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Old July 19th, 2010, 06:47 PM   #1481
quashlo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerokei View Post
Anyone who knows about how many Access Express (アクセス特急) trains that will go through to the Asakusa Line? I was checking this rail map at Keisei's website but couldn't find any good timetable of the services.
Thanks, please post any pictures you got.

Here's the timetables:

Narita Airport Station (bound for Ueno or the Toei Subway Asakusa Line)
Weekday: http://keisei.ekitan.com/norikae/pc/...682-7&d=1&rsf=
Weekend: http://keisei.ekitan.com/norikae/pc/...682-7&d=1&rsf=

Oshiage Station (bound for Narita Airport)
Weekday: http://www.kotsu.metro.tokyo.jp/subw...usa/A20ND.html
Weekend: http://www.kotsu.metro.tokyo.jp/subw...usa/A20NH.html

Anything orange in those schedules is an Access limited express. Most of these trains are through-services with the Asakusa Line, although some start / end at Keisei Ueno. Most continue on to the Keikyū Line to / from Haneda Airport, but it looks like a handful start / end all the way out at Misakiguchi on the Keikyū Kurihama Line. There's also a few that start / end at Nishi-Magome.
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Old July 19th, 2010, 07:00 PM   #1482
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerokei View Post
Anyone who knows about how many Access Express (アクセス特急) trains that will go through to the Asakusa Line?
The japanese version of Hyperdia lists 18 Access Ltd. Exp. from Narita Airport to Aoto, which I think are all thru-trains to Haneda (but too lazy to check each of them). From 5 pm the Access Ltd. Exps. continue to Keisei-Ueno. Looks like they haven't updated the English version of Hyperdia yet.

Edit: Quashlo was faster.
By the way, terrific map.
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Old July 19th, 2010, 08:23 PM   #1483
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerokei View Post
I went to Nippori Saturday afternoon and tried to snap some photos of the new Skyliner.
...

PS. It is my first post so please bear with me.
Welcome to the forum and congratulations for the photos. The new train to the Narita airport is really nice.

I Hope you do not mind sharing your photos on the Japanese railway thread in the Spanish forum.

Arigatou!
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Old July 20th, 2010, 08:35 PM   #1484
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Tokyo Subways

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKorean View Post
Japanese rail system always puzzles me.
Heres what I do understand:
Tokyo subway system are comprised of multiple private companies. ...
A subway is defined as an underground railway. Since most railways have stations I like to define a subway as an underground rail line with stations. Most of the subways in Tokyo are operated by two subway companies; Tokyo Metro with 9 lines and TOEI (the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Transportation Bureau) with 4 lines. Those are the 2 "official" subways in Tokyo. But there are many more subways and for hard core subway fans here is a list of 21 subways in Tokyo and 5 more nearby.

Here is my list of subways in Tokyo.
Tokyo Metro subways:
Chiyoda
Fukutoshin
Ginza
Hanzomon
Hibiya
Marunouchi
Namboku
Tozai
Yurakucho
TOEI subways:
Asakusa
Mita
Oedo
Shinkuku
OTHER SUBWAYS:
JR Keiyo line
JR Yokosuka/Sobu Rapid line
Keikyu Airport line
Keio Ry New Line
Seibu Ry Yurakucho line
Tokyo Monorail
Tokyu Ry Denentoshi line (continuation of the Hanzomon subway)
TWR (Tokyo Waterfront Railway)

Want more? Just go a short way outside Tokyo:
Saitama Ry (continuation of the Namboku subway)
Minato Mirai subway in Yokohama
Yokohama City subway Blue line
Yokohama City subway Green line
Kawasaki City subway (U/C)

Last edited by Rick H; July 20th, 2010 at 08:41 PM.
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Old July 20th, 2010, 08:38 PM   #1485
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More on Tokyo Subways

A complex and interesting aspect of Japanese subways is how they conduct through-running with private railways and JR lines. The most extensive examples are in Tokyo where 10 of the 13 "official" subway lines participate.
The exceptions are the Tokyo Metro's Ginza and Marunouchi lines that use 3rd rail current collection and the TOEI Oedo subway that is linear motor powered. The other 10 subways use overhead current collection and run over 3 rail gauges; 1067mm, 1372mm and 1435mm.


TOKYO METRO SUBWAYS:

Chiyoda subway:
YOYOGI UEHARA to KITA AYASE, 20 stations, 24.0km
Through running:
West end, Odakyu Ry to HON ATSUGI and KARAKIDA
East end, JR Joban line to TORIDE
Rolling Stock: Chiyoda, Odakyu and JR

Hibiya subway:
NAKA MAGURO to KITA SENJU, 21 stations, 20.3km
Through running:
West end, Tokyu Ry to KIKUNA
East end, Tobu Ry to TOBU-DOBUTSU-KOEN
Rolling Stock: Hibiya, Tokyu, Tobu

Tozai subway:
NAKANO to NISHI FUNABASHI, 23 stations, 30.8km
Through running:
West end, JR Chuo line to MITAKA
East end, JR Sobu line to TSUDANUMA
and Toyo Rapid Ry to TOYO-KATSUTADAI
Rolling Stock: Tozai, JR, Toyo Rapid

Yurakucho subway:
WAKOSHI to SHIN KIBA, 24 stations, 28.3km
Through running:
West end, Tobu Ry to SHINRIN KOEN
East end, no through running
Rolling Stock: Yurakucho, Fukutoshin, Seibu, Tobu

Hanzoman subway:
SHIBUYA to OSHIAGE, 14 stations, 16.8km
(Tokyu Ry subway continues to FUTAKO TAMAGAWA, 6 stations, 9.4km)
Through running:
West end, Tokyu Ry to CHUO RINKAN
East end, Tobu Ry to MINAMI-KURIHASHI
Rolling Stock: Hanzomon, Tokyu, Tobu
(Tōkyū CHUO-RINKAN to Tōbu MINAMI-KURIHASHI is 98.5 km).

Namboku subway*:
MEGURO to AKABANE-IWABUCHI, 19 stations, 21.3km
Through running:
West end, Tokyu Ry to MUSASHI-KOSUGI
East end, Saitama Ry to URAWA-MISONO
Rolling Stock: Namboku, Saitama, Tokyu

Fukutoshin subway**:
WAKOSHI to SHIBUYA, 16 stations, 20.2km
Through running:
North end, Tobu Ry to KAWAGOESHI and Seibu Ry to HANNO
South end (starting in 2012), Tokyu Ry and Minato Mirai subway to MOTOMACHI-CHUKAGAI

* The Namboku subway shares the 2.3km section of track between SHIROKANE-TAKANAWA and SHIBUYA with the TOEI Mita line.

** Fukutoshin line trains run on tracks of the Tobu Ry, the Yurakucho subway, it's own subway, the Seibu Ry, the Tokyu Ry and the Minato Mirai subway in Yokohama - three railways and three subways.


TOEI Subways:

Asakusa subway:
NISHI MAGOME to OSHIAGE, 20 stations, 18.3km
Through running:
South end, Keikyu Ry to HANEDA KUKO (airport) and MISAKI GUCHI
East end, Keisei Ry to HIGASHI NARITA and NARITA KUKO (airport)
Keisei Ry to INBA-NIHON-IDAI
Shibayama Ry to SHIBAYAMA-CHIYODA

Mita subway:
NISHI TAKASHIMA DAIRA to MEGURO, 27 stations, 26.5km
Through running:
North end, no through running
South end, Tokyu Ry to MUSASHI-KOSUGI

Shinjuku subway:
SHINJUKU to MOTOYAWATA, 21 stations, 23.5km
Through running:
West end, Keio Ry to HASHIMOTO and TAKAOSAN GUCHI
East end, no through running
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Old July 21st, 2010, 05:36 PM   #1486
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Thanks, please post any pictures you got.

Here's the timetables:

Narita Airport Station (bound for Ueno or the Toei Subway Asakusa Line)
Weekday: http://keisei.ekitan.com/norikae/pc/...682-7&d=1&rsf=
Weekend: http://keisei.ekitan.com/norikae/pc/...682-7&d=1&rsf=

Oshiage Station (bound for Narita Airport)
Weekday: http://www.kotsu.metro.tokyo.jp/subw...usa/A20ND.html
Weekend: http://www.kotsu.metro.tokyo.jp/subw...usa/A20NH.html

Anything orange in those schedules is an Access limited express. Most of these trains are through-services with the Asakusa Line, although some start / end at Keisei Ueno. Most continue on to the Keikyū Line to / from Haneda Airport, but it looks like a handful start / end all the way out at Misakiguchi on the Keikyū Kurihama Line. There's also a few that start / end at Nishi-Magome.
Thank you!

Any idea about the trains going the whole way Narita Airport - Haneda? Will they run on the Access Line or the old Keisei Main line?

Edit: Oh, now I see, they will all run on the Access line and on weekdays there will be 12 trains. Except these Access Ltd Exp., will any other services be bound for Haneda from Narita Airport?

Last edited by zerokei; July 21st, 2010 at 05:42 PM.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 05:40 PM   #1487
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asakaze View Post
The japanese version of Hyperdia lists 18 Access Ltd. Exp. from Narita Airport to Aoto, which I think are all thru-trains to Haneda (but too lazy to check each of them). From 5 pm the Access Ltd. Exps. continue to Keisei-Ueno. Looks like they haven't updated the English version of Hyperdia yet.

Edit: Quashlo was faster.
By the way, terrific map.
Thank you too! Actually I was checking the English Hyperdia but couldn't find anything, so now I know why.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 05:46 PM   #1488
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sr.Horn View Post
Welcome to the forum and congratulations for the photos. The new train to the Narita airport is really nice.

I Hope you do not mind sharing your photos on the Japanese railway thread in the Spanish forum.

Arigatou!
Thank you too. Absolutley, no problem. But the pictures already posted of the New Skyliner in the Spanish thread seem so much better, did you take them?

Last edited by deasine; July 22nd, 2010 at 02:09 AM.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 06:05 PM   #1489
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
With the opening of the Narita Sky Access Line on July 17, I updated my Tōkyō rail map.
Enjoy!

Greater Tōkyō (Capital Region) Rail Network v1.20 (July 2010)
http://docs.google.com/uc?id=0B4E0EN...xport=download

Major changes:
  • Added Narita Sky Access / New Skyliner and updated stopping patterns for through-service Asakusa Line trains on the Keisei and Keikyū networks.
  • For the legend: Added a new logo (Izu Hakone Railway) and a new "Special Services" section for Narita Express and Keisei Skyliner.
  • Switched the station bubbles / circles to bars. Should be cleaner now and easier to see what's going on at the major terminals.
  • Further cut back the subway through-service to better reflect practical use for a rider and cleaned up stopping patterns.
  • Added line names on top of all the lines in the actual map.
  • Added the under-construction Fukutoshin Line through-service onto the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line and Minato Mirai Line.
  • Added future proposal for Chūō Local Line extension to Tachikawa.
  • Added future proposal for Saitama – Gunma LRT.
The file works fine now. Fantastic map! You should get the railway companies in greater Tokyo to use it! Or a publisher to print it and distribute at the major hotels and tourist informations in the city.

Interesting that you included some of the lines not yet built. I am wondering about the Mita line. Wouldn't it be wise to extend it the same way as is proposed for the Oedo line, so the Mita line connects to the Musashino line at either Kita-Asaka, Higashi-Asaka, Nishi-Urawa or Musashi Urawa? It will hopefully help the Musashino line to become a better outer ring line.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 07:03 PM   #1490
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerokei View Post
Edit: Oh, now I see, they will all run on the Access line and on weekdays there will be 12 trains. Except these Access Ltd Exp., will any other services be bound for Haneda from Narita Airport?
I would guess only a handful at the most, but it's impossible to tell just by looking at the Keikyū schedules... The Keisei schedules are a little easier to decipher, and there's definitely one early morning train leaving Narita Airport on weekdays bound for Haneda Airport via the Keisei Main Line (see here).
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Old July 21st, 2010, 07:28 PM   #1491
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerokei View Post
Interesting that you included some of the lines not yet built. I am wondering about the Mita line. Wouldn't it be wise to extend it the same way as is proposed for the Oedo line, so the Mita line connects to the Musashino line at either Kita-Asaka, Higashi-Asaka, Nishi-Urawa or Musashi Urawa? It will hopefully help the Musashino line to become a better outer ring line.
Several decades ago, I think this was the plan, as the line (officially Tōkyō Subway Line 6) was supposed to stretch all the way from western Ōmiya City (now part of Saitama City) in the north through central Tōkyō to Nishi-Magome (sharing tracks with the Asakusa Line or the Tōkyū Ikegami Line here), and from there, continuing on to Kōhoku New Town in Yokohama. The line was later cut back to Meguro and instead through-serviced with the Tōkyū Meguro Line. The northern extension into Urawa and Ōmiya was dropped and the connection to Kōhoku New Town has since been usurped by the Yokohama Municipal Subway Green Line.

As far as the Musashino Line, JR East keeps talking about its "Mega Loop" but I'm not really sure there's been any concrete plans on how to improve service on the Musashino Line. Designing a through connection at Fuchū Honmachi alone would probably do a lot to improve convenience for peripheral trips.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:25 AM   #1492
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Japan’s MLIT meets with Indian officials to discuss urban development and transport
http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20...4-indonews-int

Quote:
Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) and India’s Ministry of Urban Development opened the Fourth Japan-Indo Exchange Conference on Urban Development at Vigyan Bhavan National Convention Center in New Delhi. The conference was established through the Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in the Urban Development Field between Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism and India’s Ministry of Urban Development, signed in May 2007.

The two ministries exchanged opinions on water environment, urban development, and urban transport. The conference reaffirmed the importance of mutual cooperation in the field of urban development between Japan’s MLIT and India’s Ministry of Urban Development, as well as the importance of bringing infrastructure projects to realization. In addition, the MLIT submitted a proposal to hold a workshop in India on the introduction of AGT, LRT, monorails, and other transit technologies. The MLIT also proposed cooperation on specific urban development projects related to transit-oriented development (TOD), and India’s Ministry of Urban Development, together with related agencies, responded that they are open to ideas.

The fifth conference is scheduled to be held in Japan in 2011.

Last edited by quashlo; August 8th, 2010 at 04:58 AM.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:26 AM   #1493
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Hankyū on track to open second overseas department store in Taipei
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/economy/bus...2212027-n1.htm

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On July 21, H2O Retailing, which retains Hankyū Hanshin Department Stores under its umbrella, announced that the Uni-President Hankyū Taipei Department Store, currently being constructed in Taipei by Taiwan foods and distribution giant Uni-President, will open in early October. This marks Hankyū’s second overseas store following its first venture in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

The new store will stretch between the second basement level and seventh aboveground level of a mixed-use commercial building being constructed in the Xinyi District, one of Taipei’s subcenters and an area where development is proceeding in full force. The total sales floor area will be approx. 26,000 sq m. Fashion-related items including clothing and general goods will occupy space between the first basement level and the fifth aboveground level, and the department store is aiming to be an upscale facility targeting young women working in nearby offices.

Hankyū signed a department store business agreement with Uni-President in 2006, and for this second store, assisted on the technical side including designing the stores and sales area, as well as training employees.
Website for the new department store:
http://www.uni-hankyu.com.tw/

Project site. The department store will occupy most of the podium of the high-rise on the left.


Source: China Times
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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:28 AM   #1494
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Nippon Sharyō looks to expand exports of single-level commuter cars to United States
http://www.asahi.com/travel/rail/new...007250002.html

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Nippon Sharyō (HQ: Nagoya City) has finalized plans to develop and export new-type rolling stock for conventional rail lines in the United States. Currently, the company is exporting bilevel cars, but will now develop low-cost single-level cars and expand its market share. Depending on the level of client response, the railcar manufacturer will consider the possibility of creating a new rolling stock assembly plant in the United States.

Nippon Sharyō began exporting railcars to the United States in 1982. The bulk of these orders were for unique “gallery-type” bilevel cars, and the company supplied about 700 cars to five railways operating suburban lines in the Chicago area and other areas in the United States. However, the demand for railcars has passed its peak, and the number of new orders has decreased. Development of new rolling stock has become necessary.

In past orders, Nippon Sharyō has exported approx. 70 single-level cars. However, because the company needed to redesign the cars for each order, the contract cost was more expensive and less attractive against competitors. As a result, the company hasn’t exported single-level cars in the last ten years.

The railcar manufacturer will now develop a prototype unit, and by making minor modifications to the specs based on the requests of each railway company, will keep down design and parts procurement costs. The company says that Chinese manufacturers and other competitors in the United States railcar market are using low cost as a selling point, and that it hopes to compete by lowering its own costs.

Nippon Sharyō president Nakagawa Akira expressed his desire to capture more market share: “We’ve assembled most of the primary pieces involved (in developing a new series of rolling stock). We just need to advertise that these are trains that meet United States domestic regulations.” The schedule and size of exports of the new car are uncertain, but orders are expected to come in several years from now.

Meanwhile, railcar assembly is currently being contracted out to local firms in the United States. If orders for the single-level cars begin to pick up, Nakagawa says that establishing a new factory in the United States is a “definite consideration” in order to keep down production costs.

Nippon Sharyō is a JR Central subsidiary. In Japan, the manufacturer produces conventional as well as Shinkansen rolling stock. The company also exports trains to the United States and Taiwan.


Bilevel cars manufactured by Nippon Sharyō for export to the United States
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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:30 AM   #1495
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Kawasaki succeeds at first overseas trial of Gigacell battery systems on New York City Subway
http://www.khi.co.jp/khi_news/2010data/c3100727-1.htm

Quote:
Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) has succeeded in the first overseas field trial of a trackside battery power system (BPS) for railway systems using its Gigacell nickel-metal hydride battery technology developed in-house. The field trial was carried out on lines operating on the New York City Subway, with cooperation from New York City Transit (NYCT). Kawasaki’s local American subsidiary, Kawasaki Rail Car, Inc. (KRC; HQ: Yonkers, New York) carried out the trial after receiving grant money from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) targeted at the development of cutting-edge technologies in energy conservation and carbon dioxide emissions reduction.

A chronic shortage of electrical power has been troubling the United States, and expectations are high for low-energy products. In particular, for railway operators such as NYCT, there is a high demand for strategies against voltage drops due to insufficient electrical power, as well as for products and technologies that will allow stranded trains to safely make it to the nearest station in the event of a power outage.

In this field trial, a BPS was set up for approximately three months between transformer substations in Queens on one of NYCT’s operating lines (the A Line). The trial showed that trains outfitted with regenerative braking equipment could store electricity generated during the braking process at high efficiencies. In addition, electricity supplied by the batteries was used to compensate overhead voltage, not only helping to prevent against voltage drop, but also reducing and stabilizing the fluctuation of electricity provided by the transformer substation, allowing for a reduction in supplied electrical power. Through these factors, when BPS is installed on regular operating lines using trains outfitted with regenerative braking systems, the regenerated and stored electricity can be used effectively as a strategy to prevent voltage drop during acceleration, while running, or during the rush hour, when train traffic is congested. In addition to reducing the railway system’s overall electricity consumption and electrical power supplied through contract, it is anticipated that the cost of constructing new transformer substations can also be kept down. We have also conducted a field trial of train operations assuming a power outage—NYCT’s top interest in this project—moving a single ten-car train approx. 2.5 km while maintaining air conditioning and lighting using power supplied by the battery. Only eleven percent of the battery’s electrical storage capacity was consumed in the trial, and the technology received high levels of approval from the NYCT. Based on estimates incorporating the results of the trial, we have confirmed that using the full electrical storage capacity of the battery will allow a maximum of 17 trains to reach their nearest station (based on a travel distance of 1.2 km).

Thanks to the results of this field trial, we have begun an experimental trial at the central transformer substation in Manhattan—which suffers from severe electricity shortages because a large number of NYCT’s lines service the borough—assuming the introduction of BPS to operating lines.

Kawasaki has successfully conducted field trials of its BPS on the operating lines on the Ōsaka Municipal Subway in November 2007. With the success of the latest field trial as a foundation, we will now work towards selling and distributing this technology not just in the domestic market but also in the overseas market, starting with the United States. In addition, we have been incorporating our Gigacell technology into BPS from the beginning, but are also working to expand its use in electrical grid stabilization (“smart grid”) technologies that allow introduction of large amounts of natural energy resources. Kawasaki will continue to contribute to the realization of a low-carbon society.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:31 AM   #1496
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Kinki Sharyō completes new LFX-300 LRV for United States market
http://www.kinkisharyo.co.jp/ja/news/news100721.htm

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Kinki Sharyō and our United States subsidiary Kinki Sharyō USA, Inc. have developed and manufactured an operational prototype of our LFX-300 next-generation light rail vehicle (LRV) for the United States market. The train is 100% low-floor and allows for easy boarding and alighting from ground level, and is also designed for easy wheelchair mobility. As a unique characteristic, this next-generation LRV is not only capable of collecting power from its rooftop pantograph, but can also run on a lithium-ion battery equipped on the train.

For a quarter of a century, Kinki Sharyō has supplied over 500 LRVs to clients both within Japan and in major cities in North America, and our 70% low-floor LRV, our flagship product, boasts the top share in the North American market. With the addition of the newly-developed LFX-300, we will be able to meet a diversity of customer needs.

The concept and details of the LFX-300 are summarized below.

User-friendly 100% low-floor train
In order to satisfy the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) requirements for equal and amenable treatment of all passengers, the passenger cabin is a 100% all-flat low-floor design, and uses a hydraulic suspension to eliminate height differences between the car floor and platform. The design of the car also meets American requirements for vehicle strength in collisions. In addition to allowing for rotation of wheelchairs, the passenger cabin ensures an 880 m wide corridor, and the entry / exit areas and furnishings are based on a concept of universal design. The various electrical components are connected by Ethernet, allowing for flexible response to systems changes or additions.

Environmentally-friendly low-energy consumption
Compared to other transport modes, trains are low-energy and environmentally-friendly. In particular, thanks to regenerative brakes that use the train’s motors as a generator when braking and feed electrical energy back into the network through the overhead wire, trains help reduce the burden on the environment. Up until now, this regenerative braking system was not available for use on unelectrified sections, but equipped with a lithium-ion battery, the LFX-300 stores the regenerative braking energy inside the battery even on unelectrified sections, allowing for efficient use of the regenerative braking system. When operating on electrified sections, the system also prevents regenerative braking lapses.

High-speed operations designed for convenience in suburban areas
A speed of around 40 kph is often seen as the norm for urban areas, where station spacing is short and operations must work in tandem with other transport modes. On the other hand, in cases of traveling on exclusive right-of-way through suburban areas or between cities, increasing speed on these sections will lead to reduced journey times. The top speed of the LFX-300 is 80 kph, allowing for high-speed running from the suburbs to the urban area, and the train features high acceleration and deceleration capabilities equivalent to our 70% low-floor LRVs in use in American urban areas.

Catenary-free operation that improves urban spaces
The LFX-300 can operate without catenary using its lithium-ion battery. Compared to nickel-hydride and other types of batteries currently in use, lithium-ion batteries are lighter and smaller, but have high output and high capacity. Lithium-ion batteries also feature a high cell voltage, making them an ideal choice to power trains.





I hadn’t noticed, but it looks like Kinki Sharyō USA revamped their website:
http://www.kinkisharyo-usa.com/

They also have a Flickr account to advertise their latest rolling stock orders for the U.S. market:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/kinkisharyo/
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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:34 AM   #1497
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Lobby group draws up plan for 6-line LRT network on Okinawa Island
http://www.okinawatimes.co.jp/article/2010-06-19_7373/

Quote:
Tomimoto Minoru and others from Making a Future through Trams, a group composed of citizens and experts working towards introduction of a light rail transit (LRT) system in southern Okinawa Island, held a press conference on June 18 at the Okinawa Prefectural Offices to announce their “LRT Implementation Basic Plan” which incorporates proposed route alignments and financial feasibility studies.

Tomimoto emphasized the importance of the project, saying, “There are railroads that destroy neighborhoods, and then there are railroads that bring prosperity to neighborhoods. I hope we can make this a chance for citizens to join the debate and develop a vision for a railroad that is intertwined with urban planning,” expressing his intention to submit the plan to Okinawa Prefecture and related jurisdictions.

The proposal by Making a Future through Trams calls for a six-route network that follows almost the same alignment as the narrow-gauge rail lines that existed before the war, including an Asahibashi – Kadena Town route and Asahibashi – Yonabaru route. The estimated total project cost for the Asahibashi – Yonabaru route (total length: 11.5 km) is ¥19,355,490,000.

Okinawa International University professor Teruya Hiroyuki, who specializes in urban policy, and University of the Ryūkyūs professor Tsutsumi Jun’ichirō, who specializes in environmental problems, also made an appearance at the press conference.

“The Okinawa government often heralds development of the islands as a tourist destination, but we have yet to secure the critical means of transport for people. The protection of the right of the elderly to a means of transport (transport right) is also insufficient. Every time there’s traffic, we’ve been playing a constant game of catch-up by building roads, but it will be difficult for Okinawa to maintain its development with the current car-based society,” emphasized Professor Teruya.

Professor Tsutsumi explained the significance of introducing LRT, which is superior in terms of the environment and costs: “The government is aiming for a 25 percent reduction in greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, but for Okinawa Prefecture, 40 to 45 percent of those emissions come from the gasoline and diesel fuels being used on our road network. Until we make a drastic switch, there is no way we can reduce our carbon dioxide emissions.”
Proposed LRT network:


Source: Making a Future through Trams
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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:37 AM   #1498
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Okinawa Prefecture releases report on north-south railway line
http://ryukyushimpo.jp/news/storyid-...rytopic-3.html

Quote:
On July 29, Okinawa Prefecture assembled a report studying the possibility of introducing a railway system cutting across Okinawa Island. The report estimates the total project costs for a new line running between Itoman and Nago (approx. 81 km) at ¥860 billion, based on an estimated construction cost of ¥10.5 billion per kilometer. The benefits vs. costs (benefit-cost ratio) for the 50-year period after the opening of the line—including fare revenue, reduced travel expenses for passengers, and reduced congestion—is 0.63, below the 1.0 standard often used to judge whether a project is viable or not.

The report estimates daily ridership for the line at approx. 175,000. Of that number, close to 80 percent (approx. 135,000) will consist of passengers traveling on the section between Naha Airport and Okinawa City (approx. 25 km). Because of the high ridership projections on this section, despite the total cost of ¥400 billion and average cost of ¥15.4 billion per kilometer, the benefit-cost ratio is 1.25, indicating a high viability.

The two sections between Okinawa and Nago (approx. 46 km) and between Itoman and Naha Airport (approx. 10 km) have an estimated project cost of ¥360 billion and ¥100 billion, respectively, but an estimated daily ridership of only 20,000 or so, resulting in a benefit-cost of only 0.1.

The report states that all route sections would require large sums to construct and place a heavy burden on the operating company, making realization “difficult.” In order to realize the introduction of the line, the report says that establishment of a funding program from an “Okinawa Railroad Construction Act” (temporary name) that subsidizes a large share of the costs is critical.

During the open question section of the June regular session of the Okinawa Prefectural Council on July 29, Governor Nakaima Hirokazu remarked, “We should be stressing (to the national government) that Okinawa does not have public transport, but I have no choice but to be conservative (when looking at the scale of the investment).” The Governor says he will wait for the National Government’s comprehensive study and continue to scrutinize the project.

The study was commissioned by Okinawa Prefecture’s Planning Department in FY2009. The rail line’s route assumes the reuse of Marine Corps Air Station Futenma and an alignment through areas of high population density. In accordance with the Railway Business Act, the rail line cannot be built on roadways, meaning 30 to 40 km of the route would need to be placed underground, primarily in the urban areas.

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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:37 AM   #1499
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Hanshin Sannomiya Station construction updates

My last post on this project is here:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=673

This is a series of improvements to Hanshin’s Kōbe Terminal, including platform widening / extension, construction of new station exits, renovation of existing exits, etc. Now, some recent pictures (2010.07.25) since they have just started construction work on the existing platforms:
Source: http://building-pc.cocolog-nifty.com/map/

Basic diagram of the project. They will move the stub track from the south side to the middle to improve efficiency. Platforms will be widened to relieve congestion and extended to accommodate full-length 10-car Kintetsu trains (200 m). The complexity of the work is close to that of building an entirely new underground station at Sannomiya, as they need to unearth the existing tunnel walls and ceiling and then demolish and expand them outwards. The new East Exit is expected to open in March 2011.



East end of the platforms, where steel columns are lined up in preparation for the demolition of the existing wall and ceiling.



Work has also started at the west end of the platforms. This is the south-side stub track.



Bit by bit, they are working in the wee hours of the evening to demolition the existing platforms and switch to temporary ones. Space that is currently occupied by platforms will eventually be the trackway and vice versa, but given the complexity and scope, this isn’t the typical platform widening + track switchout.



The construction site on the surface, along National Route 21.



Plenty of ventilation.



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Old August 8th, 2010, 12:38 AM   #1500
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Kōbe Municipal Subway renames station after Tetsujin 28-gō
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...007060005.html

Quote:
A station featuring “Tetsujin 28-gō” in its name will make its debut on the Kōbe Municipal Subway. On July 7, nine years since the opening of the Kaigan Line, Shin-Nagata Station on the Kaigan Line and Seishin – Yamate Line will be renamed as “Shin-Nagata – Tetsujin 28-gō-mae.”

In September of last year, a large statue of Tetsujin 28-gō, the masterpiece of the late Kōbe-born manga artist Yokoyama Mitsuteru, was completed outside Shin-Nagata Station. The statue has become a landmark for fans coming from all across the country.

The Kaigan Line was conceived as a catalyst for Kōbe’s rebirth after the Great Hanshin Earthquake, and Kōbe City spent ¥235 billion on its construction. Since its opening, however, the line has been operating in the red. Kōbe City hopes the “Tetsujin power” will boost ridership.

Pictures:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/bouseneki/









The life-size statue of Tetsujin 28-gō.

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