daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:29 AM   #1401
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Surge in demand for nursery schools near stations in Sapporo
http://mytown.asahi.com/hokkaido/new...00001006160005

Quote:
Licensed nursery schools are popping up one after another near train stations in Sapporo City. The nursery schools take many forms, from locations underneath JR's elevated viaducts operated by public companies to branch schools operated by existing nursery schools. Sapporo City children without a nursery school to attend have doubled in only a year to 840 children, and increasing nursery school capacity has become a critical concern. The demand is increasing for nursery schools convenient to public transport, and one of the factors behind this trend appears to be an increasing number of households where both parents are forced to work due to the struggling economy.

One minute walk from the train
Art Child Care Shin-Kotoni is less than a one-minute walk away after getting off the train at Shin-Kotoni Station on the JR Sasshō Line. Unusual among its counterparts, the nursery school sits beneath an elevated railway viaduct. Shin-Kotoni Station is about ten minutes from Sapporo Station by train. Asabu Station on the Municipal Subway is also within walking distance of the school, and many of mothers drop their children off on the way to work in central Sapporo.

The school is operated by COTY (HQ: Ōsaka Prefecture), a subsidiary of big-name moving company Art Corporation, and is the first licensed nursery school in Sapporo City operated by a public company.

The school had already existed on the same site since 2001 as an unlicensed facility, but constructed a cafeteria and garden before reopening as a licensed school in April of this year. Licensed facilities receive government support, and school families have less of a financial burden. Principal Komatsu Yūko says, "We can also provide an expanded array of services, and more children can make use of our facilities."

Of the approximately 50 children at the school 30 are one year old or younger. The school is already maxed out. According to Principal Komatsu, "More and more mothers are hoping to get back onto the job as quickly as possible after giving birth." A never-ending stream of parents visits the school even after its opening, and Komatsu says that there were some mothers who came with months-old infants in their arms asking to have their children enrolled in the autumn and saying they couldn't bring their children with them to job interviews.

While noise is a given underneath the elevated tracks, Principal Komatsu says, "The trains make noise, but it's not enough to be a problem." The Sapporo City Children's Future Bureau, which licensed the school, gave its big seal of approval, saying "there is no problem with the facility."

The facility and space are being leased by JR Hokkaidō Group's Hokkaidō JR Urban Development (HQ: Sapporo City). Ishitoya Shunji, executive director of the company, says, “There is definitely increasing need for daycare near train stations, and it’s a certainly a profitable-enough business. It not only puts land beneath elevated tracks to good use but also contributes to society.”

The company also plans on constructing a branch school with capacity for 18 students on an adjacent site, aiming for an opening this fall.

A compact branch school
Some already licensed nursery schools are opening branch schools in the immediate vicinity of train stations. Last fiscal year, Sapporo City established a new grant program, and in April of this year, two new branch schools opened with the help of the funding. Both rent space in buildings near Municipal Subway stations.

A branch school of Kikusui Suzuran Nursery School (Shiroishi Ward, Sapporo City) is a mere 20 m from an entrance to Kikusui Station on the Tōzai Line. The facility occupies a floor area of approx. 86 sq m, with a capacity for 20 children. The school only accepts children under 12 months, after which children are enrolled in the main school located 240 m away.

The cost to renovate the facility, including replacement of the floor, was approx. ¥14.91 million yen, and funding covered ¥11.18 million, or three-quarters of the cost. Principal Kakimoto Nobuyuki says, “Without funding, it’s difficult to establish branch schools.”

A new branch school of Nijūyonken Nursery School (Nishi Ward, Sapporo City) which also opened in April is within walking distance from a train station, about 330 m from Nijūyonken Station on the Tōzai Line. Nishikawa Satoshi, chief of the city’s Parental Support Section, stressed the benefits: “Land prices are high surrounding stations, and it’s difficult to secure sufficient space, but for branch schools, which can operate with small facilities, one room in a building is enough.” The city also plans to provide funding this fiscal year for establishment of another two branch schools.

According to the city, as of April 1, there are 196 licensed nursery schools in Sapporo City with capacity for 17,950 children. There are 840 children without nursery schools to attend, twice the 402 children from the same period last year. City spokespersons say, “One factor is an increasing number of households where both parents want to work, as a result of the struggling economy.”
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:29 AM   #1402
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Utsunomiya City to build new bike station at West Exit of JR Utsunomiya Station
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...002000089.html

Quote:
Utsunomiya City, which bills itself as a "bicycle town," will establish an exclusive rest station for bike users at the West Exit of JR Utsunomiya Station, allowing free use of showers and other facilities, and plans to begin operation of the station in September.

The station will be located in an approx. 90 sq m area adjacent to a city-operated bicycle facility in Kawamukōchō. The station will feature showers and toilets, as well as space to assemble and wash bikes. An attendant will be present at all times, and the station will also provide visitor information.

The bike station is a model project running until March 2012, and the city has included approx. ¥10 million of expenditure in its budget for the new facility. After the trial period ends, the city will evaluate the usage statistics and determine whether to make the bike station permanent.

Utsunomiya City is the home base of the Utsunomiya Blitzen cycling team, and hosts the Japan Cup Cycle Road Race, Japan's premier cycle race, annually in October. In recent years, many cycling fans have come to visit hoping to race the same course as famous cyclists.

Mayor Satō Eiichi said, "I hope people visiting from both within and outside Tochigi Prefecture will enjoy using the new station."
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:30 AM   #1403
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tsujidō Station platform widening construction

An update on the platform widening work at Tsujidō Station (2010.05.23). Tsujidō Station is a major station on the JR Tōkaidō Line, with 45,700 daily entries (2008), and headways during the morning rush hour are about three minutes.

A special schedule for the Tōkaidō Line went into effect at 17:30 on May 22, lasting until 06:00 on May 23 in order to widen the platform and switch out the tracks.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

Looking east towards Yokohama and Tōkyō, the inbound track has been shifted left (to the north) to make way for the additional platform space.



The work in the switchout involved reorganizing the freight tracks on the north side of the station to free up one-track-worth of space to shift the inbound track into. As a result, the platform was widened substantially and now feels like a completely different station.

The platform still looks unfinished, but the black mats are to protect the concrete below until curing is complete. There was quite a bit of work involved in the switchout: these platforms are built to handle 15-car trains (300 m long), and combined with the three meters of additional platform width, there was a lot of new platform that needed to be constructed in one night.



A look above at the new canopy which wraps around the old canopy, now just a frame. If you look closely, you can actually still see the former overhead still waiting to be removed.



At the west end of the station, toward Odawara and Atami. The platform is largely straight the entire way. With all the new platform space, they also needed to move the conductors’ button which activates the departure chime. As a result, it looks a bit out of place right now in the middle of the new platform space.



A look at what’s underneath that widened platform…



Switchout on the west end of the station, as a freight train approaches.



Full video report:
Source: karibajct on YouTube

First, a video from 2010.05.18, a few days before the track switchout. Workers are putting the finishing touches on preparation for the big night, moving out some dirt and ballast. Trains traveled at reduced speed through the construction site.



Next, the day of the switchout… Construction materials and equipment are lined up for the big push that night. With the last inbound train—a 17:25 departure for Takasaki—inbound trains switched to the Tōkaidō Line freight tracks and work began in earnest on the switchout. Some scenes you don’t normally get to see, including the specially-outfitted crawler crane switching from one track to another and workers splicing the rail.



Next, construction of the expanded platform. Apparently they use concrete box sections for the edge of the new platform and styrofoam cubes on top of the former track, which they cast entirely in dry concrete. The topmost styrofoam cubes have a layer of concrete on top. You can also see them removing some of the old track and sleepers.



The final part, in the early morning of May 23. Scenes of a test train (9920M) testing out the widened platform, as well as the first revenue-service train (Shōnan-Shinjuku Line train 2600E at 6:02) on the new inbound track.


Last edited by quashlo; July 5th, 2010 at 10:51 PM.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:31 AM   #1404
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Sōtetsu Main Line construction updates: Part 1

First, some updates on the grade-separation (elevation) of the Sōtetsu Main Line between Hoshikawa and Tennōchō.
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

On an outbound train between Tennōchō and Hoshikawa. After the outbound track was switched out with a temporary outbound track, the old outbound track has been removed, and the area to be used for the construction of the elevated viaduct is now free of obstructions. Further ahead, you can see the protective fence, which they will likely begin extending this way to allow them to start construction for the viaduct.



Moving towards Hoshikawa, we get a closer look at the fencing. At the top of the fence, the thin steel columns have holes for bolts, so they will probably build something atop this for the construction of the viaduct.



From south end of the outbound platform at Hoshikawa, looking towards the Yokohama direction. Here, the columns are taking shape.



At the opposite end of the platform, towards Ebina, they are making preparations to construct another column to support the viaduct and new station. There will be three rows of columns, and it appears they are constructing the middle row first. The next steps in the construction involve moving the secondary outbound track closer to the primary outbound track so they can begin construction of the foundations and columns there.



Next, we move a few stations down the line to Nishiya, where they are carrying out work for another project—the through-service between Sōtetsu and JR via the JR Tōkaidō Freight Line. This is the east end, closer to Yokohama, where a new set of tracks will branch off to connect to Yokohama Hazawa Station on the JR Tōkaidō Freight Line. The secondary outbound track has been completely removed at this location, perhaps to secure construction space. Since they’ve basically lost a track now, it will be interesting to see what they do here.



Even though they completely removed the track, there seems to be no movement on the platforms or the rest of the station.



Judging from this, there’s quite a bit of space that’s now freed up, so it’s possible they may try and move the platforms west towards Ebina, freeing up space at the Yokohama end to do work.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:32 AM   #1405
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Sōtetsu Main Line construction updates: Part 2

Next, some shots from Seya and Ebina Stations (2010.05.23).
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

First, Seya Station, where they are constructing an additional track to allow limited-stop trains to pass. In preparation for the Sōtetsu–JR and Sōtetsu–Tōkyū through-services. Under the existing configuration, the inbound direction has two tracks and one island platform, but the outbound direction only has one track. Currently, they are in the process of removing obstructions at the station to allow them to build the additional outbound track and make improvements to the existing outbound platform.



The general construction process involves removing the Sōtetsu Rosen supermarket (already done), constructing a new vehicular parking facility at the station on the former supermarket site, removing the existing parking lot, and constructing the secondary outbound track on the former parking lot site. At the same time, facilities on the Ebina end of the station will also be removed.

This is the east (towards Yokohama) end of the outbound platform. On the opposite side of this temporary wall, they will construct the additional outbound track.



Moving towards the center of the platform:



The station has an elevated concourse, meaning passengers use stairwells to walk up and then back down to the ground-level platforms, eliminating the need to access the opposite-side platforms by crossing the tracks. Here, it appears that there is enough space to keep one of the existing stairwells in operation while they construct the secondary track. This will probably be removed eventually, once they construct a replacement one on the outside of the new track. Further ahead, they are constructing the new parking facility.



This bicycle parking facility, near the wider central part of the platform, will need to be relocated to construct the additional track.



Towards the Ebina end of the outbound platform, this adjacent building will need to be relocated.



At the very end, they have constructed a temporary wall and placed wood on the track stretching to the nearest grade crossing, probably to allow construction machinery to access the site.



Moving to Ebina Station, the terminus of the Sōtetsu Main Line. The platform widening and other improvements are finally complete. The platform looks finished and all of the ubiquitous green striped tape on the columns has been removed. As a terminal station and a major transfer point with the Ōdakyū Line (and to a lesser extent, JR), the widened platform will help ease congestion from the rush of passengers exiting trains.

Further down the platform, you can see that LED departure boards have a rare four rows, allowing them to show four departures simultaneously. Ironically, the current schedule is virtually all express trains at Ebina, but this is likely in preparation for the Sōtetsu–JR and Sōtetsu–Tōkyū through-services, when the schedule complexity will be kicked up a notch with different stopping patterns and destinations.



A final shot of the completed transfer passage between the Sōtetsu and Odakyū parts of the station. For the longest time, passengers transferring between the two railways had to take a long detour, but this passage now offers the shortest path route.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:34 AM   #1406
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Machida City plans to introduce articulated buses
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/to...102000087.html

Quote:
Machida City has become the first jurisdiction in Tōkyō Prefecture to finalize plans to introduce articulated buses, which have twice the capacity of typical buses, onto its fixed-route bus lines. In preparation for an introduction next fiscal year, the articulated buses are included in the Project to Promote Use and Active Use of Fixed-Route Buses, which will draft a plan for line restructuring and operations starting this fiscal year. The city included ¥7.5 million in its June revised budget for project-related costs.

According to the city, the proposal calls for introducing four articulated buses next fiscal year on service between Machida Bus Center and Yamazaki Danchi Center, with the city providing funding to fixed-route bus operators for the bus purchases. The articulated buses have a capacity of 131 passengers.

The project is the first step in introducing trunk line bus services on the north-south transport axis linking the Tama City area with Machida City's central district. The project would introduce the high-capacity articulated buses on sections with a high number of routes, as well as improve access to the Machida Municipal Athletic Stadium, which hosts games for the Japan Football League's (JFL) FC Machida Zelvia.

The city will discuss operating routes, schedules, transfer plans, and the possibility of establishing bus-priority lanes with the affected agencies, as well as comprehensively carrying out redesigns of bus stops and intersections.

In addition, the city will also conduct surveys to determine the transport needs of visitors to Nozuta Park, home of the Municipal Athletic Stadium, to be used in devising a transport response strategy.

A large number of bus lines converge and terminate at Machida Bus Center, which is directly connected to Machida Station. As the road network is designed to serve traffic bound for the central district of Machida City, road congestion and bus delays are a chronic problem on trunk roads such as Machida Kaidō and Machida Ekimae-dōri, and improving the bus operating environment is a critical issue.

Kanagawa Chūō Kōtsū (Kanagawa Central Transport) is the most likely candidate to be selected to operate the buses. Buses manufactured by Mercedes Benz (approx. ¥80 million per bus) are most likely to be selected for the purchase. Articulated buses currently operate in Atsugi City and Fujisawa City in Kanagawa Prefecture, and Chiba City, and Gifu City has also finalized plans to introduce the buses.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:35 AM   #1407
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Yokohama Municipal Subway Green Line ridership on track
http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/ka...202000058.html

Quote:
It was revealed that average daily ridership on the Yokohama Municipal Subway Green Line (Hiyoshi – Nakayama) for April has reached 99,000. In its third year of operation, the line’s ridership growth is on track and approaching the city's target of 104,000 passengers daily.

According to the Yokohama City Transportation Bureau, the Green Line opened for service in 2008. Average daily ridership was approx. 72,000 during the first fiscal year (FY2008) and approx. 93,000 during FY2009, an increasing trend. While the line is still generating a net loss, the deficit has been improving.

In its FY2009 financial statements, the Yokohama Municipal Subway—consisting of the Green Line together with the Blue Line, the other line in the system—posted operating surpluses until the third quarter, and the likelihood is increasing that it will post its first annual operating surplus. Spokespersons explain, "Population along the line is increasing, and the Green Line is generating spillover benefits in the surrounding area."

In April, the population in Tsuzuki Ward, which is served by the Green Line and is currently undergoing residential development, surpassed 200,000. Tsuzuki Ward boasts the youngest average age (38.3) in Yokohama City, as well as a high percentage of people less than 15 years of age (18.7 percent).

A spokesperson for a real estate company that handles apartment rentals along the line commented on four stations along the line: Kita-Yamada, Center Kita, Center Minami, and Tsuzuki — Fureai no Oka. "There are large parks and the roads are wide, making for a good residential environment. A lot of our calls come from families."

Meanwhile, ridership on the four municipal bus lines running in the area between Nakayama Station and Center Minami Station and on other routes has posted substantial decreases of between 19 and 39 percent compared to before the Green Line opened. City spokespersons say, "The bus lines serve stops other than the stations, and we have no intention to discontinue the service."
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:36 AM   #1408
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tama Monorail posts sixth consecutive annual operating surplus
http://mytown.asahi.com/tama/news.ph...00001006250001

Quote:
On June 24, third- sector railway operator Tōkyō Tama Intercity Monorail (HQ: Tachikawa City), which receives investment funding from the Tōkyō Metropolitan Government, announced its financial results for FY2009. The railway posted its second straight year of current surplus following FY2008, and spokespersons for the railway said, “We are on our way to climbing out of the red.”

According to the company, average daily ridership is 122,597 passengers, a year-over-year increase of 1.7 percent. Transport revenues also posted a year-over-year increase of 0.2 percent. The operating surplus was ¥874 million, marking the railway’s sixth consecutive year in the black. After subtraction of interest payments on debt, the railway’s current profits were ¥272 million, marking the second consecutive year in the black following FY2008, when the railway posted it’s first positive current surplus.

Meanwhile, debt increased to ¥54.4 billion in March 2010 as a result of infrastructure investments, and the railway must pay approx. ¥4 billion annually.
Cab views from the Tama Monorail. Fantastic scenery of the Tama Hills and dense Tōkyō suburbs from up in the air.
Source: OleOleSaggy on YouTube

From Tachikawa-Minami to Takahata Fudō:



From Kamikitadai to Sunagawa Nanaban:



From Chūō Daigaku – Meisei Daigaku to Tama Center:

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:37 AM   #1409
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

JR Ryōmō Line in Isesaki City elevated
http://mainichi.jp/area/gunma/news/2...40141000c.html

Quote:
Isesaki Station (Kuruwachō, Isesaki City) on the JR Ryōmō Line and approx. 2.5 km of the Ryōmō Line surrounding the station were switched out to elevated track with the start of service on May 30. A special ceremony was held on the platforms at the station, with Mayor Igarashi Kiyotaka and others celebrating the elevation project with a ribbon-cutting.

The ceremony began at 10:41 am on the platforms, timed to the arrival of trains at all three platforms at the station. Mayor Igarashi welcomed the crowd, saying, “We’ve waited for this day for a long, long time. Today begins a new day in the planning of our city that will connect the north and south areas surrounding the station.” Afterwards, the mayor gave the departure sign to the inbound 11:00 am departure for Takasaki, and with a round of applause, the train departed.

The new station building that opened the same day is a barrier-free design, with elevators, escalators, and toilets for the physically disabled. From the platforms on the second level, passengers can see the ferris wheel at Kezōji Park as well as Mt. Akagi. Stationmaster Oka Toshihiko said, “One of the best things is the view. I hope many passengers will enjoy the new station.”
The night of the switchout (2010.05.29):
Source: http://natukusanosenro.way-nifty.com/

As a result of the switchout, some nighttime runs or portions of runs were cancelled and replaced with bus service. Isesaki is a small city in Gunma on the outskirts of Greater Tōkyō, but there was still lots to see for railfans.

At the ground-level platforms at Isesaki Station, waiting for the last trains: the 22:00 inbound departure for Takasaki (484M) and 22:13 outbound departure for Oyama (491M).



Train 484M arrives at Platform 1, a four-car 107 series train. Up above, you can see the elevated platforms which are getting ready to enter service the next day.



Train 491M arrives.



A 5-car 211 series, the last train at the ground-level platforms departs.



Construction workers milling about both inside and outside the station.



The current station building at Isesaki Station was built in 1934, but will now be demolished with the opening of the elevated station.



In the midst of open fields and a light rain, a team of workers hussle to remove the track ballast.



The following day:
Source: http://natukusanosenro.way-nifty.com/

A somewhat jarring site, seeing an old 115 series train on tests running along a sparkling new elevated viaduct. Now that the tracks have been elevated, they will remove the grade crossing and fix up the roadway.



Thirty minutes before the first train, outside the North Exit of the new elevated station. This is the JR part of the station.





Another test train from the other direction.



North Exit of the new station building, as the test train passes through the station behind the glass. The station is now modernized and completely barrier-free.



The elevated platforms are seven cars long. Here, the first train arrives—420M, an inbound train heading for Takasaki, operated as a 5-car 211 series train.



The platforms are crowded with construction workers. One of them, on a ladder, adjusts the angle of the conductor’s surveillance monitor.



The 115 series test train has returned in the other direction…



Moving to the outbound platform, as train 3425M, a four-car 107 series and the first outbound train, arrives. Because of the switchout, this train was also a bit delayed.



Moving to the South Exit, across what was the former ground-level JR station only last night.



One final look at the new JR ticketing hall.



The final set:
Source: http://natukusanosenro.way-nifty.com/

The old station building and its tenants, including a popular noodle house, are now shuttered.







Moving to the west switchout point.



The second outbound train on the elevated track was 429M, a five-car 211 series bound for Kiryū, followed by this inbound train, 424M bound for Takasaki, a three-car 115 series train.



Finally, another 115 series terminating at Isesaki.



Elevation of the Tōbu Isesaki Line tracks will now kick into full gear, along with demolition of the old station building and construction of the new South Exit.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:39 AM   #1410
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

JR East to construct new tenant building, daycare facility at Kagohara Station
http://www.asahi.com/travel/rail/new...006150358.html

Quote:
JR East announced that it will construct a three-story station tenant building housing a nursery school at the North Exit of Kagohara Station (Kumagaya City) on the Takasaki Line. The railway will break ground on the new building next month, with an opening scheduled for March of next year. Up until now, JR East has been establishing nursery schools near stations primarily along the Saikyō Line, but this is the first time the railway is constructing a station tenant building housing a nursery school in Saitama Prefecture.

The gross floor area of the building will be approx. 2,000 sq m, and the total project cost is approx. ¥300 million. The first and second floors will be occupied by retail space, while the third floor will be occupied by the nursery school. The railway will contract out operation of the nursery school to a local firm, and obtain licensure for the school as an approved facility.

As part of its parent support program, JR East is proceeding with the establishment of nursery schools and daycare facilities in the areas around train stations, which are easy to use for parents on the way to and from work. There are a total of 13 daycare facilities and daycare stations in Saitama Prefecture, primarily centered along the Saikyō Line. The railway is continuing the establishment of new facilities, with three already in planning along the Saikyō Line, in addition to the one at Kagohara.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:40 AM   #1411
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Tōbu Railway FY2010 infrastructure investment plan
http://www.tobu.co.jp/file/2392/100427.pdf

Quote:
At Tōbu Railway (HQ: Sumida Ward, Tōkyō), we will invest a total of ¥28.7 billion in the infrastructure of our railway business for FY2010, continuing progress on safety measures, improvements and structuring of our transport network, upgrades and improvements to existing equipment and facilities, construction to elevate tracks, and service improvements in an effort to ensure a safe, more convenient, and pleasant experience for our customers.

Our investments towards safety for this fiscal year will be ¥22.9 billion.
  1. Safety measures
    • Grade crossing safety measures
      At Tōbu Railway, we have already completed installation of obstruction detection devices at all of our grade crossings, but last fiscal year, we completed installation of “push buttons” at grade crossings equipped with obstruction detection devices using infrared rays. We will now aim for further improvements to security by moving forward with introduction of new (radar-type) grade crossing obstruction detection devices which have a wider detection range.
    • Safety measures inside stations
      As a safety measure against passengers falling from platforms, we will continue installing emergency stop buttons, warning lights below platforms, and refuge zones beneath platforms. For stations where horizontal or vertical gaps exist between the platform and train, we will carry out platform renovations, and at Asakusa Station, we installed new fixed platform barriers on Platform 3, following the installation on Plaform 5. In addition, to prevent passengers or items getting caught between closing doors, we have installed departure information announcement equipment, which notifies passengers that the train’s doors are about to close through departure melodies and voice announcements, on the Tōjō Line and Noda Line, and will now proceed with installation on the Isesaki Line.
    • Safety measures against fire
      As a safety measure against natural disasters including large-scale earthquakes and periods of wind or rain, we will continue seismic reinforcement of viaducts, renovation and reinforcement of long-span bridges, and renovation of earthen slopes.
    • Other infrastructure
      We will continue with installation of devices—including devices that quickly stop trains in the event that an emergency situation has affected the train operator and made operation of the train impossible; devices that record various information about the train’s operations; devices that switch the power source for wireless train protection systems to emergency power in the event that the primary power source fails; and devices that prevent speeding when the train enters switches—improving the safety of operations.
  2. Improvements and structuring of our transport network
    • In place of the existing automatic train stop (ATS) system, we will introduce the higher-performance automatic train control (ATC) system that controls train speed based on the location of the train running ahead, and will continue with construction on the Tōjō Line between Ikebukuro and Ogawamachi.
      Tōbu’s ATC system ensures a smooth speed control by using information (distance between trains, grades, etc.) obtained from information transmission devices located both on the train and trackside, and also features flexibility, with the ability to serve as a train protection system in the event of grade crossing failure and prevent trains from accidentally missing stops.
  3. Upgrades and improvements to existing equipment and facilities
    • Upgrades and improvements to track, electrical, and other facilities
      We will proceed with track strengthening work (including conversion to heavier-grade rail, flexible switches, and continuously-welded rail), engineering-related work including bridge renovations, architecture-related work including renovation of station buildings, and upgrades and improvements to signal and safety systems, communications systems, wiring systems, and transformer systems infrastructure, further establishing and strengthening the necessary foundations for operation of a railway business.
    • Refurbishment of rolling stock
      We will refurbish 10000 series commuter rolling stock, improving train comfort and security while upgrading to barrier-free design through installation of wheelchair spaces and passenger information displays inside trains.
      In addition, as a means of advancing our environmental measures designed to protect the ozone layer, we will continue switching to alternative refrigerants for the coolants in our train air conditioning units.
    • Replacement and manufacture of commuter rolling stock
      Based on the concept of “a user- and environment-friendly, energy-saving next-generation train,” we will manufacture seven trains (70 cars) of our 50000 series, which seeks to reduce environmental impacts through a barrier-free, energy-conserving, and low-maintenance design.
  4. Construction to elevate tracks
    • Construction to elevate tracks
      • Elevation work near Isesaki Station
        Construction for the continuous grade separation of the Isesaki Line between Gōshi and Isesaki is currently underway as a Gunma Prefecture urban planning project. With the completion of this work, Shin-Isesaki Station and Isesaki Station will become elevated stations with barrier-free designs. In addition, the elimination of 13 grade crossings will help alleviate traffic congestion in the surrounding area, contributing to a comprehensive development pattern through unification of urban neighborhoods.
      • Elevation work between Shimizu Kōen and Umesato
        Construction for the continuous grade separation of the Noda Line between Shimizu Kōen and Umesato is currently underway as a Chiba Prefecture urban planning project. With the completion of this work, Atago Station and Noda-shi Station will become elevated stations with barrier-free designs. In addition, the elimination of 11 grade crossings will help alleviate traffic congestion in the surrounding area, contributing to a comprehensive development pattern through unification of urban neighborhoods.
  5. Service improvements
    • Barrier-free improvements to station facilities
      With the aim of creating stations that are user-friendly for both the elderly and passengers with physical disabilities, we are proceeding with barrier-free improvement works. This fiscal year, we will install elevators at 13 stations (29 units total) and multi-function toilets (individual rooms) at 12 stations.
      • Elevators:
        • Isesaki Line: Tōbu Dōbutsu Kōen (4)
        • Nikkō Line: Satte (2), Shin-Kanuma (2)
        • Noda Line: Fujinoushijima (2), Kawama (3), Shin-Kashiwa (1), Masuo (4), Mutsumi (2)
        • Tōjō Line: Yanasegawa (1), Kawagoe-shi (3), Sakado (2), Yorii (1)
      • Stairwell lifts
        • Kameido Line: Omurai (2)
      • Multi-function toilets (individual rooms)
        • Isesaki Line: Tōbu Dōbutsu Kōen
        • Kameido Line: Omurai, Higashi-Azuma
        • Nikkō Line: Satte
        • Noda Line: Fujinoushijima, Kawama, Shin-Kashiwa, Masuo, Mutsumi
        • Tōjō Line: Yanasegawa, Kawagoe-shi, Sakado
    • Refurbishment of station facilities
      In addition to making stations, the “face” of a neighborhood, into a splendid place where people gather, and working towards even greater service improvements, we will conduct renovations of restrooms and ticketing areas, as well as install new or additional departure board displays. In addition, for directional signage, we will advance universal design such as use of pictograms and make further progress on provision of information in four languages (Japanese, English, Chinese, Korean), allowing foreigners to use our services with ease. In addition, we will install new or upgrade existing self-standing directional signs, making them eye-level and easier to see.
    • Train departure board displays
      At Noda Line and Tōjō Line stations, we will conduct works to install new or additional train departure board displays that are easier to read and understand for passengers, helping to improve passenger convenience.
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:42 AM   #1412
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Shin-Keisei to retire 800 series
http://www.shinkeisei.co.jp/topics/p...keisei0119.pdf

Quote:
At Shin-Keisei Electric Railway (HQ: Kamagaya City, Chiba Prefecture; President: Kataoka Ryōichi), we will hold a "Farewell 800 Series" event (pre-event applications necessary) on Saturday, July 24 and Sunday, July 25.

After the Shin-Keisei Line began revenue service in 1947 using second-hand trains from Keisei Electric Railway, the 800 series trains entered service as our first entirely-new rolling stock, with 36 cars introduced between 1971 and 1975. The 800 series trains have served as part of our transport operations for close to 40 years.

Currently, the remaining two consists (16 cars total) are continuing in service primarily during the morning rush hour, but after having finalized their retirement from service in July of this year, we will hold farewell runs and a photo session. We hope you take this opportunity to see them in full glory for the last time.

800 series
The 800 series first entered service in April 1971, during a time when older cars with 16- and 17-m bodies and nose-suspended drives were the workhorses of the fleet. With 18 m long-body cars and Cardan joint drives using multi-step controllers, a total of six four-car units and six two-car units were constructed by December 1975. The car dimensions and drive systems of the 800 series would become the base for our later rolling stock.

Starting in 1985, changes were gradually made to the trains: units were outfitted with air conditioning systems and converted to six- and eight-car trains, the automatic air brakes were converted to electromagnetic straight air brakes with regenerative braking, and train composition was changed as part of increases in operating speed. The retirement of the 800 series units began in 1995.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:43 AM   #1413
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Chiba Prefecture will not stop up Shiroi City funding gap in Hokusō Line fare reduction
http://www.asahi.com/travel/rail/new...006090543.html

Quote:
In regards to the Hokusō Railway fare reduction scheduled to enter effect July 17, Chiba Prefecture governor Morita Kensaku announced during the open question period of the June 9 Prefectural Council session that the Prefectural Government would not step in and provide additional funding, even if Shiroi City does not approve a supplementary budget proposal that includes its funding allocation for the fare reduction. Governor Morita also commented that representatives from the railway have explained to him that they "will return the fare structure to the existing situation should the agreement reached with the Prefectural Government and the six neighboring jurisdictions not be fulfilled."

The Prefectural Government and six jurisdictions along the railway including Shiroi City, as well as operator and Hokusō Railway parent company Keisei Electric railway, agreed in November of last year to assemble funding for the fare reduction. In March, however, the Shiroi City Council approved by majority vote a budget proposal that omitted approx. ¥26 million in funding for the fare reduction, claiming that the reduction in fares was minimal and that public monies should not be used to fund the reduced fares. The city has since proposed a supplementary revised budget proposal that includes the funding allocation in the current June session of the City Council, but it's unclear whether or not the proposal will be approved.

In regards to the fare reduction, Governor Morita emphasized, "This is something that can only happen if the Prefectural Government, the six neighboring jurisdictions, and the railway operator all come together to provide funding," and explained that the Prefectural Government would not stop up the funding gap with its own money. "I want Shiroi City to take appropriate response for their actions," said the governor.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:44 AM   #1414
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keisei launches new home page

Site: http://www.keisei.co.jp/

Looks a little more in line with other companies' pages now.
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:46 AM   #1415
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Narita Sky Access will bring improvements to Haneda – Narita direct service
http://www.keikyu.co.jp/corporate/pr...s/100528.shtml

Quote:
At Keihin Electric Express Railway (HQ: Minato Ward, Tōkyō; President: Ishiwata Tsuneo), we will carry out changes to destinations on train through-servicing onto the Keisei Line—primarily Airport rapid limited express trains—starting Saturday, July 17 in coordination with the opening of the Narita Sky Access Line.

As a result, direct-service trains from Haneda Airport Station to Narita Airport Station will increase and travel times will decrease, helping to further improve access between Haneda and Narita Airports.

Scheduled Start Date
Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays: Saturday, July 17, 2010
Weekdays: Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Details
  1. Increased direct-service trains between Haneda Airport and Narita Airport
    • Increased trains
      • Weekdays
        • Haneda Airport → Narita Airport: 5 trains daily → 11 trains daily
        • Narita Airport → Haneda Airport: 1 train daily → 12 trains daily
      • Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays:
        • Haneda Airport → Narita Airport: 1 train daily → 16 trains daily
        • Narita Airport → Haneda Airport: 2 trains daily → 16 trains daily
    • Travel times
      • Haneda Airport → Narita Airport: 123 minutes → 103 minutes
      • Narita Airport → Haneda Airport: 126 minutes → 104 minutes
    Midday headways are approx. 40 minutes
    Travel times based on midday service
  2. Stations served
    • Signed as "Airport rapid limited express"
      • Keikyū Line: Haneda Airport → Shinagawa → Sengakuji →
      • Toei Asakusa Line: Mita → Daimon → Shinbashi → Nihonbashi → Higashi-Nihonbashi → Asakusa → Oshiage →
    • Signed as "Access limited express"
      • Keisei Line: Aoto → Takasago →
      • Narita Sky Access Line: Higashi-Matsudo → Shin-Kamagaya → Chiba New Town Chūō → Inba Nihon Idai → Narita Yukawa →
      • Keisei Line: Narita Airport Terminal 2 → Narita Airport
  3. Other
    • A portion of trains through-servicing onto the Keisei Line from the Yokohama area will also see their destinations modified
    • There will be no changes to departure times on the Keikyū Line
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:46 AM   #1416
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

New Skyliner makes press debut

Keisei offered members of the press a pre-opening ride on the New Skyliner.

Tōkyō MX news report (2010.06.23):



Window view heading from Narita Airport to central Tōkyō, cruising at 160 kph through rice paddies. Feels a little like the Shinkansen. Too bad it slows down to 130 kph when it enters the Hokusō Line.


Source: tetsudocom on YouTube
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:47 AM   #1417
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Kanamachi Line at Keisei Takasago to be elevated on July 5
http://www.keisei.co.jp/keisei/kouhou/news/22-026c.pdf

Quote:
At Keisei Electric Railway, we are proceeding with the Keisei Takasago Station Kanamachi Line Elevation Project, which would elevate approx. 1.0 km of the Kanamachi Line between Keisei Takasago Station and Shibamata Station. Between the final train on Friday, July 2 and the first train on Monday, July 5, we will conduct the switchout of the Kanamachi Line at Keisei Takasago Station to the new elevated track.

In conjunction with this work, with the start of service on Monday, July 5 (Monday, July 12 in the event of delayed construction due to inclement weather), all Kanamachi Line trains will operate as shuttles between Keisei Takasago Station and Keisei Kanamachi Station, arriving at and departing from the Kanamachi Line's new exclusive platform (Platform 5) at Keisei Takasago Station.

Meanwhile, passengers transferring from the existing platform will need to temporarily exit the station faregates, but with the elevation of the tracks, we will increase the number of trains on the Kanamachi Line, improving passenger convenience.

Details of the Keisei Takasago Station Kanamachi Line Elevation Project works
  • Schedule: Switchout occurs between the last train on Friday, July 2, 2010 and the first train on Monday, July 5, 2010 (in the event of inclement weather, work will begin after the last train on Friday, July 9)
  • Construction details: Of the approx. 1 km section of the Keisei Kanamachi Line between Keisei Takasago Station and Shibamata Station, we will switchout the tracks near Keisei Takasago Station and establish a new exclusive platform (Platform 5) for the Kanamachi Line at Keisei Takasago Station.

    Note: On Saturday, July 3 and Sunday, July 4 during the switchout period, the Kanamachi Line will operate on a special schedule, with a portion of trains (eight in each of the inbound and outbound directions) to be cancelled, in addition to changes to destinations, schedules, and arrival platform at Keisei Takasago Station.

Kanamachi Line service after elevation (starting Monday, July 5)
  • Number of Kanamachi Line trains
    We will increase the number of trains, primarily during the midday period, increasing service from three trains per hour (20 minute headways) during the midday period to four trains per hour (15 minute headways).
    Weekdays: 80 daily trains per direction → 89 daily trains per direction
    Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays: 65 daily trains per direction → 75 daily trains per direction
  • Kanamachi Line through-service trains
    Kanamachi Line through-service trains to / from Keisei Ueno Station and other destinations will be converted to terminate / begin at Keisei Takasago Station (some trains will through-service to / from Narita).
Photo report (2010.06.07):
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

The transfer between Kanamachi Line trains and Main Line trains will be outside of the paid area. On the opposite side of the station concourse from the existing faregates is where the Kanamachi Line faregates will be located. They’ve placed a single drop-down LED display from the ceiling with enough space to display one row of information—i.e., the departure time for the next train. There will only be one platform for the Kanamachi Line, Platform 5. Straight ahead will lead us to the new Kanamachi Line platform, but this part of the station is still boarded up.



Looking at the Kanamachi Line platforms from one of the windows on the station concourse. The part closest to us is station staff offices.



Near the track switchout location, where there hasn’t been a whole lot of movement for a while now. The fact that it will take two days to do the work is a good hint that this isn’t your average track switchout.



The new Kanamachi Line platform sticks out above the Main Line tracks. It’s a pretty basic, no-frills design, perhaps a hint that there are larger changes in store. Being a major junction, there is a lot of train traffic and there’s talk of elevating the entire station (not just the Kanamachi Line) to eliminate some the major grade crossing on the east side. You can see some of the massive beams both supporting the platform as well as spanning the tracks on the east side of the station, which fan out pretty wide.



A better view of the complex structure supporting the new platform.



According to maps posted at the station and comparing against the above picture, we can see they have yet to build the stairwell connecting the new Kanamachi Line platforms directly to ground-evel.



Down at ground level, near where the new stairwell will touch down. They haven’t gotten very far on it, so obviously it won’t be opening together with the new platform.

__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:49 AM   #1418
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keikyū to introduce station numbering with opening of Haneda Airport International Terminal Station
http://www.keikyu.co.jp/corporate/pr...0100625g.shtml

Quote:
Keihin Electric Express Railway (HQ: Minato Ward, Tōkyō; President: Ishiwata Tsuneo) will open Haneda Airport International Terminal Station on Thursday, October 21. Together with the opening of the new station, an increase in the number of passengers from overseas is expected, and in order to make the Keikyū Line easy-to-understand for everyone, we will introduce a new “station numbering” system at all of our stations starting October 21.

__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:50 AM   #1419
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keisei to introduce station numbering with opening of Narita Sky Access
http://www.keisei.co.jp/keisei/kouhou/news/22-034.pdf

Quote:
Starting on Saturday, July 17, 2010, the opening date of the Narita Sky Access Line, we will introduce station numbering on all stations on the Keisei Line.

This program is part of our efforts towards universal design, including an expansion of our provision of passenger information to foreign passengers in conjunction with the opening of the Narita Sky Access.

The first two letters of the station numbering scheme will be “KS,” coming from “Keisei.”

The numbering will begin at Ueno Station and will follow the following order:
  • Keisei Main Line (Ueno → Narita Airport)
  • Narita Sky Access (Narita Yukawa only)
  • Higashi-Narita Line (Higashi-Narita)
  • Oshiage Line (Oshiage → Tateishi)
  • Kanamachi Line (Shibamata → Kanamachi)
  • Chiba Line (Makuhari Hongō → Chiba Chūō)
  • Chihara Line (Chibadera → Chiharadai)
The numbering scheme applies only one number to each station, and does not provide more than one number for junction stations with lines operated by other companies (e.g., Takasago) or on the Hokusō Line section of the Narita Sky Access (Higashi-Matsudo, Shin-Kamagaya, Chiba New Town Chūō, Inba Nihon Idai). However, although Oshiage already has number A20 attached to it for the Toei Asakusa Line, as the line is a terminus for our railway’s lines, we will also provide our own numbering for this station.

This numbering scheme (letter + number) is already used on the Tōkyō Metro and Toei Subway, as well as the Yurikamome and Yokohama Municipal Subway. The Nippori – Toneri Liner and Tsukuba Express have a different numbering scheme, using only numbers.

Personally, I’m not a huge fan of this even for the subway lines, but they at least somewhat make sense there, since there are less “forked” lines within the subway itself (excepting through-servicing, etc.). But applying the same scheme where one letter = one line to entire networks like Keisei and Keikyū so that one letter = one operator seems a bit stupid. Usually, the whole point of this is to let people know how many stations they have to go before they get to their destination, but when you start applying it to an entire operator’s lines, the benefit is lost. For example, going from Aoto to Oshaige is a five-station journey, but the numbering scheme gives KS09 for Aoto and KS45 for Oshiage.

I think this energy would be better spent in trying to make unified maps of the whole Tōkyō rail network for placement in all trains stations, regardless of operator. Right now, you can go to one station operator by one company, and you will generally only see maps of lines operated by that company, even if the station is a major terminal station with transfers to other companies’ lines. This and a consistent announcement system where each rail line is given equal treatment would greatly improve understanding. Why when I take a subway train does it only say “JR Lines” for transfer, even when there are multiple JR lines serving the station?
__________________

pudgym29 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2010, 11:51 AM   #1420
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Keikyū Kamata after the dust has settled

A photo report taken three weeks after the new second level of Keikyū Kamata Station opened. It appears that Keikyū has polished up some of the signage a bit to make it more clear to passengers:
Source: http://okiraku-goraku.com/

New signage above the stairwell on the second level, warning passengers wishing to transfer to the trains on the bottom level to use a different set of stairs.



Transfer passage to Platforms 1 and 2 (lower level).





Stairwell for the transfer passage.





Down on the ground level platforms, where they have already begun dismantling the old outbound platforms.

quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium