in-station business and advertisement business to strengthen our financial foundation.
    • Staff development: We will continue to strategically transmit knowledge to younger staff and develop an ambitious and talented workforce.
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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:53 AM   #969
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Keiō Line / Sagamihara Line grade-separation (undergrounding) updates

Keiō Electric Railway recently held an open house event on February 20 to show the latest progress in the undergrounding of the Keiō Line and Sagamihara Line in Chōfu City in western Tōkyō Prefecture.

Project details are here: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...0&postcount=18
First photolog: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=622

First some nice photos from people who know how to take pictures:
Source: http://96chillout.blog39.fc2.com/
Source: http://96chillout.blog39.fc2.com/

























Now some videos:

Starts near Tsurukawa Kaidō on the Keiō Line just west of Chōfu Station and travels east underground to the four-tunnel junction between the Keiō Line and Sagamihara Line, then heads south through the Sagamihara Line tunnels. You can see the TBM in action, including the control room, how they piece the tunnel wall segments together, and how they move the excavated dirt out.


Source: osuga01 on YouTube

Some more views of the TBM before heading back to the junction and up to the surface at Chōfu Station.


Source: osuga01 on YouTube

Details of the project, including construction method, progress, etc. (Japanese only). This was shot during the presentation at the open house.
Source: osuga01 on YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86UmpoG_xBw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyS0ZymT69Q
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfgfW7E3GX8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xd4C2H2VHA
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Old March 12th, 2010, 08:00 PM   #970
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Tokyo Fukutoshin Line Mystery Tracks

Fukutoshin subway "mystery" tracks.
Mystery #1, at Shibuya station:
Last year, while at the new Fukutoshin line's Shibuya station I noticed a track at the northeast corner of the station that went about 60 feet toward Ikebukuro, then stopped at a wall. It is easy to see on the far right in this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ki4qz5IevU
Now, too late, I realize I should have looked to see if there is a similar track on the west side of the station.

Mystery #2, at Shinjuku 3-chome station:
In this video, just as the train is leaving the station, heading north toward Ikebukuro, there is a track going to the right. Beyond where it meets the southbound track there is another track, just visible in the distance. That might be a storage track.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbks5...eature=related

Mystery #3, at Higashi Shinjuku station (same video):
Approaching H. Shinjukju, the express track continues straight, passing behind the platform wall. The train we are on turns right to stop at the platform. But just before reaching the platform, another "mystery" track joins it from the right.

I have searched in vain for a good detailed track plan that might show these tracks and explain what they are for. Does anyone know, or know where to find a good track layout of the Fukutoshin line?
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Old March 12th, 2010, 11:12 PM   #971
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There is this, but it only shows tracks used by revenue trains:
http://www.toqfan.com/2007/02/03/fukutoshin

Mystery track #1:
I believe this is a storage track for maintenance vehicles. You can see it more clearly in this cab view from a train departing Shibuya.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-W1gAjGzQNU
Source: toshiyuki1961 on YouTube

A shot of the manual switch and track here:
http://oomatipalk2.blog91.fc2.com/blog-entry-119.html

It also appears to split off before the end of the platform, another hint that it's not used by revenue trains.

Mystery track #2
This is a siding for Tōyoko Line trains not through-servicing all the way onto the Fukutoshin Line. Presumably, they will run some Tōyoko Line trains past Shibuya to only Shinjuku Sanchōme and just turn them back there.

Mystery track #3
Looks like another maintenance track.
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Old March 13th, 2010, 12:06 AM   #972
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Notice: Merged Discussion.
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Old March 13th, 2010, 06:34 AM   #973
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
There is this, but it only shows tracks used by revenue trains:
http://www.toqfan.com/2007/02/03/fukutoshin

Mystery track #1:
I believe this is a storage track for maintenance vehicles. You can see it more clearly in this cab view from a train departing Shibuya.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-W1gAjGzQNU
Source: toshiyuki1961 on YouTube

A shot of the manual switch and track here:
http://oomatipalk2.blog91.fc2.com/blog-entry-119.html

It also appears to split off before the end of the platform, another hint that it's not used by revenue trains.

Mystery track #2
This is a siding for Tōyoko Line trains not through-servicing all the way onto the Fukutoshin Line. Presumably, they will run some Tōyoko Line trains past Shibuya to only Shinjuku Sanchōme and just turn them back there.

Mystery track #3
Looks like another maintenance track.
Thanks for the reply and a special thanks for the fine job you are doing to post these marvelous details of all these ongoing projects.
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Old March 15th, 2010, 06:15 AM   #974
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Narita Sky Access Line trial run
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Old March 15th, 2010, 09:21 AM   #975
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick H View Post
Thanks for the reply and a special thanks for the fine job you are doing to post these marvelous details of all these ongoing projects.
No problem.
Welcome to the forum.
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Old March 15th, 2010, 09:22 AM   #976
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I updated my Greater Tōkyō map. The main changes:
  • Added in the recent service changes (new Musashi Kosugi Station on the Yokosuka Line, Shōnan-Shinjuku Line, and NEX)
  • Added in almost all of the under construction, planned, or proposed lines and stations. Other than the Chūō Shinkansen, Narita-Haneda maglev, and Gunma-Saitama LRT, none of which have well-defined alignments, this covers virtually all of the extensions, new lines, new track connections, and new stations in the future. This includes projects that have a relatively high likelihood (Sōtetsu – Tōkyū Through Line, Kawasaki Municipal Subway, Toei Subway Asakusa Line Bypass) and less realistic plans like Eight Liner and Metro Seven. So while not all of it will get built, it gives a good idea of how the network fills out with each of the improvements.
  • Restyled the line legend a bit so it’s more clear.
  • Fixed some errors in the previous map and pared back some of the through-servicing shown to better reflect actual operations.
Enjoy!
Please note file is a 11 MB PDF.

Greater Tōkyō (Capital Region) Rail Network v1.10 (March 2010)
http://docs.google.com/uc?export=dow...YyZDIwMWVkN2Iy
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Old March 15th, 2010, 12:44 PM   #977
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Fantastic work Quashlo.
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Old March 15th, 2010, 04:44 PM   #978
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I second that. Thank you!

I like how the names of the proposed lines and extensions are written on the line itself. For existing lines, this isn't the case; it's a problem when I don't know it's name off hand, as it's a bit cumbersome and time consuming to zoom out and scroll to the legend to look it up, especially giving the maps immense size.

On a different topic, has anyone heard anything concerning the Toei-Tokyo Metro merger? I heard news of the idea a few months ago, but it's disappeared off the radar since then. However, I read on another forum that Toei's enormous debt burden was enough to turn Tokyo Metro off to the idea...any truth to this?

Last edited by nouveau.ukiyo; March 15th, 2010 at 05:09 PM.
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Old March 15th, 2010, 06:10 PM   #979
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Enjoy!
Please note file is a 11 MB PDF.

Greater Tōkyō (Capital Region) Rail Network v1.10 (March 2010)
http://docs.google.com/uc?export=dow...YyZDIwMWVkN2Iy[/QUOTE]

Thank you for that fantastic map. Almost mind-boggling!
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Old March 15th, 2010, 06:27 PM   #980
quashlo
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Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
I second that. Thank you!

I like how the names of the proposed lines and extensions are written on the line itself. For existing lines, this isn't the case; it's a problem when I don't know it's name off hand, as it's a bit cumbersome and time consuming to zoom out and scroll to the legend to look it up, especially giving the maps immense size.
Thanks for the feedback. I was seriously debating whether to write out the line names for the existing lines, as I liked how they looked on some of the extensions, but found that the station spacing made it difficult for many of the lines. This is also why some of the extensions don't have anything written on them. I'll be looking into this in the next major revision, but wanted to publish something for the time being.
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