daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 29th, 2010, 12:09 PM   #1121
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New platform at Hōya Station to open March 21
http://www.seibu-group.co.jp/railway...100301hoya.pdf

Quote:
With the progress on the station improvement works at Hōya Station on the Ikebukuro Line, Seibu Railway Co., Ltd. (HQ: Tokorozawa City, Saitama Prefecture; Gotō Takashi) will open the new inbound (towards Ikebukuro) platform at the station with the start of service on Sunday, March 21.

The construction involves expanding the station from the current single island platform (two platforms) with two tracks to an island platform and a side platform (three platforms) with three tracks to ensure safety, speed, and on-time performance, and is scheduled for completion in FY2011.

The project will separate inbound and outbound platforms and will help prevent train delays, such as during emergencies, as well as prevent impacts to through-servicing Tōkyō Metro Yūrakuchō Line and Fukutoshin Line trains. The new platform will ensure speedy and on-time operations, and also help alleviate traffic congestion at grade-crossings.

The new inbound platform will feature one elevator and two escalators.

With the opening of the new inbound platform at the station, the existing island platform at the station will be converted to an outbound platform and construction of the remaining improvements at the station will continue.
First, some pictures from 2010.03.11, just a few days before the new platform opened:
Source: http://thankyou2200.blog.so-net.ne.jp/

The new inbound track peels off to the left just a little ways ahead of us.



This project will free up two storage tracks in the middle of the main tracks, increasing flexibility when through-service with the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line begins.



Track layout west of the station. The tracks veering to the left come to / from a former car yard for the Ikebukuro Line, but most of these duties have now been shifted over to Musashigaoka Car Yard.



Access to the yard at this location has been eliminated.



Because of constraints, the new platform needs to wrap around quite a bit, cutting into the former inbound track. This means they will need to do some major work on the island platform—either extension or relocation—in order to get the third track back.



The ramp up to the elevated structure approaching the recently elevated Shakujii Kōen Station.



Testing the new tracks out the early morning of the first day (2010.03.21):
Source: http://new101system.blog53.fc2.com/

Stopped at the new inbound platform.



Stopped at the outbound platform after coming back from a trip to Ikebukuro.



In service later in the day (2010.03.21):
Source: http://nomitetsu.cocolog-nifty.com/blog/

The new platform is Platform 3.





The old Platform 2 is cordoned off.



The switch-out location west of the station.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 29th, 2010, 12:10 PM   #1122
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New elevated concourse and North Exit at Nogata Station open

A few pictures of the new facilities. They are now focusing on improving the South Exit.
Source: http://636.cocolog-nifty.com/camera/







Old stairwell is now closed with the opening of a new stairwell and set of escalators.





New signage:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/smilemusashino/



quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2010, 12:11 PM   #1123
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New station building, pedestrian deck, and redevelopment project open at Sayama-shi Station

Sayama City held festivities on March 25, 2010 to celebrate the opening of the West Exit redevelopment project and the new station building. The redevelopment project was carried out jointly by Seibu Development and includes a public passage, pedestrian deck outside the station, elevated station concourse, roadway improvements serving the project, and new commercial / residential development.


Source: TheChorusAirship on YouTube

Picture set 1:
Source: Sayama City















A few more…
Source: http://blog.livedoor.jp/megataka_okutomi/



Membrane roof



Parts of the station are still boarded up and under construction.



And on opening day for the new station building, 2010.03.26:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/akamagawa/



The station plaza, and Sky Terrace, the official name for the completed commercial and residential portions of the redevelopment project. Apparently, Seibu also changed the platform departure melodies to give more local Sayama City flavor.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2010, 12:11 PM   #1124
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Exhibit follows history of through-servicing
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/ne...OYT1T00292.htm

Quote:
A special exhibit following the history of “bilateral through-servicing”—where trains owned by different railways travel on the others’ tracks as a means of eliminating the hassle of transferring and relieving congestion at stations—is on display at the Subway Museum in Higashi-Kasai, Edogawa Ward, Tōkyō.

Bilateral through-servicing between subways in Tōkyō Prefecture began in 1939 between the Tōkyō Underground Railway linking Asakusa and Shinbashi and the Tōkyō Rapid Railway linking Shinbashi and Shibuya. The first example between surface-running trains and subways was between Keisei Electric Railway and the Toei Subway Line 1 (now the Asakusa Line), after which more and more examples would follow. Out of the 13 total Tōkyō Metro and Toei Subway lines currently in operation, ten have bilateral through-servicing arrangements with private railways and JR.

The exhibit introduces the spread of direct-service trains through the use of route maps and timelines. Also featured are the train schedule and commemorative tickets from the start of bilateral through-service between the Hibiya Line and the Tōbu Isesaki Line in 1962.
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2010, 12:12 PM   #1125
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Japan aims to certify technologies as international standards
http://www.asahi.com/business/update...003240506.html

Quote:
The Railway Technical Research Institute (RTRI; HQ: Tōkyō), a JR-affiliated foundation, will establish an organization in April to work towards establishing Japan’s railway equipment and operating systems as an international standard. Cities across the globe are in a frenzy planning high-speed rail and urban railways, and the competition for contracts is fierce. Although the effort towards obtaining international standardization comes later than European firms, the aim of the program is to turn the tables and win contracts for Japanese firms.

The international standardization of railway technology is performed by the Swiss-headquartered International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO), who review standardization proposals by countries and make final judgment. Approx. 100 railway-related equipment and technologies have been declared as international standards, including train body materials and signaling systems, but most of these are technologies submitted by European countries.

In order to sell Japanese technology, the RTRI says it will establish a Railway International Standards Center. JR East, along with Kawasaki Heavy Industries and other rolling stock manufacturers, will transfer ten of their employees to the center, while RTRI will also request participation from fifty firms and groups. Up until now, standardization review and lobbying has been undertaken along industry group lines such as steel or industrial machinery, but these efforts will now be consolidated into one center to submit technology proposals and conduct verifications. The first-year budget for the center is ¥220 million.

The technologies being envisioned for international standardization include the system used to allow for interoperability between IC farecards such as Suica and PASMO, and steel-wheeled linear motor trains propelled by magnetism. The center will also look at obtaining international standardization for some technologies by incorporating both Japanese and European standards.

World Trade Organization (WTO) policy states that when governments purchase rolling stock and equipment, it must meet international standards. As a result, the “standardization battle” is directly connected to the outcome in the competition for contracts. “While we’re a little late out the gate, we’re hoping to level the playing field with Europe by consolidating our efforts under a centralized structure,” says the RTRI.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2010, 12:13 PM   #1126
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Station retail goes high-end; department stores hurting
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/life/lifest...0734001-n1.htm

Quote:
In place of struggling department stores, ekinaka (station retail) is turning heads as a new outlet for consumption. A study published this month by the Station Consumption Research Center (Shibuya Ward, Tōkyō), a JR East research agency, revealed that nearly half of all station users shop at station retail and station-related facilities. And among customers, the focus of purchases is gradually shifting from drinks and newspapers to slightly more luxurious items.

Growing station retail
Shopping malls inside faregates and stations began spreading about ten years ago. Railway companies are taking the lead, opening shopping malls one after another inside stations, including JR East’s ecute (Ōmiya, Shinagawa, Tachikawa, etc.), Tōkyō Metro’s Echika (Omotesandō, Ikebukuro), and Kintetsu’s Times Place (Kintetsu Namba).

On March 28, JR East will open renovated facilities inside the paid area at Tōkyō Station as ecute Tōkyō, and 31 new stores are scheduled to move in.

Meanwhile, department stores are continuing to struggle. The Isetan Kichijōji store, beloved by locals for close to 40 years, will shutter its doors this month. In December, the Seibu Yūrakuchō department store will also close for good. It’s almost as if the strengths of department stores, which offer a variety of specially-selected goods for purchase, have been usurped by station retail, which likewise features a wide variety of stores.

In the study by the Station Consumption Research Center, conducted during a full week in July of last year, 46.7 percent of the 2,750 total respondents said they shopped at station retail, inside station tenant buildings, and in the vicinity of the station. When asked about why they shopped at these locations (a multiple-choice question), 68.8 percent of women and 48.5 percent of men said they wanted a break from things, and 64.1 percent of women and 49.4 percent of men said they felt they might find something interesting—indications that many station shoppers don’t have specific objectives.

More higher-end stores
To respond to the growing popularity of station retail, stores are becoming higher-end.

Three years ago, famous high-end chocolatier Godiva opened a store near the faregates at the West Exit of JR Shinjuku Station. Umeda Mai, communications manager for Godiva’s Marketing and Merchandising Department, says, “There were people in the company who questioned the decision to move into that particular space. But, we see a lot of commuters drop in who clearly don’t have plans to visit our department store locations, and on some days, we have lines of customers.”

Godiva later established stores near ticketing halls at JR Tōkyō Station and Tōbu Kashiwa Station. Compared to outlets inside department store, average sales per customer are low, but the company has succeeded in opening up to entirely new market segments such as men, and sales are growing.

In addition, makeup retailer L’Occitane and luxury retailer Louis Vuitton are opening up stores at stations in the Greater Tōkyō area. Turning the tables on station retail’s low barrier to access, even more brand-name stores are likely to enter the station retail industry looking to develop new markets.

==============

What is ekinaka?
While there is no precise definition, ekinaka generally refers to retail space located inside rail station buildings or inside the paid area of stations. Up until now, “station retail” meant small-scale shops and convenience stores such as Kiosk, but recently, restaurants and fashion stores are expanding into the industry. The general ekinaka facility takes the form of a shopping mall with an array of specialty shops. While stores can count on a large customer base thanks to superior location inside train stations, some also point out that ekinaka steal customers from regular stores outside the station. Other critics also point to a preferential tax structure that favors station retail over typical street retail.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2010, 12:14 PM   #1127
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Designer Mitooka Eiji: Trains as public space
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/li...002000208.html

Quote:
It was nothing other than a comical illustration of a cat that covered the insides and outsides of this two-car train. Perusing the interior of the train, everything was covered, from one end to the other, with cats—from “cat’s paws” benches to “calico” seats. The Tama Train on Wakayama Electric Railway’s Kishikawa Line in Wakayama Prefecture is nothing short of fun.

This train, the subject of countless reports and articles on television and in newspapers, is the work of designer Mitooka Eiji (62). Starting with JR Kyūshū’s Sonic limited express, he has debuted groundbreaking trains one after another, and is a leading figure in railway design, having won the Brunel Award for international railway excellence multiple times. In addition, his design work covers an array of different fields, from station buildings to resort hotels, down to the wrapping paper on ekiben box lunches.

Deep down inside, is his mind filled with beautiful dreams and happy thoughts? Contrary to this reporter’s preconceptions, the words from Mitooka’s mouth at his office in Kyōto were dead serious.

“When I think about what will happen to the younger generation working in this office, and then their children… How they will live… It worries me. –Instead of worry, perhaps ‘anger’ is a better word.”

The reasons behind these feelings are expressed plainly in the chaos encompassing Japanese cities.

Cluttered and disorderly, blanketed in signs… Passing people don’t even say a word to each other. Face-to-face with cities that lack richness and communication, Mitooka says, “Everyday I see one case after another that raises yellow flags, red flags.”

There’s a reason behind Mitooka’s lament. “The chaos in our cities is a reflection of the chaos in our lives and in our souls,” claims the designer.

Mitooka looks to Japan’s loss in the War in the Pacific as the primary reason. It wasn’t just houses and towns that were burned and destroyed in the war—it was also the Japanese lifestyle and knowledge.

“After the war, we looked to American and European culture as ‘right,’ and taking the superficial and the convenient in what saw, we developed our country’s economy. But before we knew it, our culture—the foundation that allows us to live rich and fulfilling lives—had lost its roots. Traditional lifestyles and knowledge were snipped away, and when in trouble, we looked to the next new thing to bring us happiness. At least that’s my take on it,” says Mitooka.

Two years after defeat in the war, Mitooka was born in Okayama. As a child, he loved to draw, and after seeing illustrations of the inside of a passenger boat, he was changed forever. Rather than art to be enjoyed through viewing, this was a picture that transmitted an image of something that was part of daily life. His desire to draw such images led him onto the path of a designer.

“I, myself, was caught up in American culture until 20 and in European culture until age 50 or so,” confides Mitooka, but he slowly began to think thusly: “When it comes down to it, I am Japanese. I cannot create true wealth and happiness without building on the history the Japanese people have cultivated for centuries.”

Those thoughts brought him to an entirely new means. Inside the interior of a train, the quintessential industrial product, or in station buildings, where durability is key, Mitooka incorporates traditional natural materials such as wood, bamboo, and rush, in plenty.

It is an attempt to remove the cold and repetitive atmosphere from the public space of trains, and get people to take a second look at Japan’s culture. For the Kyūshū Shinkansen Tsubame trains that debuted last summer, Mitooka used gold leaf on the interior walls and even displayed gold maki-e lacquer created by Buddhist altar designers.

“Gold leaf is the highest grade of material, and you see it used in temples and shrines. There is value in bringing it to a public space that anyone and everyone can use,” he explains. “In order to raise all of our children on an equal footing, we must show them the value in the common tools and items that society shares. That is a country’s strength, and it’s culture, as well. If we only focus on how wonderful our individual possessions are, the country will be weak. It’s precisely because it’s a public space that I want to use only the best materials.”

The father of the playful Tama Train that pleases adult and child alike is a man with unwavering conviction.

Incorporating natural elements in trains and stations is no easy task. It costs money, and it makes for additional maintenance and administration. But doesn’t Japanese culture value raw materials, accepting even those that are rotting or damaged? This man’s design work—such that people can look at one wooden table and say, “Mitooka made this”—was born thusly, and gained response and applause from others. And the Kishikawa Line, once on the verge of being abandoned, was reborn as a must-ride line.

“As our duty as adults, we have to construct the very best, and show our children how to use it. The next generation will watch us, use it, and make it a part of them before they know it. This is how culture must be transmitted from one generation to the next, again and again. In order for us to gain back what we’ve lost, it will take us at least three generations and a hundred years.”
Many of JR Kyūshū’s train designs are crafted by Mitooka, and they are some of the most attractive trains in Japan.
Source: http://railsound.sakura.ne.jp/

JR Kyūshū 303 series



JR Kyūshū 813 series



JR Kyūshū 815 series



JR Kyūshū 817 series

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2010, 02:20 PM   #1128
city_thing
Put it in your mouth
 
city_thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Melbourne.
Posts: 7,128
Likes (Received): 883

Excellent updates Quashlo.

Sincerely, thank you for all the effort you put in!
__________________
Calling occupants of interplanetary craft...
city_thing no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2010, 07:35 PM   #1129
Rick H
Registered User
 
Rick H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 20
Likes (Received): 0

New platform at Hōya Station to open March 21 ...

Thanks for showing the changes at HOYA. That was "my" station for many years.
Dick
Rick H no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2010, 03:52 AM   #1130
Gag Halfrunt
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 719
Likes (Received): 27

Are there ethnic Korean communities in Nogata and Sayama? The signs have Korean translations.
Gag Halfrunt no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2010, 07:56 AM   #1131
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gag Halfrunt View Post
Are there ethnic Korean communities in Nogata and Sayama? The signs have Korean translations.
I'm not aware of any sizeable communities, but I will defer to anyone who knows better. My guess is this is just part of the general trend in signage to show Japanese + English + Korean + Simplified Chinese, like this one at Hiyoshi in Yokohama City on the Tōkyū network:

image hosted on flickr

(my picture)

However, it's not universally practiced by all railway companies, and even within companies, some stations have them, some don't. They probably just omitted the Simplified Chinese since it's the exact same as the Japanese.

Railway companies appear to be moving towards multiple languages in other forms of passenger information as well. The latest N'EX and the Skyliner trains have announcements in all four languages. And I was quite surprised to find out that the new Ōsaka Municipal Subway 30000 series for the Tanimachi Line displays all four languages in the LCD screens above the doors, perhaps the first for a major urban railway operator in Japan.


Source: kroz1989 on YouTube

I suspect this trend will just continue to expand, especially given that Japan is eager to encourage foreigners (such as from Korea and China) to visit and spend money. I believe Odakyū might have been one of the forerunners, as they often try to get foreign visitors to go to Hakone.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2010, 12:18 PM   #1132
Gag Halfrunt
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 719
Likes (Received): 27

Thanks for the explanation.

Talking of 'try[ing] to get foreign visitors to go to Hakone', last week I saw a BBC documentary about the sculptor Henry Moore which including some shots of works by Moore at the Hakone Open-Air Museum and an interview with a staff member there. The documentary was a co-production with Fuji Television, whose parent company, I discovered from Wikipedia, just happens to own Hakone Open-Air Museum. (Of course the blatant product placement might be aimed at the Japanese audience, but the BBC is supposed to have rules against this kind of thing.)
Gag Halfrunt no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 2nd, 2010, 03:41 PM   #1133
nouveau.ukiyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 25

Yurikamome @ night + an interesting trick...





Videos created by cat2525jp on YouTube
nouveau.ukiyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 5th, 2010, 03:14 AM   #1134
coth
pride leader
 
coth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Moscow
Posts: 21,679
Likes (Received): 6998

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
EMobile completes mobile network covering Tōkyō Metro
http://www.asahi.com/digital/cnet/CNT201002220085.html
Only stations? no tunnels?
__________________
coth está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old April 8th, 2010, 12:51 AM   #1135
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Stations only.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 8th, 2010, 05:23 AM   #1136
cjfjapan
Registered User
 
cjfjapan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,276
Likes (Received): 140

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I'm not aware of any sizeable communities, but I will defer to anyone who knows better. My guess is this is just part of the general trend in signage to show Japanese + English + Korean + Simplified Chinese, like this one at Hiyoshi in Yokohama City on the Tōkyū network:
I wonder if this station was signed for the 2002 World Cup, which Japan shared with South Korea. If there is a station nearby, that may explain it. I think there are few Koreans living in Japan who don't speak Japanese; most were born there I believe.
cjfjapan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 8th, 2010, 11:25 AM   #1137
nouveau.ukiyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 25

Quote:
Originally Posted by cjfjapan View Post
I wonder if this station was signed for the 2002 World Cup, which Japan shared with South Korea. If there is a station nearby, that may explain it. I think there are few Koreans living in Japan who don't speak Japanese; most were born there I believe.
To reiterate what quashlo said, it is quite normal, especially in major cities, to see station names written in 4 languages including Korean.

As for the Koreans born here, they most likely speak Japanese. Also, many Koreans, usually young adults and up, can read a lot of kanji as well; up until recently, Koreans had to learn just over 1000 kanji in middle school. Some kanji vocabulary in Korean and Japanese is the same or similar in both spelling and sound because they both came from the same Chinese.
nouveau.ukiyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 9th, 2010, 11:22 AM   #1138
FML
Registered User
 
FML's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saitama, JP
Posts: 521
Likes (Received): 49

While the majority of Zainichi Koreans speak Japanese better than Korean, there are also more than few Koreans in Japan who are not Zainichi. (e.g.: Expatriate workers, students, tourists.)

Though, I'm not quite sure if we really need station name signs in Korean/Simplified Chinese. Most, if not all, Koreans/Chinese can read names written in Latin alphabets. On the other hand, I believe what we really need is more of explanations of intricarte rules like these in multiple languages.





FML no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 11th, 2010, 07:51 PM   #1139
ShibuyaBoy
Registered User
 
ShibuyaBoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 74
Likes (Received): 1

Hi Quashlo-san! I have a question of about the Narita Access line. Once that one opens, will they still run the airport-to-airport express on the currently used line? And, if I remember they will use the new trains on the new line of course, but they'll also use the older trains as well? Or the older trains on the new line will just be to serve that line only? Or they'll use both lines, but just educe the frequency of non-skyliner trains on the currently used line, which could be good to increase the time-performance of the local keisei trains?
ShibuyaBoy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 11th, 2010, 08:01 PM   #1140
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

I believe they still plan on running regular Skyliner service on the current route via the Keisei Main Line. It will just be a slower service than the New Skyliner trains via the Narita Sky Access line.

I don't think they will be using the old Skyliner trains on the Narita Sky Access line, since they can't reach the 160 kph top speed. However, technologically-speaking, I don't think there's anything stopping them from running the old Skyliner trains on the Narita Sky Access line at 130 kph or slower (max speed of the old Skyliner trains).
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium