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Old March 16th, 2010, 09:50 PM   #981
ShibuyaBoy
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cool map! さすが

haven't made a post in awhile, but that Keio line(the disney one) extension is cra---zy... So what parts will be undergrounded? and will it also stop at shinjuku-sanchome and tocho-mae as well?
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Old March 16th, 2010, 10:22 PM   #982
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Tōkyō governor refuses to sell shares in Tōkyō Metro
http://www.nikkei.co.jp/news/main/20...Z05032010.html

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At a March 5 press conference, Tōkyō Metropolis governor Ishihara Shintarō responded regarding the Ministry of Finance (MOF) plan to sell the national government’s shares in Tōkyō Metro when the subway goes public. “Let them sell it and then the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government can buy those shares.” In regards to the MOF request that the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government (TMG) also sell its 40 percent share in Tōkyō Metro, Governor Ishihara also responded, “We have no intention whatsoever of selling our shares together just because they tell us to.”

The Governor also touched on the plan to merge the Toei Subway and Tōkyō Metro, pointing out, “If the Tōkyō government has complete control of Tōkyō Metro’s initiative under this consolidation plan, it will definitely be a benefit for Tōkyō residents. Why would we sell our shares in such a poor market? The national government might be scrambling this way and that because of its own foolishness, but the Tōkyō government has nothing to worry about.”
This is the latest article I can find regarding the merger. I think the plan is for the Tōkyō government to retain ownership of the track and other facilities and contract the operations out to Tōkyō Metro, so I'm not sure if debt is as much of an issue for Tōkyō Metro.
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Old March 16th, 2010, 10:46 PM   #983
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Originally Posted by ShibuyaBoy View Post
cool map! さすが

haven't made a post in awhile, but that Keio line(the disney one) extension is cra---zy... So what parts will be undergrounded? and will it also stop at shinjuku-sanchome and tocho-mae as well?
That's just my best guess... In central Tōkyō, assuming the magical ban on digging beneath the Imperial Palace isn't lifted somehow, there's really nowhere to put the Keiyō Line except underneath the Yūrakuchō Line and / or Uchibori-dōri to Nagatachō, as every major road in that area has one or two subways already underneath it. After that, I just took it up to Yotsuya and then had it follow beneath the Marunouchi Line. I suppose they could try and align it along the Metropolitan Expressway and beneath the existing Chūō Line, but a route through Yotsuya and underneath the Marunouchi Line also allows for a stop at Shinjuku Sanchōme, adding a connection to the Fukutoshin Line that couldn't be accomplished (easily) with an alignment beneath the existing Chūō Line.

West of that, I put it under Hōnan-dōri and Inokashira-dōri. That entire area is basically 密集地 (dense residential), so elevated is probably out of the question.
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Old March 17th, 2010, 05:21 AM   #984
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First of all, congratulations Quashlo, you rock!

Second, regarding the map you made, I would like to know more (if possible, of course) about the Toei Asakusa bypass line. I thought it would be a spur going to Tokyo station, but it's in fact an "inner branch", like in the Northern Line in London. Are the stations in central Tokyo already defined? Will the line have those bypass tracks for express service? (because I thought this bypass line would have no stations beside Tokyo)
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Old March 17th, 2010, 04:53 PM   #985
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Do you happen to have any photos of the recently opened Musashi Kosugi platforms on the Yokosuka Line? I've heard the walk between the new platforms and the existing Nambu Line platforms is a fair hike!
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Old March 17th, 2010, 06:42 PM   #986
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Originally Posted by Martini87 View Post
Second, regarding the map you made, I would like to know more (if possible, of course) about the Toei Asakusa bypass line. I thought it would be a spur going to Tokyo station, but it's in fact an "inner branch", like in the Northern Line in London. Are the stations in central Tokyo already defined? Will the line have those bypass tracks for express service? (because I thought this bypass line would have no stations beside Tokyo)
If you look at the original "Transport Policy Report No. 18" from 2000 published by the MLIT (here), Item #9 calls for bringing a spur (really a wye, I guess) off the Asakusa Line into Tōkyō Station.

I believe this plan has been pretty much superseded by more recent work (here), however, which calls for an entirely new bypass line between Oshiage and Sengakuji. They appear to be analyzing three alternatives for this:
  1. Beneath Naka-dōri (west side of the station)
  2. Beneath the Marunouchi Line (west side of the station)
  3. Beneath Yaesu-dōri (east side of the station)

I chose the last simply because there's less lines on that side (of course, there's still expressway tunnels underground), and they could also build tunnels for the proposed extension of the Tsukuba Express to Tōkyō Station at the same time.

The intermediate stations are just my guess. They may end up not building any stations between Oshiage and Sengakuji except for at Tōkyō, but personally, I felt a few more connections to the existing network were needed, so I added stops at Akabanebashi, Shinbashi, and Ginza, and a new stop at Horidomechō in the Nihonbashi area.
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Old March 17th, 2010, 06:51 PM   #987
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Do you happen to have any photos of the recently opened Musashi Kosugi platforms on the Yokosuka Line? I've heard the walk between the new platforms and the existing Nambu Line platforms is a fair hike!
Yes, the temporary passage is close to 400 m, while the permanent passage still under construction will bring this down to 300 m. Still quite a hike, but they'll be putting in moving walkways in the permanent passage, so ultimately it will be less painful than it seems.

I was going to post this later, but here's a video that should give an idea of the distance. The video through the passage is sped up 15x.


Source: kanaloco on YouTube
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Old March 19th, 2010, 01:07 AM   #988
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So, what exactly is the Gunma-Saitama LRT all about?

And speaking of light rail, has there been any update on the Naha LRT?

Last edited by manrush; March 19th, 2010 at 07:19 AM.
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Old March 19th, 2010, 04:18 AM   #989
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
If you look at the original "Transport Policy Report No. 18" from 2000 published by the MLIT (here), Item #9 calls for bringing a spur (really a wye, I guess) off the Asakusa Line into Tōkyō Station.

I believe this plan has been pretty much superseded by more recent work (here), however, which calls for an entirely new bypass line between Oshiage and Sengakuji.

The intermediate stations are just my guess. They may end up not building any stations between Oshiage and Sengakuji except for at Tōkyō, but personally, I felt a few more connections to the existing network were needed, so I added stops at Akabanebashi, Shinbashi, and Ginza, and a new stop at Horidomechō in the Nihonbashi area.
Thanks!
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Old March 19th, 2010, 03:35 PM   #990
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Wow, it's impressive to see how many tunnels exist in central Tokyo: road, suburban rail and subway. I tend to agree with you that an eastern alignment would be the best because of the possibility of joint construction with the TX (and the possible lower costs on tunneling as well). I never undestood quite well the fact that only one subway line served Tokyo Station (although the dozen of JR lines are in fact an expanded subway system; and Otemachi is quite -but not so much-close). With the Asakusa bypass and the Tsukuba Express, the situation is going to improve a lot in central Tokyo. The latter will relieve a lot the Joban-Yamanote system in its worst section.

Another question: usually the overcrowding in Japan's trains systems is measured as a percentage of occupation. The worst sections have a 180-200 % occupation in relation to capacity. In some other countries, the measure used is the number of standing passengers/sq. m .For example, in São Paulo (my city) the overcrowding in the most used line averages 9 standing passengers/sq. m in rush hour - which is an unbearable figure.

Is there any way one can compare these different data, converting one to the other? Cause we know the comfort standards are different in Europe, South America and Asia. Probably a 100% capacity train in São Paulo would be different than a 100% capacity train in Stockholm.

Last edited by Martini87; March 19th, 2010 at 03:49 PM.
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Old March 19th, 2010, 06:51 PM   #991
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
So, what exactly is the Gunma-Saitama LRT all about?
Details here: http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9F%...96%B0%E7%B7%9A (Japanese only)

New line from Shinrin Kōen on the Tōbu Tōjō Line via the Musashi Kyūryō National Government Park and Risshō University's Kumagaya campus to Kumagaya Station. This would be all new track. From Kumagaya, the line would reuse former right-of-way from the abandoned Tōbu Kamagaya Line and Tōbu Sengoku Gashi Line (a freight line) to reach Ōta City. I'll probably include it in my next revision of the map when I have more time to think about alignments and such.

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Originally Posted by manrush View Post
And speaking of light rail, has there been any update on the Naha LRT?
Haven't heard anything. They may still be in the process of planning or testing temporary improvements on certain bus corridors to determine the viability of LRT on some of them.
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Old March 19th, 2010, 07:07 PM   #992
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martini87 View Post
Is there any way one can compare these different data, converting one to the other? Cause we know the comfort standards are different in Europe, South America and Asia. Probably a 100% capacity train in São Paulo would be different than a 100% capacity train in Stockholm.
I'm not really an expert on this, but I did a quick Google search and found this definition of "capacity" from the Japan Private Railways Association (日本民営鉄道協会):
http://www.mintetsu.or.jp/word/Individual/151.html

Basically, they define "standing space" as 0.14 sq m per passenger. However, I'm not sure whether this is the same standard used in the actual calculation of capacity since it seems too low. This may be equivalent to something like the "crush load."

There are also some other standards (here) that say capacity is based on 0.3 sq m per passenger. Ultimately, it's a little bit difficult to compare across systems, much less trains. There are many situations where a train might be crowded, but that may only be one car (due to it stopping at a specific location on the platform), or it may be due to seating configuration, which reduces the standing space and "artifically" creates more crowding than might otherwise be the case.
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Old March 20th, 2010, 02:14 AM   #993
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Fantastic work quashlo! The most complete map I've seen so far.
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Old March 20th, 2010, 11:47 PM   #994
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
... Basically, they define "standing space" as 0.14 sq m per passenger. However, I'm not sure whether this is the same standard used in the actual calculation of capacity since it seems too low. This may be equivalent to something like the "crush load."
The JR Zen Sharyo (all rolling stock) Handbook has capacity data. My copy is old (1995) so it does not have the latest commuter rolling stock, but the numbers have not changed much over the years. The numbers vary, depending on the exact type of cars (Ku Ha, Mo Ha, etc.).

Tokyo area commuter trains, 103 to 209 series, are as follows.
Capacity: 136 to 163 (Most cars are in the 144 to 150 range).
Seating: 48 to 58
Standing: 88 to 105
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Old March 21st, 2010, 12:31 PM   #995
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I tried a simple calculation to test it out:

car length × car width = floor area
20 m × 2.8 m = 56 sq m

Using
0.14 sq m / passenger, we get 400 passengers
0.3 sq m / passenger, we get 186 passengers

If we take the standard capacity of the rolling stock as about 150, the 0.3 sq m / passenger sounds much more reasonable once you take away the area under the seats and the thickness and taper of the car sides. So I think we can say with at least some certainty that they use a figure around 0.3 sq m / passenger when calculating the standing capacity of the car.
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Old March 22nd, 2010, 12:25 AM   #996
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Hitachi Zōsen wins order for Taipei MRT TBMs
http://www.hitachizosen.co.jp/news-r...10/03/850.html

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Hitz (Hitachi Zōsen Corporation) has recently acceted an order for two 6.24 m diameter earth pressure balance (EPB) shield machines for construction of the Taipei Metro Tucheng Line extension being carried out by a joint-venture between Chun Yuan Construction Co., Ltd. (HQ: Taipei) and Iwata Chizaki Construction Corporation (HQ: Chūō Ward, Sapporo City; President: Iwata Keigō).

The construction work is being carried out to connect construction areas in Taipei City and Tucheng City, and the two shield machines procured in this order will each bore 1,529 m between Yongning Station and Dingpu Station on the Tucheng Line. The cutter bits on both shield machines have been designed using special materials and with a unique shape and placement, allowing for continuous boring through gravel and sandstone layers without the need for bit replacement.

Since delivering our first shield machine to Taiwan in 1988, we have now delivered 30 shield machines for subway construction, 18 for water and sewer construction, and 15 for electricals construction, for a total of 63 shield machines to Taiwan—the largest share in Taiwan’s shield machine market. Hitachi Zōsen’s expansive portfolio of work and technological expertise in supplying approx. 1,200 shield machines to Taiwan and both within and outside Japan helped us win this latest order.

We are actively expanding our shield machine business, including signing a collaborative agreement with Beijing Huasuitong Boring Equipment Co., Ltd. (HQ: Beijing City) in 2008 and completing a new factory exclusively for the manufacture of shield machines and other industrial machinery inside our Sakai Plant (Nishi Ward, Sakai City, Ōsaka Prefecture) in November 2008. Hitachi Zōsen has provided approx. 100 shield machines for foreign markets in the United States, Taiwan, China, Korea, Singapore, and Turkey, and we will continue to actively pursue projects in the ever-expanding international shield machine market.
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Old March 22nd, 2010, 12:26 AM   #997
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Nishimatsu wins portion of Hong Kong MTR West Island Line construction
The Nikkan Kensetsu Kōgyō Shimbun

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On March 10, Nishimatsu Construction Co. announced that it has won a contract for subway construction in Hong Kong as part of a joint-venture with local firm Gammon Construction as lead. The total value of the contract is ¥54.8 billion and investment share is split 50-50 between Gammon and Nishimatsu. The construction period will span across 52 months and is expected to be complete by June 2014.

The contract is for Section 704 of the MTR West Island Line for Sai Ying Pun Station and Hong Kong University Station and was put out to tender by MTR Corporation (MTRC). The construction site stretches from Sai Ying Pun to the Kennedy Town area in western Hong Kong Island, and involves two single-track bores (two tunnels, each 1,040 m) and one double-track bore (90 m) for the main line of the subway, Sai Ying Pun Station (270 m), and Hong Kong University Station (230 m), as well as horizontal passages for passengers and ventilation shafts (3,410 m).

Nishimatsu has already won several contracts for subway construction in Hong Kong, but this is the company’s first win for the West Island Line.
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Old March 22nd, 2010, 12:27 AM   #998
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Nishitetsu invests in struggling theme park
http://www.asahi.com/business/update...003120045.html

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Nishi-Nippon Railroad (Nishitetsu; HQ: Fukuoka City) has finalized plans to invest in Huis Ten Bosch (HTB; Sasebo City, Nagasaki Prefecture), which is aiming to restabilize itself under the management of big-name travel agency HIS (HQ: Tōkyō). The railway is considering an investment of approximately ¥50 million in the struggling theme park. Together with Kyūshū Electric Power (Kyūden), Saibu Gas, Kyūdenkō, and JR Kyūshū, which have already committed to investments, five big-name firms in Kyūshū’s financial sphere are investing approximately ¥1 billion in the park.

Nishitetsu has business dealings with HTB through Nishitetsu Travel, a subsidiary of the the railway. Nishitetsu has also participated in discussions within the Kyūshū financial sphere last summer over how to bring HTB back onto its feet, but up until now, Nishitetsu president Takeshima Kazuyuki had been reluctant to commit to investment, saying the railway had “no business relationship” with the theme park.

On February 12, however, HIS finalized a plan to invest in HTB and inherit management of the park. After hearing HIS chairman Sawada Hideo’s business plan for HTB and his requests for additional investment, the railway reevaluated its stance. Spokespersons for Nishitetsu say, “The HIS plan is forward-thinking, and we were very pleased with the concepts. We expect both sides to benefit.”

The financing plan includes ¥400 million from Kyūden, ¥300 million from Saibu Gas, ¥150 million from Kyūdenkō, and ¥100 million from JR.

On March 26, HIS will announce the business plan for HTB, and HTB is scheduled to receive approval to a change to its corporate rehabilitation plan from the Tōkyō District Court by the end of the month.
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Old March 22nd, 2010, 12:27 AM   #999
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Nishitetsu bus cuts to start at end of March
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/fuk...OYT8T01347.htm

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On February 26, Nishi-Nippon Railroad (Nishitetsu; HQ: Fukuoka City) announced that it will implement service cuts and full or partial elimination of routes for 65 of the 217 total bus lines operated by Nishitetsu Group between March 27 and April 1. The railway is set to undertake the largest restructuring of its bus network in history, with the aim of bringing bus operations back into the black three years down the road.

The one bus line to be completely eliminated is the Kokura (199) Tabata Line. A total of fourteen lines including the Kama-Nishiyama Line will see portions of their routes discontinued. Service will be cut on 50 lines in Fukuoka City, including on the central city circulator route and on the Meinohama (Meiji-dōri) – Tenjin Line. The railway is also scheduled to implement full or partial elimination of an additional 39 routes (a total of 51 route sections) this fall, and will discuss with local jurisdictions whether or not to preserve the service and if not, when to eliminate it. In addition, depending on the economic situation and trends in revenue and cost, the railway may need to make additional restructuring of its bus network.
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Old March 22nd, 2010, 12:28 AM   #1000
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New Hakata Station tenant building to be named “JR Hakata City”
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...2002063-n1.htm

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On March 17, JR Kyūshū announced that it has decided on “JR Hakata City” as the name for the new station tenant building to open at Hakata Station to open in March 2011 in conjunction with the spring 2011 opening of the full route of the Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route (Hakata – Kagoshima Chūō).

At a March 17 press conference, JR Kyūshū president Karaike Kōji commented, “The number of people working in the new tenant building is estimated to be 6,000 to 7,000, equivalent to building an entire neighborhood. We’re committed to building a large ‘neighborhood’ that will contribute to the revitalization of Fukuoka City as a whole.”

JR Hakata City will stretch three belowground levels and ten aboveground levels, with a gross floor area of approx. 200,000 sq m. Tenants in the new building include Hankyū Department Stores, which will make its debut in the Kyūshū market. Inside Amu Plaza Hakata, set to become JR Kyūshū Group’s largest retail facility, approx. 200 fashion shops and other specialty stores, big-name general-store Tōkyū Hands, and a next-generation cinema complex capable of digital screenings are all scheduled to move in. The facilitiy will also feature a 680-seat multi-purpose hall and an approx. 2,000 sq m roof garden.
Scenes of the construction at JR Hakata Station:


Source: manjyuu12 on YouTube
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