daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 7th, 2009, 07:23 AM   #81
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Google adds subway maps
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/net/news/cn...OYT8T00547.htm

Google Maps just added special subway maps for 10 operators covering nine cities in Japan:When you click on a subway station, it will highlight only the subway lines serving that station.
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 7th, 2009, 07:24 AM   #82
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Debit use of Suica and Pasmo reaches 35 million transactions a month
http://www.business-i.jp/news/ind-pa...904070072a.nwc

Quote:
JR East announced on April 6 that transactions using the electronic money functionality of IC farecards Suica and PASMO reached 35.32 million for the month of March. JR East attributes the numbers to their expansion of the card for use in convenience stores and taxis, as well as vending machines inside stations. At the end of March, the total number of Suica and PASMO cards issued had reached 27.94 million and 11.77 million respectively.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 7th, 2009, 07:24 AM   #83
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Carsharing facilities near Yamanote Line
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/eco/miniinf...OYT8T00485.htm

Quote:
ORIX Auto Corporation (HQ: Minato Ward, Tōkyō) has announced that it will install carsharing pods in parking facilities within five minutes walk of all 29 stations on the Yamanote Line. Carsharing allows one car to be used by multiple members of the network. Service will begin April 17 with pods located near Ebisu, Gotanda, Ōsaki, Okachimachi, and Uguisudani Stations, with all 29 stations having service by mid-May. By encouraging the use of trains and cars together, the company hopes the venture will ease traffic congestion in central Tōkyō and reduce pollution.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 10th, 2009, 08:04 AM   #84
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New International Terminal Station at Haneda Airport

Websites:
http://www.keikyu.co.jp/corporate/pr...5_1005_1.shtml (Original Keikyū press release)
http://www.pa.ktr.mlit.go.jp/haneda/.../ronbun_03.pdf (Tōkyō Monorail station plan)
Construction start: July 2006 (Keikyū), 2008 (Tōkyō Monorail)
Construction end: December 2009 (Keikyū), 2009 (Tōkyō Monorail)

Benefits:
  • Access to Haneda Airport’s new International Terminal via Keikyū and Tōkyō Monorail
Coinciding with the fourth runway and new International Terminal to open at Haneda Airport in October 2009, a new International Terminal Station (unofficial name) will open December 2009, served by the Keikyū Airport Line and Tōkyō Monorail.

The Keikyū station is being constructed adjacent to the existing tracks between Tenkūbashi and Haneda Airport Stations and will consist of two side platforms. For the outbound platform (bound for Haneda Airport Station), faregates will be located on the platform level (Basement Level 2) and escalators and elevators will connect the platform level directly with the terminal departure level (above-ground Level 3), allowing quick and easy access for passengers catching a departing flight. For passengers coming from arriving flights, faregates will be located on Level 2 and escalators and elevators will be provided directly to the inbound platform (bound for Kamata, Shinagawa, Yokohama). The Keikyū station will also allow passengers to carry baggage carts directly onto the platform


Source: Sankei News
Conceptual design for the Keikyū station.


Source: Sankei News


Source: Sankei News
The mound of earth is the location of the future Tōkyō Monorail International Terminal Station.


Source: Sankei News
Station emergency exit


Source: Sankei News


Source: Sankei News
A Tōkyō Monorail train passes the construction site.

The Tōkyō Monorail station will be located in the same location but will require shifting the overhead structures closer to the site of the new terminal building. Approximately 900 meters of existing structure above Kanpachi-dōri will be replaced. Like the Keikyū station, the inbound platform (for Hamamatsuchō) will offer direct access from the International Terminal’s arrival lobby, while the outbound platform (for Haneda Airport Terminal 2) will offer direct access to the departure lobby.


Source: Tōkyō International Air Terminal Corporation
This rendering of the new International Terminal shows how the monorail tracks will bend towards the new terminal.

Videos:
http://zoome.jp/sugiura/diary/171
A recently-taken window view of an Airport Express service on the Tōkyō Monorail. The train surfaces just past Shin-Seibijō, where you can see all the construction going on associated with the new International Terminal and rail stations. You can see the foundations for the columns supporting the new monorail structure around 00:45. The video continues all the way to Hamamatsuchō.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ja9fE6Im9JI Source: VVVF2100 on YouTube
Cab view of a Keikyū Airport Line train from 2007, between Anamori Inari and Haneda Airport Stations, with an intermediate stop at Tenkūbashi. This was before you could see any of the new station. Nowadays, if you ride between Tenkūbashi and Haneda Airport, you can catch a quick glimpse of the new station to the left of the train.

Related projects:
  • The proposed Kamakama Line would construct a new tunnel from Yaguchinowatashi Station on the Tōkyū Tamagawa Line via JR Kamata Station and Keikyū Kamata Station to Ōtorii Station on the Keikyū Airport Line, with through-service to Haneda Airport.
  • The proposed Eightliner service which would create a third loop line in between the Yamanote Line and Musashino Line / Nambu Line would have a terminus at Haneda Airport.
  • In 2000, the Ministry Transport Council (運輸政策審議会) suggested creating a new Kawasaki Approach Line by converting the existing cargo branch of the Tōkaidō Line to passenger service. The new line would connect Tōkyō Teleport and Shinagawa Stations with Hamakawasaki Station, with an intermediate station somewhere near Haneda Airport. From Hamakawasaki Station, one branch would continue south down to Sakuragichō Station in Yokohama, while another branch would continue north on the Nambu Line branch up to Shitte and Kawasaki Stations.
  • In 2000, the Ministry Transport Council (運輸政策審議会) also suggested the New Haneda Access Line, which would create a branch off the Tōkyō Waterfront Railway Rinkai Line from Tōkyō Teleport Station leading to Haneda Airport.
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 10th, 2009, 08:13 AM   #85
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New Musashi Kosugi Station on Yokosuka Line

Websites:
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2005_1/20050402.pdf (Original JR press release)
Construction start: 2005
Construction end: March 2010

Benefits:
  • Improved access and shorter travel times to Central Tōkyō and Yokohama for passengers along the Nambu Line
  • Redevelopment in area surrounding the station
The project involves construction of a new station on the JR Yokosuka Line between Nishi-Ōi and Shin-Kawasaki Stations, which are currently 9.1 km apart. The new station would be located in the vicinity of where the JR Nambu Line crosses underneath the Yokosuka Line in Kawasaki City, approximately 6 km from Nishi-Ōi Station and 3 km from Shin-Kawasaki Station. The new station would be connected by a 260 m passage to the existing JR Musashi Kosugi Station on the Nambu Line. Estimated daily station entries, exits, and transfers for the new station are 70,000; the total estimated daily station entries and exits for JR Musashi Kosugi Station (Nambu Line + Yokosuka Line) is 180,000 after completion of the project. A station plaza would be constructed on the west side of the new station and the faregates would be located at a single location underneath the Yokosuka Line tracks. Parking for 1,500 bicycles will also be provided. The station itself would consist of a single 310 m island platform serving two tracks to be constructed by shifting the outbound Yokosuka Line tracks slightly to the east. The total estimated cost for the project is ¥20 billion. Kawasaki City is bearing the full cost of constructing the new station structure, but is sharing the cost of the new walkway with JR East.

Together with the existing JR Musashi Kosugi Station and Tōkyū Musashi Kosugi Station serving the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line and Tōkyū Meguro Line, the new station will be located in an area undergoing intense redevelopment. JR East plans to have all local trains (260 trains per day across both directions) stop at the new station, but is still considering whether or not to have non-local services—including the Shōnan-Shinjuku Line, special “liner” trains, and the Narita Express, which offers access to Narita International Airport—serve the station.


Source: Kawasaki City
The hook highlighted in red is the new station. The hook itself is the new walkway connecting to Nambu Line’s Musashi Kosugi Station, while the longer stem is the location of the new station. The proposed walkway will travel underneath the Tōkaidō Shinkansen elevated structure running parallel immediately west of the Yokosuka Line and connect to the east end of the Nambu Line Musashi Kosugi Station.

image hosted on flickr

Source: Nemo’s great uncle on Flickr
The cluster of developments in Musashi Kosugi. Tōkyū’s Musashi Kosugi Station used to be known as Kōgyō Toshi Station (Industrial City Station) due to all the factories and industrial activity in the area. The area is being transformed into a new mixed-use neighborhood, including homes for 15,000 residents, commercial space, hotels, and various public facilities.


Source: Wikipedia
The existing JR Musashi Kosugi Station, serving the Nambu Line, serves approximately 140,000 entries and exits daily (2007).

image hosted on flickr

Source: yuki.koga on Flickr
Tōkyū Musashi Kosugi Station is a key station on the Tōyoko Line and Meguro Line, serving a total of 199,886 average daily station entries and exits (2007). The station is located directly adjacent to the Nambu Line’s Musashi Kosugi Station.

Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3ddcFmwkSo Source: y2kama on YouTube
Cab view of Nambu Line train between Musashi Nakahara and Musashi Kosugi Stations. You get a good view of the skyline.

Related projects:
  • A Musashi Kosugi station is also included as the terminus of the proposed Kawasaki Rapid Railway, running from Shin-Yurigaoka Station on the Odakyū Odawara Line and Odakyū Tama Line to Musashi Kosugi Station via Miyamaedaira Station, with a possible extension later on to Kawasaki Station.
__________________

geometarkv liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 10th, 2009, 08:25 AM   #86
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Chūō Rapid Line grade-separation: Mitaka – Tachikawa

Websites:
http://www.city.koganei.lg.jp/matidu.../cyuohsen.html (Koganei City)
http://www.city.kunitachi.tokyo.jp/t...atizukuri.html (Kunitachi City)
http://www.city.kokubunji.tokyo.jp/t...35/004761.html (Kokubunji City)
Construction start: 1999
Construction end: 2010

Benefits:
  • Removal of 18 at-grade crossings, improving road and train safety and eliminating accidents
  • Reduced traffic congestion in neighborhoods surrounding the railroad
  • Unification of neighborhoods originally separated by train line
  • Potential use of land underneath new elevated structures


Source: Koganei City
The portion under construction.


Source: Koganei City
Section view.

This project involves the grade-separation of the JR Chūō Main Line tracks between Mitaka and Tachikawa Stations, alternatively known as the Chūō Rapid Line. This 13.1 km segment is being grade-separated as follows:
  • Mitaka – Kokubunji (6.2 km): elevated structure
  • Kokubunji – Kunitachi (4.1 km): trench
  • Kunitachi – Tachikawa (2.8 km): elevated structure
Besides improving traffic and connectivity for neighborhoods surrounding the rail line, grade-separation will also improve on-time performance for the Chūō Line, which often suffers from delays as a result of accidents at at-grade crossings.


Source: Koganei City
Diagram showing contruction phasing for elevated structures. Once the temporary tracks are removed, the right-of-way underneath is converted into a roadway. Currently, the elevation of the outbound tracks is already complete (Mitaka – Kokubunji in July 2007 and Kokubunji – Tachikawa in January 2009). For the inbound tracks, the Mitaka – Kokubunji section will open sometime later this year, while the Kokubunji – Tachikawa section will open in 2010. Removal of the temporary tracks and construction of the adjacent parallel roadway is scheduled for completion in 2011.


Source: Wikipedia
Outbound platforms at Musashi Sakai Station after elevation. Construction on the inbound platform continues immediately adjacent to the new tracks.


Source: Wikipedia
New transfer gates at Musashi Sakai Station between the Chūō Line and the Seibu Tamagawa Line. Elevation of the Seibu platforms at the station was completed in 2006.


Source: Wikipedia
Seibu Tamagawa Line platforms after elevation.


Source: Wikipedia
South entrance to Higashi-Koganei Station.


Source: Wikipedia
Outbound platform at Higashi-Koganei Station after elevation.


Source: Wikipedia
Musashi Koganei Station from 2007, showing in-service at-grade tracks and continuing work on the new elevated tracks.


Source: Wikipedia
Temporary inbound platform at Higashi-Koganei Station.

Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZdRfSnHvP8&fmt=35 Source: ikki1204 on YouTube
A special public pre-opening tour of the completed outbound platforms at Kunitachi Station in December 2008, just weeks before the official opening of the segment January 1, 2009. Trains continue to run at-grade just below the new elevated tracks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeIZvr5yleI&fmt=18 Source: VVVF2100 on YouTube
Tōkyō–bound “Chūō Special Express” on the Chūō Rapid Line between Tachikawa and Kokubunji, running on the temporary tracks. It’s a little over a year old, but you can see the construction going on to the right of the train. The train skips Kunitachi and Nishi-Kokubunji Stations.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgvXs4ve-RY&fmt=18 Source: VVVF2100 on YouTube
Part 2 of the above, between Kokubunji and Mitaka. The train skips Musashi Koganei, Higashi-Koganei, and Musashi Sakai Stations.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIEXOeiQQ-g&fmt=18 Source: kinemi049 on YouTube
Window view from the new elevated tracks between Kunitachi and Tachikawa Stations, facing the north.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LN0cD0T4TfE&fmt=18 Source: kinemi049 on YouTube
Same, but facing the south.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9p12pF_Ogfs&fmt=18 Source: kinemi049 on YouTube
Cab view from Kunitachi to Tachikawa.

Related projects:
  • In 2000, the Transport Policy Council (運輸政策審議会) identified the section of the Chūō Line from Mitaka Station to Tachikawa Station for quadruple-tracking by 2015. As a result of the grade-separation project, the two new tracks would need to be located below ground, which results in an unusual arrangement of elevated structure and underground tunnels along the same line. If realized, it would likely mean that the rapid services would use the new tunnels, while the local services, which currently operate through-service with the Tōkyō Metro Tōzai Line and JR Sōbu Local Line, would be extended onto the elevated tracks being constructed as part of this project.
__________________

geometarkv liked this post

Last edited by quashlo; April 11th, 2009 at 07:32 PM.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 10th, 2009, 09:52 AM   #87
city_thing
Put it in your mouth
 
city_thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Melbourne.
Posts: 7,128
Likes (Received): 883

I wish I was Japanese.
__________________
Calling occupants of interplanetary craft...
city_thing no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 15th, 2009, 07:02 AM   #88
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Railway summit in Ōsaka on April 17
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...1342001-n1.htm

Quote:
JR West, five major private rail companies, Ōsaka Prefecture, Ōsaka City, and the elite in the Kansai financial sphere will congregate in Ōsaka on the April 17 to work towards improving the Kansai Area’s railway network. The aim is to come together and facilitate improvements to Central Ōsaka’s rail system, which lags behind Tōkyō and still lacks several “missing links.” The parties will discuss access improvements to Kansai International Airport (KIX) as well as the remaining planned lines in Central Ōsaka which have yet to be built. Eventually, they plan to strengthen pressure on the national government to complete its studies of various projects within FY2009.

The “missing links” in question specifically include the Naniwasuji Line from JR Shin-Ōsaka Station to JR Namba Station and Nankai Shiomibashi Station via Umeda North Yard; the extension of Keihan Electric Railway’s Nakanoshima Line west past Nakanoshima Station; and the Nishi-Umeda – Jūsō link between Ōsaka Municipal Subway Nishi-Umeda Station (Yotsubashi Line) and Hankyū Jūsō Station, among other planned lines. The various projects would bring rail access to areas previously unserved and improve access between Central Ōsaka and KIX.

The summit is being advertised as a “discussion of the railway network as a means of revitalizating the Kansai Area.” Summit attendees include Governor of Ōsaka Prefecture Hashimoto Tōru, JR West President Yamazaki Masao, Hankyū Hanshin Holdings President Sumi Kazuo, and Keihan Electric Railway President Ueda Seinosuke, and other big names in the Kansai Area. The summit will establish which missing links have the highest priority and work to obtain support from the national government. In addition, the summit will establish roundtable discussions and lobby groups for infrastructure improvements to stimulate the regional economy.

“By establishing this railway summit, I hope to take key steps towards improving our train system and helping jump-start the rest of Japan,” says Governor Hashimoto.

How did the missing links come about? According to Saitō Takahiko, a professor of business administration at Kinki University who studies transport policy, “The structure of state funding was geared primarily for Tōkyō, so Ōsaka’s plans for new lines were unable to take advantage of assistance from the national government. As a result, we have these gaps in the railway network.”

In Tōkyō, most of the suburban railway network was constructed outside of the JR Yamanote Line, while the inside of the Yamanote Line was criss-crossed with subways. With the expansion of through-services from private railways onto the subways, gaps in the network were eliminated. The improvements in Central Tōkyō were carried out by Tōkyō Metro and the Toei Subway with the help of public sources of funding.

But in Kansai, the so-called “Kingdom of Private Railways,” private rail lines reached the city center and the construction of new lines—which was a way for private enterprise to build up assets—did not receive public subsidy. As a result, the financial burden on private operators was large and improvement projects proceeded much slower. In addition, while there are some through-services—such as between Hankyū Electric Railway and the Ōsaka Municipal Subway Sakaisuji Line—they are limited, leaving gaps in the railway network.

In 2002, a “separated” structure of management and operations began, whereby third-sector entities financed by local jurisdictions construct the line and private railways operate the trains. As a result, the financial burden of new projects has been alleviated and construction of new lines is finally proceeding again.

The Hanshin Namba Line, which opened this March, was implemented using the same separated structure of construction and operation. While the new trackage is a mere 3.4 km, with through-service it is now possible to travel between Kōbe (Sannomiya) and Nara on a single train, reinforcing the importance of expanding the railway network. “Although we don’t have official ridership figures to release yet, there have been favorable gains in ridership at stations concentrated along the Nara Line,” says a representative from Kintetsu’s public relations department.

In a discussion with Governor Hashimoto this February, Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Kaneko Kazuyoshi demonstrated a positive attitude towards the Naniwasuji Line proposal, saying the government would step up its efforts to complete its study of the project.

At the upcoming summit, the Kinki Transport Bureau, the national government agency in charge of transport in the region, hopes to collect opinions from a diverse array of parties and work towards completing studies of the various proposals as quickly as possible.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 15th, 2009, 07:05 AM   #89
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

MLIT announces move on Naniwasuji Line
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T00140.htm

Quote:
The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) has announced that it plans to initiate the urban railway study for the proposed Naniwasuji Line as early as July. The proposed Naniwasuji Line (JR Shin-Ōsaka Station – JR Namba Station / Nankai Shiomibashi Station, 10.2 km) would link Central Ōsaka and Kansai International Airport (KIX) in 30 minutes.

After Ōsaka Governor Hashimoto Tōru called the proposal “critical to the revitalization of KIX” and urged the national government to take action, Minister Kaneko of the MLIT expressed that the agency will consider the proposal as a means of improving access to the airport. The Kinki Transport Bureau will convene a meeting on April 17 with the Ōsaka Prefectural Government, Ōsaka Municipal Government, and representatives from the various railroad operators and work towards an agreement among the various parties.

According to the proposal, the new line would begin at Shin-Ōsaka Station, traveling via tunnel to a new station at the Umeda North Yard (north of JR Ōsaka Station) and continue north-south down Naniwasuji, before forking in two to connect with JR at Namba Station and with Nankai Electric Railway at Shiomibashi Station. The line would continue to Kansai International Airport via the JR Hanwa Line and Nankai Main Line.

The new line would decrease travel time by train between Ōsaka Station and KIX by thirty minutes from the current one hour, and would allow for connections with Shinkansen and Tōkaidō Line trains at Shin-Ōsaka Station, improving access to the airport from areas throughout Keihanshin.

The urban railway study would make use of ¥150 million allocated for studies by the MLIT for this fiscal year, and would take approximately two to three years. In addition to estimating projected ridership, the study would evaluate the proposal’s profitability (currently, there are three stations planned at Kita-Umeda, Tamaebashi, and Horie) and consider station design with an eye towards increasing ridership.

Initial estimates pegged the cost of the new line at ¥400 billion, but if the line makes use of the new Tōkaidō Cargo Line tunnel and associated station proposed as part of the Umeda North Yard redevelopment, the expected cost would decrease dramatically. The Kinki Region Transport Policy Council Report in 2004 designated the new line as a “mid-range improvement,” but the responsible project entity and construction methods have yet to be determined. It is likely that the funding arrangement will split the cost three ways between the national government, local jurisdictions, and the project entity. Funding contribution among the national, prefectural, and city governments, JR West, and Nankai Electric Railway is likely the next issue to resolve.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 18th, 2009, 06:45 AM   #90
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,450
Likes (Received): 62

It's great to see that Japan, with perhaps the best urban rail transport in the world, is continuing to expand and modernize its system.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2009, 08:14 AM   #91
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Seibu train LCDs and station signs show other operators
Press release: http://www.seibu-group.co.jp/railway...009/0413_1.pdf

Seibu Railway just began providing information about other companies’ lines on station platform LED signs and in-car “SmileVision” LCD displays (Seibu 3000 series trains only). The information is provided for other operators for lines in the same service area as Seibu Railway (northwest Tōkyō and Saitama Prefectures) and is partially intended to help passengers make decisions about using alternate routes, such as when Seibu lines experience delays. The following operators and lines are included:
  • JR East
    • Yamanote Line
    • Chūō Line (Tōkyō – Takao)
    • Saikyō Line
    • Kawagoe Line
    • Hachikō Line
    • Ōme Line
    • Musashino Line
  • Tōkyō Metro
    • Yūrakuchō Line
    • Fukutoshin Line
    • Tōzai Line
  • Tōbu Railway
    • Tōjō Line
    • Ogose Line
  • Toei Subway
    • Asakusa Line
    • Mita Line
    • Shinjuku Line
    • Ōedo Line
  • Tama Monorail
  • Chichibu Railway (Kumagaya – Mitsumineguchi)
Seibu 30000 series is the newest series of commuter EMU for Seibu Railway, first entering service in 2008. The trains are outfitted with 15-inch LCD displays above each set of car doors (a total of 16 units per car). The LCDs are nicknamed “SmileVision” (the actual trains are nicknamed “Smile Trains,” partially deriving from the face-like appearance of the train ends).

Source: Wikipedia


Source: http://kurofunetrain.livedoor.biz/ar.../65180406.html
__________________

geometarkv, pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2009, 08:17 AM   #92
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Suica: Becoming part of our daily lifestyle
http://mytown.asahi.com/saitama/news...00380904180001

Quote:
After hearing the word “Suica,” the first thing that pops into your head probably isn’t a watermelon (suica) but rather the IC card “Suica.” Suica was first released in 2001 by JR East as a farecard. In 2004, electronic money functions were added, increasing its usefulness. Convenience stores, restaurants, home electronics retailers, bookstores, drugstores, vending machines… The number of store locations accepting Suica reached approximately 59,220 by the end of March, with a total of 27.94 million cards sold.

At Keyaki Plaza immediately adjacent to Saitama Super Arena, customers can pay using Suica at virtually all the restaurants and shops (14 stores). “During lunchtime on weekdays, we get a rush of customers who work in the offices around here… Suica is very popular, and transactions are smooth since you don’t need change,” says Manager Michizaki Miyuki of Curry House Kokoro.

Suica’s also popular at Chinmaya, a Sichuan restaurant. According to Manager Shinoyama Atsushi, “Mobile Suica (cell phones embedded with the functionality of a Suica card) are becoming more popular, since you can easily add value onto the card when your balance is low.”

For a slightly more unusual location to use Suica, there’s the Higashi-Tokorozawa Bicycle Parking Facility outside Higashi-Tokorozawa Station on the JR Musashino Line. Bicyclists can use Suica to pay for parking their bikes. According to Takamisawa Cybernetics, the company that operates the facility, while its possible to pay in cash at the ticket machine, the use data from March indicates that over 60 percent of riders use Suica to pay for the parking.

And the most critical function of Suica—as a farecard—continues to expand. In the Tōkyō area, Suica is interoperable with the farecard and electronic money functionalities of the PASMO system used by private railways and buses. It’s the same for JR Hokkaidō’s KITACA and JR West’s ICOCA. Suica can be used in place of JR Central’s TOICA for fare payments, with interoperability for electronic money functionality coming in 2010.

Next year, Suica will also be compatible with JR Kyūshū’s SUGOCA card, Nishi-Nippon Railroad’s nimoca card, and the Fukuoka City Transportation Bureau’s Hayakaken card for both fare payment and electronic money. Eventually, Suica will be compatible with cards in all major cities in Japan.

In fact, one could argue that Suica was born in Saitama Prefecture. About half a year before the public release, the card was repeatedly tested along the JR Kawagoe Line and Saikyō Line between Kawagoe and Ebisu Stations. Helping make wallets obsolete… It’s one thing Saitama can be proud of.


Paying at a Keyaki Plaza shop using Suica


Suica-accepting ticket machine at a bicycle parking facility outside JR Higashi-Tokorozawa Station
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2009, 08:19 AM   #93
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Touch-screen map trial at Ginza Station
http://www.tokyometro.jp/news/2009/2009-m15.html

Tōkyō Metro and electronics maker Hitachi have teamed up to conduct an experiment with touch-screen station area maps at Ginza Station. The map is intended to help users reach their final destination from the station, and the information obtained from the experiment will identify areas of improvement in the current provision of maps and directional information to passengers. The displays provide passengers with a map of the street network and underground walkways surrounding the station, and identify routes to reach each destination. The information can then be sent to your cellphone to assist you once you leave the station.


One vertical-type and one horizontal-type display each are being used for the test, which will begin on April 20 and last until June 30.


Sample display. Users can search destinations by name, address, or type, or search through a list of the “most searched” destinations. The map and route information can then be transmitted to your cellphone by placing your phone near the interface located at the rightmost of the display.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2009, 10:55 AM   #94
nemu
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 292
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
MLIT announces move on Naniwasuji Line
Just curious, how will this affect traffic at Yotsubashi line, which is going to be squeezed between this and midosuji line.
nemu no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2009, 11:02 AM   #95
2co2co
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 440
Likes (Received): 225

Quote:
In fact, one could argue that Suica was born in Saitama Prefecture. About half a year before the public release, the card was repeatedly tested along the JR Kawagoe Line and Saikyō Line between Kawagoe and Ebisu Stations. Helping make wallets obsolete… It’s one thing Saitama can be proud of.
Wow..... DaSaitama can do something
2co2co no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2009, 08:08 AM   #96
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by nemu View Post
Just curious, how will this affect traffic at Yotsubashi line, which is going to be squeezed between this and midosuji line.
Yes, they will basically have three parallel subway lines running between Umeda and Namba, with the Yotsubashi Line in the middle less than 400 m from both the Midōsuji Line and Naniwasuji Line... Probably not the ideal solution, but it may be the best realistic choice.

Some people suggest having the Yotsubashi Line serve Kansai International Airport instead of the Naniwasuji Line, but the problem is that JR and Nankai are narrow-gauge / overhead, while Yotsubashi Line is standard-gauge / third rail. If we define the main objective as improving access to the airport, it may make sense to just build an entirely new north-south line to JR / Nankai standards instead of trying to regauge or lay dual-gauge track + changing current collection or using special trains that can run on overhead and third rail.

On a side note, if I remember correctly, they were also initially planning to extend the Yotsubashi Line north as the Nishi-Umeda - Jūsō link, where it could connect with the Hankyū lines. Through-service on the Hankyū Kōbe and / or Hankyū Takarazuka Lines would bring the total cost to ¥200 billion due partially to different current collection, but ¥95 billion if there were no through-service and passengers needed to transfer.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 24th, 2009, 07:42 AM   #97
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

JR East E259 series begins test runs

This is the replacement for the 253 series trains used exclusively for the Narita Express (N'EX). The 253 series is 18 years old and has been in service since the beginning of the Narita Express. The E259 series trains will begin service in Autumn 2009, with a total order of 132 cars. Like the 253 series, top speed is 130 km/h and basic formation is 6-car trains, which are then coupled as 6+6.

Features:
  • Improved comfort through use of active suspension (used on Shinkansen E2 “Hayate” trains) and dampers
  • Improved sound insulation for floor of car
  • Roomier seats, with large tables and electrical outlets
  • Increased space underneath seats for luggage
  • Larger washroom to accommodate passengers in wheelchairs
  • Reduced height gap between train and platform
  • In-train information in multiple languages
  • Security cameras located at each door and at luggage areas
  • Locked luggage areas to deter theft
  • Redundancy of critical electrical systems, train control, etc. (used on E233 series sets for Chūō Line and Keihin-Tōhoku Line)


Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/
E259 series is at left, 253 series is at right. At Tsudanuma Station on the Sōbu Main Line.



Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/
Near Ichikawa Station on the Sōbu Main Line.



Source: http://rail.hobidas.com/blog/natori/
Near Shimousa Nakayama Station on the Sōbu Main Line.



Source: safaia2008 on YouTube
Departing Tsudanuma.



Source: safaia2008 on YouTube
Passing Shimousa Nakayama.



Source: yukinamatusima on YouTube
Full-color LED sign on car.
__________________

geometarkv liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2009, 05:36 AM   #98
LtBk
Registered User
 
LtBk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Greater Baltimore
Posts: 3,103
Likes (Received): 3710

Those are some cool and futuristic looking trains.
LtBk está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2009, 05:42 PM   #99
orulz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 314
Likes (Received): 47

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Under Construction
...
[Shin-Keisei] Shin-Keisei Line grade-separation: Kamagaya Daibutsu – Kunugiyama
...
The Shin Keisei is a weird line. It slithers around like a snake, and it runs at grade taking up lots of land in probably the densest town that it runs through (Tsudanuma). Burying it through tsudanuma would seem to be a worthwhile exercise. At least one 鉄っちゃん agrees with me. This would allow a direct transfer at JR Tsudanuma and get rid of several downtown grade crossings. At least some of the cost could be recovered by developing the land. I guess maybe businesses in Tsudanuma like the Aeon wouldn't be too happy though since there would no longer be the steady stream of people waking between Shin-Tsudanuma to JR Tsudanuma station.
orulz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2009, 06:14 PM   #100
Vapour
Registered User
 
Vapour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Pop. 450
Posts: 6,327
Likes (Received): 27

Thanks for the updates quashlo
__________________
♪ I love Morty and I hope Morty loves me, I'd like to wrap my arms around him and feel him inside me ♪
Vapour no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium